Family http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4566/all en-US 20 Ways to Make Family Camping Easy http://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-to-make-family-camping-easy <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/20-ways-to-make-family-camping-easy" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/family_camping_outdoors_in_forest.jpg" alt="Family camping outdoors in forest" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I like camping with my kids, but I don't like working hard at it. I try to keep the whole trip easy, from the planning, to the packing, to the sitting around the campfire. Of course, there are always trade-offs; you can spend more time preparing at home and put in less effort while on the trip, or vice versa. I like to find that sweet spot where work is minimized at every stage. Most of that has to do with relaxing some of the standards I adhere to back in civilization. Here's how I make family camping a cinch, and how you can, too!</p> <h2>1. Camp locally</h2> <p>When I was a kid, some of my happiest camping memories were made at a place in central Texas called Jellystone Park, less than an hour's drive from my house. In the mornings, my dad would drive to work, while my mom, brother, and I made jars of colored sand and took turns going down the waterslide at the pool.</p> <p>An eight-hour drive to a national park might be what you dream of when planning summer camping, but if your family is new at it, start with a state park or a private campground within an hour or two of home. This way, you'll be able to make a quick getaway if there's a storm or someone gets sick. You can even run home if you forget something. And if one parent can't take the whole time off work, you can do like my dad did and head to the office from the campground. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/camping-for-a-week-is-only-160-at-these-national-parks?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Camping for a Week Is Only $160 at These National Parks</a>)</p> <h2>2. Camp near a town</h2> <p>Some families strap on backpacks and hike miles into the woods before setting up camp. That's admirable, but that ain't my family, at least at this point in our lives. Some of our most enjoyable camping trips have been on the outskirts of small towns, where we could walk or take a short drive to the store to stock up on necessities. This way, you won't have to plan all your meals in advance, and you don't have to bring as many coolers or as much ice, because you can buy a day's worth of groceries at a time.</p> <h2>3. Choose an easy campground and campsite</h2> <p>National forest campgrounds are cheap and often easy to book. It's even possible to camp in the wilderness, find your own water source, and just dig a hole for your bathroom needs. But if you have young children and little appetite for roughing it, look for a campground with an on-site store, showers, laundry, and even a pool or an indoor activity room. Kampgrounds of America (KOA) offers hundreds of private campground options that often provide these types of amenities. They cost a little more than public campgrounds, but KOAs delight my kids with their pancake breakfasts and mini-golf courses.</p> <p>Another thing to keep an eye out for is whether you get to park right by your campsite or you have to carry your belongings from a parking lot to your site. If you have big kids this may not be a problem, but with toddlers or babies, it can be tough to ferry gear back and forth while keeping track of the little ones.</p> <p>Once the campground is chosen, you're not done. Study the campground map. (<a href="https://www.reserveamerica.com/outdoors/tent-camping.htm" target="_blank">ReserveAmerica</a> has maps for state parks and some other camping areas.) I like to pick sites near enough to the bathrooms that my kids can visit them alone. If water spigots or electric outlets are only available at some sites, I get one of those.</p> <p>On the flip side, if there is a lazy river or pond in the campground, you want to be far away from that because that's where the mosquitoes will be. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-simple-all-natural-bug-and-mosquito-repellents?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Simple All Natural Bug and Mosquito Repellents</a>)</p> <h2>4. Lower your beauty standards</h2> <p>We don't pack that much in the way of beauty and hygiene products. A hairbrush and toothbrush for each kid, some toothpaste and hand towels to share, a beach/shower towel for each person, some soap and deodorant, and we're good to go. The most important personal care products you will bring are your sunscreen and bug spray.</p> <p>I don't bring stuff like shampoo, conditioner, makeup, or razors because I greatly lower my beauty standards in the woods. Showering or bathing every other day might be a firm rule at home, but while camping, I'm fine with my kids going the whole week without a shower if they want. I do, however, try to keep them brushing their teeth twice a day while camping. That has to do with health, not necessarily beauty.</p> <h2>5. Load up on baby wipes</h2> <p>Even if you no longer have babies, these things are clutch for camping. If you don't have access to a shower, <a href="https://amzn.to/2rScFJm" target="_blank">baby wipes</a> will be your hygiene go-to. Even at campgrounds with showers, wipes can come in handy for cleaning kids' grubby hands before a snack without hiking to the bathrooms. And if anyone gets car sick on the way there, you're ready for cleanup.</p> <h2>6. Bring all kinds of lighting</h2> <p>It's important to have a light source that doesn't need to be handheld. We have some tabletop lanterns with handles that can be hung inside the tent or from a clothesline as needed. Other handy lights are headlights and small <a href="https://amzn.to/2Iw6O3k" target="_blank">LED flashlights</a> that can be slipped into pockets. These tend to disappear as a trip goes on, so buy lots of inexpensive lights and scatter them everywhere. <a href="https://amzn.to/2KxU2lF" target="_blank">Glow stick bracelets</a> or necklaces are also an affordable way to keep track of your kids in the dark.</p> <h2>7. Don't skimp on sleeping arrangements</h2> <p>After trying a number of camping products, I have become resigned to the fact that I was not built to rough it when it comes to sleeping. I can easily go a week without makeup, but I'm not happy if I try to sleep on a foam pad on the ground.</p> <p>Last summer, my family bought a big <a href="https://amzn.to/2LbjSNr" target="_blank">Aerobed</a>, and we used the electrical outlet in our car to blow it up. I slept like a baby, and will bring it on every camping trip from now on. The only other thing that has given me serious comfort during camping is a <a href="https://amzn.to/2rQYYdu" target="_blank">hammock</a> &mdash; which is a lot cheaper and easier to pack, if you don't get too cold at night. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-air-mattresses?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 5 Best Air Mattresses</a>)</p> <h2>8. Bring easy activities</h2> <p>My kids spend a lot of time playing in the woods and making up games involving their favorite trees, but everyone should have a book with them for quiet times, and bringing a board game is always a good idea.</p> <p>You can certainly implement a no-gadget rule, but if one of your kids is driving you crazy, you could always give them some tablet time alone in the tent or car.</p> <h2>9. Pack firemaking tools</h2> <p>I am a Girl Scout leader and I know how to construct a killer fire with a single match, but I'm also not above starting with a <a href="https://amzn.to/2Gv4CYk" target="_blank">Duraflame log</a> if I don't feel like working at it. A box of long stick matches is also helpful.</p> <h2>10. Bring all the baby gear you need</h2> <p>If you're camping with a baby, you already get a medal. You don't need to rough it by going without the things you rely on at home to keep baby safe and happy. I'm not saying you have to bring all 1,000 pieces of baby equipment in your house, but if you think you might need something and you have room in the car, don't deny yourself.</p> <p>Bringing a portable playpen could literally be a lifesaver, because an air mattress is not a safe surface for a baby to share. When we camped with our babies, I really appreciated having a safe place to stash the baby when I was cooking. Some <a href="https://amzn.to/2IylIq6" target="_blank">portable playpens</a> even have changing table attachments, which is great because no one really wants you to change the baby on the picnic table.</p> <h2>11. Bring a huge tent</h2> <p>You'll already be dealing with more togetherness than anyone is used to while on a family trip. Don't feel bad about getting a huge tent so that sleeping bags don't have to be crowded up against each other. Or if the kids want their own tent, you can bring a small one just for them and let them set it up themselves.</p> <p>Bonus: You won't have to step over their mess in your own tent.</p> <h2>12. Pack with clear tubs</h2> <p>Clear plastic storage containers allow you to see everything you brought without having to unpack everything. They will keep everything dry and if the containers have a good latch, they&rsquo;ll prevent animals from getting into anything. You can even stack them to make a temporary work surface at the campsite.</p> <p>When you're done with your trip, store your camping supplies in the same tubs, labeled, to make packing for the next trip a breeze. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-storage-products-as-recommended-by-organization-pros?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 9 Best Storage Products as Recommended by Organization Pros</a>)</p> <h2>13. Consider renting a specialty vehicle</h2> <p>The closest my family has gotten to renting an RV for camping is renting a Jucy &mdash; a minivan converted for camping use &mdash; and we loved it so much that the kids are begging to do it again this summer. The beauty of a converted van is that it drives like an ordinary passenger vehicle, but it has a little kitchen in the back with a mini-fridge, sink, drawers, and a stove. These things come with all your silverware and dishes. You also have a pop-up tent with a padded floor on the roof, allowing you to go camping with very little preparation.</p> <p>The Jucy made days at the beach during our trip a breeze, since we had cold food waiting for us in our fridge in the parking lot. I also loved stopping at a grocery store and loading my purchases directly into the fridge in the back of the van. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-easiest-ways-to-save-on-your-next-rv-camping-trip?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Easiest Ways to Save on Your Next RV Camping Trip</a>)</p> <h2>14. Arrive before dark</h2> <p>Last summer, my family went on a camping trip and it was lovely &mdash; except the first night, when we arrived after sundown and struggled to put up two large tents on an unfamiliar, irregularly-shaped site.</p> <p>When you're on a weekend trip, it can be tempting to leave after work on a Friday to get the most camping time in, but if there's a chance that traffic or a delayed start might land you there after dark, think twice.</p> <p>You should also stop for a meal on the way to the site, so you don't have to worry about cooking while also setting up the tents the moment you arrive.</p> <h2>15. Make your kids help</h2> <p>After a long drive, your kids will want to run around and play. Let them do this, but only for five minutes. Then put them to work. Everyone above the age of infant should have a job when you pull into the campsite. Little kids can set up their own camp chairs and hold onto the bag of stakes while the tent is going up. At ages eight, 11, and 14, my kids can now set up the tent with little adult help.</p> <h2>16. Put up clothes lines</h2> <p>Having somewhere off the ground to hang everything, from damp towels to clothing to sleeping bags that need airing out, is really handy. It's also a great place to clip a lantern after dark to add more lighting to your campsite.</p> <h2>17. Don't try to be a fancy chef</h2> <p>I like to keep camping meals really simple. At home, we make pancakes from scratch, but at the campground, I've been known to bring the kind of pancakes you spray out of a can. I get precooked meats wherever possible because I've experienced the kind of mess you can make if a package of raw ground beef leaks in a cooler. And canned soup and boxed macaroni and cheese are lunchtime favorites.</p> <p>Simple also means fewer dishes to wash. I confess that I resort to a lot of individual packaging when camping. I've purchased those individual boxes of cereal, which the kids <em>love</em>, and cases of granola bars and canned sparkling water are my best friends.</p> <p>If you want to avoid waste, there are a lot of ways to prepackage things using upcycling. Don't want to buy ready-made pancake batter? You can make it at home and package it in a ketchup bottle for the same ease with less waste. Instead of individually packaged granola bars, you can make granola at home and store it in an empty coffee creamer bottle for easy snacking.</p> <p>Pre-measuring ingredients such as flour, spices, etc., allows you to both throw together meals more easily and pack less, since you only bring as much as you need of each ingredient.</p> <p>Or you can go all out at home and cook the whole dish, then freeze it to reheat at the campground. My mom would often make a big pot of chili or spaghetti sauce before we went camping. If you have leftovers already stored in your fridge, you're all set to grab and go. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-tips-for-camping-cooking?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Tips for Camping Cooking</a>)</p> <h2>18. Bring your cooking gadgets &mdash; or not</h2> <p>If you like to pack less, try to get a campsite with a grill or a grate that goes down over the fire and bring a bag of charcoal. On one trip last summer when we forgot to pack our camp stove, we managed to cook all kinds of meals, including bratwurst, eggs, and grilled cheese, right over the fire with little hassle.</p> <p>But if you have a campsite with electrical hookups &mdash; or even a converter to plug into your car for electricity &mdash; you can use all your gadgets to make cooking easier at the campground. Folks are bringing their <a href="https://amzn.to/2s1ih3T" target="_blank">Instant Pots</a> camping, and I may just try it this summer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-instant-pot-recipes-that-will-save-you-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Instant Pot Recipes That Will Save You Money</a>)</p> <h2>19. Try to get everything dry before packing up</h2> <p>Sweep or use a portable vacuum cleaner on the inside of the tent and wipe any dew off the sides before packing it up. If you can't get it clean and dry &mdash; like if it's pouring out during your departure &mdash; you'll have to set the tent up again in your yard when you get home in order to prevent mold from forming. To make your next trip easy, double check for moisture or any odors in the bins, your tent bag, and sleeping bags before storing them.</p> <p>For me, the exception to this is dishes. Although I like to keep a dedicated bin of cooking utensils and dishes for camping, I do run them through the dishwasher when I get home before repacking them. I wash the dishes at camp before heading home, but I don't pay too much attention to how they get thrown in the bin since I know I'll be redoing it in the comfort of my kitchen.</p> <h2>20. Keep all your camping gear in the same place</h2> <p>Stack all those clear bins full of clean, dry, ready-to-go camping gear in the same area of your garage or crawl space, so that next time, you can throw them in the car and go. If you need to replace or repair something, do it now instead of putting it off until you're getting ready for your next trip. If you make a habit of having everything ready before you store it, you won't have to waste time going through everything before the next trip.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-to-make-family-camping-easy">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family">How to Handle World Travel With Your Family</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-affordable-family-travel-is-possible">Yes, Affordable Family Travel Is Possible</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-lessons-your-kids-can-learn-while-they-travel">10 Money Lessons Your Kids Can Learn While They Travel</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare">How to Make Flying With an Infant Less of a Nightmare</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-bring-your-pet-onboard-a-flight">How to Bring Your Pet Onboard a Flight</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Travel camping camping tips family camping family travel travel tips traveling with kids Fri, 25 May 2018 08:00:21 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2143389 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Questions to Ask Before Sending Your Child to Private School http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-sending-your-child-to-private-school <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-questions-to-ask-before-sending-your-child-to-private-school" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/pupils_in_science_lesson_studying_robotics.jpg" alt="Pupils In Science Lesson Studying Robotics" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Parents consider sending their children to private school over public school for several reasons, and while a private school setting might be best for your child's learning style, you need to evaluate the decision carefully before signing up. Here are five questions to ask yourself before deciding on private school for your child. