raise http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4778/all en-US Didn't Get the Raise? Ask for This, Instead http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_strong_work_71194917.jpg" alt="Woman doing something after getting denied for a pay raise" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Getting knocked back when you've built up the courage to ask for a pay raise at work can feel like a real blow. It can seem as if your hard work has gone unnoticed, and will quickly sour working relationships if you let it. But with some segments of the economy still decidedly wobbly, every pay bump is hard-fought, and more of us than ever are getting turned down when we ask for more cash.</p> <p>If this is your situation, don't get disheartened. Instead, think about the different negotiating angles you can work, like requesting a deferred raise, extra pension or benefits, increased vacation time, a personal development payment, or even the opportunity to work from home.</p> <p>All of these can effectively put money back in your pocket, even if your boss says no to a raise.</p> <h2>Deferred or Conditional Raise</h2> <p>If you asked for a straight raise and your boss was not able (or willing) to offer it, then asking for a conditional or deferred raise is an option. A deferred raise simply means a pay raise that is delayed until an agreed date &mdash; and might be worth asking for if your company has specific short-term cash issues, or if the issue is linked to the financial year. If there is no stretch in the budget for right now, that does not necessarily mean that there won't be in future, and getting an agreement in advance is a head start.</p> <p>A conditional raise, on the other hand, is linked to your achievement on a certain task or project. This might mean that you are to receive a raise if you secure a new contract, or pass a professional qualification. You might link it to the company profits or your team performance, depending on the sort of business you work for. This gives you the opportunity to show, not only why you deserve a raise, but also how your boss can find the cash.</p> <p>But for these options to work, they should be agreed in writing, and with as much specific details as possible to back them up.</p> <h2>Boost Your Benefits</h2> <p>Depending on the type of company you work for, it might be possible to effectively boost your overall remuneration by addressing other fringe benefits instead of the salary. This is often an appealing option for bosses if the financial pots for salary and benefits are separate. Even if the one pot dries up, there might still be some wriggle room in the other!</p> <p>You should look at the benefits your company offers, and make a specific request for improvement. For example, if your business has a grading system which is linked to benefits, you might ask to be bumped up a grade &mdash; especially if this allows you access to perks like a company car or share options. If this is hard to swallow for your HR team or boss, then consider agreeing that the grade improvement now could be set off against any future entitlement.</p> <p>Think broadly when you negotiate this one. You might request company pension contributions, share options or grants, reward cards, discounts on products you actually use, or even increased vacation time. All these routes effectively boost your package and leave you with more cash in your pocket overall.</p> <h2>Invest in Yourself</h2> <p>Sometimes, investing in yourself through personal development or improved qualifications is really worthwhile. If you are struggling to get a raise at work, then why not ask for support in achieving this development or qualifications instead? Some qualifications can <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-certifications-that-add-big-to-your-salary">give your salary a huge boost</a> over the long term.</p> <p>If you have courses in mind which would give you transferable skills, and also improve your performance at work, then see if your boss will pay for them. Even better, maybe you can get some study time off to reflect the extra work you are doing. These cash investments tend to be relatively small for the company, but the end result is that you have more skills with which to negotiate a better role or raise later down the line.</p> <h2>Flex</h2> <p>Ask for improved flexibility in your work schedule. This can be an equivalent to a pay raise if you can negotiate some time working from home, and therefore cut the costs of commuting or parking. If this is not possible, then perhaps working a more flexible shift would allow you to do some longer days in return for more time off.</p> <p>The benefits here are felt in reducing the cost of commuting, but also the peripheral costs of things like buying lunch at work or stocking up on gourmet coffees. On the other hand, by reducing your travel, you win back time that can be used to boost your income if you wish. To get the biggest return from this approach, use the time you save to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-unexpected-side-benefits-of-your-side-hustle">set up a side hustle</a>, and suddenly it's like you're being paid double time.</p> <h2>Try Again</h2> <p>When you're asking for a pay or benefits rise, how you ask is at least as important as what you're requesting. If you've already been knocked back for a straight raise and are going in for a second pass, then it's especially important to get your message straight.</p> <p>Here are some hints to make sure you're making your case effectively.</p> <h3>Pick the Right Moment</h3> <p>If you were refused because the business is genuinely struggling, then putting the request on ice for a few months might be best. Use the time to sharpen your skills and, if necessary, start applying elsewhere.</p> <h3>Don't Whine or Give Ultimatums</h3> <p>Avoid comparing yourself to others. Don't say, &quot;I do way more than the rest of the team!&quot; As tempting as it might be, it's not going to help your case.</p> <h3>Don't Highlight Personal Financial Problems</h3> <p>If this is a real challenge, then be honest with your boss, but don't try to use your cash flow as leverage.</p> <h3>Remember You Are Not Entitled to It</h3> <p>You won't get one because you did everything asked of you, or just because the cost of living has gone up. Assume you're making a business case for the raise and present it as such, not a demand.</p> <p>As uncomfortable as it might be, asking for a raise is part of working life. And if necessary, bouncing back from rejection should be, too. Think of it as an ongoing project to market yourself and your skills and ensure that you are paid fairly, and consider different angles to make your requests so good they can't be refused.</p> <p><em>What is your experience in asking for a pay rise? Let us know in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income ask for a raise benefits income job promotion pay increase raise salary work Fri, 01 Jul 2016 09:00:03 +0000 Claire Millard 1742408 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000066992053_Large.jpg" alt="she needs to make these money moves after getting a promotion" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Congratulations on your promotion! You've just made another step toward a successful future.</p> <p>Still, this isn't the time to become complacent. A promotion comes along with new challenges and tasks. To help you make the very best out of your new job, here are the 10 money moves to make after a promotion.</p> <h2>1. Revisit Your Tax Withholding</h2> <p>Most promotions don't come with just a title upgrade, they come with a well-deserved raise. If that's your case, calculate whether or not you need to adjust your W-4 form and submit it to your HR department.</p> <p>Let's assume that you file a joint return with your spouse and your combined taxable income was $90,000. Your tax due would be $18,293.75 ($5,156.25 + 25% of the amount over $37,450). After your promotion, your new combined taxable income is now $100,000. Your new tax bill is $21,071.25 ($18,481.25 + 28% of the amount over $90,750). Assuming no offsets to your salary bump and no changes to your W-4, you would be $2,777.50 short of your tax bill! (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/top-three-tax-facts-to-know-for-2016?ref=seealso">Top Three Tax Facts to Know for 2016</a>)</p> <p>Use the <a href="https://www.irs.gov/Individuals/IRS-Withholding-Calculator">IRS Withholding Calculator</a> and determine if you need to update your W-4.</p> <h2>2. Calculate Vesting of Company Shares</h2> <p>Vested company shares are another way that your employer could reward you. Very often, these restricted stock units vest over time, meaning that you gain ownership of those shares the longer you stay. The idea is that your employer wants you to perform well and remain with the company. Contact your HR department to find out the vesting schedule of your company shares so that you know how much you would actually take with you if you were to part ways with your employer.</p> <h2>3. Time Profit Sharing and Bonus Checks</h2> <p>When your promotion includes a large bonus or profit sharing check, pay attention to the date that the payment will be issued on. An elective deferral contribution to your retirement accounts must be deposited by the tax filing due date (April 19, 2016 for Maine and Massachusetts residents and April 18, 2016 for everybody else). For 2015 and 2016, the contribution limit to 401K, 403B, and most 457 plans is $18,000, and to regular and Roth IRA plans it's $5,500. If you're age 50 or over, you can make an additional $6,000 in catch-up contributions. When you haven't met the applicable contribution limit, take advantage of that windfall to fatten up your retirement accounts.</p> <h2>4. Identify Additional Costs</h2> <p>With great power comes great responsibility, Peter Parker! Take stock of the responsibilities of your new position and determine how much additional time you may need to perform those tasks successfully. Having to stay a bit longer at work may increase several costs, including paying higher fees for babysitters or preschools, and dining out more often than before the promotion. Your first weeks in your new position will provide you an idea of how much your budget will need to adjust.</p> <h2>5. Determine New Tax Deductions</h2> <p>The good news is that some of those new-job-related costs may also be tax deductible.</p> <ul> <li>Keep track of mileage that you have to drive to off-site locations for job-related activities. You can deduct <a href="https://www.irs.gov/uac/Newsroom/2016-Standard-Mileage-Rates-for-Business-Medical-and-Moving-Announced">54 cents per mile</a> for business miles driven in 2016, down from 57.5 cents in 2015. Also, you may use that mileage to allocate a portion of your car expenses, such as insurance and maintenance.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Being able to telecommute from home allows you to designate a portion of your home as a business office. Use the percentage from your total home space used used for business purposes to allocate allowable deductions using <a href="http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f8829.pdf">Form 8829</a>.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Having to dine and wine prospective clients may also be tax deductible.</li> </ul> <p>Consult your accountant for more details on allowable deductions.</p> <h2>6. Prevent Burnout</h2> <p>Several human resources experts claim that the <a href="http://fortune.com/2011/04/01/just-got-promoted-how-not-to-blow-it/">first 100 days on the job</a> are critical, particularly after a promotion. To thrive in your new role &mdash; and to maximize your number of fully vested shares if applicable &mdash; take steps to mitigate additional stress related to your new job. Whether it's hitting the gym more often, signing up for a new class, or having &quot;pizza day&quot; with the kids once a week, you may have new costs to cope with stress. Make sure to include them in your new monthly budget.</p> <h2>7. Request a Credit Limit Increase</h2> <p>Now that you have a higher annual income, you may be eligible for a higher limit on your credit cards. If you've have been current in all of your payments for the last year, have an account in good standing, and haven't requested a limit increase in several months, contact the issuers of your credit cards to submit your request. Most financial institutions allow you to do this over an online portal, but some may request to contact them via phone.