global warming http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4320/all en-US 8 Industries That Could Benefit From Climate Change http://www.wisebread.com/8-industries-that-could-benefit-from-climate-change <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-industries-that-could-benefit-from-climate-change" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/engineer_projecting.jpg" alt="Engineer projecting" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The recent devastation brought on by hurricanes in the U.S. and Puerto Rico has led to renewed conversations about the impact of climate change. Dangerous storms, rising sea levels, droughts, and heat waves are now more commonplace around the globe, and for better or for worse, there are many companies poised to cash in.</p> <p>Few companies will explicitly <em>try</em> to profit off climate change, but there are a number of industries that could see revenues rise if our planet continues to warm. Whether by harnessing new energy sources, building new infrastructure, or creating products to protect people's health, companies will step up and respond as our climate changes. Meanwhile, other firms will profit in unexpected ways.</p> <p>Here are some major industries that may benefit &mdash; rightly or wrongly &mdash; from climate change.</p> <h2>1. Renewable energy companies</h2> <p>Most scientists agree that the pace of global warming can be slowed by a shift toward green energy. Companies that produce solar energy and electricity from wind and other nonpolluting sources should see revenues grow as the energy economy shifts. The number of startups operating in this area is expected to increase, too.</p> <p>Here's why. Renewable energy sources comprised about 15 percent of U.S. electricity production in 2016, and that's likely to increase. According to the Solar Energy Industries Association, solar energy accounted for 30 percent of all new sources of electricity in the first quarter of 2017. Renewable energy is expected to pass coal as an energy source within the next 12 years. We won't be switching entirely to green energy overnight, but the megawatts produced by environmentally friendly sources will continue to increase.</p> <h2>2. Established energy companies</h2> <p>While concern over climate change has led to a push for more renewable energy sources, traditional energy companies aren't going away tomorrow. In fact, as energy needs increase due to rising temperatures, it (ironically) may be established fossil fuel companies that meet those needs until renewable sources become more abundant and reliable. Some companies have also noted that melting ice in the Arctic could open up more areas for offshore oil drilling.</p> <h2>3. Construction companies</h2> <p>While many people are focused on preventing and slowing climate change, others are examining how to make our world more resilient to deal with the impacts. This means potentially building sea walls and other infrastructure to address rising sea levels. It could also mean bolstering major infrastructure such as railways, airports, and roads. Much of this work will be done by private companies, and could come sooner rather than later if lawmakers agree on a large increase in infrastructure spending.</p> <p>Companies such as Caterpillar, Bechtel, and Whiting-Turner are among those often involved in major construction projects. It's worth pointing out that many of these same companies are active in disaster relief efforts, as well.</p> <h2>4. Air conditioning suppliers</h2> <p>An increasing number of places in the world, including some densely populated regions, are dealing with temperatures that are virtually deadly unless citizens have access to air conditioning. This presents a huge opportunity for air conditioning suppliers such as Daikin Global and Fujitsu, provided that their potential customers have access to the electricity to run AC units.</p> <p>Of course, air conditioning is also a contributor to climate change due to the use of hydrofluorocarbons, which trap thousands of time more heat in the atmosphere than carbon dioxide. As countries move to phase out the use of HFCs, companies that produce affordable and scalable air conditioning solutions that are better for the environment are the best poised to cash in.</p> <h2>5. Specialized clothing manufacturers</h2> <p>If an increasing number of people are facing extreme weather, that's an opportunity for clothing manufacturers who use technology to produce clothing that helps keep us safe and comfortable. Think of specialized apparel and gear that's designed to keep you cooler, block out the sun, protect against extreme rainfall, or respond to changes in temperature. Even sunglasses may become more technologically advanced.</p> <p>Climate change also presents an opportunity for companies committed to reducing their carbon footprints when sourcing and manufacturing their products.</p> <h2>6. Shipping companies</h2> <p>In August, a Russian tanker ship made headlines by becoming the first ship to cross the Northeast Passage from Europe to Asia without the use of an icebreaker. This is significant, because it suggests that companies can now ship goods much faster. For example, a trip through the Northeast Passage, which runs along the Arctic coast of Russia between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, takes 30 percent less time than the traditional route through the Suez Canal.