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-times-you-should-choose-private-school-over-public?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Times You Should Choose Private School Over Public</a>)</p> <h2>1. Can I afford it?</h2> <p>Before you even consider how great a certain school is, you have to know whether you can afford it or not. Will you have to get another job? Will sending your child to this school put unnecessary financial stress on your family? What will you sacrifice to send your child to private school?</p> <p>The national average private school tuition is about $10,302 per year, according to Private School Review, but of course this cost varies drastically depending on the area. For example, the average price of a private school in Iowa is almost $5,000, but over $16,000 in New York. Most private high schools cost more than private elementary schools, as well, so your cost will go up if you keep your child enrolled throughout their school life.</p> <p>Yes, this school might be an amazing opportunity for your child, but is the cost truly worth it? I'm not talking about just the sticker price of the school. You also have to weigh the cost of working longer hours and spending less time with your family in order to make it work. Really consider if you can afford the school and the sacrifices you might have to make along with it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-late-starters-can-save-for-their-kids-education?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Here's How Late Starters Can Save for Their Kids' Education</a>)</p> <h2>2. What are the hidden costs?</h2> <p>Unfortunately, the costs of sending your child to a private school don't stop at the monthly tuition bill. There could be several other hidden costs as well, such as the cost of uniforms, expensive textbooks, fundraising fees, field trips, and other special events. Of course, don't forget about sports, elective classes, or after school activities. If the tuition bill is already tipping your budget into the negative, then the extra fees might be too much for your family to handle. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-money-on-kids-activities?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Save Money on Kids' Activities</a>)</p> <h2>3. How does it compare to the other schools nearby?</h2> <p>There must be a reason why you're considering a private school rather than a public one, so make a list of those reasons. Is it because of safety? A particular sport your child plays? Is it because of your religion? Or perhaps because private schools tend to look better on college applications?</p> <p>Once you have those written down, find out all you can about the private school versus the public schools in your area. For example, if safety is a main priority for you, find out how the private school maintains a safer campus than the other schools. What safety protocols do they have in place? How many incidents have there been in the past five years?</p> <p>It's important to dig deeper into these issues because you might discover that behind the high price tag and fancy test scores, the private school you had your eye on isn't much safer or better at getting students accepted to top colleges than you thought. On the other hand, the private school you're interested in might have a huge lead over other schools in athletics or academics, which makes the tuition easier to justify.</p> <h2>4. What will this school do for my child?</h2> <p>No one knows your child better than you do, so evaluate potential schools for what they will offer your child. Don't get distracted by impressive stats the school might advertise, like having an unbeatable mathletes team or having the highest number of full college scholarships for basketball players. Make a list of your child's strengths and weaknesses and discover how the school can support both. For example, if your child is naturally talented in theater arts but struggles in math, will this school give him or her unique opportunities to act and learn more about theater? Does the school offer special classes or tutoring to strengthen math skills, or will they be thrown into an advanced math class and expected to stay afloat?</p> <h2>5. What is student life like?</h2> <p>School is more than just academics; it's the place where students learn to socialize and create strong friendships. A school that boasts high test scores, but has miserable students is not a healthy environment for anyone. When evaluating the school, ask how the school gets the students involved in their local community. Are the students encouraged to partake in activities that help others outside of the school?</p> <p>You also want to learn how much time is given for breaks and socializing and how often the teachers encourage group projects and working together in the classroom. Most importantly, how does the school deal with bullying and other social behavior issues?</p> <p>There is truly no right or wrong answer when it comes to choosing a private school or a public school for your child. You know your kid best, and you know what's the best for your family.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-sending-your-child-to-private-school">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-private-schools-worth-the-money-they-demand">Are Private Schools Worth the Money They Demand?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-lessons-your-kids-can-learn-while-they-travel">10 Money Lessons Your Kids Can Learn While They Travel</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare">How to Make Flying With an Infant Less of a Nightmare</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-successfully-negotiate-everything-with-your-kid">How to Successfully Negotiate Everything With Your Kid</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Family affordable education costs of raising a child parenting tips private school school costs school tuition Thu, 24 May 2018 08:30:47 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 2142705 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Money Lessons Your Kids Can Learn While They Travel http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-lessons-your-kids-can-learn-while-they-travel <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-money-lessons-your-kids-can-learn-while-they-travel" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/happy_child_girl_collect_suitcase_on_vacation.jpg" alt="Happy child girl collect suitcase on vacation" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Think back to what you loved most about your latest family vacation. What's the first thing that comes to mind? Maybe you enjoyed teaching your kids about new places, new cultures, or the history of the destination you visited. Or perhaps you were just tickled to give your kids some undivided attention without work or life getting in the way.</p> <p>What you may not have considered, is the fact that any kind of travel can be a learning opportunity &mdash; even if it's not too far from home. This is particularly true when it comes to lessons about money, because travel requires so many financial decisions.</p> <p>If you're angling to broaden your children's perspectives on money, keep an eye out for learning opportunities that may be less than obvious. Here are some lessons your kids can pick up no matter where you go.</p> <h2>1. The importance of budgeting and tracking spending</h2> <p>No matter how careful you are when you set your travel budget, it's easy to let your spending get out of hand. You're away from home and on a different schedule, and you're probably around food, souvenirs, and constant temptations to spend.</p> <p>That's why a family vacation may be the perfect time to introduce your kids to the concept of tracking your daily spending &mdash; it's one of the best ways to stay within your travel budget. To get your kids into this mindset, you just need to set a daily spending limit, then clue your kids into how it works. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-fool-proof-ways-to-stay-within-your-travel-budget?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Fool-Proof Ways to Stay Within Your Travel Budget</a>)</p> <p>My husband and I typically take our kids on a three- or four-week trip to Europe every summer. On these trips, we set a daily spending limit to cover food, souvenirs, and snacks. While the spending limit depends on where we are, it's usually enough to cover one meal &quot;out&quot; per day and a daily splurge like gelato or candy. We eat the rest of our meals in our condo or hotel.</p> <p>This really annoys my kids (ages six and nine) sometimes, but I explain that we have a budget for the entire trip and the only way to stay within our budget is by breaking it down by the day. They don't always like when we're in our hotel eating sandwiches for dinner, but they do understand why we do it.</p> <h2>2. How credit works</h2> <p>Tanner Calais, founder of Cruzely.com, says cruises are another opportune time to teach kids about spending and credit, since cruise lines have you charge all your expenses to a key card tied to your account. The system is similar to credit cards in that you're using &quot;invisible money&quot; to buy things, and you pay your bill at the end of the cruise. &quot;This is a great opportunity to introduce kids to the power of credit cards and how they work,&quot; says Calais.</p> <p>For instance, it can be tough to track your spending when you don't see it because you're using a card. By forcing the kids to watch you keep track of your daily purchases with a notepad or your smartphone, you can help them see how spending can add up over time. &quot;It's also not free money simply because cash doesn't come out of your wallet when you buy something,&quot; he says. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-saving-items-to-bring-on-your-next-cruise?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Money-Saving Items to Bring On Your Next Cruise</a>)</p> <h2>3. Money doesn't grow on trees</h2> <p>Here's another lesson kids need to learn: Money is a finite resource.</p> <p>Eileen Gunn, founder of the blog Families Go Travel, says this is one lesson her child has learned by bringing her own souvenir money on vacation. Having her 10-year-old daughter bring her own stash of cash to spend has helped her learn that &quot;you can't have everything you want,&quot; says Gunn.</p> <p>For example, if she has $20 to spend on a trip and sees something she wants for $20, she has to decide whether she wants the item badly enough to spend her entire budget on it. She also has to make peace with the fact that she won't be able to afford anything else she wants for the duration of the trip.</p> <p>Gunn says she has occasionally loaned her daughter money when she was desperate to have another souvenir, &quot;but it has to be something really worthwhile.&quot; Also, Gunn makes her repay the loan as soon as they get home from their trip. The entire process &quot;makes her a more discerning consumer,&quot; says Gunn.</p> <h2>4. The power of compound interest</h2> <p>Travel blogger Kevin Payne, founder of Family Money Adventure, offers the perfect example of how you don't have to travel far to teach your kids about money and finance. Recently, part of his family had an epic staycation in their hometown of Cleveland, Ohio while his two older kids were in New York City. They visited the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, including its Learning Center and Money Museum.</p> <p>Payne says he and his children learned many money lessons during the trip, including the history of bartering and why money is a better system of exchange. But that's not all.</p> <p>&quot;I think the biggest lesson they learned was the importance of saving money and the role of interest,&quot; he says. The museum accomplishes this goal via a staircase to its second level that illustrates the power of compound interest on every step.</p> <p>&quot;Each step represented a year more of interest so the kids could see how much money they would end up with after a 20-year period of saving,&quot; says Payne. &quot;It was such a great way to illustrate how quickly savings can add up.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-investing-lessons-you-must-teach-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Investing Lessons You Must Teach Your Kids</a>)</p> <h2>5. The power of negotiation</h2> <p>In some countries, local markets provide a powerful lesson in bargaining. Travel blogger Shannon O'Donnell, founder of A Little Adrift, has had periodic custody of her niece, and she has used that time to travel with her and teach her about money.</p> <p>O'Donnell says that, while they were in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Myanmar, her then 11-year-old niece learned to critically evaluate the cost of something she wanted, plus how to respectfully bargain if she wanted a better deal.</p> <p>&quot;She would use this skill at the local markets if she wanted to buy a souvenir and became quite good at disarming them with a smile as she politely asked for better deals,&quot; says O'Donnell. &quot;Overall, by learning that some cultures bargain for better deals, it has allowed her to consider the value of her purchases and how she spends her money even when back home in the states.&quot;</p> <h2>6. How you can save money while still having fun</h2> <p>While travel isn't typically cheap, there are still plenty of ways to save. Blogger Lee Huffman of Dads Who Travel says he uses travel to teach his kids that you can save money on some aspects of your trip and still have a blast.</p> <p>One strategy he uses to impart this message is booking accommodations that have some sort of kitchen. This allows them to save money on food by buying groceries. &quot;For example, on our last trip to Orlando, we stayed at a timeshare property that offered a mini-kitchen with a fridge, microwave, and two-burner stove,&quot; says Huffman.</p> <p>They still have a boatload of fun on their trips, but he goes out of his way to explain to his kids why dining out for every meal would make each trip cost considerably more.</p> <h2>7. Be grateful for what you have</h2> <p>Corinne McDermott, founder of Have Baby Will Travel, says travel has helped her kids understand how fortunate they are. During her family's frequent trips to the Caribbean, they often talk about how people's homes are different and how the children appear to have fewer belongings. Yet, the people they meet are still happy and thriving.</p> <p>&quot;We've been fortunate to meet and socialize with many locals on our travels, and they work hard and are as proud of their homes and families as we are of ours,&quot; says McDermott. &quot;Occasionally we all need reminders to be grateful for all that we have, no matter how it compares to others next door or across the world.&quot;</p> <h2>8. Being able to travel means parents have to work</h2> <p>Family finance writer Catherine Alford agrees that travel offers an endless number of opportunities to teach your kids about money. However, the most important lesson she wants to teach her kids is that, in order to travel, Mom and Dad have to work. &quot;I've been teaching them the connection between hard work and purchases since they were babies,&quot; she says.</p> <p>When her children were two years old, Alford and her husband took them on a monthlong European vacation where they visited five different countries. Since she works remotely as a blogger and freelance writer, Alford had to work throughout the trip. &quot;I kept reminding them that we were able to travel because Mommy was working,&quot; she says.</p> <h2>9. Experiences are better than things</h2> <p>For many families, prioritizing travel means they need to cut back on other kinds of purchases in their everyday lives. Those are often sacrifices they're happy to make. Shannon Austin, senior communications director at the Center for Financial Services Innovation says one of the biggest lessons her family has learned from travel is that they can have amazing experiences if they maintain a reasonable lifestyle.</p> <p>Austin and her children had the opportunity to live in Germany for three years when her oldest was six and her youngest was two. Once they moved abroad, she says she told her kids that they planned to &quot;live small so they can experience big.&quot; Over the three years they spent in Germany, they took 36 trips to destinations including Slovenia, Croatia, Greece, Portugal, Spain, Italy, and Austria.</p> <p>&quot;My oldest delights in noticing some flowers that remind her of the plants growing over terraces in Ronda, Spain; my youngest recalls riding donkeys in Santorini. They remember filling water bottles on the roadside at a waterfall in Norway; they remember hikes in the Franconian part of Germany,&quot; says Austin. These memories are priceless, she says, but they were only possible because her family prioritized travel instead of &quot;stuff.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-you-should-splurge-on-experiences-not-things?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Reasons You Should Splurge on Experiences, Not Things</a>)</p> <h2>10. How currency exchange works</h2> <p>Travel can also help teach your kids how money works around the world. Tracey Carisch, author of the upcoming memoir <em>Excess Baggage: One Family's Around-the-World Search for Balance, </em>says her children gained firsthand experience in how currency works when they traveled nomadically for 18 months.