</p> <p>With a higher credit limit, you can effectively improve your credit utilization ratio, which accounts for 30% of your FICO credit score.</p> <h2>8. Ask for Education and Licensing Subsidies</h2> <p>Most promotions are the result of hard work, and some of them are the result of an important investment that requires a recurrent annual expense.</p> <p>For example, an architect needs to complete a series of hour requirements and exams to become licensed. Upon becoming licensed, an architect can choose to become a member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), which has an initial cost of $442 per year and costs $600 each year thereafter to renew. Having the AIA in the title of a lead architect in a project bid makes a company more desirable to clients, so an architect could successfully argue that it's in the company's best interest to subsidize the annual cost of $600.</p> <p>Similar scenarios take place in other industries, including accounting, engineering, and finance.</p> <h2>9. Inquire About Additional Company Benefits</h2> <p>Your promotion could unlock new or improved perks, including:</p> <ul> <li>Health plans;</li> <li>Flexible spending accounts (FSA);</li> <li>Telecommuting devices (laptops, smartphones);</li> <li>Fund options in retirement accounts;</li> <li>Industry conferences; and</li> <li>Parking options.</li> </ul> <p>Find out what discretionary items are covered by your updated employment package.</p> <h2>10. Hire an Assistant</h2> <p>One <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-time-saving-hacks-from-the-worlds-busiest-people">time saving hack</a> from the world's busiest people is to outsource non-critical tasks, such as researching travel options, transcribing audio, and scheduling meetings, to an assistant. If your new job doesn't include a personal assistant, then hire a virtual one for about $10 per hour through Upwork, Fancy Hands, or Zirtual.</p> <p>You'll free up time to be able to focus on higher level priorities.</p> <p><em>What are some other things that people should do after a promotion? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead">Didn&#039;t Get the Raise? Ask for This, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income career growth potential job job promotion more money raise Thu, 03 Mar 2016 10:00:11 +0000 Damian Davila 1666773 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Money Moments That Are Awkward for Everyone http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moments-that-are-awkward-for-everyone <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-money-moments-that-are-awkward-for-everyone" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/awkward_couple_date_000072860441.jpg" alt="Couple experiencing money moment that is awkward for everyone" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most of us don't like to talk about money, because when we talk about money, things get awkward. But it's not just the talking part that ruffles our feathers. Sometimes just being in a situation that <em>relies</em> on money can make us uncomfortable. From the first time you ask your boss for a raise to not having enough cash when tipping is suggested, these are the most awkward money moments in life.</p> <h2>1. The First Time You Ask Your Boss For a Raise</h2> <p>It's not easy asking your boss for <em>anything</em>, let alone a higher salary. In fact, I suspect that many people never speak up where money is concerned because they're afraid the boss will take it the wrong way or it might somehow affect their current employment status. I can assure you, however, that you cannot be penalized or fired for asking for a raise &mdash; because that would be illegal. There's a chance your boss could say no, of course, but that shouldn't stop you from standing up for yourself. If you think you deserve a raise or haven't received one in a while, don't be intimidated. Schedule a meeting to discuss your performance and take it from there. If nothing comes of it, at least you'll know where you need to improve. If it works out in your favor, on the other hand, well... you're welcome.</p> <h2>2. Deciding Who Pays the Check on a First Date</h2> <p>I have a real problem when someone on a date automatically assumes that the other person is paying. I don't want to be sexist, but this happens more among females than it does males when they're out together. I also see this imbalance when one person is younger than the other (at least in my personal experience); the oldest among the two is often expected to pick up the tab. But I don't mess with either of those scenarios. Instead, I have a solid solution to keep things fair. If I ask you on a date, I'll happily pay. If you ask me on a date, you should pay. And if we've decided mutually to go on a date, we should split the tab. No free rides from this show pony.</p> <h2>3. Forgetting Your Wallet When on a Date or Out With Friends</h2> <p>I think we've all forgotten our wallets at home on a date or while we're out with friends at least once, and it's a bit embarrassing. Especially if you have friends like mine who like to rag on you when you do something silly. It's a little worse on a date, though &mdash; even if your date is easy-going about the situation &mdash; because you want to make a great first impression. But these days the problem is easily solvable by being able to pay your portion immediately to the person who covered for you via PayPal, Venmo, or another mobile banking tool.</p> <h2>4. When Your Credit and Debit Cards Are Declined at Checkout</h2> <p>This has happened to me more than a few times, not because I didn't have the funds, but because my bank flagged unusual spending habits on my card when I'm on vacation or in an area that's not within my typical range. To avoid this particular problem when traveling, give your credit card company a call to let them know in advance where you will be. If however, you've been declined because you have gone over your limit, it's simply a strong reminder to keep track of your finances and not to take your credit for granted in the future. Do not act indignant and insist there must be something wrong with their machine.</p> <h2>5. Discussing Finances With a Soon-to-Be Spouse</h2> <p>Having the money discussion with the person you're about to marry isn't the most fun you'll have with each other, but it's a completely necessary conversation. Before your lives become intertwined with a binding legal contract, you both need to be honest about assets, debts, loans, savings goals, and anything else money-related. If you love each other, your past financial history shouldn't matter too much &mdash; unless someone's been hiding a huge secret &mdash; but it's a smart start to lay everything out on the table. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-simple-ways-to-split-bills-with-your-spouse">3 Simple Ways to Split Bills With Your Spouse</a>)</p> <h2>6. Dealing With a Roommate Who Owes Rent</h2> <p>I have two ways of going about this. First, if you're not the landlord, your roommate's lack of payment shouldn't be your problem. This is why I recommend that everyone have separate leases. Without an individual lease for yourself only, you run the risk of having to cover for your roommate financially or deal with the consequences of their failure to pay &mdash; and that could mean eviction.</p> <p>Secondly, if you own the property, you shouldn't feel awkward at all about asking your tenant to pay on time each month. Paying the bills on time is a fundamental adult skill, and, frankly, if they can't afford to live in your property, they should find another suitable option that's more in line with their budget.</p> <h2>7. Reminding Someone You've Loaned Money to That They're Late</h2> <p>I generally don't advise anybody to loan money to family or friends in order to avoid this awkward conversation altogether. But, if you somehow get suckered into loaning people cash, at least draw up a written contract to help avoid potential default. Establishing terms, like due dates and interest, will improve your chances of receiving your money on time.</p> <h2>8. Asking Your Parents to Help With Bills as an Adult</h2> <p>Quite honestly, the last people I want to ask for money are my parents. Somehow it feels as if I've failed if I'm running to Mom and Dad for cash, so I'd rather reach out to friends first. But if they're a last resort, don't just show up asking for a handout. Promise to pay them back &mdash; even offer to draw up the loan contract for them so they can respect your seriousness about the situation &mdash; and stick to your plan. While you're at it, take this time to figure out what's wrong with your financial situation that you needed to ask your parents for money, and try to address that simultaneously.</p> <h2>9. Explaining Overdraft Fees to Your Significant Other</h2> <p>Yep, even I've overdrafted before, and I hate when my bank sends me a note in the mail reminding me of the fact. Like I didn't notice it in my online banking statement. Oh, I noticed. And we all know what the little mailer looks like, so it's not like my husband has to open it to recognize that I've overdrafted. Then I have to tell him that I forgot about an automatic bill payment while I was Christmas shopping. Which will totally make me roll my eyes because it's my bank account and my error, but it's still awkward nonetheless.</p> <h2>10. Not Having Cash on Hand When Tipping Is Suggested</h2> <p>If you know you're going someplace where tipping is suggested, you should have cash on you. There are times, however, that you go someplace where you didn't expect to tip and you don't have any cash on you &mdash; and I'm not sure if there's anything more awkward than staring that service provider in the face, like, &quot;my bad,&quot; before they sulk away cursing your name under their breath. In this case, go get the tip money you owe that person and give it to them after the fact. It'll totally make their day that you recognized your mistake, and it'll help you feel like less of a jerk for stiffing the poor guy or girl in the first place.</p> <p><em>Are there other awkward money moments in life that you'd like to share? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moments-that-are-awkward-for-everyone">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-moves-you-can-make-while-stuck-in-an-endless-tsa-line">6 Money Moves You Can Make While Stuck in an Endless TSA Line</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-you-disrespect-your-money">10 Ways You Disrespect Your Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-awkward-money-moments-everyone-has-at-work">8 Awkward Money Moments Everyone Has at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/47-simple-ways-to-waste-money">47 Simple Ways To Waste Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-often-do-you-get-your-paycheck">How often do you get your paycheck?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Budgeting awkward moments bills budgeting money moments raise Tue, 05 Jan 2016 12:00:02 +0000 Mikey Rox 1632863 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Things You Should Never Do After Getting a Raise http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-after-getting-a-raise <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-things-you-should-never-do-after-getting-a-raise" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_holding_cash_000020148820.jpg" alt="Man learning what he shouldn&#039;t do after getting a raise" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last time that you got a raise, you may have been shocked at how very little (or even at all) your financial situation improved. As Charles A. Jaffe famously said, &quot;It's not your salary that makes you rich, it's your spending habits.&quot;</p> <p>To help you make the best out of your windfall, here are the 10 things that you should never do after you get a raise.</p> <h2>1. Don't Act Entitled at Work</h2> <p>No matter how long you have been waiting for this raise, you should never act like it was &quot;about darn time!&quot; Keeping a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-mistakes-to-stop-making-by-30">professional attitude</a> post-raise is necessary so that your employer has no second thoughts. For example, in <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2013/09/18/how-much-of-a-pay-raise-can-you-expect-in-2014/2832791/">2014 the average pay raise</a> was about 3%. If you were lucky enough to get a raise that is way above that figure, reciprocate the gesture and continue to excel in your tasks. This will increase your chances of waiting less time for the next raise.