</p> <p>The trip by the Russian tanker was made possible due to declining ice levels in the Arctic, presumably as a result of climate change. The reduction in ice could also mean more potential routes for vacation cruise ships, including more trips to the Arctic and Antarctic regions.</p> <h2>7. Defense and security firms</h2> <p>There is increasing concern that food shortages and other challenges caused by climate change could lead to civil unrest. In fact, the United Nations Food Programme last year said high food prices led to unrest in Morocco, Bangladesh, Tunisia, and Indonesia. Large defense companies, including Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, and United Technologies, would indirectly profit if tensions escalated into armed conflicts, and many of those same companies are involved in carrying out the delivery of humanitarian aid.</p> <p>Moreover, climate change is often cited as a contributing factor to the refugee crisis in Syria and other parts of the Middle East. Continued mass migration could mean a greater need for border surveillance and security forces, which would also benefit security and defense firms.</p> <h2>8. Crop science companies</h2> <p>A number of forces are combining to drive prospects for crop science companies. The world's growing population is causing food demand to rise. Meanwhile, consumers are showing more interest in organic food products. This is all happening at a time when climate change is causing more droughts, floods, and unpredictable growing conditions.</p> <p>Companies that may benefit from these trends include new biotech firms, as well as established giants such as Monsanto and Bayer, which have invested billions of dollars in crops designed to be more resilient and produce higher yields with less water and soil.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-industries-that-could-benefit-from-climate-change">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-climate-change-could-affect-your-money">6 Ways Climate Change Could Affect Your Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/welcome-to-container-city-how-shipping-containers-are-recycled-into-green-dwellings">Welcome to Container City - How Shipping Containers Are Recycled into Green Dwellings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-big-of-a-house-do-you-really-need">How Big of a House Do You Really Need?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/oprah-asks-a-great-question-what-can-you-live-without">Oprah Asks A Great Question; What Can You Live Without?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-easy-ways-to-get-your-finances-fit-for-summer">10 Easy Ways to Get Your Finances Fit For Summer</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Green Living air conditioning climate change construction defense energy global warming hurricane harvey renewables trade Fri, 13 Oct 2017 08:30:04 +0000 Tim Lemke 2035541 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways Climate Change Could Affect Your Money http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-climate-change-could-affect-your-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-climate-change-could-affect-your-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-586087414.jpg" alt="Learning how climate change could affect your money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As our planet steadily warms and the climate changes, one thing is for certain &mdash; it is incredibly hard to predict what the long-term future holds.</p> <p>There is a ton of data that shows Earth's climate is warming, but the change is occurring so rapidly that the existing data doesn't necessarily provide scientists with a way to make 100 percent accurate predictions. Plus, we can hardly get weather predictions right for the next week, so imagine trying to make accurate predictions for decades into the future.</p> <p>All of that said, there are six predictions that we can generally make regarding the future of our planet and our money.</p> <h2>1. Water will cost more</h2> <p>Water is, hands down, our most precious resource on this planet. Scientists predict that potable water may become increasingly rare in the next 50 years &mdash; at least, based on our current climate models and methods for collecting and storing water. At least half the world's population relies on groundwater for personal consumption (with urban demand expected to grow by 55 percent by 2050, according to National Geographic), and groundwater is supplied by precipitation.</p> <p>Global warming is expected to increase downpours, so one might expect that our groundwater supply should be in good shape. However, that's not the case. Groundwater builds up slowly over time, through melting snowpack and steady precipitation. If climate forecast models are accurate, then it's possible that the next 100 years will see northern hemisphere snowfall amounts decline dramatically (between 10 percent and 30 percent, according to National Geographic). Increased precipitation, when it comes in the form of monsoon-like deluges that are too voluminous to be absorbed, simply causes flooding.</p> <p>In addition, warmer global temperatures will contribute to problems with water quality, according to both the Union of Concerned Scientists and Physicians for Social Responsibility. Rising seawater in low-lying coastal areas can contaminate freshwater reserves. In areas of drought, on the other hand, concentrations of freshwater contaminants are expected to increase, which can lead to potential health concerns for humans.