</p> <p>Carisch says her oldest child began to understand how different types of currency work when they arrived in South Africa from Ethiopia. They found a currency exchange booth at the airport and went to exchange their remaining Ethiopian birr for South African rand. As she was talking to the cashier, she mentioned to her daughter that they made a little money on the trip due to the favorable exchange rate.</p> <p>&quot;My daughter's curiosity was piqued and she started peppering me with questions,&quot; says Carisch. &quot;Within five minutes, she understood the concept behind currency trading and cross rates. She researched it on Forex and came up with a home-school module for herself based on reading currency pairs and calculating spreads.&quot;</p> <p>Carisch also says her child &quot;doesn't even like math.&quot; This just goes to show how powerful travel can be when it comes to learning about money and math. You can learn and forget almost anything in a classroom, but real world experiences teach lessons that last a lifetime.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/holly-johnson">Holly Johnson</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-lessons-your-kids-can-learn-while-they-travel">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare">How to Make Flying With an Infant Less of a Nightmare</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family">How to Handle World Travel With Your Family</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-travel-must-haves-for-nursing-moms">8 Travel Must-Haves for Nursing Moms</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-affordable-family-travel-is-possible">Yes, Affordable Family Travel Is Possible</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-affordable-family-getaways-when-you-dont-have-a-vacation-fund">7 Tips for Family Getaways When You Don&#039;t Have a Vacation Fund</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Travel family vacation money lessons parenting tips travel tips travel with kids vacation with kids Mon, 21 May 2018 08:31:15 +0000 Holly Johnson 2140594 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Make Flying With an Infant Less of a Nightmare http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/dad_holding_his_baby_daughter_during_flight.jpg" alt="Dad holding his baby daughter during flight" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When Jim Wang and wife Martha flew to Taiwan with their infant six years ago, they had no idea what they were in for. Their baby wasn't even a year old and hadn't yet discovered he could walk, Wang says. What was the worst that could happen?</p> <p>Unfortunately, their baby refused to sleep the entire journey, and Wang had to walk the length of the plane to keep him busy. In the meantime, he &quot;just about lost his mind.&quot;</p> <p>&quot;It was a nightmare,&quot; he said, and an extremely long one. If he had to do things over, Wang says he would have probably just stayed home.</p> <p>Skipping the entire thing may sound good if you're facing a long flight with a baby or several kids, but it's not always feasible. Maybe you're desperate for a real vacation or need to travel to see family. Whatever the reason, flying with babies is sometimes inevitable.</p> <p>Many family travel pros say your flight doesn't have to be miserable. There are strategies parents can use to make the experience relatively painless. If you know what to prepare for &mdash; and what to avoid &mdash; flying with an infant can even be seamless.</p> <h2>1. Consider buying your baby an airline seat</h2> <p>While most airlines let children ages two and under share a seat with a parent (sometimes for a small fee), you do have the option to buy them a separate seat. That's one thing Wang, who writes about personal finance and frugality at Wallet Hacks, wishes he had done differently.</p> <p>&quot;We would've considered spending the extra money to buy a seat so we could use a baby seat that he was familiar with and stood a chance at sleeping in,&quot; he says. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-southwest-airlines-is-the-best-domestic-airline-for-families?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Why Southwest Airlines is the Best Domestic Airline for Families</a>)</p> <h2>2. Bring out the screens</h2> <p>Another big fail the Wangs admit to is not bringing along any screens or digital entertainment. Yes, even a baby under the age of one may be entertained watching a movie or cartoon &mdash; at least for a while. Even if you have a &quot;no screens&quot; policy at home, a long flight is a good reason to reconsider &mdash; at least for the day and for your time in the airport.</p> <p>&quot;It's not good to put such a young kid in front of a screen, but for that special circumstance, I would've buckled,&quot; Wang says. &quot;Since it never occurred to us, we didn't have anything prepared so we couldn't even give in.&quot;</p> <p>Corinne McDermott, founder of the blog Have Baby Will Travel, agrees that technology is a must if your baby is old enough to care. &quot;The tablet is your friend,&quot; she says.</p> <h2>3. Plan your flights around the baby's sleep schedule</h2> <p>McDermott says another important consideration is what time you travel. And if you're able to pick among several different flights, you should tailor your schedule around your baby's natural rhythms.</p> <p>&quot;Try to book your flight for a time your baby is likely to sleep,&quot; she says. With this strategy, you may let your baby squeeze in their nap while you're in the air.</p> <p>You could even consider a red-eye flight that takes place overnight. But if you opt for this option, you should try to follow your baby's regular sleep schedule as much as possible. For example, have your baby change into pajamas, brush their teeth, and read them their normal bedtime stories.</p> <p>If this doesn't work, you should &quot;try to book for when your baby will be most cheerful,&quot; she says. If your baby is always crabby first thing in the morning but good by 10 a.m., for example, keep that in mind when you're booking your trip.</p> <h2>4. Bring stuff to do</h2> <p>While this might seem obvious, bringing stuff to keep your baby entertained is a stellar idea &mdash; even if you expect them to sleep. McDermott suggests stashing a few toys and books out of sight before your trip, then bringing them out on the plane as a surprise. &quot;Your baby or toddler will be happy to see old favorites while en route,&quot; she says.</p> <p>Depending on the age of your baby, old-school fun like crayons, blank sheets of paper, and a travel Etch-a-Sketch could be lifesavers. If your baby is a small infant, bring their favorite mobile, a boatload of pacifiers, board books, and whatever else your baby loves.</p> <h2>5. Dress for success</h2> <p>Since the temperature on planes can be so variable, you need to think about how you dress your baby before you leave for your trip, says writer and editor Melissa Mayer of Why Not Let's Go. Frequent flyers know that some planes tend to be hot while others can be overly cool. &quot;Babies are temperature-sensitive and you don't want to be unprepared,&quot; she says.</p> <p>The solution? &quot;Dress your baby in layers and have a blanket in your carry-on so you can cool down or warm up your baby if and when necessary,&quot; says Mayer. The blanket will also help provide comfort and block the light when it's time to sleep.</p> <h2>6. Make the airport experience as easy as possible</h2> <p>While flying with your baby is a big part of the travel experience, you'll also need to spend a few hours in the airport each way. This part of the trip can be important since it can set the tone for the rest of your journey.</p> <p>Sarah Hirsch, founder of the blog Well-Traveled Kids, says she believes upgrading to services like TSA Precheck and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-sign-up-for-global-entry?ref=internal" target="_blank">Global Entry</a> can be worth it to avoid long lines at the airport. While you can pay for these benefits outright, keep in mind that there are several travel <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-credit-cards-that-offer-tsa-pre-check-and-global-entry-reimbursement?ref=internal" target="_blank">credit cards that offer TSA Precheck and Global Entry</a> as a cardholder perk.</p> <p>Also, be prepared for TSA screening. &quot;If you are boarding with liquids for the baby, put those on the belt before your luggage so they can be tested while you are getting your bags and stroller through security,&quot; says Hirsch.</p> <p>Also, take your stroller in the airport and gate-check it before boarding the plane. This is better than checking the stroller with your luggage since you'll still have access to it while you're waiting in the terminal for boarding.</p> <h2>7. Bring a fully stocked diaper bag</h2> <p>Last but not least, make sure you are fully prepared for any typical day with your baby. This includes bringing extra clothes, bibs, diapers, diaper cream, and wipes. &quot;I've been stuck on the runway for hours and happy I had extra supplies,&quot; says Hirsch.</p> <p>You should also be prepared to change a diaper or two on the plane. This may have to go down in your seat since not all planes have a changing table. Also remember that diapers can and do fail &mdash; often at the worst times. &quot;My infant always had a blow out when the plane took off,&quot; says Hirsch. As the saying goes, better safe than sorry.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/holly-johnson">Holly Johnson</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-lessons-your-kids-can-learn-while-they-travel">10 Money Lessons Your Kids Can Learn While They Travel</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family">How to Handle World Travel With Your Family</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-travel-must-haves-for-nursing-moms">8 Travel Must-Haves for Nursing Moms</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-bring-your-pet-onboard-a-flight">How to Bring Your Pet Onboard a Flight</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-affordable-family-travel-is-possible">Yes, Affordable Family Travel Is Possible</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Travel flying tips flying with a baby flying with kids parenting tips travel tips travel with kids Thu, 17 May 2018 08:30:20 +0000 Holly Johnson 2140430 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Handle World Travel With Your Family http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/brothers_and_sister_sightseeing_in_pisa.jpg" alt="Brothers and sister sightseeing in Pisa" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Making the decision to go on a family vacation can be kind of terrifying, especially if it's your first time. Everything we're told about raising children revolves around the importance of routine and stability &mdash; two things you're likely to lose on a travel day.</p> <p>It can be challenging just trying to get the kids off to school in the morning, let alone taking them to a new country on a one-week vacation. Travel days will likely be your biggest challenge because once you arrive at your hotel or resort, you can mostly relax and enjoy. But you can mitigate most of the stress and chaos of long travel days by packing the right items and following a few simple rules.<span style="font-size: 13px;">&nbsp;(See also: </span><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-wisely-choose-your-next-travel-destination?ref=seealso" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">How to Wisely Choose Your Next Travel Destination</a><span style="font-size: 13px;">)</span></p> <h2>1. Choose the right destinations</h2> <p>The right destinations for you and your family will depend on a lot of factors, as there's no one-size-fits-all destination. While you don't need to rule out certain countries because you're traveling with kids, you do need to take your children's ages into consideration to find locations that will be the most suitable for kids.</p> <p>Daily adventures like long hikes may be more difficult with younger children, whereas many teenagers will need things to keep them stimulated. A good way to ensure everyone is happy is to get them involved in the decision-making. Older kids can do their own research on the internet, while younger children can be given a number of options to choose from after explaining what each has to offer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-affordable-vacations-to-please-every-age-group?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Affordable Vacations to Please Every Age Group</a>)</p> <h2>2. Book family-friendly accommodations</h2> <p>Booking the right accommodation is vital to making traveling the world with your family a success. Those with kids, particularly younger ones, will attest that a good night's sleep can mean the difference between a fun day and a nightmare. Your options are obviously more limited than when you're solo traveling or with friends, with many hostels, guesthouses, and even some hotels operating a no-children policy.</p> <p>Your best options are to stay in hotel suites, or to rent full apartments through sites like Airbnb. Privacy is a must, and it's great to have your own space to relax in, and for the kids to have room to play and run around. You can narrow the hotel options on search engines by using the sort function to filter by family-friendly properties. Airbnb also enables you to find entire houses or apartments that are family-friendly. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-hotel-booking-websites-can-save-you-money-and-headaches?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Hotel Booking Websites Can Save You Money</a>)</p> <h2>3. Pack light</h2> <p>What to pack is often at the forefront of parents' minds when they make the decision to travel with their family. Just the thought of trying to condense all of the gear &mdash; particularly associated with younger children &mdash; down to a manageable amount can be daunting. Things like strollers, car seats, and carriers all take up huge amounts of space, and that's before toys, clothes, and everything else they might need. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-families-can-travel-like-minimalists?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Ways Families Can Travel Like Minimalists</a>)</p> <p>Packing as light as possible will make moving around far easier, and will potentially save your family lots of money in excess baggage fees. As soon as your kids are old enough to carry a backpack or wheel a suitcase, it's a good idea to get them involved in the packing stage as well. They'll soon come to appreciate the importance of packing light, and will enjoy being involved in the process.</p> <p>Generally, anything that's an absolute necessity for children will be available pretty much anywhere you go, but here are a few things that you can pack to ensure that your travel day will run as smoothly as possible.</p> <h3>Baby wipes</h3> <p>There are a lot of germs on travel days and your little ones are going to be more susceptible to catching something on the road. Bring a few sanitizer or baby wipes and wipe down airplane seats, seat belts, handles and any surfaces your children may touch during the trip.</p> <h3>Comfort toy</h3> <p>Most children have some kind of toy, blanket, or pacifier that calms them down. Bring it! These simple items can be life savers.</p> <h3>Tablet</h3> <p>Load it up with all of your kid's favorite music, movies, and TV shows and let them play and watch to their heart's content. Keep in mind that while on buses and in cars, you may want to limit exposure as it can lead to motion sickness.</p> <h3>Child-sized luggage</h3> <p>Kids like to feel like adults from time to time, and by having their own carry-on luggage or backpack, not only will they feel like Mom and Dad, but they'll be able to carry some of their own things and access them when they feel like it.</p> <h3>Headphones</h3> <p>Even if you don't have a tablet or smartphone for your kids, you can usually plug in the headphones and let them watch the entertainment provided on planes and buses.</p> <h3>Lots of water</h3> <p>This is something you don't want to run out of. Bring plenty of water and have your kids carry their own bottle, either clipped to their person or onto their luggage.</p> <h3>Trash bags</h3> <p>With wet wipes, snacks, water bottles, and tissue, you're likely to have a lot of trash on travel days. Bring bags to easily store it all until you can ditch it in a proper trash bin.</p> <h3>Healthy snacks</h3> <p>Loading your kids up on sugar on travel days is just asking for trouble. Instead, pack low-sugar, healthy snacks like crackers, nuts, cheese sticks, Cheerios, and pretzels.</p> <h3>Sunscreen</h3> <p>Even if you're planning to be in the airport for most of your travel day, you never know if you'll be by the bus window on the tarmac or waiting in line to board the plane. Bring lots of sunscreen and keep everyone from getting burned. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-sunscreens?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 5 Best Sunscreens</a>)</p> <h3>Camera</h3> <p>Keep your camera somewhere that you can easily grab it at a moment's notice. Funny things happen on travel days and it's always adorable to take a photograph of your kid boarding a plane or looking out the plane window.</p> <h2>4. Slow it down</h2> <p>Though it's completely possible to move from place to place relatively quickly with a family, if you have the luxury of an extended vacation, it's a much better idea to take it slowly and spend a good amount of time in each destination. This is important for practical reasons, like not having the hassle of unpacking and repacking every few days, but it will also allow you to create routines and provide a level of stability in each place.