</p> <h2>2. Don't Let Coworkers Know About Your Raise</h2> <p>While <a href="http://www.npr.org/2014/04/13/301989789/pay-secrecy-policies-at-work-often-illegal-and-misunderstood">&quot;pay secrecy&quot; policies</a> are illegal nationwide, it's still a good idea to keep your salary bump to yourself. Several career experts advise against sharing your salary with your coworkers. From invoking jealousy, feeding water cooler gossip, and annoying your manager, letting your coworkers know about your recent pay bump has many undesired side effects.</p> <p>Even under the very few instances it may help you professionally to discuss your salary bump with a coworker, such as when you suspect you're still severely underpaid, the same career experts advise that those discussions have a high probability of backfiring on you.</p> <h2>3. Don't Break Your Monthly Budget</h2> <p>When you get a raise, you may be tempted to start indulging a bit more. Before you start upgrading to a fancy $5 coffee cup from your current $1 morning beverage, take a look at your monthly budget for the past year and how many times you've gone over. Being over budget for two or more months is a red flag that you're not able to stick to your budget and should keep your current expense levels.</p> <h2>4. Don't Continue to Pay the Bare Minimum of Debts</h2> <p>Let's imagine that you have about a $4,056.49 balance on a credit card with a 25.25% APR. If you were to continue paying only the minimum monthly payment of $132.70, you would pay off the debt in 17 years for an estimated total of $11,125! On the other hand, if you were to sock away $162 every month, you would pay off the balance in just three years for an estimated total of $5,824. That's an estimated $5,301 in savings! Take advantage of your raise and bump up your monthly debt payments.</p> <h2>5. Don't Forget to Contribute to Your Emergency Fund</h2> <p>One in four Americans <a href="http://blogs.wsj.com/numbers/one-in-four-americans-has-no-emergency-savings-1467/">has no emergency savings</a>. Even those that are diligently building an emergency fund aren't saving enough. Only one third of Americans meet the recommended six-months savings for rainy days. To become part of this group, you need to start building up or beefing up your emergency fund with part of that raise.</p> <h2>6. Don't Skip a Contribution to Your Retirement Accounts</h2> <p>Before your raise, you may have been putting a pause to contributions to your retirement account or keeping them at a minimum. Now it's the time to restart or bump up contributions from your paycheck to your retirement account. There are three important reasons why you should. First, nest egg contributions reduce your taxable income. Second, you have a limited amount of money that you can contribute to retirement accounts per year. Use it or lose it forever. Third, this maximizes your potential employer match (average employer match is <a href="http://www.americanbenefitscouncil.org/pub/e613e1b6-f57b-1368-c1fb-966598903769">4.5% of pay</a>).</p> <h2>7. Don't Leave Your 401K Loans Unpaid</h2> <p>Speaking of retirement accounts, remember that 401K loans that aren't fully paid back within five years become taxable income with an extra 10% early distribution tax penalty from the IRS for those under age 59 1/2. Take advantage of this salary bump to make a serious dent on those outstanding 401K loan balances.</p> <h2>8. Don't Leave Your Tax Withholding Forms Untouched</h2> <p>The salary may put you in a different tax bracket. Take the following example:</p> <ul> <li>An individual with taxable income between $37,451 and $90,750 pays $5,156.25 + 25% of the amount over $37,450 in 2015.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>An individual with taxable income between $90,751 and $189,301 pays $18,481.25 + 28% of the amount over $90,750 in 2015.</li> </ul> <p>If you were making $87,000 and receive a $4,000 raise, you would then be in a higher tax bracket and would need to adjust your Form W-4.</p> <p>Here is how to check if you need to adjust your federal tax withholding:</p> <ul> <li>Review the applicable <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/kellyphillipserb/2014/10/30/irs-announces-2015-tax-brackets-standard-deduction-amounts-and-more/">tax brackets</a>,<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Use the IRS Withholding Calculator to determine how much you should be withholding from your paycheck;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Find out the process to adjust your tax withholding from your HR office (some companies have digital systems instead of paper-based ones); and<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Adjust your Form W-4 (if necessary).</li> </ul> <h2>9. Don't Keep Your Banking and Investment Accounts</h2> <p>Now that you have access to more funds, you may have the opportunity to better banking and investment opportunities. Contact your bank rep and financial manager to inquire about required thresholds to access lower fees.</p> <p>For example, a credit union in Hawaii pays 0.20% for money market deposits from $10,000-$24,999, and 0.25% for money market deposits from $25,000-$99,999. An individual holding a balance of $23,000 in such an account would gain access to a better savings rate by depositing an extra $2,000.</p> <h2>10. Don't Forget to Have Fun</h2> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MX7MbG6MiQs" width="420" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p>Like Donna Summer sang back in the '80s, you worked hard for the money, so you better treat yourself right! Take the time to celebrate your achievement and spoil yourself a bit.</p> <p><em>What are some other things that people should never do after getting a raise?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-after-getting-a-raise">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-radical-implosion-can-help-you-get-ahead-at-work-and-everywhere-else">How &quot;Radical Implosion&quot; Can Help You Get Ahead at Work — and Everywhere Else</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-pearls-of-career-wisdom-from-brian-tracy">6 Pearls of Career Wisdom From Brian Tracy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-career-tips-you-wish-you-could-give-your-younger-self">7 Career Tips You Wish You Could Give Your Younger Self</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-negotiate-higher-pay-at-your-next-new-job">How to Negotiate Higher Pay at Your Next New Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income career tips raise raise at work salary increase Thu, 10 Dec 2015 12:00:25 +0000 Damian Davila 1619154 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Times You Should Demand a Raise http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/000033126062.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You haven't seen a raise since the Great Recession hit the country, and you probably feel overdue for a salary bump. But when is the right time to ask your boss or supervisor for a raise? Does your timing play a role in whether you're likely to nab that paycheck boost? It sure does. Here are five times when you should demand &mdash;&nbsp;or at least ask for &mdash; a raise from your boss.</p> <h2>1. You've Made or Saved Your Company Money</h2> <p>Have you worked on a new advertising campaign that has increased sales at your company? Maybe you've recommended new technology that has saved your company thousands of dollars per year.</p> <p>If you've done something that has either boosted your company's revenues or cut its expenses, there might be no better time than now to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-facts-women-should-know-before-asking-for-a-raise">ask for a raise</a>. Just make sure to remind your supervisor of the benefit you've just brought your company. And if your boss refuses your request for a pay raise even when shown this evidence? Then it might really be slow going to get a raise at this company.</p> <h2>2. You've Surpassed a Goal</h2> <p>Maybe your boss asked you to land three new clients this quarter, but you brought in five. Or maybe your supervisor asked you to create a new video promoting a product in three months and you wrapped your work in just two. If you've not only met, but surpassed, a big goal, it's time to ask for a raise &mdash;&nbsp;especially if you do so consistently.</p> <p>Your goal when asking for more money is to show your employer how valuable you are to the company. You want your boss to know that the extra money you're requesting pales in comparison to your value.</p> <p>The best time to prove this is when you've exceeded your boss' expectations.</p> <h2>3. You Just Got Another Job Offer</h2> <p>There's something appealing about negotiating from a position of strength. If you've gotten a job offer from another company, you now have an advantage when it's time to negotiate a raise.</p> <p>Don't be afraid to tell your boss that you've gotten an offer from another firm. Tell your boss, too, that you'd like to stay put, but that you'll need a salary bump to do so. If your boss doesn't want to lose you, the odds are good that your raise will be forthcoming.</p> <p>Be careful, though. Only threaten to leave if you really are willing to accept your new job offer. And don't ever bluff your boss by pretending that you've been offered another job. This could backfire if your boss refuses your request for a raise. If you don't have that fallback job to turn to, life can get pretty awkward around the office.</p> <h2>4. You've Been Asked to Train a New Employee</h2> <p>If your boss asks you to train a new employee, it's a sure sign that your boss respects and appreciates the work you've done. Your boss thinks you are talented and knowledgeable enough to mentor a new worker.</p> <p>Now that you know this, there are few better times to request a raise. Remind your boss that you are taking on a new responsibility by training an employee and that you'd like to be rewarded for it.</p> <h2>5. Your Division Is Thriving</h2> <p>Maybe your entire company isn't raking in the big dollars, but your division or department is thriving. It's actually growing and generating an ever-increasing amount of profits. If this is the case, you can ask for a raise confidently even if your company isn't having a record-setting year.</p> <p>Remind your boss that you are an integral part of the company division that is performing well. And offer evidence that your work is part of the reason for that success.</p> <p>No matter when you ask for a raise, make sure that you come armed with concrete reasons why you deserve the paycheck boost. It's not enough to remind your boss that you haven't had a raise in five, seven, or 10 years. You need to convince your boss that your performance is boosting the company, and that you're too much of a valued employee to potentially lose over a $5,000, $10,000, or $20,000 raise.</p> <p><em>How have you successfully asked for a raise? Share in the comments below!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead">Didn&#039;t Get the Raise? Ask for This, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career">6 Job Perks That Can Lead to a Dream Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income career career goals raise raise at work work Thu, 15 Oct 2015 15:00:29 +0000 Dan Rafter 1592421 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_bored_000039342058.jpg" alt="Woman learning unexpected costs of a high paying job offer" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You've just been offered a job that will give you a significant boost in salary. It's a given that you should take it, right?</p> <p>Maybe not.</p> <p>That's because sometimes a bigger salary isn't enough to overcome the other negatives that come with a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">new job</a>: Maybe your commute will be longer. Maybe you'll need to put in longer hours. Maybe the work will be more stressful, ultimately making you less happy.</p> <p>Here are four key factors to consider before deciding to take that more lucrative position:</p> <h2>1. A Long Commute</h2> <p>Nothing can ruin an otherwise perfect new job like a long commute. Just consider the wasted time. The U.S. Census Bureau found that in 2014, it took workers an average of 25.4 minutes to get to work one way. And, yes, that comes out to more than 50 minutes spent in the car each day for the average U.S. worker.</p> <p>If you log 50 weeks of work for the year, that comes out to more than 200 hours of your life each year spent commuting to and from work. That's a lot of time to spend in the car.