</p> <p>Precipitation deluges can also cost municipalities millions if excess stormwater floods damage sewage treatment plants (as happened in Seattle in February 2017). This can lead to a costly backup &mdash; or in the case of the Seattle treatment plant, millions of gallons of raw sewage pouring into Puget Sound. All of this makes it extremely likely that the cost of potable water will get much higher in the next 50 years or so.</p> <h2>2. Energy will cost more</h2> <p>North America has enjoyed a boom in cheap oil and natural gas in recent years, thanks to fracking, a means of extracting oil and gas from rock shale using pressurized water. But as climate change causes freshwater supplies to dwindle and water costs to rise, expect to see either a falloff in fracking-related production of fossil fuels or a drop in demand.</p> <p>Other means of power generation may come under threat, too. Many of the country's rivers may actually see less water flow due to shifting precipitation patterns and accelerated evaporation rates. Less water flowing in our rivers will mean less water to power hydroelectric dams. Did you know that water is used to cool coal and nuclear power plants, too? Without access to that water, power brownouts are a possibility in many areas, especially during times of peak power usage.</p> <p>Fortunately, advancements in green technologies like solar and wind energy production (coupled with new efforts to manufacture batteries for home storage of electricity) promise possible relief. These technologies, along with microgrids &mdash; local energy grids that can disconnect from main power grids and run autonomously &mdash; can also help alleviate problems that arise from the aging of the already hopelessly outdated U.S. utilities infrastructure.</p> <h2>3. Food may cost a lot more</h2> <p>A warming climate is a mixed blessing when it comes to food production. Warmer weather and higher levels of carbon dioxide can mean happier crops and larger yields, but that's assuming that new diseases and pests don't also thrive on the warming conditions. Because the cost of food depends on so much more than crop yields, it's very difficult to say how food prices may rise in the future.</p> <p>According to National Geographic, some crops' yields will increase<a href="http://www.nationalgeographic.com/climate-change/how-to-live-with-it/crops.html">,</a> while others may see a significant drop. Among the predictions scientists are making:</p> <ul> <li>Corn yield may decline by as much as 20 percent in the Midwestern United States, and 16 percent in Brazil. And if the cost of corn and other basic cereals rises along with the cost of water, the cost of meat production will also rise.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Potato farmers in northern Europe may expect an increase in production, whereas farms farther south will become increasingly drought-prone.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>West and East Africa may support more industrial agriculture, but China and India are expected to experience massive losses of arable land.</li> </ul> <p>As the climate continues warming, Americans may see a serious shortage of fresh fruits and vegetables, causing price hikes. California produces the vast majority of the fresh produce eaten in the United States, including citrus fruit, artichokes, broccoli, nuts, plums, and tomatoes. The state's vast farmlands are expected to suffer from more frequent droughts and heat waves as the climate continues warming.</p> <p>Seafood is also likely to become rarer and pricier as rising carbon dioxide levels cause oceans to acidify and harm or kill off species like salmon.</p> <h2>4. Flood prone real estate may lose value</h2> <p>Temperamental weather is one thing, but the warming atmosphere and oceans are also giving rise to more intense and numerous hurricanes and other ocean-centered storms.</p> <p>The tempests, combined with rising sea levels, are expected to devalue coastal property significantly over the next 50 to 100 years. According to the National Ocean Service, in 2010, 39 percent of the U.S. population lived in counties directly on the shoreline, with another 8 percent expected to join them by 2020. Consumers who own properties right up against the coast face not only physical dangers from rising sea levels, but also increasing costs, particularly for homeowners and flood insurance. You can expect to see premiums and deductibles rise in areas affected by climate change-related flooding.</p> <p>It has taken some time for the U.S. real estate world to react to the predictions about climate change, perhaps because North America hasn't experienced as much climate change-related damage as initially predicted (or perhaps because 60 percent of Americans don't believe that climate change will affect them personally, according to research from Yale University's Program on Climate Change Communication). However, changes are taking place. New York Times data shows home sales have dropped about 7.6 percent in high-risk flood areas of Miami-Dade County, even though home sales have increased 2.6 percent nationally.</p> <h2>5. Homeownership will cost more</h2> <p>Real estate agents like to say that there are three factors to consider when buying a home: location, location, location. Well, it's more true now than ever. While homeowners previously considered issues like neighborhood safety, the quality of the local school district, or local amenities, now homebuyers will also have to factor in issues like: Will my home be swept away in a freak flood? Are forest fires becoming a possibility in this area? The answers could point to significant dangers or at the very least, higher costs.