</p> <p>Slow travel will allow you the option of booking longer-term accommodation, which is likely to bring the cost down. Rather than staying in hotel suites, you'll be able to book houses or apartments via sites like Airbnb, where hosts regularly offer long-stay discounts, or directly with local landlords.</p> <p>Moving quickly can begin to feel like a whirlwind of activity and leave no time for your children to build attachments to places. In contrast, spending a few weeks or months in one spot will allow your kids to get familiar with the people and places at the location and give them a deeper connection. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/savor-your-trip-and-save-big-with-these-5-slow-travel-tips?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Savor Your Trip and Save Big With These 5 Slow Travel Tips</a>)</p> <h2>5. Plan ahead when flying with babies</h2> <p>Generally, you won't pay for airline tickets for children under two years of age who sit in your lap, at least on domestic flights. However, you do still have to inform the airline when booking that you're traveling with a small child. You may also want to reserve a baby cot or bassinet with the airline in advance, or arrive early for those that operate on a first come, first served basis. It's generally free, but check with each airline for their individual policies.</p> <h2>6. Sign the kids up for frequent flyer miles</h2> <p>On many airlines, frequent flyer programs have no age minimum, meaning kids can earn points, as well as adults. They will have to have their own frequent flyer account in order to start accumulating the points, but that's just a matter of filling out a simple form. Pooling family members' points can be a quick way to multiply your earnings. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-frequent-flyer-miles?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Everything You Need to Know About Frequent Flyer Miles</a>)</p> <h2>7. Get a travel-friendly stroller</h2> <p>Nothing is more annoying than fumbling around with a bulky stroller while trying to check into a flight. You may want to consider an fold-up umbrella-style stroller or a lightweight, portable travel stroller. There are <a href="https://amzn.to/2K6UkQ7" target="_blank">plenty on Amazon</a> to choose from, and most stores that carry strollers will also carry umbrella strollers and other lighter-weight options.</p> <h2>8. Make sure kids sit middle or window</h2> <p>The aisle seat is a surprisingly dangerous place for little ones. With heavy metal carts and people whizzing by, I've seen many a tiny finger squished by an unsuspecting passenger, who feels awful afterward.</p> <p>To avoid a lot of tears and potentially a broken finger, always try to seat your little ones in away from the aisle.</p> <h2>9. Have a &quot;what if I get lost?&quot; plan</h2> <p>This one seems obvious, but in the rush and chaos of getting everyone to the airport on time, many parents forget to form an emergency plan with their children on travel days. Whenever you arrive in a new place, let your child know which people are security or police and who to go to in the event of splitting up.</p> <p>Also, choose a safe and secure meeting point that you can all head to if for some reason you can't find one another. If your kids are a little older, make sure everyone has their phone volume on loud and set to vibrate so that you can call each other if anyone gets lost.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nick-wharton">Nick Wharton</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-affordable-family-travel-is-possible">Yes, Affordable Family Travel Is Possible</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-lessons-your-kids-can-learn-while-they-travel">10 Money Lessons Your Kids Can Learn While They Travel</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare">How to Make Flying With an Infant Less of a Nightmare</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-a-family-of-4-can-book-a-disney-vacation-for-1000-or-less">How a Family of 4 Can Book a Disney Vacation for $1,000 or Less</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-save-on-a-european-getaway-with-kids">7 Ways to Save on a European Getaway With Kids</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Travel affordable travel family travel family travel tips family vacation travel tips travel with kids Tue, 15 May 2018 08:30:25 +0000 Nick Wharton 2140373 at http://www.wisebread.com Does Your Teenager Really Need a Credit Card? http://www.wisebread.com/does-your-teenager-really-need-a-credit-card <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/does-your-teenager-really-need-a-credit-card" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/girl_shopping_online_with_credit_card.jpg" alt="Girl shopping online with credit card" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Giving your teenager a credit card may seem like a scary proposition, but it could be the safest way to teach them about credit. Credit expert John Ulzheimer says it's just like teaching your teenager how to operate a car, but in a controlled environment. &quot;Nobody would just let a teen hop in a car and drive,&quot; says Ulzheimer, who formerly worked with Equifax and FICO. &quot;And nobody should just let their kid get a card on their own someday without some teaching by the parents.&quot;</p> <p>Yet, that is exactly what many people do. The problem is, for a teen, a credit card may seem &quot;no different from using a gift card or some other stored-value card,&quot; says Ulzheimer. And that can be dangerous. If they charge more than they can afford to repay, they might wind up dealing with years of debt and regret.</p> <p>The reality is that your child will need credit to borrow money one day. If they don't build a solid credit history during high school or college, they may start their adult lives at a disadvantage. &quot;Helping your teenager build their credit can make their life easier in the future when they go to purchase a big-ticket item on a line of credit, like a vehicle or home,&quot; says Gina McKague, president and CEO of retirement planning firm McKague Financial.</p> <p>And while some financial experts like Dave Ramsey insist that nobody needs a credit score to get by in life, many argue that thinking is outdated. The reality is, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-life-is-better-with-good-credit?ref=internal" target="_blank">good credit improves your life significantly</a>. &quot;Not only is establishing credit vital for obtaining something significant like a loan, but as more and more vendors exclusively accept payments via credit cards or even smartphones, it can be necessary just for buying lunch,&quot; says Jeff Motske, financial planner and CEO of Trilogy Financial in Huntington Beach, California.</p> <p>Besides lenders, everyone from car insurance companies, to landlords, to employers can ask for modified versions of your credit report. They can influence your ability to get a job, an apartment, or good car insurance rates. If those aren't reasons enough to get your teen on the right track with responsible credit use, what is?</p> <h2>How to get your teenager a credit card</h2> <p>Ulzheimer says there are several ways to know if your child is ready to learn about credit. If they're already using debit cards, prepaid cards, or their phone to make purchases with your credit card information, then they're probably ready to get a credit card with your help, he says. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-best-sites-to-help-your-kids-learn-about-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Websites to Help Your Kids Learn About Money</a>)</p> <p>Still not sure? A teenager's senior year in high school is often a good time to start. &quot;That way, they're as mature as possible while still living under your roof,&quot; notes Ulzheimer.</p> <p>Once your kid is primed and ready, the best way to introduce them to credit is by <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-to-add-your-teen-as-an-authorized-user-on-your-credit-card?ref=internal" target="_blank">adding them as an authorized user</a> to your own credit card account. Doing so comes with several advantages, including the fact that your own positive credit movements will be reported to your teenager's credit report. Not only that, but you will receive the bill, so you can keep tabs on their activity. Just be aware that you and you alone are responsible for repaying every charge your teenager makes.</p> <p>Ulzheimer suggests teaching your kids to use credit cards only for purchases they were going to make anyway, such as gas or movies. If they have a job, you can even require that they make payments from their own money, he says.</p> <p>This should be easy to do even though you're the one receiving the bill. When your statement arrives in the mail or via email, simply tally up your child's purchases and let them know what they owe. Ideally, they will also keep a record of what they paid for with credit and have the money saved to pay their share of the bill &mdash; just like in the real world.</p> <p>And if you're worried your teen will fall into some bad credit habits right away, Ulzheimer suggests setting up text alerts so you know exactly when the card is being used. This way, &quot;you can make sure they're not using the card outside the boundaries you set,&quot; he says. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-kid-build-their-first-budget?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Help Your Kid Build Their First Budget</a>)</p> <h2>Other ways to introduce the concept of credit</h2> <p>If you're not sure if your teen is ready for a credit card, you can always start them off with a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-prepaid-debit-cards?ref=internal" target="_blank">prepaid debit card</a>. &quot;Be sure to establish some ground rules,&quot; says Motske. For example, explain what expenses the card should be used for, how long the funds on the card should last, and what criteria would cause you to revoke the prepaid card.</p> <p>Many prepaid debit cards, such as the Current Card, are geared toward teens. The Current Card runs on the Visa system, so it's accepted at most merchants. Like any other prepaid debit card, you have to load funds into the account before it can be used. But the Current Card also offers enhanced features that help kids budget their money, save for a rainy day, and donate to charity. Parents are able to manage and oversee the teen's purchases with a mobile app and add money to their accounts instantly.</p> <p>A regular debit card tied to a bank account can also be a good way to get the ball rolling, or it can be a transition tool between a prepaid card and a credit card. You may even want to link it to the child's own bank account, so they can only use money that's given to them or that they earn from chores or a job.</p> <p>Eventually, however, you want to introduce them to credit cards by adding them as an authorized user to your account. Ideally, you'll want to do this before they leave the nest and wind up dabbling with credit on their own. &quot;Be sure to establish a new set of ground rules with the new card, including the familial and financial consequences of not following those rules,&quot; advises Motske.</p> <p>The idea of giving your teenager a credit card may be the stuff of nightmares. But it could be even scarier to imagine them learning about credit through the school of hard knocks &mdash; by racking up a huge mountain of debt or ruining their credit score by not paying their bills. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-best-sites-to-help-your-kids-learn-about-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Credit Card Truths You Wish You Could Tell Your Younger Self</a>)</p> <p>&quot;By educating your children early about credit and credit cards, you can hopefully help them avoid the pitfalls that so many stumble upon the hard way,&quot; says Motske.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fdoes-your-teenager-really-need-a-credit-card&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FDoes%2520Your%2520Teenager%2520Really%2520Need%2520a%2520Credit%2520Card_.jpg&amp;description=Does%20Your%20Teenager%20Really%20Need%20a%20Credit%20Card%3F"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Does%20Your%20Teenager%20Really%20Need%20a%20Credit%20Card_.jpg" alt="Does Your Teenager Really Need a Credit Card?" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/holly-johnson">Holly Johnson</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/does-your-teenager-really-need-a-credit-card">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-your-first-credit-card-and-build-credit">How to Get Your First Credit Card and Build Credit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-build-credit-without-using-credit-cards">How to Build Credit Without Using Credit Cards</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-to-add-your-teen-as-an-authorized-user-on-your-credit-card">4 Reasons to Add Your Teen as an Authorized User on Your Credit Card</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-rebuild-your-credit-in-8-simple-steps">How to Rebuild Your Credit in 8 Simple Steps</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-credit-cards-to-improve-your-credit-score">How to Use Credit Cards to Improve Your Credit Score</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Credit Cards Family authorized user building credit credit card tips credit score kids teenagers Tue, 08 May 2018 08:30:26 +0000 Holly Johnson 2136674 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Bring Your Pet Onboard a Flight http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-bring-your-pet-onboard-a-flight <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-bring-your-pet-onboard-a-flight" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/dog_in_airport_terminal_on_vacation.jpg" alt="Dog in airport terminal on vacation" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Flying with a pet is a hot topic lately, thanks to various incidents that have been all over the news. Some of the most memorable headlines in the past few years have even gone viral, giving the animals in question an instant dose of fame. There was the woman who caused a stir trying to board a flight with a fully grown peacock at Newark Airport, and a pig named Hobie who was ejected after boarding for defecating on the plane.</p> <p>But behind all the bizarre headlines, there's a lingering concern of how to safely travel on a plane with your pet. There are a number of possibilities for animal lovers and their companions to travel together, though the specifics tend to vary from airline to airline, and your destination will have a big impact on it, too. Here's what you need to know before heading to the airport with Fido.</p> <h2>Check with the airline before booking</h2> <p>Many carriers, particularly on flights departing and arriving within the U.S. and its overseas territories, do allow you to bring animals onboard with you. Domesticated dogs and cats (and sometimes small birds) will be allowed on, though there is usually an extra fee attached, and there's a limit on the total number of pets per flight. For example, American Airlines charges $125 per carry-on pet. Larger animals will typically need to be boarded with cargo underneath the plane.</p> <p>Each airline has its own rules about the size, weight, and breed of animal you are permitted to travel with, as well as specific guidelines on how they are to be transported. Because of this, it's best to check directly with your intended airline before booking the flight. Generally, they must be small enough to fit underneath your seat in a carrier that's large enough for them to turn around in.</p> <h2>Certify your pet as an Emotional Support Animal</h2> <p>If taking your pet onboard with you is a medical requirement &mdash; for example, if you've been diagnosed with depression or anxiety &mdash; then you should consider getting it classified as an Emotional Support Animal (ESA). If this is the case, and the animal in question helps alleviate symptoms, then you can legitimately get your pet designated as your ESA. Keep in mind, this is not a quick fix or workaround and should only be used in genuine circumstances.</p> <p>In order to have your pet certified as an ESA, you'll need to get a letter from a mental health professional. This letter will need to detail your condition, testify to the fact that you are a patient under their care, include the name of your pet, and explain how the pet helps you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-your-pet-an-official-emotional-support-animal?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Make Your Pet an Official Emotional Support Animal</a>)</p> <p>Several sites allow you to purchase these kinds of letters online for a fee, with very little process and without ever meeting a medical professional, but many of these services are not legitimate and the letter they provide will not be deemed valid.</p> <p>Once you have secured this letter, you're good to go and need to carry it with you to show to the airline crew before boarding. Letters are valid for a year, so they need to be dated when they are issued.</p> <h2>Head to the airport early</h2> <p>The most important step to take when flying with a pet is to contact the airline well in advance to inform them of your plans. This applies whether it's an ESA or not, so you can avoid any nasty surprises that may prevent you from being able to catch your flight.