</p> <p>If your new job requires a longer commute than this average &mdash; or significantly longer than the one you're already logging &mdash; think carefully before accepting it, even if your salary will jump. You'll grow tired of a long commute quickly, even if your bank account is expanding.</p> <h2>2. It Will Damage Your Health</h2> <p>A long commute can also worsen your health. The data isn't the freshest, but a 2010 study from Gallup found that adults who commute more than 90 minutes one way to work were more likely to suffer from obesity, high cholesterol, back pain, and neck pain.</p> <p>If your work pays you more but is less interesting, that can have a negative impact on your health, too. A 2012 study from Gallup found that 15.5% of U.S. workers who were &quot;actively disengaged&quot; at work reported that they suffered from high levels of stress and worry and lower levels of happiness.</p> <p>And 27.1% of workers who were both uninterested in their work <em>and </em>had a one-way commute of 45 minutes or more reported the same.</p> <p>The message is clear: Make sure that you are interested in your new job, especially if your commute is a longer one. If you're not, you might not be happy with your working life, even if you are earning a bigger paycheck.</p> <h2>3. Less Family Time</h2> <p>You might think that your family will appreciate your larger paycheck. Maybe it will help you save more for your children's college education. Or maybe you'll be able to buy a bigger home or take fancier vacations.</p> <p>And here's an interesting factor: A study published in the March 2015 edition of the Journal of Marriage and Family found that the amount of time parents spend with their children has no real relationship to how successful or happy their children turn out to be. What's more important, according to the study, is the amount of money parents have and their social resources. This would seem to suggest that your higher-paying job &mdash; because it funnels more money into your family &mdash; would actually be more important than spending more time with your children and spouse.</p> <p>So you don't necessarily have to feel guilty about spending less time with your children. But &mdash; and this is a big but &mdash; what if you want to spend more time with your children and spouse? A higher-paying job with a long commute might mean that you have fewer hours to spend with your family each week. And if that is making you, your spouse, or your children unhappy, than maybe your newer, higher-paying job isn't the best choice, no matter what the most recent research shows.</p> <h2>4. You Love Your Current Coworkers</h2> <p>What makes people happy at work? The TINYpulse Engagement Survey published in 2014 found that coworkers are the most important factor for workplace happiness.</p> <p>The survey found that employee happiness is 23.3% more related to connections with coworkers than it is with interactions with direct supervisors. In other words, if you like your cubicle mates, you'll be happier at work.</p> <p>So if you enjoy taking lunch twice a week with Matt from accounting, you might want to think twice before giving that up to take a new job. Sure, you'll find new co-workers wherever you work. But what if those new co-workers aren't as friendly as Kathy from human resources or Joe from IT? You might find yourself less satisfied while at work.</p> <p><em>Have you ever turned down a higher-paying job? Why or why not?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead">Didn&#039;t Get the Raise? Ask for This, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building employment job offer raise salary work Mon, 20 Jul 2015 09:00:12 +0000 Dan Rafter 1490913 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_side_job_000020816287.jpg" alt="Woman using her side hustle to further her career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do you feel stuck in a career rut but not sure what needs to change? Your job likely pays the bills and quitting a steady paycheck just because you're bored or unchallenged doesn't seem like a smart option. You still have to pay the rent, after all.</p> <p>This is where a side hustle can be both financially rewarding and creatively stimulating. But balancing a full time job and a side hustle is not always easy.</p> <p>Here are five ways a side hustle can expand your career and give you more options.</p> <h2>1. Learn New Career Skills</h2> <p>One of the main benefits to starting a side hustle is that you can expand your knowledge by acquiring new skills. This can include learning how to start a website, optimizing social media channels, seeking out new clients, and even taking courses on copywriting, SEO, bookkeeping, and the like.</p> <p>You always have the opportunity to learn something new. Even after four years of having a side-hustle turned full-time gig, I still find new programs, books, and courses that help me learn new skills and increase my knowledge about certain subjects.</p> <h2>2. Manage Multiple Projects</h2> <p>When you work as a traditional employee, you generally only have a certain amount of tasks each day, and you're often doing the same things each month. But when you have a side hustle, things are lot less consistent. You're not only an employee but also the boss, the bookkeeper, the receptionist, the manager &mdash; and everybody else.</p> <p>As a side hustler, you wear a lot more hats and are able to balance many types of projects. Not only are you working for clients, but you're also managing multiple deadlines, and perhaps even outsourcing to other contractors. All of these things will help you learn to balance lots of priorities while still getting things done on time.</p> <h2>3. Streamline Your Workflow</h2> <p>If you don't have a side hustle yet, you may not understand the importance of managing your time wisely. When you have a full time job, family, household chores, errands, and a side hustle, you have to be <em>very efficient </em>with where you spend your time and energy.</p> <p>When I started my side hustle alongside my day job, I began noticing holes in my workday productivity routine. I was able to streamline the processes at my job, in order to get more done in less time.</p> <p>This allowed me to reduce my workload overall, so I could make room for other personal and professional tasks. My employer appreciated this too, as I helped them save money and increase productivity in the office.</p> <h2>4. Diversify Your Income and Career Path</h2> <p>Your career and income are tightly woven together and we all need to make a living to support our families. So what happens when your boss needs to cut costs, or you're handed a pink slip? A side hustle alleviates some of this risk by diversifying the types of income streams you have.</p> <p>Finding another job can take a lot of time and effort, not to mention the additional time it takes to get paid from when you were first hired. This period of stress can be eased by having some money coming in from your side hustle, and a side gig can be a viable second career option, should you need it. It can also take off the pressure while giving you the chance to take your time in pursuing the best opportunity.</p> <h2>5. Broaden Your Network</h2> <p>Working in a traditional office setting means you see the same people day in and day out, which doesn't leave much room for expanding your network. With a side hustle though, specifically one that's online based, you're able to broaden your network everyday.</p> <p>Whether it's meeting up at a local coffee shop, or connecting with new people at an industry conference, a side hustle offers the chance for you to broaden your list of contacts and like-minded individuals. This list of contacts could come in very handy in the future if you get laid off, need to switch jobs, or even take your side hustle full-time.</p> <p><em>Do you have a side hustle? How has it helped expand your career?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-smith">Carrie Smith</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career">6 Job Perks That Can Lead to a Dream Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-launch-your-second-career">How to Launch Your Second Career</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income career career skills promotion raise side hustle Fri, 24 Apr 2015 13:00:05 +0000 Carrie Smith 1400450 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Times a Higher Salary Isn't Worth It http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_stressed_office_000043549226.jpg" alt="Man stressed out at the office" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Money isn't everything. Having the extra funds for foreign travel and designer shopping splurges can be nice &mdash; to say the least &mdash; but not when the tradeoffs include scientifically backed side effects such as insomnia, death, and divorce. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-times-youre-better-off-without-a-promotion?ref=seealso">12 Times You're Better Off Without a Promotion</a>)</p> <p>So if you're facing a job offer that comes with an attractive salary bump, be sure the new gig won't catapult you into any of the following problems.</p> <h2>1. The Commute Would Kill You</h2> <p>Americans spend more time commuting (100+ hours per year) than they do vacationing (80 hours). According to reserach out of Sweden, long commutes also cause a wealth of <a href="http://www.slate.com/articles/business/moneybox/2011/05/your_commute_is_killing_you.html">horrible side effects</a>, including&nbsp;neck pain, obesity, loneliness, divorce, stress, and insomnia. So if the twice daily traffic jam you'd have to endure to get to your higher paying gig seems likely to drive you mad, then it's probably best to stick with the job you've already got. Sure, the extra money would be nice. But research shows you very well may end up spending a good portion of that salary increase on your newfound needs for physical therapy, sleep doctors, and a divorce attorney.</p> <h2>2. The Office Culture is Toxic</h2> <p>If you've ever said, &quot;My job is killing me!&quot; &mdash; you could be right. Research shows that people in&nbsp;<a href="http://healthland.time.com/2011/08/10/study-your-hostile-workplace-may-be-killing-you/">hostile work environments</a> are more likely to die sooner than those who work in atmospheres that are more favorable. Death aside, toxic work environments are also known to provoke aches, stress, and signs of depression. So before accepting a new job offer with a dazzling salary, do your homework.</p> <h2>3. Your Work-Life Balance Would Be Out of Whack</h2> <p>Work has a way of getting in the way of what matters most: family time. These numbers offer a glimpse at the epidemic: 55% of all employees say they don't have enough time for themselves, 67% of employed parents say they don't have enough time with their kids, and 63% of married employees say they don't have enough time with their spouse, according to Families and Work Institute's <a href="http://www.familiesandwork.org/context-matters-insights-about-older-workers-from-the-national-study-of-the-changing-workforce/"><em>National Study of the Changing Workforce</em></a>. If a higher paying gig would mean severely under-serving yourself or your loved ones, it may be best to stick with a lower paying job that offers more flexibility.</p> <h2>4. You Don't Believe in the Work</h2> <p>All the money in the world can't make you feel pride in the job you're doing unless you truly believe in the work. And if you're being offered a better-paying gig at a company whose ideals are in conflict with your beliefs, be they religious, social, or otherwise, your time would be well spent to figure out how to reconcile that &mdash; which could mean declining the job. You'll never reach your potential if you're doing something you don't stand behind 100%.</p> <h2>5. You Don't See Eye to Eye With Your Boss</h2> <p>If the person who's supposed to be raising you up seems set on bringing you down, it might be time to skedaddle. Studies show that <a href="http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10869-011-9253-2">unsupportive bosses</a> affect how your whole family relates to one another, your physical health, and your morale while in the office. They also raise your risk for heart disease. No job is worth putting up with woes like that &mdash; no matter how many zeros are included in the salary.</p> <h2>6. The Company is on the Fritz</h2> <p>There's no need to go down with a sinking ship. If the company trying to pad your pockets is on its way out, it may be wise to stay in control and decline the job offer rather than suffer a layoff in the future.