research http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4798/all en-US 6 Quick Ways to Retrain for a New Career http://www.wisebread.com/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i_have_made_my_tablet_a_mini_workstation.jpg" alt="I have made my tablet a mini workstation" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You need more than an entry-level job to pay the bills, but you don't have the time or funds to get a four-year college degree. Or maybe you already have a college degree, but it's not helping you find work. You could be a stay-at-home parent re-entering the workforce, or a midlevel manager who's sick of your industry and wants to start fresh.</p> <p>If this sounds familiar, you could soon be one of the most in-demand types of workers in America: the &quot;middle skill&quot; worker. More than half of all available jobs fall into this category. These are jobs that require more than a high school diploma, but less than a college degree &mdash; whether it's a certificate program, an apprenticeship, or on-the-job training.</p> <p>If you're ready to switch gears and retrain for a new gig, there are some fast and affordable ways to do that.</p> <h2>1. Pinpoint your target job</h2> <p>Even if you need to get retrained quickly, that doesn't mean you should skip the planning stage. <em>Do not </em>enroll in a training program without knowing what job you're going for and how much it would pay.</p> <p>If you haven't chosen a target industry yet, look at the ones with the highest-paying jobs that don't require a college degree. Once, these jobs were mostly found in manufacturing, but now they're more likely to be in the &quot;skilled services industries,&quot; such as health care, finance, and information technology.</p> <p>Georgetown University lists the <a href="https://goodjobsdata.org/wp-content/uploads/Good-Jobs-States.pdf" target="_blank">top industries and occupations in each state</a> that don't require a BA; in Pennsylvania, for instance, the top industries are manufacturing and health services, and the top occupation is office and administrative support (median earnings: $51,000). You can also check the resources offered by your state development department; California, for example, lists the <a href="http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/customers/middle-skill-infographics.html" target="_blank">most in-demand middle skill occupations</a> for each region. Also think about the job's future; check <a href="https://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_table_103.htm" target="_blank">job growth projections</a> and find out which workers may be <a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2015/05/21/408234543/will-your-job-be-done-by-a-machine" target="_blank">replaced by robots</a>.</p> <p>Besides this online research, you should get the word on the street in your community. Ask your friends and family what type of jobs their employers have trouble filling, what those jobs are like, and what they pay. Visit your local job center and study the openings.</p> <p>Finally, consider working with a vocational counselor or career coach who could guide you. If you recently lost your job, your local workforce agency or your former employer might provide you with this kind of help for free. If not, it may be worth the money to hire one out of pocket. Make sure you find a counselor with experience in the middle-skills market &mdash; not an executive recruiter or coach &mdash; and make it clear what you want out of the relationship before you start.</p> <h2>2. Focus on fit</h2> <p>Once you have a list of promising jobs you could train for, cross out those that you know you don't have the aptitude for or would hate. If you're a couch potato, there's probably no point in trying to get certified as a personal trainer. Ask yourself which jobs could make good use of your soft skills or transferable skills from previous jobs. Take an aptitude test if you don't already know what you're best at. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-soft-skills-every-employer-values?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Soft Skills Every Employer Values</a>)</p> <h2>3. Find the right training program</h2> <p>Local research is probably your best friend here, too. If you can land an informational interview at a prospective employer, find out what certificate, associate degree, or other training they look for or require. Ask contacts who are already in your desired field where they trained and if they would recommend it.</p> <p>Perhaps the most important question you can ask about a job training program is whether it is connected with local companies that hire graduates. Programs codeveloped by hiring companies, or otherwise &quot;demand driven,&quot; produce graduates with higher employment rates.</p> <p>Having teachers who work full-time in the industry can be a plus, too; when my husband was training to be a video game artist, he ended up getting hired as a part-time game tester by one of his teachers, and that job later led to a full-time artist position.</p> <p>You should also research potential schools and programs online. Is the program recognized by a national association for the field? What do students say about the program in forums? Has the school been targeted by student lawsuits for fraud or does it have other bad press? What is the school's graduation and employment rate? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-online-certifications-worth-the-price?