</p> <p>On the day of travel, you should arrive early to the airport to allow yourself time to sort out any issues that may arise. Your airline may want to check paperwork; examine, weigh, and measure the pet; or check that the crate or carry case meets their specifications. Animal spots on planes are also often provided on a first come first serve basis, and while it's unlikely that there will be several other pets onboard, it's not worth taking the risk. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/23-tips-for-traveling-with-pets?ref=seealso" target="_blank">23 Tips for Traveling With Pets</a>)</p> <h2>What you need to know about pets flying with cargo</h2> <p>Flying in the cargo hold is the obvious alternative to let you fly with your pet, but it's one that many people try to avoid. It can be stressful for the dogs, and there have been numerous incidences of animals being lost, injured due to turbulence, or dying due to extreme temperature fluctuations. However, many planes that carry pets keep their luggage compartment pressurized and climate-controlled, as a way to keep pets in the cargo hold more comfortable.</p> <p>It's also not free, and the fee attached might be more than the fee to take the pet onboard with you. For larger dogs, you may have no other choice than to put them in the cargo hold. But for smaller pets, it&rsquo;s a good idea to check fees before you decide which way to take your pet.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-bring-your-pet-onboard-a-flight&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Bring%2520Your%2520Pet%2520Onboard%2520a%2520Flight.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Bring%20Your%20Pet%20Onboard%20a%20Flight"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Bring%20Your%20Pet%20Onboard%20a%20Flight.jpg" alt="How to Bring Your Pet Onboard a Flight" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nick-wharton">Nick Wharton</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-bring-your-pet-onboard-a-flight">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-a-great-seat-on-southwest">How to Get a Great Seat on Southwest</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-first-class-airlines-that-are-dripping-with-luxury">3 First Class Airlines That Are Dripping With Luxury</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare">How to Make Flying With an Infant Less of a Nightmare</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family">How to Handle World Travel With Your Family</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-romantic-getaways-any-couple-can-afford">7 Romantic Getaways Any Couple Can Afford</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Travel airline safety flight booking flight tips flying with a pet pet owner pet safety travel tips Fri, 04 May 2018 08:30:21 +0000 Nick Wharton 2136758 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Liquidate a Loved One's Estate http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-liquidate-a-loved-ones-estate <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-liquidate-a-loved-ones-estate" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/unpacking_boxes_at_her_new_home.jpg" alt="Unpacking boxes at her new home" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When someone you love dies, at first, you may only be able to think about the emotional things: How you will miss them, how different your life will be without them, and maybe, if they were suffering, a sense of gratitude that their pain has ended.</p> <p>Unfortunately, most of us also have to deal with logistics when someone in our family departs this world. If you are named executor of the estate, the heirs have the right to expect you to turn over their inheritance in a timely manner. Part of settling an estate is dealing with the personal possessions of the deceased. Often this must be done before the house or condo can be sold, or the lease terminated, and the estate closed out. The more possessions the departed owned, the more difficult this task can be. Some triaging is in order.</p> <h2>Before death</h2> <p>If your loved one is elderly, it's a good idea to encourage and help them to dispose of clutter and organize their possessions as an ongoing project. Focus on how discarding piles of old newspapers could make their home safer, or on how those clothes from the 1940s might be appreciated by the high school theater department. A wonderful project to do with an elderly loved one is to organize old photos, because there may be people in them that you can't identify without their help. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-holding-onto-too-much-stuff-is-a-burden-for-your-loved-ones?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Why Holding Onto Too Much Stuff Is a Burden for Your Loved Ones</a>)</p> <p>While doing these projects, if it feels right, you can gently inquire about any items they might be saving for particular family members, which is especially helpful to know if the person <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-happens-if-you-dont-leave-a-will?ref=internal" target="_blank">hasn't created a detailed will</a>. The process may be frustrating and time consuming &mdash; after all, they may have had this stuff since before you were born, and it can be understandably hard to part with such things. But the more you can do with the cooperation of the property's owner, the easier things will be after they're gone. You run less risk of accidentally disposing of important papers or family treasures.</p> <p>Sometimes the decluttering process is prompted by a move. When my elderly cousin had to move into assisted living, my family and I gradually cleared out the house she had been living in for decades. While she wasn't able to help us on site, we were able to set aside possessions we thought she might want to keep, bring them to her new home, and have her make decisions. Many of the old photos and letters we found were great conversation starters during our visits, especially when her memory began to fail.</p> <h2>Immediately after death</h2> <p>If your loved one was living in their home up until the day they died, you may need to check on the home immediately after leaving the hospital, to make sure it's secure and safe. Of course, if your loved one had pets, they must be attended to and rehomed without delay.</p> <p>Within the first week, you'll want to clear out the kitchen to prevent problems with pests, mold, and odor. Clean out the refrigerator and get the trash out of the house. Discard or give away any nonperishable pantry items.</p> <p>If you have not already done so, you may also need to immediately look for items to be used in the funeral. If your loved one is not being cremated, you may need to retrieve a nice outfit for the body to be dressed in. It's common to display photos, awards, and other mementos at funeral services, as well. If you're writing the obituary, you may find useful information in the home, such as school yearbooks or scrapbooks. Any record of military service is important to gather, so that your loved one can receive the posthumous honors they are due.</p> <h2>After the funeral</h2> <p>A few years ago, my family lost an uncle who was the last of his generation. After the funeral lunch, we gathered in his home and experienced the strange feeling of being allowed to roam through his rooms uninvited. I suspect even my eldest aunts felt a bit like naughty children. We were all sad, but it was also a little bit &hellip; fun.</p> <p>On your first visit to start sorting through the home of the deceased, take a deep breath and look around so you can remember how the home looked when they lived there. Remember that while the task you are undertaking will be difficult and sad, it may also be exciting, because you could uncover letters and other relics from the past that may help you come to know your loved one better than you ever did when they were alive.</p> <p>Here are a few steps to make the task of clearing out their belongings less stressful.</p> <h3>1. Sort through it all</h3> <p>There are two ways to sort through the personal possessions in the home of the deceased. One way is to comb through everything yourself, which can be exhausting. The second way is to hire an estate sale company to sort through everything for you. Many reputable estate sale companies offer sorting and trash removal as part of their service. In fact, they advise that you throw nothing away, because you might inadvertently chuck something of value. I actually tossed an old automobile company shareholder brochure into the trash while sorting through my relative's home, only to have second thoughts and retrieve it. It ended up selling for $20. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-financial-moves-to-make-when-a-loved-one-dies?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Financial Moves to Make When a Loved One Dies</a>)</p> <p>In exchange for preparing and conducting the sale, the estate sale operator keeps a percentage of the proceeds, and may also charge fees. Such an arrangement could save you a lot of work. However, keep in mind that if you don't sort through the home yourself, you may miss items of sentimental value that you didn't know were there. The sale operator may promise to set aside any family photos and documents, but they won't know as well as you know what you would want to keep.</p> <p>This happened to me. A few months after my cousin's estate sale was over, I was online researching her obituary. Imagine my shock when I found, online, images of her original baptismal certificate and her parents' wedding certificate, written in Slovak calligraphy. These documents had apparently been sold on eBay, but I couldn't find the original listing so I had no chance to contact the buyer or seller. The most charitable assumption I could make was that the estate sale company had inadvertently sold these items that obviously fell into the &quot;sentimental value&quot; category.</p> <p>If you decide to do the sorting yourself, I have a few recommendations based on experience:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Bring a friend or family member along for help.</p> </li> <li> <p>Drag trash and recycle bins through the home as you work.</p> </li> <li> <p>Pack up boxes of papers to sort through in the comfort of your own home.</p> </li> <li> <p>Don't throw away anything old before checking its value. You'd be surprised what people buy on eBay!</p> </li> </ul> <h3>2. Make sure that heirs get a chance at keepsakes</h3> <p>Beyond any specific property named in the will, you probably want to make sure that everyone who was close to the deceased gets a memento to remember them by. This is tricky territory, because many decadeslong family fueds have started over granny's handmade quilts or even Uncle Joe's second-best TV trays. Some families may leave this task to the closest surviving relative.</p> <p>But if there are a number of survivors of equal status, you might need a more formally mediated approach. After my great uncle passed, my family used an interesting method of distributing property of both sentimental and practical value: a family auction. All the heirs walked through the house and bid on the items there, with the moderation of an auctioneer. Every dollar they paid went into a pot, later divided equally among them. You can do such a private auction before an estate sale, or in place of one. Another system is to run an auction with points instead of cash, with each relative starting with the same number of points.</p> <h3>3. Sell what can be sold</h3> <p>If you decide to hire an estate sale company, interview and research the candidates carefully. The online review website Angie's List reports that Auction Services listings, which include listings for estate sales companies, make up one of its most complained-about categories. Thirty percent of those reviews score a D or F from customers.</p> <p>Before a sale, you should remove anything from the house that the family intends to keep. Make it clear to the auction company what you're keeping, because they will base their prices on the amount they estimate they can make from the sale. If a sentimental item is too large for you to remove before the sale, make sure the sale company clearly marks it as not for sale.</p> <p>Assuming you do want an estate sale, it's not a given you'll find an estate sale company that will agree to work with you. If the house has a lot of stuff but no high-value items, many estate sale companies will refuse to take on the job because they typically earn their money by keeping a percentage of the sale's proceeds.</p> <p>In that case, you may be forced to run the estate sale yourself, list items in the local paper, or find a low-end operator to take the job on the cheap. Make sure to check the local regulations before advertising a garage sale.</p> <h3>4. Dispose of what can't be sold</h3> <p>Once you're down to items that no one in the family wants that also aren't worth enough to sell, your next step is to donate what you can to charity. Typical items in this category are: used clothing that doesn't qualify as vintage, worn furniture, and everyday dishes. The most expeditious way to get this stuff out of the house is to request and schedule a pickup with a local charity. Goodwill, Salvation Army, and Habitat for Humanity are three that commonly make pickups; your area may have these or others. If you don't find a charity that will pick up your items, you could pay movers to deliver the stuff to the nearest resale shop, or deliver it yourself.</p> <p>Try to avoid dumping stuff on the curb &mdash; some cities will fine you for this. If you can't get a charity to take the items, you could list them on Freecycle or advertise them on Craigslist as available for free. Also, some newspapers don't charge to print ads for free items.</p> <h3>5. Pay for junk removal if you must</h3> <p>If you're able to do the work of getting the junk out of the house, check with your local government offices to see if you can get a large trash receptacle parked at the curb or schedule a large item pickup for free or at a low cost. You can also check with your local home improvement store; some now sell large heavy duty bags or bins that you can fill with thousands of pounds of junk and call them to pick up. The bag option usually costs only about $150-$200, compared to about $300-$850 to rent a trailer-sized trash receptacle for a week and have it hauled away full. Cost really depends on your area and the amount of stuff you're tossing.</p> <p>The more expensive option is to pay a full-service junk removal company that will come into the home and remove everything you ask them to. These companies may charge $500 per truckload. On the upside, the work for you is minimal.</p> <p>Once you have removed, given away, sold, donated, or thrown away every last item in your loved one's home, you're ready to bring in a housecleaner for a thorough cleaning, and list the home for sale.</p> <p>This is a good time to devote some attention to the mementos that you decided to keep in your own home. Display knickknacks in a case, hang a framed photo on the wall, or get that ring resized so that you can see these precious things and be reminded of your departed loved one often.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-liquidate-a-loved-ones-estate&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Liquidate%2520a%2520Loved%2520One%2527s%2520Estate.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Liquidate%20a%20Loved%20One's%20Estate"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Liquidate%20a%20Loved%20One%27s%20Estate.jpg" alt="How to Liquidate a Loved One's Estate" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-liquidate-a-loved-ones-estate">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-should-know-about-joint-checking-accounts">6 Things You Should Know About Joint Checking Accounts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-things-to-throw-out-today">25 Things to Throw Out Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-end-of-life-cost-savings-your-survivors-will-thank-you-for">9 End-of-Life Cost Savings Your Survivors Will Thank You For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-garage-sale-items-that-sell-like-hotcakes">12 Garage Sale Items That Sell Like Hotcakes</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-get-spring-cleaning-done-during-winter">7 Reasons to Get Spring Cleaning Done During Winter</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Banking Family cleaning death in the family declutter estate planning funeral losing a loved one Fri, 20 Apr 2018 09:00:06 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2130996 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Travel Must-Haves for Nursing Moms http://www.wisebread.com/8-travel-must-haves-for-nursing-moms <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-travel-must-haves-for-nursing-moms" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/close_up_of_baby_bottles_and_breast_pump.jpg" alt="Close up of baby bottles and breast pump" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Pumping on the go is hard enough when you're a nursing mom, but how do you keep up your milk supply when you have to travel for work or for an event and can't bring the baby along? These essentials will make traveling without your precious babe a whole lot easier. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-life-skills-for-working-moms?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Life Skills for Working Moms</a>)</p> <h2>1. Milk delivery and/or storage system</h2> <p>If you don't want to worry about keeping your pumped milk fresh, try a milk delivery service like Milk Stork. Starting at $139, Milk Stork ships a 34 oz. cooler to your hotel and comes with a pre-labeled and postpaid package to allow your fresh milk to get back home quickly without spoiling.