</p> <p><em>Have you ever taken the higher salaried job only to regret it later? Tell us about it in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential">6 Simple Steps to Discovering Your True Salary Potential</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-should-always-negotiate-a-raise-here-are-10-reasons-why">You Should Always Negotiate a Raise: Here Are 10 Reasons Why</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building promotion raise salary Fri, 13 Mar 2015 08:00:09 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1334919 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Career Tactics That Are Actually Holding You Back http://www.wisebread.com/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/career_000026674434.jpg" alt="Coworkers using career tactics that are holding them back" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>What if all your efforts to become the shining star of your organization were having the opposite effect? Sometimes even our best-intentioned ploys to climb the ladder higher and faster can result in an unfortuitous fall down to the lower rungs. Just like over-exercising can harm your body rather than help it, there are repercussions to trying too hard to get ahead at work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today?ref=seealso">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a>)</p> <p>Sometimes our career advancement tactics may be causing you more harm than good.</p> <h2>1. Volunteering for Every Assignment</h2> <p>If you're volunteering for every assignment in hopes of projecting yourself as the tireless, tenacious worker you think your boss wants you to be, you're at risk of stretching yourself too thin. You're right, your boss probably <em>does</em> want a go-getter. But not a burnt out one.</p> <p>Research shows that we actually need rest to not only perform at our peak, but to perform well, period. A 2010 LexisNexis survey of 1,700 white collar workers from the U.S., China, South Africa, the U.K., and Australia revealed that employees spend more than half their workdays receiving and managing information. What's more, half of those surveyed workers confessed that they were <a href="http://www.lexisnexis.com/en-us/about-us/media/press-release.page?id=128751276114739">reaching a breaking point</a> after which they would not be able to accommodate the deluge of data. The takeaway is this: Man is not machine, and if you keep pushing yourself to act like the Energizer Bunny, it's only a matter of time before you crash and burn.</p> <h2>2. Personal Websites That Highlight Your Lack of Experience</h2> <p>If you've got it, flaunt it, as the saying goes. But when it comes to all things ranging from your physique to your personal website, it's best not to accentuate what you're lacking.</p> <p>Yes, a resume site can help advance your career by showcasing your skills and accomplishments. But it can also ward off potential job and networking opportunities if it merely serves as a cyber billboard promoting the fact that you haven't got much experience under your belt. So if you're having trouble compiling a list of your work-related talents, it's probably best to hold off on building that website and instead bide your time trying to gain more experience. Then, once you've got something to boast about, get back to creating that website and shout it from the virtual mountaintops.</p> <h2>3. Unabashedly Trying to Be the Best</h2> <p>In professional team sports like soccer and football, <a href="http://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/cbs-directory/sites/cbs-directory/files/publications/Too%20much%20talent%20PS.pdf">too many elite players</a> can hinder a&nbsp;team's overall performance, according to a recent study by researchers at Columbia University. The same is true in the workplace. When teams of any sort need to come together, the study authors concluded, a deluge of talent can tear them apart. Infighting over dominance is just one of many negative outcomes of what researchers dubbed the &quot;too-much-talent-effect.&quot; So if you're currently on a mission to assert yourself at the head of the office talent pool, it might be beneficial to take a step back, gain some perspective, and consider whether you'd be better off branding yourself instead as the all-star team player.</p> <h2>4. Branding Yourself as Someone You're Not</h2> <p>If you're lying, or even just slightly embellishing, to qualify yourself for a raise, promotion, or new gig, you're running the risk of setting yourself back five steps rather than one ahead. Whether it's saying you're an expert at using a computer program you're actually unfamiliar with or asserting that you speak fluent Spanish when you really don't, you're probably going to suffer some serious repercussions when it comes time to perform on those skills and you fall short. Half of all employers said they would automatically <a href="http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?sd=8%2F7%2F2014&amp;id=pr837&amp;ed=12%2F31%2F2014">dismiss a job candidate</a> if they caught a lie on his or her resume, according to a nationwide survey by CareerBuilder.</p> <h2>5. Over-Extending Yourself Financially</h2> <p>Maybe you broke your budget by self-funding a flight to Colorado for a meet-and-greet with company executives that very well may not hire you. Or you joined the ritzy golf club you can't really afford because your boss belongs there and you're hoping to get some more face time. Perhaps it was a new business suit you splurged on in hopes that it might improve the outcome of your annual performance evaluation meeting. If you're spending money you don't have on things that very well may do nothing to advance your career, stop. Long shots aimed at making gains in the office aren't worth the risk of financial ruin.</p> <p><em>What career tactics have you tried &mdash; only to have them backfire? Please warn others in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise">These 10 Words and Phrases Are Keeping You From Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it">6 Times a Higher Salary Isn&#039;t Worth It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career growth promotion raise Tue, 03 Mar 2015 10:00:06 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1316589 at http://www.wisebread.com The 8 Worst Things Good Employees Do http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_work_000020741145.jpg" alt="Woman at work contemplating" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most of us like to think of ourselves as good employees. We show up for work on time, do our jobs to the best of our abilities, are team players, and put in more than enough hours. But, even good employees can commit career sins &mdash; and most of the time we don't even know we're doing it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired?ref=seealso">12 Reasons You Deserve to Get Fired</a>)</p> <p>Read on to learn the eight worst things good employees do.</p> <h2>1. Buckle Under Pressure</h2> <p>Some jobs are super high stress &mdash; and that can take a toll on an employee after an extended period of time. But as a professional, it's your duty to take these situations in stride and weather the storm to the best of your ability. The last thing you want to do is send the impression that you're just not cut out for your position.</p> <p>&quot;There are times when the environment of the workplace, company culture, or pressure from coworkers, peers, and upper management may influence [good employees] to act outside of their normal behavioral pattern,&quot; says Michael Lan, senior resume consultant at Resume Writer Direct. &quot;Being pressured to meet a quota within a certain deadline, or accomplishing a number of set goals and tasks increases an employee's stress level. Some employees will consequentially buckle under this pressure and make questionable or 'bad' decisions in order to keep up with demands.&quot;</p> <p>You should always strive to handle yourself with poise, but if you think your work demands are consistently unreasonable, schedule a meeting with your boss to discuss.</p> <h2>2. Make Too Many Excuses or Apologize Too Much</h2> <p>&quot;Over-justifying or over-communicating why something isn't ready is a horrible habit I've seen employees fall into,&quot; explains Michelle Brammer, marketing manager for eZanga. &quot;When employees over-justify or give too much communication as to why a task isn't complete, I'm left questioning their judgment or dedication to their job.&quot;</p> <p>As a result, Brammer says, the barrage of apologies may come off like you can't manage multiple tasks or responsibilities &mdash; and that's never a good look. Instead, simply reaffirm your commitment to completing the over-due task ASAP and deliver. If there's something meaningful preventing you from timely completion, by all means do discuss it with your boss.</p> <h2>3. Blend Into the Crowd</h2> <p>Know what happens to the rank-and-file? They get lost in a sea of nobodies just doing their jobs. Is that who you want to be? Let's hope not.</p> <p>&quot;Between being a showy braggart and muffling your hard work, there's a comfortable middle road that you must find in order to claim the benefits of your labor,&quot; offers Constance Dunn, communication and manners expert and author of <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0978761022/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=0978761022&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=FNSTO6IUTD6ATBA4">Practical Glamour: Presenting Your Most Beautiful &amp; Polished Self</a>. &quot;Otherwise, you might find yourself plodding about in the same role, year after year, while others &mdash; perhaps less talented others &mdash; sprint ahead with promotions and raises.&quot;</p> <p>In an effort to avoid this trap, Dunn suggests making it your business to socially congregate with co-workers, even if it's standing around the coffee machine or going for a coffee run with the pack.</p> <p>&quot;Don't wait for them to ask you what you're working on; go ahead and offer interesting tidbits about your current projects in a conversational way,&quot; she says. &quot;This is one strategy to increase your visibility and communicate your competency in the workplace.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Rest on Their Laurels</h2> <p>Becoming a sheep is one thing, but giving up on career advancement altogether is a whole other ballgame &mdash; and one in which you ought not be participating. You don't want to be just a good employee; you should get up every morning to be the best employee. That's the only way you'll see the kind of promotion you dream of &mdash; but you have to work for it.</p> <p>&quot;The worst things good employees do is to not tactfully push to advance their careers,&quot; says David T. Waring, editor of FitSmallBusiness. &quot;Often times good employees trust that good work will be rewarded automatically. Especially in larger companies, this is not always the case, and often times it's the squeaky wheel that gets the grease. While good employees do not want to turn into whiners, making sure that you keep yourself top of mind with those that have the power to advance your career is simply good business.&quot;</p> <h2>5. Allow a Lack of Self-Confidence to Hinder Success</h2> <p>Ever had an idea in a meeting, but were too afraid to lay it out there for fear of sounding stupid or getting that condescending &quot;Really?&quot; look from the boss? I have, so I feel your pain. But keeping mum on a creative or productive idea is never going to help your cause &mdash; ever.</p> <p>Jason M. Schulz, benefits consultant and retired U.S. Army Captain, agrees.</p> <p>&quot;[Some employees are] afraid to speak up when appropriate to do so for fear that they will be ostracized, but then complain later around the water cooler,&quot; he says. &quot;Truth is, most of those employees that think their idea is great when they hear it at the water cooler, really want them to voice their opinion when asked by the boss. And managers aren't just asking for ideas for their health; they genuinely want to see things from the workers' perspective.&quot;</p> <h2>6. Micromanage</h2> <p>I quit a job because I was being micromanaged; it's bad news for a control freak like me (who also has a tendency to micromanage; I'll admit it). The people with whom <em>you</em> work don't like it either &mdash; trust me. So if you have a propensity to be this kind of pest &mdash; yes, I said a <em>pest</em> &mdash; stop it immediately.