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are Online Certifications Worth the Price?</a>)</p> <h2>4. Don't forget the trades</h2> <p>Deciding to become a plumber, electrician, or carpenter isn't a quick fix. It takes four years of apprenticeship, for example, to become a licensed journeyman electrician. That's after passing the union application exam, which many people spend months or years preparing for. On the other hand, you can earn while you learn; the average apprentice electrician earns around $35,000 a year. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Jobs That Pay Over $50K and Don't Require a Bachelor's Degree</a>)</p> <h2>5. Try temping</h2> <p>Registering with one or more temporary agencies can be more than a way to make ends meet while researching your career move; it can be a way of conducting that research. Think about it: If you apply for a job or even attend a job interview, you get a very limited peek inside the company. But as a temp, you'll spend all day on the inside. You could be exposed to job roles you might not have even known about. Ask questions of everyone you work with, from the agency staff, to your on-site supervisor, to co-workers.</p> <h2>6. Look for retraining opportunities within your current company</h2> <p>If you like where you work, try to get trained for a better job within the organization. You might approach a manager about this, or you could ask human resources what education programs the company has.</p> <p>You might also discreetly talk to other managers, or browse internal job listings. I recently met someone who had been driving a forklift at a large grocery warehouse, until the company paid for her to get trained in refrigerator/freezer repair. Now she makes more money and has more job satisfaction, without ever having to interview for a new job.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Quick%2520Ways%2520to%2520Retrain%2520for%2520a%2520New%2520Career.jpg&amp;description=6%20Quick%20Ways%20to%20Retrain%20for%20a%20New%20Career"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Quick%20Ways%20to%20Retrain%20for%20a%20New%20Career.jpg" alt="6 Quick Ways to Retrain for a New Career" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree">5 Jobs That Pay Over $50K and Don&#039;t Require a Bachelor&#039;s Degree</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-escape-a-dying-industry">8 Ways to Escape a Dying Industry</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job">12 Things You Should Do in the First Six Months of a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/starting-a-new-job-3-rules-to-live-by">Starting a New Job: 3 Rules to Live By</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building apprenticeships certifications job growth middle skills new job research retraining training programs Fri, 06 Apr 2018 09:00:07 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2120733 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Research a Home's Location Before You Buy http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-research-a-homes-location-before-you-buy <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-research-a-homes-location-before-you-buy" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/paper_house_under_a_magnifying_lens_1.jpg" alt="Paper house under a magnifying lens" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When searching for the best qualities in a new a home, you've probably heard that location is everything. There's a reason for that. You can change nearly everything about a house except for where it's located.</p> <p>To make sure you're going to love where you're located, you'd best research the heck out of your future block, neighborhood, city, and region. Here are the criteria to use when evaluating home locations.</p> <h2>1. The home market</h2> <p>You need to look at current home prices in a neighborhood to figure out not only whether you can afford to buy a house there, but also whether a particular house is priced fairly. In addition to current prices, look at the direction prices have moved over the past five years. Are you buying on the upswing or the downswing?</p> <p>Realtor.com warns that neighborhoods with a number of houses lingering on the market for years, despite multiple price decreases, might be a warning sign of a bad investment. A good tool for researching an area's market history is <a href="https://www.zillow.com/home-values/" target="_blank">Zillow's Home Value Index</a>. Enter the ZIP code and get summaries of the price changes for the past five years, and a forecast for the next year. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-learn-about-your-homes-history?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Learn About Your Home's History</a>)</p> <h2>2. Crime</h2> <p>If you ask around, you'll get a wide variety of subjective impressions about whether a neighborhood is safe. But there is data out there that can give you a more realistic picture.</p> <p><a href="https://www.trulia.com/local-info/cities" target="_blank">Trulia's City Guides</a> include crime statistics and neighborhood crime maps for some of the biggest cities. Many city police departments have created their own crime data maps. <a href="https://www.crimereports.com/" target="_blank">CrimeReports</a> has consolidated data from 1,000 different departments, searchable by ZIP code.