</p> <p>If you're traveling for work, your employer might be willing to pay for this service. If not, you might be able to write it off on your taxes, since it is considered a work-travel expense.</p> <p>If you don't use a milk shipping service, you will need to stay in a hotel room that has a fridge or freezer. The hotel might allow you to store your cooler of milk in their main freezer, but it's best to call ahead of time to see what they have available to accommodate new moms.</p> <h2>2. Cooler and ice packs</h2> <p>If you decide to store and transport your milk yourself, take an <a href="https://amzn.to/2He5Clw" target="_blank">airtight cooler</a> and plenty of <a href="https://amzn.to/2HbYrdz" target="_blank">gel ice packs</a>. If you're flying, this will count as a carry on, so plan accordingly. This is not an ideal method of transporting milk home if you will be traveling for more than five days. Breast milk is good for one day transported in a cooler with ice packs, in the fridge for up to five days, and in the freezer for several months.</p> <p>It's a good idea to smell your milk before use. If it smells sour, you need to dump it.</p> <h2>3. Automatic and manual breast pumps</h2> <p>An <a href="https://amzn.to/2GXKsdH" target="_blank">automatic breast pump</a> will allow you to pump quicker and more efficiently than the manual handheld versions. I also recommend bringing along a <a href="https://amzn.to/2qapuxX" target="_blank">manual pump</a> for when you need relief but can't use your automatic pump.</p> <h2>4. Milk storage bags</h2> <p>Use <a href="https://amzn.to/2JpyIz8" target="_blank">milk storage bags</a> instead of bottles to save room in your hotel fridge and cooler, and to make life a little simpler. These can be stored in the freezer, and are much easier to transport than clunky bottles.</p> <h2>5. Sterilization bags and wipes</h2> <p>Medela makes <a href="https://amzn.to/2GAok5O" target="_blank">quick clean wipes</a> and <a href="https://amzn.to/2q7cHvS" target="_blank">sterilization bags</a> to make cleaning your pump parts and bottles easy on the go. The wipes are great for cleaning your pump in the airport or at the office, while the sterilization bags can be used in the microwave and eliminates 99.9 percent of germs and bacteria on pump parts.</p> <h2>6. Extra batteries and adapters</h2> <p>It's a good idea to bring extra batteries for your automatic pump just in case it loses power in a moment when you really need it to work. Having a <a href="https://amzn.to/2H1nPoU" target="_blank">breast pump adapter</a> is also very helpful to have on hand.</p> <h2>7. A wet bag</h2> <p>A <a href="https://amzn.to/2Hc2bMe" target="_blank">wet/dry bag</a> is a great way to store pump parts after you are done using them. Wet bags are also extremely versatile, and new parents can use them as waterproof storage for dry cloth diapers or anything else that needs to be put away immediately before being cleaned.</p> <h2>8. Nursing Attire</h2> <p>Button down blouses are the perfect career-friendly nursing attire, since they look professional and are easy to discreetly pump in. Wear a hands-free pumping bra underneath so that you can pump and multi-task at the same time. Bring a <a href="https://amzn.to/2JoZ9EO" target="_blank">nursing cover</a> or fashionable wrap with you if you want more privacy when pumping on the plane or in the airport.</p> <h2>Employee rights and breast-feeding</h2> <p>If you are traveling for work, know your <a href="http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/breastfeeding-state-laws.aspx" target="_blank">rights as a new mom</a> at work. Make sure to discuss travel accommodations and your work needs when you're on the road. For example, will your employer provide you with a hotel room that has a fridge or freezer or pay for the delivery of your milk back home? Will your working location have a private room you can pump in and store milk when you are away from your hotel room? How many breaks will you receive to pump? Inquire about all of these things beforehand.</p> <h2>Your travel rights</h2> <p>Whether you travel for work or for other reasons, it is also important to know your rights when it comes to TSA and flying. First of all, the <a href="https://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/HomeHealthandConsumer/ConsumerProducts/BreastPumps/" target="_blank">FDA</a> considers the breast pump a medical device. Some airlines allow passengers to bring the pump on the plane and not count it toward the carry-on limit. However, other airlines might not be so generous. Know your airlines' guidelines and plan ahead so that you aren't stuck at the gate with more carry-ons then you are allowed.</p> <p>In regards to bringing breastmilk on board, <a href="https://www.tsa.gov/travel/special-procedures/traveling-children" target="_blank">TSA laws</a> are in your favor. Per the TSA, you aren't limited to the three-ounce liquid rule when it comes to breast milk, but you need to declare your milk and supplies. You are allowed to bring a cooler, breast milk, bottles, and ice packs on the plane. Ask the TSA agent to change their gloves before opening up your cooler to inspect the milk. They might swab the outside of the milk bags, but they will not open up the bags. Ask to talk with a supervisor if you have issues.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-travel-must-haves-for-nursing-moms&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Travel%2520Must-Haves%2520for%2520Nursing%2520Moms.jpg&amp;description=8%20Travel%20Must-Haves%20for%20Nursing%20Moms"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Travel%20Must-Haves%20for%20Nursing%20Moms.jpg" alt="8 Travel Must-Haves for Nursing Moms" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-travel-must-haves-for-nursing-moms">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare">How to Make Flying With an Infant Less of a Nightmare</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family">How to Handle World Travel With Your Family</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-bring-your-pet-onboard-a-flight">How to Bring Your Pet Onboard a Flight</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-romantic-getaways-any-couple-can-afford">7 Romantic Getaways Any Couple Can Afford</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-affordable-family-travel-is-possible">Yes, Affordable Family Travel Is Possible</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Travel breast-feeding new moms newborn parenting tips travel must-haves travel tips working moms Thu, 12 Apr 2018 08:30:09 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 2129350 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Money Lessons Kids Can Learn From the Tooth Fairy http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-lessons-kids-can-learn-from-the-tooth-fairy <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-money-lessons-kids-can-learn-from-the-tooth-fairy" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/little_girl_holding_up_her_tooth.jpg" alt="Little girl holding up her tooth" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>My first visit from the Tooth Fairy is my first specific memory of holding money in my hand. I ran to my parents bedroom excitedly exclaiming, &quot;I got a quarter!&quot;</p> <p>&quot;Actually,&quot; my sleepy dad told me, &quot;You got a 50-cent piece. That's worth two quarters.&quot;</p> <p>I know firsthand that kids can learn a lot about money from the Tooth Fairy, since I did. I also know that my own kids have been able to learn some valuable money lessons based on the under-the-pillow payouts that they've received.</p> <h2>1. The values of different coins and bills</h2> <p>Like my father before me, I like to provide my kids with unusual coinage when they lose a tooth. My thought was that it makes it seem more magical if they receive a denomination that they never see otherwise. So my husband and I have always slipped Sacagawea golden dollars under their pillows.</p> <p>The funny thing is, for years my oldest child hoarded these coins in her room and never spent one. One day she was gathering up all her money and was frustrated that she didn't have enough to buy something. I suggested she raid her trove of tooth money, and she told me that those weren't &quot;real money.&quot; We had neglected to tell her that golden dollars were legally accepted currency, and she had gone years thinking that she was exchanging her teeth for mere trinkets.</p> <p>Besides using it as an opportunity to introduce unusual coins, you could use the Tooth Fairy's visit as a lesson by alternating between different combinations of coins, so they learn that four quarters equal ten dimes which equal 20 nickels. But good luck slipping 20 nickels under the pillow without waking them up! (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/21-things-you-should-make-your-kids-pay-for?ref=seealso" target="_blank">21 Things You Should Make Your Kids Pay For</a>)</p> <h2>2. How to handle a windfall</h2> <p>As an adult, handling a surprise influx of cash can be one of our tougher decisions. It's always tempting to see a windfall as license to spend freely, but then again, a wisely invested windfall could have a vastly different effect on your life than one you decided to blow.</p> <p>If allowance is a kids' &quot;salary,&quot; Tooth Fairy money is analogous to a tax refund or a Christmas bonus. Let them decide how and whether to spend it, and watch them learn.</p> <h2>3. How to make sure you're getting paid fairly</h2> <p>Just like sharp-eyed employees at a company, my kids pay attention to what the Fairy pays their siblings. If someone gets more, they do not fail to speak up about it, and the Tooth Fairy seems to get the message, because future payments tend to be more equal. My kids have also had some success in investigating market rates by asking friends how much they get. Once they reported to me that other friends got more money for top teeth, for example, the Fairy started paying a premium for those as well. Lesson learned: It pays to do your research and demand equal pay. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a>)</p> <h2>4. Sometimes money doesn't show up when you expect</h2> <p>As a freelance writer, I know the excitement of hearing the mail carrier approach my door, followed by the disappointment of seeing a pile of bills and no checks coming through the slot. Many children will at some point wake up to find that the Tooth Fairy forgot to come. According to a report by Delta Dental, more than half the parents surveyed at some point forgot to leave money under the pillow &mdash; which gives children an opportunity to practice their patience and learn that sometimes you have to wait longer than you expected to get paid.</p> <h2>5. The spending power of money</h2> <p>Just like me with my 50-cent piece, most little children have no idea what their first Tooth Fairy payout can buy. Take them to the store and let them shop. Next time, they'll have a more concrete understanding of what 50 cents or a few dollars is worth. This will help them better budget their allowance once they start earning one. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-easy-way-to-set-an-allowance-that-wont-ruin-your-kid?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Easy Way to Set an Allowance That Won't Ruin Your Kid</a>)</p> <h2>6. How to forecast future earnings</h2> <p>Most kids lose their first few teeth in kindergarten, at an age when thinking about the future at all is a challenge. As they get older, kids may realize that they can count on a payout every time they lose a tooth. Really canny ones may even consult a medical text or ask their dentist how many more baby teeth they have to lose so they can figure out how much they've got coming to them.</p> <h2>7. No pain, no gain</h2> <p>Sometimes one of my kids will let a loose tooth dangle by a thread for days because they're afraid of the small amount of pain that might happen if they pull at it. When this happens, sometimes one of the other kids will comfort them by reminding them that they'll get money once the tooth finally comes out. Sometimes it's just the push they need to face the pain.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-money-lessons-kids-can-learn-from-the-tooth-fairy&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Money%2520Lessons%2520Kids%2520Can%2520Learn%2520From%2520the%2520Tooth%2520Fairy.jpg&amp;description=7%20Money%20Lessons%20Kids%20Can%20Learn%20From%20the%20Tooth%20Fairy"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Money%20Lessons%20Kids%20Can%20Learn%20From%20the%20Tooth%20Fairy.jpg" alt="7 Money Lessons Kids Can Learn From the Tooth Fairy" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-lessons-kids-can-learn-from-the-tooth-fairy">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-make-your-young-kids-pay-rent">Should You Make Your Young Kids Pay &quot;Rent?&quot;</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-adult-children-become-financially-independent">How to Help Your Adult Children Become Financially Independent</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists">Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know">9 Family Money Matters Your Kids Don&#039;t Need to Know</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family bills children coins kids money lessons saving money teeth tooth fairy Wed, 11 Apr 2018 08:00:06 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2123014 at http://www.wisebread.com What Happens to Debt After Divorce? http://www.wisebread.com/what-happens-to-debt-after-divorce <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-happens-to-debt-after-divorce" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/spouses_having_their_first_disagreement.jpg" alt="Spouses having their first disagreement" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you consider that 40-50 percent of marriages in the U.S. end in divorce, it shouldn't surprise you that some marriages end in a financially messy way. Marriage typically involves the joint payment of debts just as it involves collecting joint assets, and everything &mdash; both assets and debts &mdash; must be distributed in some way when a couple calls it quits. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-protect-yourself-financially-during-a-divorce-or-separation?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Protect Yourself Financially During Divorce or Separation</a>)</p> <h2>Community property vs. common law states</h2> <p>In a lot of ways, what happens to your debts and assets depends on where you live. If you reside in one of the nine community property states (Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin) or &quot;opt in&quot; for community property in the state of Alaska, then all debts accumulated during a marriage are the responsibility of both parties no matter how they were held. This means that if your spouse ran up a secret credit card balance during your marriage, that debt is your responsibility as well as theirs in a community property state.</p> <p>If you live in one of the remaining states, then you live in an equitable distribution state (also known as a common law state). Typically, this means that debt incurred during a marriage is the responsibility of both parties, if both parties were joint owners of an account. If one spouse opens an account in their name only, on the other hand, that debt is their sole responsibility.</p> <h2>What happens to debt incurred during separation?</h2> <p>Note that debt incurred after a couple separates may be treated differently than debt incurred during a marriage. Your liability for such debt usually depends on your state, whether you took out the debt jointly or separately, and whether the debt was used for, say, a spending spree in Las Vegas or necessities for your children such as food and rent.</p> <p>Since the moment of separation is figured differently in different states, the cutoff for new debt can also vary. In some states you need to legally separate while others consider the moment of separation as starting when you begin living apart. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-manage-your-money-during-a-spousal-separation?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Manage Your Money During a Spousal Separation</a>)</p> <h2>How are debts divided when you divorce?</h2> <p>Sally Boyle, a certified divorce financial analyst and author of <em>Deconstructing Divorce</em>, says that no matter whether you live in a community property or equitable distribution state, debts are divided along with assets during a divorce. This means the court system that handles your divorce will help you figure out ways to split your debts equally and fairly. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-decide-to-get-divorced?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Money Moves to Make the Moment You Decide to Get Divorced</a>)</p> <h3>Credit card debt</h3> <p>If a couple has credit card debt that is jointly held, for example, both spouses can try to move the debt into two separate accounts.</p> <p>&quot;The challenge with joint debt is going back to the lender to split the debt up,&quot; says Boyle. It's possible your credit card issuer may not want to help you move part of the debt into a new account in one spouse's name, although they will usually cooperate if both spouses have good enough credit to qualify for an account on their own.