</p> <p>John J. Brady, executive director and principal of Protem Partners, reminds us that if you can't identify the micromanager in the office, it might just be you.</p> <p>&quot;Most micromanagers do not realize that this label applies to them. They get great feedback as they hold themselves and members of their team to a very high level,&quot; he says. &quot;The problem is, they fear anything less than perfection will hurt their hard-earned credibility, and their very image of perfection gets distorted such that they fail to see the inefficiencies they create and, in most cases, the errors they create by sending a message that only they are competent. Dysfunction and burnout are the usual results.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Work More Than They Contribute</h2> <p>Brady also details the fine line between working and contributing &mdash; two very different things &mdash; that could be holding you back.</p> <p>&quot;Many employees feel insecure about their station at work and, as such, never take vacations, send emails at crazy hours and, in an effort to make sure their commitment is known, talk about it [incessantly],&quot; he says. &quot;Every major study shows that quality and productivity falls after a certain number of hours and without proper breaks from work. The result is that they do good work instead of great work, and they come off as a martyr to management and to colleagues. It doesn't help their career, let alone anyone else's, and isolation is a frequent result.&quot;</p> <p>The takeaway? Relax, boo, you got this. Strive for success, but not <em>too</em> hard, and enjoy a day (maybe a week even) to yourself once in a while.</p> <h2>8. Fail to Think About the Boss's Objectives</h2> <p>Most of us are so busy at work concentrating on our own tasks that we don't give a second thought to what may be on other people's plates, particularly the boss's. It's in your best interest to squash this bad habit today.</p> <p>&quot;Many excellent employees get nothing but stellar feedback, but wonder why they never get promoted,&quot; Brady explains. &quot;At a minimum, you need to think about the business from at least one level up, and then frame your work to fit that set of objectives. Doing a great job at one level doesn't lead management to presume you could excel at the next level, unless you are consistently showing that you know how your current work fits into a larger framework.&quot;</p> <p>Something to consider the next time you're up for review.</p> <p><em>Are any of these habits yours? Or are there other worst things you've seen your good coworkers do?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-people-who-have-their-dream-jobs-do">5 Things People Who Have Their Dream Jobs Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential">6 Simple Steps to Discovering Your True Salary Potential</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-you-should-quit-your-job">8 Signs You Should Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-weird-ways-people-get-promoted">3 Weird Ways People Get Promoted</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-first-5-things-you-must-do-after-getting-laid-off">The First 5 Things You Must Do After Getting Laid Off</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income boss fired layoff promotion raise success Fri, 27 Feb 2015 10:00:12 +0000 Mikey Rox 1309035 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Weird Ways People Get Promoted http://www.wisebread.com/3-weird-ways-people-get-promoted <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-weird-ways-people-get-promoted" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000064732223_Full.jpg" alt="business man selfie" title="business man selfie" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are lots of ways to get promoted. Hard work, diligence, nepotism... But at some companies, not even having a relative in a senior position is worth much when it comes to climbing up the ranks. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-unique-ways-to-score-a-job-interview?ref=seealso">12 Unique Ways to Score a Job Interview</a>)</p> <p>Read on for three of the quirkiest, most inventive promotion methods you've ever heard of. They're anything but run of the mill.</p> <h2>1. An Algorithm</h2> <p>Seven years ago a team of Google's senior-most data crunchers set out to create a mathematical equation to determine <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KY8v-O5Buyc#t=151">who got promoted</a> and when. &quot;We wanted analytics to spit out our people decisions,&quot; says Google VP of People Analytics Prasad Setty. Previously, the company's top dogs would gather for several days at a hotel where they would scour performance reviews and ultimately hand out promotions to those employees they concluded were most deserving. It was an exhausting and time-consuming process, one that Google executives believed big data could accomplish more efficiently. And so the fate of thousands of employees was entrusted to an algorithm.</p> <p>Turns out, people didn't like that much. &quot;We thought that these people who lived in the world of search and ads algorithms all day long would love this,&quot; Setty says. But when the algorithm was presented to Google's hiring committees, they were completely unreceptive. They simply didn't think an algorithm could replace the consideration and care that goes into human resources decisions. And so, after much debate, Google executives agreed that people should make people decisions. Data still contributes to Google's promotions processes, but it's people that are at the reigns.</p> <p>It seems robots won't be taking over for human resources managers anytime soon.</p> <h2>2. Random Selection</h2> <p>Organizations would be more efficient if they promoted people at random. That's the counterintuitive conclusion arrived at by three Italian researchers who were awarded the 2010 Ig Nobel prize in management for their research. Their work is based on the <a href="http://arxiv.org/abs/0907.0455">Peter Principle</a>, the idea that merit-based promotion results in many people assuming positions that exceed their level of competency. To fix this problem, the researchers simply removed merit from the equation. What they found is that when people win promotions by lottery, the entire organization performs better. Yes, we know it sounds crazy, but these researchers did the math to back it up.</p> <p>What the Italians didn't consider, however, is the reaction of employees when informed by management that when it comes to future promotions, their hard work and accomplishments won't be considered. (We predict the scene would be something just short of the apocalypse.)</p> <h2>3. A Sense of Humor</h2> <p>Proteus International&nbsp;<a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/erikaandersen/2013/05/06/want-to-get-a-promotion-be-funny/">weighs a person's sense of humor</a> when making hiring and promotion decisions, according to founding partner Erika Andersen. &quot;Last year we had two final candidates for an admin job in our company; both looked great on paper, and their phone interviews had been positive,&quot; she writes in an explainer on Forbes. &quot;We then had both candidates do an in-person 'inbox simulation' &mdash; in effect, a couple of hours doing tasks and interactions he or she would do on the job. So both people came into the office and spent a couple of hours with us. It quickly became very clear which person we wanted. A key difference: One candidate had a sense of humor, while the other was almost completely humorless.&quot;</p> <p>It wasn't that the chosen candidate told jokes; rather, she was quick-witted and funny in an understated sort of way. Andersen explains, &quot;When I said, 'You're a native New Yorker? I don't meet many of those,' she replied, 'Yeah, I know more people in New York who are from other countries than from other boroughs.'&quot; Nothing worthy of an SNL performance, but it's the kind of clever and light-hearted remark that makes a person generally pleasant to be around.</p> <p>As it turns out, humor is valued by executives far beyond the boardroom at Proteus International. A recent survey by Robert Half Finance found that 79% of chief financial officers believe an&nbsp;<a href="http://blog.roberthalffinance.com/humor-career-advice">employee's sense of humor</a>&nbsp;plays an important role in how well they fit in with the company's corporate culture. Many of those surveyed also said they believe a person with a sense of humor produces better work.</p> <p><em>What's the strangest way you've been promoted?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-weird-ways-people-get-promoted">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential">6 Simple Steps to Discovering Your True Salary Potential</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do">The 8 Worst Things Good Employees Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-biggest-mistakes-freelancers-make">The 5 Biggest Mistakes Freelancers Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-after-getting-a-raise">10 Things You Should Never Do After Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income marketing promotion raise self promotion Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:00:13 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1283631 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Simple Steps to Discovering Your True Salary Potential http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/wealthy-businessman-478885063-small.jpg" alt="wealthy businessman" title="wealthy businessman" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Salary negotiation is not always easy, especially if you don't know the value you and your position bring to your team and to your company.</p> <p>So ask yourself these six questions and uncover your true market worth before you start driving a hard bargain. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-should-always-negotiate-a-raise-here-are-10-reasons-why?ref=seealso">You Should Always Negotiate a Raise: Here are 10 Reasons Why</a>)</p> <h2>1. How Valuable Are You to Your Team?</h2> <p>For any salary negotiation to be successful, you need to be highly regarded by your boss and colleagues. If your reputation is lacking, it's time to start enhancing skills and networking within the office. People who <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-should-always-negotiate-a-raise-here-are-10-reasons-why">get ahead at work</a> tend to follow through on their commitments, help other people reach their goals, and do more than what is merely expected. Get a firm understanding of what skills and traits are valued within your organization and do your best to personify them.</p> <p>If you don't know what these are, it never hurts to ask. Set up time with your boss to ask which skills she'd like to see you develop. Talk to senior team members and find out what successes led to their promotions. Ask peers how you're perceived within the organization (or even within your team). All of this feedback can help you develop the picture of where you currently stand and what steps you can take to move up within your organization.</p> <h2>2. Do You Understand Your Compensation Structure?</h2> <p>Many positions come with multiple compensation streams including salary, commission, stock options, and retirement and health benefits. Each is (normally) offered for a different reason and so should be considered separately when negotiating for compensation.</p> <p>Salary is what your employee offers in exchange for your job performance. In theory, if you do a good job, you'll get higher pay raises.</p> <p>Stock options, in contrast, are generally offered to incentivize employee loyalty, which is why you'll often see this perk packaged with a vesting schedule. In other words, don't fail to negotiate for a salary bump because your employer offers a stock option. According to one career writer, the best time to ask for a raise is when you first recognize <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-ask-for-a-raise-and-get-it-2014-6">you're not being paid your fair worth</a>. If you wait for your annual review, your team's salary increases will have already been planned out, and your boss likely won't have budget flexibility. Start lobbying six months in advance, however, and you have real potential to change the outcome of the conversation.</p> <p>Attractive health and retirement benefits are designed to make a job more attractive than competing offers for new prospects.</p> <h2>3. How Is Your Industry Compensating Your Role?