</p> <p>You can also plug an address into the <a href="https://www.nsopw.gov/" target="_blank">U.S. Department of Justice's sex offender database</a> to find out how many registered sex offenders live nearby.</p> <h2>3. Walkability</h2> <p>Whenever my family drives through a beautiful (and often expensive) mountainous neighborhood in Marin County, California, I shake my head and say, &quot;I could never live here.&quot; Why? Because I like to be able to walk out my front door to run my errands, without getting in the car or worrying about being run down on the edge of the road.</p> <p>If you're like me, check your future neighborhood's <a href="https://www.walkscore.com/cities-and-neighborhoods/" target="_blank">Walk Score</a>, which rates the proportion of your errands that can be accomplished on foot. Highly walkable cities such as New York score in the high 80s, while certain neighborhoods, such as San Francisco's Chinatown (Walk Score: 100), qualify as a &quot;Walker's Paradise.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-evaluate-a-neighborhood-before-you-buy?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Evaluate a Neighborhood Before You Buy</a>)</p> <h2>4. Public transit</h2> <p>The Walk Score website also ranks ZIP codes by the <a href="https://www.walkscore.com/transit-score-methodology.shtml" target="_blank">availability of public transit</a>, a consideration that not nearly enough people consider when buying a house. Besides checking the score, look into how a neighborhood's transit would work for you. Does it go to your work? Would you be able to walk or bike to the train or bus, or would you have to drive there? And if you have to drive, how's the parking situation? Is there a backup form of transit if the main system is down or delayed? Get this information by looking up the websites of the local transit systems, asking locals, and &mdash; this is important &mdash; trying the commute before you commit.</p> <h2>5. Schools</h2> <p>Since I have three children, the quality of public schools has been a major factor both times we have relocated. For every house I've considered, I've looked up the local school on Zillow, and checked <a href="https://www.greatschools.org/" target="_blank">GreatSchools</a>, which provides data on test scores, student progress, equity, and disciplinary issues, as well as reviews.</p> <p>But schools are much more than just numbers. So if we got serious about a house, I'd dig deeper, researching the school by searching local parent bulletin boards and social media, asking local contacts about the school, and finally, touring the school.</p> <p>Besides the general quality of a school, you should look at whether the school offers programs that are important for your family &mdash; for instance, foreign language instruction or a gifted and talented program. Another question to look into: Are there public charter or magnet schools your child could attend if the neighborhood school doesn't work for you?</p> <p>Often, being in a better school district can explain why one house costs more than a similar house just a few blocks away. Some families may opt to take the cheaper house and use the money they save to send their kids to private school. It's all part of the equation.</p> <h2>6. Climate</h2> <p>My family once considered a move from Chicago to Montreal for a job. My husband and I figured that, having grown up in Wisconsin, we were used to snow and cold. But one statistic gave me pause: Montreal receives an average 82 inches of snow per year. That's more than twice Chicago's annual total. I realized that, while living in Chicago, not once had I wished for twice as much snow. We moved to California instead.</p> <p>If you are considering a move to another geographical region, make sure you have a realistic idea of what the weather will be like year round and how that might impact you. How will it affect your utility bills? You might have loved the weather in Florida while you vacationed at the beach, but would you love having to run the air conditioner year round if you lived there?</p> <p>One place to research weather is <a href="https://www.usclimatedata.com/" target="_blank">U.S. Climate Data</a>, which will give you the average high and low for each month of the year, as well as the average sunshine and precipitation totals.</p> <p>In this era of climate change, it's also worth considering not just the past, but the future. Check with <a href="https://msc.fema.gov/portal/search" target="_blank">FEMA's Flood Map</a> to figure out if you'll need flood insurance. And if you are anywhere near the East Coast or Gulf of Mexico, check the national <a href="https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/nationalsurge/" target="_blank">hurricane storm surge maps</a>. Also read up on natural disasters in the area in the past few years. Have there been floods? Wildfires? Ask yourself if you are prepared to deal with more intense versions of those incidents in the future. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-other-kinds-of-insurance-you-may-need-to-buy-for-your-home?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Other Kinds of Insurance You May Need to Buy for Your Home</a>)</p> <h2>7. Seismic risk</h2> <p>Surprisingly few people seem to consider earthquake risk when buying a home. My own home sits precariously close to the Hayward fault in the San Francisco Bay Area, which some scientists say is overdue for a major earthquake. It didn't dissuade my family from buying, but we did decide to invest heavily in seismic retrofitting, shoring up our old house's foundation and certain walls to help it survive the Big One when it comes.