</p> <p>As an alternative, Boyle says a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-0-balance-transfer-credit-cards?ref=internal" target="_blank">balance transfer card</a> can be a good way to split up credit card debt if at least one spouse can get approved. &quot;It all comes down to whether the card issuer approves or not,&quot; says Boyle. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-divide-rewards-and-keep-your-sanity-in-divorce?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Divide Rewards and Keep Your Sanity in Divorce</a>)</p> <h3>Mortgage debt</h3> <p>Mortgage debt is handled similarly to credit card debt, except that there is an asset involved, since mortgage debt is secured by your home. If you own a home together and the debt is in both of your names but you get divorced, then it's possible that one spouse can keep the home. In that case, Boyle says most couples go to their mortgage company and ask it to approve the remaining spouse to refinance the home in their name only.</p> <p>If there is equity in the home, there are several ways to split it. If one party keeps the house, they could &quot;buy out&quot; the other person with cash. &quot;You could also refinance the home for what it's worth and get cash out,&quot; says Boyle.</p> <p>Another option is for the remaining spouse to get a home-equity loan and use some of the cash to give the other spouse their share of the equity. A final option is to just sell the house and split the proceeds, notes Boyle.</p> <h3>Auto loans</h3> <p>What about cars? Auto loans can work a number of different ways. Many times, each spouse will keep the car they drive and take over the payments even if both spouses are on the loan. However, it often makes sense for each spouse to refinance the car loan into their own names when they don't want to continue sharing a joint debt after divorce.</p> <h3>Student loans</h3> <p>Then there are <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/does-divorce-affect-your-student-loans?ref=internal" target="_blank">student loans</a> to contend with. Boyle says that since student loans are taken out by only one spouse most of the time, the debt is often retained by the borrower. However, there are some exceptions.</p> <p>&quot;I've had situations where a spouse might pay off the other spouse's student loans as part of a broader divorce settlement,&quot; she says. &quot;Maybe they were the breadwinner or they had more assets.&quot;</p> <h2>Why couples typically split up debts during divorce</h2> <p>Attorney Nicholas Dowgul of <a href="http://www.feltonbanks.com/" target="_blank">Felton Banks</a> in Raleigh, North Carolina says couples there occasionally continue holding debt together after divorce.</p> <p>Basically, if the parties get a divorce and no equitable distribution action is filed, then equitable distribution (property settlement) is waived by both parties and the debt remains in whomever's name it was, says Dowgul. But if it's joint debt, then it remains the obligation of both spouses.</p> <p>However, the problem with joint debt after divorce is that one spouse may not stick to the agreement. In that case, the creditor would likely go after both spouses for repayment, regardless of their agreement to remain jointly liable. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-divorce-and-credit?ref=seealso" target="_blank">What You Need to Know About Divorce and Credit</a>)</p> <p>For example, imagine there's a court order from a North Carolina court that says the husband is required to pay the credit card held jointly by the parties, but he stops paying his part of the bill. The card issuer will hold both spouses liable for the debt and repayment, meaning the bank will come after the wife as well, even though, according to the divorce decree, she's not responsible for paying that credit card bill.</p> <p>This doesn't mean that the husband would be off the hook, however. If he agreed to hold the debt jointly during the divorce settlement, then he could be held in contempt of court unless he pays what was ordered, notes Dowgul. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-myths-about-divorce-and-money-debunked?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Myths About Divorce and Money Debunked</a>)</p> <p>To avoid situations like this one where one spouse stops paying their share, many couples opt to pay off joint debts and close all joint accounts, then refinance remaining debts in one or the other's name only. It's just too risky to remain in an account with an ex-spouse, especially if you can avoid the situation altogether by moving debts into separate accounts.</p> <h2>What can you do to ensure debt is distributed fairly when you divorce?</h2> <p>While Dowgul only practices law in North Carolina and believes people in other states should consult a local divorce lawyer for specific advice, he says he recommends his clients write up a separation agreement once they decide they are going to divorce. A separation agreement should include a basic understanding of who gets what after the divorce, including which person is responsible for each debt accrued up to that point.</p> <p>In the state of North Carolina, couples have to be separated a year and a day before a divorce is granted, he says. While there's no requirement in his state that couples get their separation in writing, it makes things easier if the parties can at least agree on matters involving debt and assets upfront.</p> <p>Finally, hire a divorce lawyer who can represent you and ensure you're left with a fair number of assets and no more than your share of the debts once your divorce is final. &quot;The goal of divorce is for each spouse to end with assets of similar value,&quot; says Boyle. &quot;It's not always a 50/50 split, but it needs to be a fair split.&quot;</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fwhat-happens-to-debt-after-divorce&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FWhat%2520Happens%2520to%2520Debt%2520After%2520Divorce_.jpg&amp;description=What%20Happens%20to%20Debt%20After%20Divorce%3F"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/What%20Happens%20to%20Debt%20After%20Divorce_.jpg" alt="What Happens to Debt After Divorce?" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/holly-johnson">Holly Johnson</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-happens-to-debt-after-divorce">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-to-ask-before-hiring-a-credit-counselor">8 Questions to Ask Before Hiring a Credit Counselor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-debt-tracking-systems">The 5 Best Debt Tracking Systems</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tough-questions-about-debt-answered">7 Tough Questions About Debt, Answered</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-manage-your-money-during-a-spousal-separation">How to Manage Your Money During a Spousal Separation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-pay-down-debt-first-or-invest">Should You Pay Down Debt First or Invest?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Debt Management Family debt management tips divorce getting divorced lawyer fees Paying Off Debt Fri, 30 Mar 2018 09:30:19 +0000 Holly Johnson 2124619 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Tactful Ways to Ask for Money for Your Wedding http://www.wisebread.com/3-tactful-ways-to-ask-for-money-for-your-wedding <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-tactful-ways-to-ask-for-money-for-your-wedding" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/bride_and_groom_in_green_nature.jpg" alt="Bride and groom in green nature" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your partner put a ring on it and now you get to marry the person of your dreams. Congratulations! While planning a wedding and figuring out how to pay for everything can be stressful, you also get to create a wedding registry and select all the gifts you want people to give you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-big-on-everything-for-your-wedding?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Save Big on Everything for Your Wedding</a>)</p> <p>While it's fun to scan house decor and that big screen TV you hope one of your guests will be cool enough to buy, cash would be a lot more helpful to you and your soon-to-be spouse. You don't need fancy place settings or sheets with a high thread count, but how can you ask friends and family members to skip the shopping spree and hand over the dough without sounding tacky?</p> <p>Here are three strategies that work.</p> <h2>Create a specialized registry</h2> <p>You aren't the only one who wants cash gifts for their wedding, which is why many online donation registries are available. Sites like Honeyfund and Traveler's Joy allow you to create a wish list of items like a dolphin excursion for your honeymoon or new cabinets for your kitchen in your condo, and your guests can donate money to help you pay for those things. Your wedding guests will feel like their money is going toward a good cause, and you will be able to cash out after your wedding.</p> <p>Note that some of these registries will charge you a small 2 to 3 percent transaction or processing fee (and your guests if they use a credit card). Also, many of these registries will take a few weeks to deposit your funds into your bank account, so plan your honeymoon accordingly. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-saving-gifts-to-put-on-your-wedding-registry?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Money-Saving Gifts to Put on Your Wedding Registry</a>)</p> <p>Whatever you do, don't skip the registry! Some couples think that if they skip the registry altogether that guests will automatically give them cash. Instead, some guests might take this as a sign to give you anything. You might end up with three toasters and floral bedspreads that you would never choose to buy. At least with a registry, you can get items you selected, and you know where to return them if you don't like the gifts. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/alternative-wedding-registry-ideas?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Alternative Wedding Registry Ideas</a>)</p> <h2>Do the dollar dance at your wedding</h2> <p>During your wedding, the DJ will announce to the guests that the dance floor is now open for anyone who wishes to dance with the bride or groom. The DJ will also mention that for those who want to help the couple have an extra special honeymoon, this dance is the time to hand over the bills. The &quot;dollar dance,&quot; also known as the &quot;money dance&quot; or the &quot;apron dance,&quot; is socially acceptable and expected in many cultures.</p> <p>This dance is extremely awkward, but it also gives older relatives a chance to relish in this special moment and say a sweet word to the bride or groom away from the crowd. My family and my husband's family expected the dollar dance, and even though it made both of us cringe, we are glad we did it. We earned about $400 from the 20-minute dance session, and that moment gave my grandma and aunt a chance to dance and welcome my husband to the family without feeling embarrassed. I thought no one would want to dance with us, but it did end up being a sweet way to thank guests for coming and make them feel noticed.</p> <p>However, it is important to think about your guests. Will they think the dollar dance is a fun tradition or would they be offended? For my wedding, we were surrounded by people who just wanted to bless us financially, but we were also a young couple just starting out. Older couples that are perceived to have high-paying jobs might not get the same reaction from their guests if they did a dollar dance.</p> <h2>Word-of-mouth</h2> <p>Let a few close family members and friends know that while you have a registry, you are also saving money toward a down payment on a house or a kitchen renovation. Ask them to mention this to anyone who asks for registry help or gift ideas. For example, when your old school grandmother asks your mom how to work the registry, your mom can say, &quot;I can take you shopping this week, but I heard that Jane and Mark are trying to save up for a down payment on a house this year if you would rather contribute the money to that.&quot;</p> <p>The idea is that your wedding guests aren't hearing directly from you that you want cash. You don't want your wedding to feel like a call for money handouts. You also have to realize that many guests might prefer to give checks, but they just don't know how much to give. For example, gifting a nice punch bowl seems more gracious to many people than handing over the cost of the bowl. Word-of-mouth can also help in these tricky situations. Close friends can say, &quot;I'm just going to give them a $40 check for their honeymoon. I know every little bit will be appreciated,&quot; when other friends ask what they are gifting.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F3-tactful-ways-to-ask-for-money-for-your-wedding&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F3%2520Tactful%2520Ways%2520to%2520Ask%2520for%2520Money%2520for%2520Your%2520Wedding.jpg&amp;description=3%20Tactful%20Ways%20to%20Ask%20for%20Money%20for%20Your%20Wedding"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/3%20Tactful%20Ways%20to%20Ask%20for%20Money%20for%20Your%20Wedding.jpg" alt="3 Tactful Ways to Ask for Money for Your Wedding" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-tactful-ways-to-ask-for-money-for-your-wedding">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-millennials-are-changing-marriage">4 Ways Millennials Are Changing Marriage</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-turn-your-wedding-expenses-into-a-free-honeymoon">How to Turn Your Wedding Expenses Into a Free Honeymoon</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-frugal-guests-guide-to-surviving-wedding-season">The Frugal Guest&#039;s Guide to Surviving Wedding Season</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-splurges-that-are-worth-every-penny">7 Retirement Splurges That Are Worth Every Penny</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-lessons-kids-can-learn-from-the-tooth-fairy">7 Money Lessons Kids Can Learn From the Tooth Fairy</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Lifestyle honeymoon planning your wedding saving money wedding wedding budget wedding fund wedding tips Thu, 29 Mar 2018 10:00:05 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 2123633 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Prep Your Finances for an Emergency Vet Visit http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prep-your-finances-for-an-emergency-vet-visit <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-prep-your-finances-for-an-emergency-vet-visit" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/dog_at_the_veterinarian.jpg" alt="Dog at the veterinarian" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When an accident sends your pet to the hospital, will you be prepared to handle the situation financially? Emergency vet bills can quickly make a huge dent in your savings, and that could leave you in a tough spot during an already stressful situation. Can your pet receive the care he or she needs, or will you have to euthanize the animal because you can't afford the treatment? If you plan ahead, you can avoid the latter. Here's how.</p> <h2>Get pet insurance while your pet is healthy</h2> <p>When my dog, Jaxon, was about a year and a half old, he was admitted to the vet with a respiratory infection that filled his lungs with fluid, which required several nights in the hospital. The bill for the treatment was nearly $8,000, a fee that my husband and I couldn't afford as a young couple in New York City. Unfortunately, we also were unaware that we weren't allowed to leave the hospital without paying the bill in full, and emergency pet care facilities sometimes do not accept payment plans.</p> <p>Thankfully, we had insurance to cover it. We paid the full amount to the hospital on our credit cards and then had to wait to be reimbursed by the insurance company (a caveat to consider) after we submitted the claim. But it was a small price to pay to save Jaxon's life. If it weren't for the insurance, we would have had no choice but to put him down at that point. In hindsight, it was a valuable lesson to learn about emergency vet bills and pet insurance, and the life-or-death difference it can make. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-need-to-know-about-pet-insurance?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Things You Need to Know About Pet Insurance</a>)</p> <h2>Have copies of your pet's medical records handy</h2> <p>If you have to visit the pet emergency room in the middle of the night, chances are the attending doctors will not be able to access your pet's medical file, because your primary vet will be closed. So it's a good idea to keep a copy of them at your home so you can grab and go when needed.</p> <p>&quot;If your pet has an ongoing medical condition, it would be best to bring any recent medical records, [and] X-rays with you,&quot; says Dr. Gary Richter, veterinary health expert with Rover.com. &quot;Similarly, if the reason for the visit is because the pet got into something that could be toxic, bringing the exact product or a picture of a label is very helpful. The more information you can provide to the team at the emergency clinic, the easier things are going to be.&quot;</p> <h2>Bring some form of payment with you</h2> <p>Even if you haven't figured out exactly how you're going to pay the bill, you will need to show some form of payment (especially if you don't have insurance) if you'd like your pet to receive care. Don't leave home without it.