</h2> <p>You'll want to be aware of the salary range for your role, within your industry and geographic location. Jobs in some industries and areas of the country pay substantially higher than in others. Check out services like <a href="http://www.salary.com">Salary.com</a> or <a href="http://www.payscale.com">Payscale</a> to research the range for your current field.</p> <h2>4. What Would It Cost to Replace You?</h2> <p>Before you can negotiate, it pays to know that what you're asking for is less than your<a href="http://www.zanebenefits.com/blog/bid/312123/Employee-Retention-The-Real-Cost-of-Losing-an-Employee"> replacement cost</a>. According to one health benefits and insurance blog, it costs a business the equivalent of six to nine months of salary to recruit and train a new worker. For someone making $40,000 per year, that adds up to $20,000 to $30,000.</p> <p>If you're an employee worth keeping (i.e., you're good at what you do and not at PIA to be around), then your boss would probably rather avoid the hassle and cost of finding a new recruit. The problem? Bosses aren't always proactive about making sure their employees are paid fairly. It's up to you to open a dialogue about your expectations. Ask what steps you can take to improve your job skills and reach a higher salary level. If your boss isn't willing to discuss a potential salary increase (even over the long term), it may be an indication that you're not valued in your role or that there just isn't budget for the bump. If this is the case, then consider step number 5 (or 6).</p> <h2>5. Is Your Current Employer Your Best Option?</h2> <p>If your current boss doesn't appreciate the value you bring to the role, it may be time to start looking at other options. Sometimes a non-quantifiable event like a personality conflict with a boss can get in the way of an employee's upward mobility. If you know you provide quality work but still can't seem to move beyond your current role, it may be time to explore options outside of your current employer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-things-you-need-to-do-if-you-want-to-quit-your-job?ref=seealso">The 10 Things You Need to Do If You Want to Quit Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>6. What's Going On Outside of Your Company?</h2> <p>Keeping your finger on your industry's pulse is the best way to stay aware of new job opportunities. If you're not properly valued by your current employer, you may want to find out what a competitor would pay for your skills.</p> <p>Make connections through trade organizations, your local chamber of commerce, or by befriending people who perform similar functions at the competitor down the street. You never know what opportunities may arise and it can pay off to be well networked. You may even want to apply for competitor jobs. Being offered a position that pays 20% more can provide valuable leverage with your current boss. Or, you may simply decide that the new position offers better long-term opportunity than your current gig. Either way, the more you know about the current market in your industry, the better prepared you are for any opportunities that may come your way. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-31-hidden-networks-that-can-help-you-land-jobs?ref=seealso">Your 31 Hidden Networks That Can Help You Land Jobs</a>)</p> <p><em>Have you used your negotiating prowess to land a new and better job? What knowledge did you arm yourself with and what strategies worked best for you? We want to hear about it in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/alaina-tweddale">Alaina Tweddale</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise">These 10 Words and Phrases Are Keeping You From Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-underpaid-how-to-figure-out-what-salary-you-deserve">Are You Underpaid? How to Figure Out What Salary You Deserve</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-negotiate-higher-pay-at-your-next-new-job">How to Negotiate Higher Pay at Your Next New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it">6 Times a Higher Salary Isn&#039;t Worth It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do">The 8 Worst Things Good Employees Do</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income earnings paycheck promotion raise salary Fri, 17 Oct 2014 09:00:04 +0000 Alaina Tweddale 1236864 at http://www.wisebread.com Wages Are Rising — Here’s How to Get Your Cut http://www.wisebread.com/wages-are-rising-here-s-how-to-get-your-cut <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/wages-are-rising-here-s-how-to-get-your-cut" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/counting-money-466559183-small.jpg" alt="counting money" title="counting money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Thankfully, after wage levels remained stagnant for many years, wages are finally rising! Annual gains could hit <a href="http://www.kiplinger.com/article/business/T019-C021-S005-wages-to-rise-but-more-for-some-than-others.html">4% by 2017</a>.</p> <p>That said, employers are still conservative and not rushing to pay you more. Here are some helpful tips on getting your share.</p> <h2>1. Join an Industry on the Rise</h2> <p>Information technology positions such as programmers, developers, analysts, and engineers continue to fare well. Cities are <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/joelkotkin/2014/05/27/the-cities-winning-the-battle-for-information-jobs-2014/">battling each other</a> to court IT companies. Have a background in mathematics, science, or information systems? Start interviewing for jobs in that arena, where the starting salary is already higher than the average.</p> <p>Health and medicine professionals are also riding a higher tide. Nurse practitioners, registered nurses, and practical nurses are all making more, but nurse practitioners are especially in demand with the <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/dandiamond/2014/06/06/since-obamacare-passed-50-months-ago-healthcare-has-gained-almost-1-million-jobs/">expansion of health care</a> coverage to more citizens.</p> <p>Financial sector workers like traders, bankers, and fund managers <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/alpha-consumer/2014/02/05/why-finance-jobs-are-growing-fast">continue to do well</a> (surprise, surprise). Due to the continued need for credit and asset analysis, there is room to join the financial sector with the right experience.</p> <p>Areas that do not see much growth are categories in which tons of eager candidates compete for jobs: teaching, marketing, public relations, and customer service. If you find yourself in one of those categories, try spinning your experience to applying for positions at companies in information, health, engineering, and finance.</p> <h2>2. Ask for a Raise</h2> <p>If you are currently employed, now would be a good time to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-should-always-negotiate-a-raise-here-are-10-reasons-why">ask for a raise</a>. When was your last raise? It should typically happen every year. If you have gone longer than two years without a raise (and thanks to the recession, many have), it will be fairly reasonable and easy to ask. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise?ref=seealso">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a>)</p> <h3>When to Ask for a Raise</h3> <p>Try asking three to four months before the annual review. Annual reviews tend to happen at the end of the fiscal year, when the money is spent and companies are more conservative. Asking before your company's annual wage hike is ideal because you can state your case before the bosses evaluate the staff. Plus, you likely do a lot of great work that your bosses do not know about. Make them aware of your worthiness and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-should-always-negotiate-a-raise-here-are-10-reasons-why">negotiate your slice</a> before the pie has been cut.</p> <h3>Leverage Your Education</h3> <p>Have you spent most of the recession going to back to school in the summers, nights, and weekends? It's always a good time to take advantage of your new income potential. Those who can boast a college degree for entry-level positions can ask for more than those with a high-school degree. Try asking your employer to review your new experience and education level when considering your raise.</p> <h2>3. Relocate to a High Minimum Wage State</h2> <p>Many students and working parents find themselves in need of extra minimum wage shifts in industries such as retail, fast food, and customer service. If you are work for hourly wages, now might be a good time to relocate, as 13 states raised their minimum wage in 2014. Even more good news: Those same 13 states are seeing <a href="http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2014/07/03/3456393/minimum-wage-state-increase-employment/">faster job growth</a> than the states that did not increase their minimum wage. This may also be a good time to leverage a higher paying position elsewhere for an hourly raise at your current job.</p> <p><em>How are you planning to boost your wage? Please share in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amanda-meadows">Amanda Meadows</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/wages-are-rising-here-s-how-to-get-your-cut">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-should-always-negotiate-a-raise-here-are-10-reasons-why">You Should Always Negotiate a Raise: Here Are 10 Reasons Why</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-use-technology-to-upgrade-your-career">6 Ways to Use Technology to Upgrade Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-high-paying-jobs-that-didnt-exist-10-years-ago">9 High-Paying Jobs That Didn&#039;t Exist 10 Years Ago</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building jobs money negotiation raise wages Thu, 04 Sep 2014 15:00:06 +0000 Amanda Meadows 1203542 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/boss-employee-handshake-140300414-small.jpg" alt="boss employee handshake" title="boss employee handshake" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The squeaky wheel gets the grease, and that goes double when it comes to asking for a promotion or a raise.</p> <p>A 2014 study performed by management consulting firm Accenture found that nearly 80% of employees who ask for a raise, and 70% of employees who <a href="http://www.accenture.com/SiteCollectionDocuments/PDF/Accenture-IWD-2014-Research-Career-Capital.pdf">ask for a promotion, get one</a>. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year?ref=seealso">12 Ways to finally Get That Promotion This Year</a>)</p> <p>But even with such high success rates, the study found that half of the people polled never bring up the subject of a promotion or a raise to their superiors, potentially robbing themselves of advancement. Getting ahead and earning more can be as easy as asking for it, as long as you know what to say. So go ahead and try one of the following angles.</p> <h2>1. &quot;I'm Good for the Company.&quot;</h2> <p>Remind higher-ups of your value whenever the opportunity arises, such as during performance reviews, meetings, and other business-related conversations with management. You don't want to bring up every little thing you do, but you should definitely mention those specific times when you exceeded a customer's expectations, outdid yourself on a special project, or had an especially positive impact on the bottom line. Make sure you have hard numbers or other evidence to back up your claims, or it may just come across as empty bragging.</p> <h2>2. &quot;I Have a Unique Skill Set.&quot;</h2> <p>One of the best ways to set yourself up for a promotion or raise is to let management know about the distinctive knowledge, skills, and experience you bring to the table. Think about the things you do or know that go above and beyond what is necessary for your current position. Even better, demonstrate how those skills have helped you overcome issues or otherwise perform your job. Of course, the absolute best way to go about it is to let your boss know how you can use your one-of-a-kind knowledge to address a current or recurring problem.</p> <h2>3. &quot;What He Said.&quot;</h2> <p>How do upper leadership, top performers, and key influencers interact and engage upper management and each other? Observing these interactions during meetings as well as in the break room can tell you a lot about the communication styles and behaviors adopted by leaders in your company. To learn even more, engage these key people in conversation by making a positive comment about how they handled a recent project and asking specific questions, such as how they dealt with a prominent issue or managed to come in under budget despite the high demands of a client.