</p> <p>If you decide to buy in a quake-prone area, you will need to decide whether to purchase earthquake insurance. You may want an engineer to conduct a seismic inspection to see what has been or could be done to strengthen the structure.</p> <p>Another consideration in seismic activity zones is the type of earth your home sits on. When my husband and I bought our first San Francisco condo, we found out after the fact that it was in a &quot;liquefaction zone&quot; &mdash; an area where the ground could act like a liquid during intense shaking. These homes are built on loose sand or landfill, and are much more susceptible to damage than homes built on more solid ground. You can investigate an area's liquefaction risk on <a href="https://geomaps.wr.usgs.gov/sfgeo/liquefaction/maps.html" target="_blank">U.S. Geographical Survey maps</a>.</p> <h2>8. Taxes</h2> <p>Property taxes and sales taxes vary widely from one region to another &mdash; even from one suburb to another. States levy different amounts of income tax, and some (like Florida) have no income tax at all; check your <a href="https://taxfoundation.org/state-individual-income-tax-rates-brackets-2017/" target="_blank">income tax rate</a> at The Tax Foundation. Sales tax is (literally) all over the map; you can <a href="https://taxfoundation.org/state-and-local-sales-tax-rates-2018/" target="_blank">look up sales tax rate</a> at The Tax Foundation as well.</p> <h2>9. Homeowners' association</h2> <p>If you are buying a condo or a townhome, or even a stand-alone house in some communities, you may fall under the rule of a homeowners' association, or HOA. If you've never lived in one before, you might be surprised at the amount of power the HOA has over your choices as a homeowner. For instance, certain types of landscaping or pets might be banned, or you might be required to repaint your house even if you think it looks OK. If there are shared amenities, such as a community pool, there will be monthly dues to pay as well.</p> <p>It's not enough to ask the listing agent if there is an HOA and how much the dues are. Experts recommend you request and review the past two years of meeting minutes; this is where you'll find out if the current homeowners are considering levying a big assessment for deferred maintenance, for example. You should also investigate whether the HOA's reserves are adequate. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-homeowners-associations?ref=seealso" target="_blank">What You Need to Know About Homeowners' Associations</a>)</p> <h2>10. Fun</h2> <p>Researching the location isn't all boring adulting. You'll also want to take a turn in the local downtown or arts district to see what's fun to do. Besides an in-person investigation, you can check a website such as <a href="https://nabewise.com/" target="_blank">NabeWise</a>, which describes individual neighborhoods in select cities, listing their top attributes and areas in which they're weak. Also look at <a href="https://www.yelp.com/" target="_blank">Yelp</a>, which can give you the lowdown on local restaurants and other businesses.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-research-a-homes-location-before-you-buy&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Research%2520a%2520Home%2527s%2520Location%2520Before%2520You%2520Buy.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Research%20a%20Home's%20Location%20Before%20You%20Buy"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Research%20a%20Home%27s%20Location%20Before%20You%20Buy.jpg" alt="How to Research a Home's Location Before You Buy" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-research-a-homes-location-before-you-buy">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-neighborhood-features-for-new-families">5 Best Neighborhood Features for New Families</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-learn-about-your-homes-history">How to Learn About Your Home&#039;s History</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-real-estate-agents-hear-most-often">8 Questions Real Estate Agents Hear Most Often</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-things-youll-hate-about-your-next-house">14 Things You&#039;ll Hate About Your Next House</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-buying-a-home-with-cash-is-bad-for-your-budget">5 Times Buying a Home With Cash Is Bad for Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Real Estate and Housing climate community crime statistics home buying location neighborhoods new home research school districts taxes transportation Mon, 26 Mar 2018 09:30:19 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2119239 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Learn About Your Home's History http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-learn-about-your-homes-history <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-learn-about-your-homes-history" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mature_couple_standing_outside_house.jpg" alt="Mature Couple Standing Outside House" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The nightmare scenario goes like this: You spend months, maybe even years, searching for a home that's just right. You make a bid, close the deal, move in, and wham &mdash; you discover all kinds of secrets about your formerly-perfect home. Suddenly it seems like an uncomfortable money pit.