</p> <p>Most facilities have an initial exam fee, after which they'll provide an estimate for recommended testing and treatment. Costs can range from under $100 to thousands if the pet is in critical condition. You'll then have some time, but perhaps not much time if the situation is critical, to make your decision on what you can afford and how to proceed with the care. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-lower-your-vet-bills?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Ways to Lower Your Vet Bills</a>)</p> <h2>Put aside money for your pet's emergency</h2> <p>You stash away cash for your own emergencies, so it makes sense to save a little extra for your pet's needs since they are such an important part of your life. At the very least, you should have enough to cover your pet insurance deductible, but more will likely be necessary if you don't have pet insurance.</p> <p>&quot;If you forgo insurance, you should have at least $2,500 set aside for your pet,&quot; advises Jme Thomas, executive director of Motley Zoo Animal Rescue in Redmond, Washington. This is, sadly, really hard for a lot of people to do, but instantly when your dog gets hit by a car, that's pretty much what you're looking at to start &mdash; not even for the ongoing care and treatment. We feel that's a slightly conservative estimate [for the actual care], but a relatively typical amount for an emergency fund.&quot;</p> <h2>There are credit options specifically for these emergencies</h2> <p>If you're in the hospital with your pet and you're trying to figure out how to pay for the bill, CareCredit could be an option for you. You can apply for this medical assistance credit line in advance, possibly at your veterinarian's office, or online, just so you have it on hand when the emergency arises. You can also do it at the emergency vet's office at the time, if needed.</p> <p>Your qualification for this card is based on your credit situation, like any other card would be, so you can't have a terrible score, Thomas says. But it's not as harshly critical of your score as, say, a mortgage lender would be.</p> <p>&quot;This is what saves a lot of people's pets in the end,&quot; she adds.</p> <h2>Don't let emotion control the situation</h2> <p>You want to save your pet, there's no doubt about that. But one practical question you need to ask yourself when your pet has an emergency is if going into debt for the treatment is worth it. That may seem harsh, but you need to keep a roof over your own head if you want to be able to afford caring for another living creature.</p> <p>Adds Dr. Richter, &quot;When people are faced with these kinds of choices, they need to weigh the costs with the pet's prognosis and how spending the money will impact their lives. An excellent long-term prognosis &mdash; broken leg, for example &mdash; may warrant spending the money, whereas end-stage terminal cancer is a more difficult decision.&quot;</p> <p>In the end, it's your decision, but you shouldn't compromise your ability to provide for yourself. It defeats the whole purpose. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-lessons-you-can-learn-from-your-pets?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Money Lessons You Can Learn From Your Pets</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-prep-your-finances-for-an-emergency-vet-visit&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Prep%2520Your%2520Finances%2520for%2520an%2520Emergency%2520Vet%2520Visit.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Prep%20Your%20Finances%20for%20an%20Emergency%20Vet%20Visit"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Prep%20Your%20Finances%20for%20an%20Emergency%20Vet%20Visit.jpg" alt="How to Prep Your Finances for an Emergency Vet Visit" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prep-your-finances-for-an-emergency-vet-visit">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-pet-expenses-you-should-never-skip">6 Pet Expenses You Should Never Skip</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-lower-your-vet-bills">8 Ways to Lower Your Vet Bills</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-need-to-know-about-pet-insurance">7 Things You Need to Know About Pet Insurance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-personal-finance-tips-for-animal-lovers">7 Personal Finance Tips for Animal Lovers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-pet-expenses-that-arent-worth-it">4 Pet Expenses That Aren&#039;t Worth It</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Family cats dogs pet care pet costs pet expenses pet parenting pets vet visit veterinarian Fri, 23 Mar 2018 10:00:05 +0000 Mikey Rox 2122415 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways New Parents Can Manage Debt http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-new-parents-can-manage-debt <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-new-parents-can-manage-debt" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_holding_her_baby.jpg" alt="Woman holding her baby" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Bringing a new little one into your family is an exciting time, but it can also be stressful if you have to juggle new baby expenses on top of debt repayment. Don't get overwhelmed. These tips will help you to pay off debt faster so you can enjoy your baby's first moments without so much stress. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-financially-ready-to-start-a-family?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Signs You're Financially Ready to Start a Family</a>)</p> <h2>1. Don't add to your debt burden</h2> <p>Babies can be costly, especially when you're buying diapers and formula weekly. Be as cost-effective as possible when shopping for your new bundle of joy. Do your best to pay for diapers, baby food, and formula out of your normal grocery budget. This may mean juggling some of the normal things you buy to fit in an extra $25 to $50 each week.</p> <p>That can feel like a stretch, but it doesn't have to be a drastic one. It might just mean you eat a rice and bean meal once per week, or eat only chicken instead of steak and fish. You won't have to make this grocery trade forever, it's just a means to an end.</p> <p>As far as baby gear and clothes go, buy used or use hand-me-downs when possible. The first six months of your baby's life go fast, and items like swings, baby wraps, bath tubs, and rockers are not needed after that time frame, so don't waste your money. Any baby items that require strict safety regulations &mdash; like car seats &mdash; should be bought new. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-waste-money-on-this-pricey-baby-gear?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Things You Definitely Don't Need for a Baby</a>)</p> <h2>2. Don't be afraid to ask for help</h2> <p>There is no shame in admitting to family members and close friends that you are working hard to pay off debt and raise a baby. They might be able to take care of the baby one or two days a week so you can go to work, or they might have a lead for someone who is looking to hire out a side job. Many times, parents or grandparents are happy to have you over once a week for dinner, which can save you a small amount on your grocery bill.</p> <p>Outside of your family and friends, check to see if you are qualified for <a href="https://www.fns.usda.gov/wic/wic-eligibility-requirements" target="_blank">WIC benefits</a> or <a href="https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/eligibility" target="_blank">food stamps</a>. Furthermore, if your debt is a federal student loan, you might be able to lower your payments <a href="https://studentloans.gov/myDirectLoan/ibrInstructions.action" target="_blank">based on your income</a>.</p> <h2>3. Refinance and rebalance your debts</h2> <p>Write down all of your debts and their APRs. Are you getting the best deal for them, or are you throwing your money away on high interest rates?</p> <p>If your credit score is healthy, try refinancing your auto loan, student loan, or mortgage to an arrangement with more favorable terms. The difference from a lower monthly payment can go toward expenses you need for your new baby.</p> <p>If you're struggling with credit card debt, consider moving that balance to a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-0-balance-transfer-credit-cards?ref=internal" target="_blank">balance transfer credit card</a> with a promotional 0 percent APR. During that promotional window &mdash; typically between six and 21 months &mdash; interest does not accrue. This can be a tremendously effective way to pay down debt while saving on interest, especially considering that typical credit card rates can exceed 16 percent. Just be sure to pay the balance off in full before the promotional APR ends and the normal rate kicks in.</p> <h2>4. Try to survive on one income</h2> <p>Another strategy to tackle debt before and after the baby comes is to try to live on one income. Devoting one income to living expenses and the other income to debt repayment can quickly reduce the debt you owe. It takes a lot of sacrifice and budget cuts, but you will get out of your debt situation faster.</p> <p>After debt is repaid, one parent can choose to stay home with the baby, which might be a better option financially than paying for child care. Or, both parents can keep working and continue to practice living on one income to supercharge their emergency fund and retirement savings. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-go-from-two-incomes-to-one?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Go From Two Incomes to One</a>)</p> <h2>5. Make drastic cuts</h2> <p>What drastic cuts can you make during this period of your life? Huge budget cuts are not fun, but they don't have to be permanent changes. Can you sell an extra household vehicle and get by with one? Could you sell some of your clothes, gadgets, or furniture? Can you cut your cable subscription for a while? Could you do a spending ban on anything that isn't an absolute necessity? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/becoming-a-one-car-family-5-points-to-consider?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Becoming a One-Car Family: 5 Points to Consider</a>)</p> <p>These options aren't for everyone, but talk them over with your partner to figure out how you can get serious about your debt repayment. Remember that it is better to go extremes now and pay off your debt so you can enjoy growing your family with the comfort of being debt-free.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-ways-new-parents-can-manage-debt&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Ways%2520New%2520Parents%2520Can%2520Manage%2520Debt.jpg&amp;description=5%20Ways%20New%20Parents%20Can%20Manage%20Debt"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Ways%20New%20Parents%20Can%20Manage%20Debt.jpg" alt="5 Ways New Parents Can Manage Debt" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-new-parents-can-manage-debt">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-lessons-kids-can-learn-from-the-tooth-fairy">7 Money Lessons Kids Can Learn From the Tooth Fairy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-kid-build-their-first-budget">How to Help Your Kid Build Their First Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-essential-money-moves-for-new-parents">7 Essential Money Moves for New Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-frugal-living-skills-i-wish-my-parents-would-have-taught-me">8 Frugal Living Skills I Wish My Parents Would Have Taught Me</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Debt Management Family balance transfer budget cuts cutting expenses kids new baby one income refinancing saving money Thu, 15 Mar 2018 09:00:07 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 2114572 at http://www.wisebread.com Here's What You Need to Know About 529 ABLE Accounts http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-you-need-to-know-about-529-able-accounts <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/heres-what-you-need-to-know-about-529-able-accounts" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/little_girl_with_special_needs_enjoy_spending_time_with_mother.jpg" alt="Little girl with special needs enjoy spending time with mother" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="132" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do you have a child with disabilities? You might benefit from investing in a 529 ABLE account. These tax-advantaged savings accounts let you save money for your child's long- or short-term care without jeopardizing their eligibility for public assistance from the government.</p> <p>Many parents with special needs children may not even know this savings vehicle exists. After all, it wasn't until 2014 that legislation paved the way for the 529 ABLE account. If you're the parent of a child with a disability, here's everything you should know about these tax-advantaged accounts.</p> <h2>A new opportunity</h2> <p>Congress signed the Achieving a Better Life Experience, or ABLE, act into law in 2014. The new law gave families with special needs children the option to save post-tax dollars in a new type of account. These ABLE accounts were designed to give families a way to save extra money <em>in addition to</em> the financial benefits their disabled child was already receiving from private insurers or from government programs such as Social Security and Medicaid.</p> <p>It's a huge positive that families can save in an ABLE plan without losing their eligibility for financial government assistance. Before the act was passed, disabled people who earned more than $700 a month or who had more than $2,000 in assets could lose their eligibility for Medicaid and Social Security assistance.</p> <p>The ABLE Act changed that. Today, families can save up to $100,000 in a 529 ABLE account before their child will lose their extra Social Security benefits. Even if they do save more than $100,000 in an account, their child will still be eligible for financial assistance from Medicaid. The money saved in a 529 ABLE account does not count against that $2,000 asset limit.</p> <h2>How they work</h2> <p>A 529 ABLE account works similar to its cousins, the 529 college savings and prepaid plans. But it does come with some key differences.</p> <p>As with a traditional 529 savings plan, the contributions that you make to an ABLE account are not tax-deductible. But the earnings on those investments will not be taxed as long as you use any money you withdraw from the account for what are known as &quot;qualified disability expenses.&quot; With 529 ABLE accounts, you can withdraw money tax-free for several types of expenses. Qualified disability expenses include money spent on health, education, housing, transportation, legal fees, employment training, and monitoring.</p> <p>In other words, there is more flexibility with a 529 ABLE account. Where there is less flexibility, however, is in eligibility. To be eligible for a 529 ABLE account, individuals must meet specific requirements.</p> <h2>Eligibility requirements</h2> <p>There is only a narrow band of individuals who are eligible for 529 ABLE accounts. Individuals participating must have been diagnosed with a disability before they turned 26 and must have a disability that is expected to last at least 12 consecutive months.</p> <p>Individuals must also already be receiving benefits through the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) programs offered through Social Security, or obtain a certificate of disability from a doctor.</p> <p>For the 2018 tax year, individuals can make an annual contribution up to $15,000 into an ABLE account.</p> <p>These accounts are sponsored by individual states. If your state doesn't offer a 529 ABLE account, you can still participate. You are free to sign up for an ABLE account through any state offering one, even if you don't live in that state.</p> <h2>Changes under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act</h2> <p>In more good news, two key changes that came with President Trump's Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, signed into law late last year, make 529 ABLE accounts even more attractive.</p> <p>The new federal law allows for tax-free rollovers from traditional 529 plans to 529 ABLE accounts. This is a benefit to individuals whose disabilities are diagnosed later in life. Say you've saved money for your child in a traditional 529 plan. When your child turns 16, he or she is diagnosed with a disability. In the past, if you wanted to take your funds from the traditional 529 plan and roll them into an ABLE account, you'd have to pay taxes and a financial penalty. Today, you can rollover funds from a traditional 529 plan into an ABLE account without suffering any financial penalties or paying taxes on the money.</p> <p>The new tax law also allows ABLE account beneficiaries who are employed and earning income through their jobs to make contributions of more than $15,000 each year up to the Federal Poverty Level, as long as they are using their own income to get past that $15,000 mark and not participating in an employer-sponsored retirement plan.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fheres-what-you-need-to-know-about-529-able-accounts&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHeres%2520What%2520You%2520Need%2520to%2520Know%2520About%2520529%2520ABLE%2520Accounts.jpg&amp;description=Heres%20What%20You%20Need%20to%20Know%20About%20529%20ABLE%20Accounts"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Heres%20What%20You%20Need%20to%20Know%20About%20529%20ABLE%20Accounts.jpg" alt="Here's What You Need to Know About 529 ABLE Accounts" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-you-need-to-know-about-529-able-accounts">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. 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