</p> <h2>4. &quot;I Understand the Inner Workings.&quot;</h2> <p>Showing that you know the little nuances that keep the business running smoothly tells your supervisors that you understand not just the nature of your position, but the interconnected network of other employees and departments as well. Use the intel you gather from all that bigwig shoulder rubbing to enhance your knowledge and demonstrate your grasp of things that exceed your job description, especially the details of any specific positions you're gunning for. Peruse trade publications and professional association newsletters and attend industry-related functions to stay up-to-date on the bigger picture, as well.</p> <h2>5. &quot;People Like Me.&quot;</h2> <p>You may be the absolute best person for the job, but your chances of snagging a raise or promotion can be affected negatively if you don't have a good rapport with coworkers and supervisors. A 2010 study to <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=JcpU___4L7sC&amp;pg=PA125&amp;lpg=PA125&amp;dq=favorable+impression+performance+review+study+pfeffer&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=9-P0-n6gVL&amp;sig=uYzdxXvDRyB-Sf7VDBV031JO5hg&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ei=5y3QU4PWH4LC8AGqiYGYAw&amp;ved=0CB8Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&amp;q=favorable%20impression%20performance%20review%20study%20pfeffer&amp;f=false">determine the effect friendliness has on performance evaluations</a> found that participants gave more favorable reviews to people who displayed better interpersonal skills than those who appeared less amiable, even when the good-natured subject performed worse on tasks. The leader of the project, Stanford professor Jeffrey Pfeffer, summarized the gist of his findings in a 2013 interview: &quot;<a href="http://www.bakadesuyo.com/2013/04/interview-stanford-mba-school-professor-teaches-secret-promotions-raises-power/">Life is really about relationships</a> and your success in getting promoted and getting raises and getting hired, depends on the quality of the network and relationships you were able to build with a large number of other people inside your company and for that matter, outside your company.&quot;</p> <p><em>What have you said to help you get that promotion or raise? Please share in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lauren-treadwell">Lauren Treadwell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bosses-say-these-are-their-6-favorite-qualities-in-employees-do-you-have-them">Bosses Say These Are Their 6 Favorite Qualities in Employees — Do You Have Them?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it">6 Times a Higher Salary Isn&#039;t Worth It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career promotion raise Wed, 27 Aug 2014 15:00:04 +0000 Lauren Treadwell 1195556 at http://www.wisebread.com These 10 Words and Phrases Are Keeping You From Getting a Raise http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/female-businesswomen-talking-480160831-small.jpg" alt="female businesswomen talking" title="female businesswomen talking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Nobody seems to have told 2014 that the <a href="http://www.epi.org/publication/class-of-2014/" style="text-decoration:none;">recession ended five years ago</a>.</p> <p>Not only are college graduates having a hard time getting jobs, but current employees are having <a href="http://www.foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2014/05/21/how-to-ask-and-get-raise-deserve/" style="text-decoration:none;">a hard time getting raises</a>. This means that now more than ever, you should take every interaction with your supervisor or boss as an opportunity to leave a positive impression.</p> <p>And while we can't necessarily tell you how to solve your companies' specific challenges or exceed your role's specific expectations, we can tell you that speaking eloquently and with confidence is a great way to stand from the crowd. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year?ref=seealso" style="text-decoration:none;">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a>)</p> <p>With that in mind, here are 10 words and phrases that you should drop from your vocabulary to increase your chances of getting a raise.</p> <h2>1. &quot;Oh&hellip;&quot;</h2> <p>If the first word coming out of your mind is &quot;oh&quot; every time that your boss asks you a question, she may get the impression that you have no idea of what's going in your projects. Being caught by surprise every now and then is not a corporate sin, but you shouldn't give the impression that your mind is wandering instead of focusing in your tasks.</p> <p>Stop looking like a deer caught in headlights and ask relevant, meaningful questions that allow you to gather more information.</p> <h2>2. &quot;Everything&quot;</h2> <ul> <li>What caused the delay in the project?</li> <li>What can I do to help you improve your performance?</li> <li>What are the benefits to our company from your job?</li> <li>What would you have done differently?</li> </ul> <p>If you answer &quot;everything&quot; to the four questions above, your supervisor is likely to facepalm. While it may be true that every single possible thing went wrong with your project, he is asking you to shine some light into the specifics.</p> <p>From that &quot;everything,&quot; cite up to three specific reasons and elaborate on them. Your supervisor will thank you and believe that you know your stuff.</p> <h2>3. &quot;Not My Job&quot;</h2> <p>Words to die by. If you are a fan of the Spiderman comics or movies, then you know that this mentality contributed to the eventual death of <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsOGSMvQSxE" style="text-decoration:none;">Peter Parker's Uncle Ben</a>. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-surprisingly-frugal-lifestyles-of-12-famous-superheroes?ref=seealso" style="text-decoration:none;">The Surprisingly Frugal Lifestyles of 12 Famous Superheroes</a>)</p> <p>You cannot refuse to lend a hand to your coworkers all the time. Put yourself in their shoes and imagine if every single person in the office did that to you &mdash; how would you feel?</p> <p>Listen to your coworker's request and determine who is the right person to help. Remember what goes around, comes around. Set a positive expectation for when you are the one asking for help.</p> <h2>4. &quot;Honestly&quot;</h2> <p>Does this mean that unless you're saying &quot;honestly&quot; people are to assume that you're not being honest?</p> <p>Most people tell white lies or misrepresent facts. Researches have found that <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1213171/Men-lie-times-day-twice-women-study-finds.html" style="text-decoration:none;">men tell six lies a day</a> on average to their partner, boss and work colleagues, while women tell an average of three. However, this doesn't mean that you should create special truth periods through &quot;honestly.&quot; Additionally, if you say &quot;honestly&quot; out loud, it sounds as if you're venting frustration rather than infusing confidence in your statements.</p> <h2>5. &quot;I'll Try&quot;</h2> <p>Does this mean that you will do it or not? There is a big difference in either answer, so you need to be more specific than that.</p> <p>For example, imagine that you want to get a raise. The &quot;I'll try&quot; answer doesn't provide you any specifics. You don't have a target date, a list of action items, or a target salary to reach. If you want a raise, you have to go for it, not just try. From those who ask for a raise, <a href="http://www.cbsnews.com/news/easiest-way-to-get-a-raise-and-promotion/" style="text-decoration:none;">85% at least get something</a> and 63% get at least as much as they asked for.</p> <p>So say yes or no, and fully commit to a course of action.</p> <h2>6. &quot;It's Just Business&quot;</h2> <p>It's never just business. The <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/use-the-8020-rule-to-maximize-your-financial-opportunities" style="text-decoration:none;">80/20 rule explains</a> why.</p> <p>This ratio reminds us that 80% of your revenue, comes from 20% of your client base. That 20% is a combination of legacy clients, satisfied clients, and &quot;afraid of change&quot; clients. You know most of those clients by name and are comfortable enough to have a relaxed, casual chit-chat with them during conference calls. These clients are sticking with your company because of a good relationship. It's just not business.</p> <p>By coldly claiming &quot;it's just business,&quot; you are burning bridges and closing doors to potential business opportunities. And you're also potentially closing a door on your own raise if your supervisor catches wind.</p> <h2>7. &quot;Just Kidding&quot;</h2> <p>Every office needs a bit of good humor. No office needs passive-aggressiveness. And the end-all phrase of passive-aggressiveness is &quot;just kidding.&quot; As in:</p> <ul> <li>&quot;Kelly is such a slacker. Just kidding!&quot;</li> <li>&quot;Because Matt aaaaalways shows up on time, right? Just kidding!&quot;</li> <li>&quot;I didn't mean that, you know I was just kidding, don't you?&quot;</li> </ul> <p>Sugar coating insults or negative comments leads to resentment. There is a time and a place for jokes. Make sure that you learn the appropriate situations for serious and light comments at your company. Making enemies means losing respect, means having a tougher time justifying why you deserve more responsibility and compensation than you're already getting.</p> <h2>8. &quot;Let Me Finish This First&quot;</h2> <p>Every time that you hear this phrase, three things often come to mind:</p> <ul> <li>This person can only work on one thing at a time.</li> <li>This person is very rigid and not willing to adapt.</li> <li>This person is not willing to listen to me.</li> </ul> <p>While multitasking can do more harm than good, it is also true that our brains can handle <a href="http://www.feedbooks.com/userbook/23831.pdf" style="text-decoration:none;">five to nine things</a> at once. When asked to pay attention to something that may be more urgent, you need to answer that call. Being a team player provides you ammunition for the next time that your supervisor is doing performance reviews or that you ask for a raise.</p> <h2>9. &quot;But&hellip;&quot;</h2> <p>This one word has the power to undo everything positive you listed earlier. As in:</p> <ul> <li>&quot;Your design is outstanding, but&hellip;&quot;</li> <li>&quot;Yes, you show up to work early, however&hellip;&quot;</li> <li>&quot;I love the latest logo revision, but&hellip;&quot;</li> </ul> <p>People don't hear enough compliments throughout the day. Researchers say that you should give between <a href="http://appreciationadvantage.com/how-many-compliments-should-you-give" style="text-decoration:none;">three to ten positive comments for each negative one</a> you dish out. So the next time you provide a compliment, simply say it, and let it marinade on the other person. Especially when closing a meeting or ending a call, you want to end on a high note that resonates for a couple moments.</p> <h2>10. &quot;I'm No Expert&hellip;&quot;</h2> <p>Then you shouldn't be saying anything!</p> <ul> <li>Would you ask a non-expert in medicine about how to treat a disease</li> <li>Would you care that somebody without legal expertise reviews your will?</li> <li>Would you trust your retirement account to a person without expertise in financial matters?</li> </ul> <p>No, you wouldn't.</p> <p>When you don't have the expertise, let the experts talk. And when you do hold the necessary credentials, don't undermine them and just state your case. You will sound more assertive and look more professional.</p> <p>And so will your new compensation package.</p> <p><em>What other words and phrases need to disappear from our professional vocabulary? Please share in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential">6 Simple Steps to Discovering Your True Salary Potential</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-turn-your-stress-into-money">8 Ways to Turn Your Stress Into Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead">Didn&#039;t Get the Raise? Ask for This, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building earnings extra income income paycheck promotion raise Fri, 15 Aug 2014 09:00:04 +0000 Damian Davila 1184375 at http://www.wisebread.com