</p> <p>Buying a home in an area that is negatively affected by climate change will affect more than your mortgage options and your insurance: You may also pay a fee just to live dangerously. Homes built in unincorporated fire-prone areas, for instance, may be charged an annual fee to help pay for firefighting efforts. This has already been proposed in Washington State.</p> <h2>6. Health care costs will continue to grow</h2> <p>Anyone who has been to Beijing or Bangkok knows how terrible air pollution can affect your health. From asthma to emphysema, a more polluted atmosphere (which is currently a huge contributor to our warming climate) can mean a host of new health issues.</p> <p>Warmer weather, combined with higher levels of carbon dioxide, can also cause plants to vigorously produce more pollen &mdash; meaning worsening symptoms for people with allergies.</p> <p>And a wetter, warmer climate encourages the spread of insects like mosquitoes, which carry deadly diseases. Speaking of insects, the bark beetle that is killing off vast swathes of forest in the Western United States and Canada is creating so much dead wood that it's contributing to larger, deadlier forest fires in the dry summer months. Those, in turn, further hurt asthmatics and people with other pulmonary issues.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-ways-climate-change-could-affect-your-money&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Ways%2520Climate%2520Change%2520Could%2520Affect%2520Your%2520Money.jpg&amp;description=6%20Ways%20Climate%20Change%20Could%20Affect%20Your%20Money"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Ways%20Climate%20Change%20Could%20Affect%20Your%20Money.jpg" alt="6 Ways Climate Change Could Affect Your Money" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-climate-change-could-affect-your-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-industries-that-could-benefit-from-climate-change">8 Industries That Could Benefit From Climate Change</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bottled-water-bottled-hype-part-1">Bottled Water, Bottled Hype Part 1</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/there-are-cheaper-ways-to-return-to-a-greener-earth">There are Cheaper Ways to Return to a Greener Earth</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-places-to-check-out-medical-care-for-the-uninsured">5 Places to Check out Medical Care for the Uninsured</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-things-we-keep-buying-that-are-killing-the-planet">8 Things We Keep Buying That Are Killing the Planet</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Green Living agriculture climate change environment food costs global warming health care homeownership sea levels water Thu, 03 Aug 2017 09:00:05 +0000 Andrea Karim 1992116 at http://www.wisebread.com Saving the Planet - One Drop at a Time http://www.wisebread.com/saving-the-planet-one-drop-at-a-time <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/saving-the-planet-one-drop-at-a-time" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/water conservation.JPG" alt="water" title="water" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="250" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p class="MsoPlainText">More and more catastrophic storms. Global warming. Droughts and floods. It seems that we have entered an era of extremes in <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/2012-is-coming-what-are-you-doing-about-it" target="_blank">planet earth&rsquo;s saga</a>. <o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">With global environmental issues becoming bigger and harder to ignore, there are <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-easy-ways-to-be-nicer-to-the-environment-and-your-wallet" target="_blank">things we all can work on</a> to help do our part. You may argue that we should stop making &ldquo;the little guy&rdquo; pay and change their habits when it is really the big corporations who exponentially consume that should be held to a higher standard. <o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">But truly &ndash; if we are to continue to foster a planet for future generations to enjoy, we have to start somewhere. Being an example and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-financially-educate-your-children" target="_blank">teaching our children</a> how to conserve resources is the first step to getting the &ldquo;big guys&rdquo; to listen; some of our <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-afford-to-have-a-baby" target="_blank">children</a> will eventually be in those positions of power and influence to enforce greater changes than we could ever imagine. All we have to do is give them the proper building blocks. <o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">I am currently traveling through Australia, a country that has suffered terrible drought for over a decade now. So here in Oz, water conservation is not a nice thing to do for the environment; it is a necessity. <o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Here are a few ways you can save the planet, one drop at a time: <o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <h3><strong>2 Minute Showers</strong><o:p></o:p></h3> <p class="MsoPlainText">You heard me: two minutes. Public showers at some campgrounds in Australia actually have timers. If you aren&rsquo;t done in the allotted time, you will be one soapy dude for the rest of the day.<o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">At home, you don&rsquo;t necessarily have to complete your shower in two minutes. But see if you can run the water for just two minutes by turning it on and off as needed. Myscha wrote a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-take-a-shower-in-sixty-seconds-or-less" target="_blank">great article</a> about how to get the greatest use out of the least amount of water while sudsing up.<o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <h3><strong>Brushing Teeth</strong><o:p></o:p></h3> <p class="MsoPlainText">I&rsquo;m sure it goes without saying, but if you aren&rsquo;t tuned in yet, let&rsquo;s get with the program! Turn off the water while you are brushing your teeth, okay? It involves no sacrifice other than the laborious action of turning a tap on and off a few more times. <o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <h3><strong>Washing Dishes</strong><o:p></o:p></h3> <p class="MsoPlainText">For anybody who has camped and had to haul their dishwashing water from a nearby river or tap or wash using a sink that&rsquo;s way too small, you are already a good chunk of the way towards washing your dishes in a water-friendly way. Every kitchen is set up differently for washing dishes, so techniques for how to get those plates clean while using the least amount of water will vary. <o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">One technique I have found useful is to fill the sink with rinse water (not too much!), and <strong>rinse dishes creatively instead of running the tap to do so</strong>. Use glasses and bowls to scoop up the water and pour it over the awkward dishes, killing two birds (or rather, rinsing two dishes) in one shot. And at the end, if your rinse water isn&rsquo;t too grimy, leave it in the sink to soak your next set of dirty dishes. <o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">For those with dish washers, seriously consider cutting down or eliminating your usage. It is a pig on both power and water, while ultimately being totally unnecessary for survival. At the very least, only use it when it is absolutely fully packed. Even then&hellip;<o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <h3><strong>Watering Your Garden</strong><o:p></o:p></h3> <p class="MsoPlainText">Using a hose to water your garden is the perfect way to waste a ton of water. Instead, <strong>try using a bucket and scoop</strong>. You will concentrate your watering efforts on exactly the plants and spots that need watering, and you&rsquo;ll get better exercise hauling the bucket. In Australia, this is how even some commercial growers water their produce; so you can too. <o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">If you are an avid floral gardener (and thus not able to consume the product of your watering efforts as with a veggie patch), consider the types of plants you are landscaping with. If you live in a dry climate and plant with a water-hungry plant, you are doing no favors to anybody and satisfying no more than your own sense of aesthetics. Try instead learning about drought-bed techniques, and planting things that do well even in dry conditions. <o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">For those with a new property and a small patch of lawn, try not laying sod down at all. There are lots of grass-free landscaping techniques that are very attractive, virtually maintenance free, and dry as a bone. <o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <h3><strong>If It&rsquo;s Yellow, Let It Mellow</strong><o:p></o:p></h3> <p class="MsoPlainText">Do you have to flush the toilet every time you pee? Arguably, no. Ladies: don&rsquo;t use a half a roll of toilet paper (one or two squares will do &ndash; this is also <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-easy-ways-to-be-nicer-to-the-environment-and-your-wallet" target="_blank">environmentally friendly</a>) to wipe, and you can get lots of extra mileage out of a toilet flush without clogging the pipes. <o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <h3><strong>Catch the drips</strong><o:p></o:p></h3> <p class="MsoPlainText">Most taps drip, even if very slowly. Think about all the taps you have; outside taps for hoses are the biggest culprits. Bathtubs are close followers. Catch those drips! It may not be aesthetically appealing to have a bowl or bucket under the tap, but at least perfectly potable water won&rsquo;t be wasted. <o:p></o:p></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <h3><strong>Get Creative</strong><o:p></o:p></h3> <p class="MsoPlainText">Every time you turn on the tap, think about how you can either reduce your usage, or get some extra mileage out of it by reusing it. Some people <strong>water their gardens with their gray water</strong> (from washing dishes with biodegradable soap). Others install <strong>water-saving taps and pressure reducers</strong>. By calculating how every single drop of water gets used, you can actually turn water conservation into a creative exercise that is stimulating and even enjoyable! <strong>Present it as a challenge for the whole family to participate in.</strong> Put the right slant on it, and saving the planet &ndash; one drop at a time &ndash; can create a more sustainable world for us to live in, and actually be fun too. <o:p></o:p></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nora-dunn">Nora Dunn</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/saving-the-planet-one-drop-at-a-time">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-industries-that-could-benefit-from-climate-change">8 Industries That Could Benefit From Climate Change</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-climate-change-could-affect-your-money">6 Ways Climate Change Could Affect Your Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-conserve-water-by-harvesting-rain-or-snow">How to Conserve Water by Harvesting Rain or Snow</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/50-ways-to-save-water">50+ Ways to Save Water</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-dichotomy-of-media-messages">The Dichotomy of Media Messages</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Green Living Australia drought global warming short showers water conservation Tue, 09 Dec 2008 05:46:41 +0000 Nora Dunn 2635 at http://www.wisebread.com The Dichotomy of Media Messages http://www.wisebread.com/the-dichotomy-of-media-messages <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-dichotomy-of-media-messages" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/the dichotomy of media messages.jpg" alt="TV War" title="TV War" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="373" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p class="MsoNormal">I don’t watch a lot of television. When I’m not living in the bush <a href="http://freedom30.blogspot.com/2007/11/where-we-live.html" target="_blank">somewhere off the grid</a>, or <a href="http://freedom30.blogspot.com/2007/07/dont-look-down.html" target="_blank">trekking through the mountains</a>, or taking on some such nomadic adventure or another, I am usually sleeping, writing, or spending time with friends and family. </p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">So when I had an occasion to watch some television recently, <strong>I was horrified</strong>. </p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Here is how my evening went:</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>10pm:</strong> An extremely educational, inspirational, and moving show on global warming. It opened my eyes further to the very real world tragedy that will occur within our lifetimes if we don’t change our ways drastically. And I don’t mean carpooling to reduce gas use – I mean life-altering drastic changes. </p> <p class="MsoNormal">But the finer points of how the world needs to change are neither here nor there in the context of this article. </p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>11pm</strong> <em>on the same channel</em>: A program glamorizing the logging industry. Loggers are made out to be tough macho heroes as they rip apart forests, several trees at a time.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Hmm…do you see any mixed messages here? </p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">The idolization of big tough dangerous jobs like logging, mass fishing in rough seas, and even trucking seems to be a new trend in the media. And yet it is these very activities that are effectively destroying our planet, as indicated in the many environmentally based documentaries also being televised. </p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">And to schedule these rampantly opposing programs back to back…what on earth are they thinking?! </p> <p class="MsoNormal">Is it a method of presenting both sides of a story to the viewing audience?</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Maybe this channel (which shall remain unnamed) is trying to be everything to everybody, catering to environmentally sensitive individuals who want to save the planet, as well as people watching television for mindless entertainment. </p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">I have no doubt that the global warming show is just as over-produced and riddled with agenda as the logging show is. And maybe I am biased towards the global warming audience (heck – it’s Earth Day – I’m allowed!), but with the dichotomy of mixed messages coming from the media every day, it’s no wonder that we are continuing down a very dangerous road with our lives, our planet, and our future. </p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">At this rate, maybe the <a href="/2012-is-coming-what-are-you-doing-about-it" target="_blank">end of the world</a> is closer than we thought…</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nora-dunn">Nora Dunn</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-dichotomy-of-media-messages">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-greenwash-your-holiday">Don&#039;t Greenwash Your Holiday</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-industries-that-could-benefit-from-climate-change">8 Industries That Could Benefit From Climate Change</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-remove-yourself-from-mailing-lists-and-eliminate-junk-mail">How to Remove Yourself from Mailing Lists and Eliminate Junk Mail</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-7-rules-of-budget-travel">The 7 Rules of Budget Travel</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/want-free-hbo-or-showtime-just-ask">Want Free HBO or Showtime? Just Ask.</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Cars and Transportation Consumer Affairs Green Living Art and Leisure Earth day global warming media messages reality tv television programming Tue, 22 Apr 2008 21:31:13 +0000 Nora Dunn 2035 at http://www.wisebread.com