</p> <p>The only way to combat this situation is to be ahead of the game &mdash; research, research, research. You need to know all the details about your home's history. What you see is not always what you get, so you need to pull back the figurative (and maybe literal) dry wall and learn the true story.</p> <p>How, you ask? Luckily, we live in an age where historical documentation is plentiful if you know where to look. Below are a few tips to learn the history of a home before you buy it, or even while you're living in it if you want to know what dangers might await you.</p> <h2>Find out if your home is in a historic district</h2> <p>We love the charm of historic homes: the details, the ambience, and the knowledge of the role they played in the life of our community. When buying a historic home, there are many things to consider. The home may need a lot of work (which always translates to sweat equity and financial investment), repairs may be more expensive, and future changes may be limited.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/nhl/find/statelists.htm" target="_blank">National Historic Landmarks Program</a> is one place to look for answers about the home. A simple Google search can also be helpful. If those don't turn up anything, check directly with your city or town, including any local historical societies, archives, and libraries to verify your home's status.</p> <p>Another great source of information is the <a href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/" target="_blank">Historic American Buildings Survey</a> at the Library of Congress. More than 43,000 historic structures dating back to the early 20th century are included in more than half a million photographs, written histories, and drawings. Almost the entire collection is now digitized. Just search by location and you might turn up records and images that could be helpful in your research. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/23-hidden-costs-of-buying-an-old-house?ref=seealso" target="_blank">23 Hidden Costs of Buying an Old House</a>)</p> <h2>Expand your research beyond just your home</h2> <p>It's just as important to investigate your neighborhood's history as it is to investigate your home's history. You will spend a good deal of time out and about, and information about the neighborhood and your neighbors' homes can prove useful.</p> <p>Have there been any kinds of infestation in the neighborhood? Was lead a commonly used building material in any of the houses? What are the crime rates and incidents? Any sinkholes or soil issues? All of this information should inform your buying decision. Look through newspaper archives, police records, assessment and city planning records, and again check with the historical societies and library.</p> <p>One interesting fact that speaks to the history of urban sprawl is the distance of the home from the city center. The farther you are from the city center, the more likely the home is a part of urban sprawl, and therefore, the younger the home likely is compared to others that are closer to the city center.</p> <h2>Take a very close look at your home</h2> <p>Inspect wooden rafters in the attic, exposed brick, wallpaper, paint, doorknobs, windows, fixtures, baseboards, and the molding. Even the interior architecture such as the placement of the kitchen, the shape of the doorways and archways, and the tile work in the bathroom and kitchen can provide signs of the home's age. There can be trend clues, sometimes even a date stamp, on any of these that could indicate a possible time frame when the house was built, remodeled, or renovated in some way.</p> <h2>Access oral history</h2> <p>Neighborhoods are comprised of people, and where there are people, there is oral history. Chat with your new potential neighbors, local business owners, dog walkers, mail delivery people, local church or community center staff, and any people doing any kind of house or property work in the neighborhood. Longtime residents can often provide a wealth of history that is hard to find any other way.</p> <h2>Dig into the records</h2> <p>All of the legal records of a property are publicly accessible. You can likely find them online, though if that doesn't give you the results you want, go to your city or town hall to access them. In these records, you will find tax records, which indicate how the value of the property has changed over time; and the deed and title, which can tell you who owned the home, when they owned it, and for how long.</p> <h2>Don't skip the inspection</h2> <p>When I lived in Washington, D.C. for a few years, I considered buying a home. My agent tried to get me to waive the right to an inspection, but I refused. An inspection not only reveals mechanical flaws in the house, but also a high-quality inspector can tell you a lot about the home's history because they know what to look for to properly date a home.</p> <p>For example, the inspector I hired knew the area very well and was able to tell me that the home I was considering was built on a slab foundation. This meant that the home was at least 100 years old, and that it likely had lead pipes that had never been replaced. Lead pipes last about 100 years &mdash; so I would likely have needed to rip up the slab foundation to get the lead pipes removed. That is one expensive and inconvenient job, and I noted that in my offer on the home. Someone outbid me for it so I didn't win the deal, and that was fine with me. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/thinking-of-skipping-the-home-inspection-heres-what-it-will-cost-you?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Thinking of Skipping the Home Inspection? Here's What It Will Cost You</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-learn-about-your-homes-history&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Learn%2520About%2520Your%2520Homes%2520History.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Learn%20About%20Your%20Homes%20History"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Learn%20About%20Your%20Homes%20History.jpg" alt="How to Learn About Your Home's History" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/christa-avampato">Christa Avampato</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-learn-about-your-homes-history">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-research-a-homes-location-before-you-buy">How to Research a Home&#039;s Location Before You Buy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-long-does-it-really-take-to-close-on-a-house">How Long Does It Really Take to Close on a House?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-things-you-should-do-when-you-move-to-a-new-town">14 Things You Should Do When You Move to a New Town</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-worst-reasons-not-to-buy-a-house">7 Worst Reasons NOT to Buy a House</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-house-hunting-red-flags-you-cant-ignore">12 House-Hunting Red Flags You Can&#039;t Ignore</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Real Estate and Housing history home inspections national historic register neighborhoods old homes research Mon, 05 Mar 2018 09:30:10 +0000 Christa Avampato 2110803 at http://www.wisebread.com How Being Uninformed Costs You Money http://www.wisebread.com/how-being-uninformed-costs-you-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-being-uninformed-costs-you-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/please_sign_the_contract.jpg" alt="Please sign the contract" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Have you ever negotiated what you thought was a good deal, only to find out later that you didn&rsquo;t have all of the information? You probably could have gotten a <em>better</em> deal (or wouldn&rsquo;t have made the purchase at all) if you had all the facts. That&rsquo;s an awful feeling, because you feel like you let yourself down.</p> <p>In fact, there&rsquo;s a name for this kind of interaction, and there are things you can do to keep it from hurting you again.</p> <h2>Information asymmetry</h2> <p>When one party in any sort of transaction knows more than another, it&rsquo;s called information asymmetry. This mismatch of knowledge means that one person &mdash; the one with more knowledge &mdash; has more power in the transaction.</p> <p>That power differential is why you often feel terrible when you find out you got a bad deal because you didn&rsquo;t know enough. You may feel like you didn&rsquo;t hold the cards you thought you held &mdash; like you were manipulated, cheated, or lied to.</p> <h2>Information asymmetry and your money</h2> <p>When you don&rsquo;t have all the information, you end up losing money. My family experienced this when we bought our first used car. We did all of the right things: drove it around, took it to a mechanic, and asked good questions. However, the previous owners didn&rsquo;t disclose that they had used the wrong kind of chemical in the radiator, clogging the entire system. They cleaned it up just enough so it would pass the typical mechanic&rsquo;s inspection, and they sold it to us.</p> <p>We found out soon enough what had happened, and we had to replace almost every component of the car&rsquo;s cooling system. It was incredibly expensive. A mechanic let us know what he found inside, and we were furious. Had we known about the previous owners&rsquo; mistake, we would have never bought the car.</p> <p>If you&rsquo;ve found yourself in a similar situation, you know the pain of paying for someone else&rsquo;s transgressions. Information asymmetry causes many of our most frustrating money moments, because you almost always lose when you don&rsquo;t know as much as the person you&rsquo;re negotiating with. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-negotiation-mistakes-that-will-destroy-your-deal?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Negotiation Mistakes That Will Destroy Your Deal</a>)</p> <h2>Mitigating the effects of information asymmetry</h2> <p>While you can never get inside another person&rsquo;s head, there are ways to get as much information as possible before you make a financial decision. Research shows that a balance of information creates the best deals possible &mdash; the kind where everyone ends up happy. Therefore, both parties should be interested in disclosing as much information as necessary. Here are some steps you can take to help that happen. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-negotiating-skills-everyone-should-master?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Negotiating Skills Everyone Should Master</a>)</p> <h3>1. Educate yourself</h3> <p>Before you enter into any sort of financial transaction, make sure you understand how it works. If you&rsquo;re getting a mortgage, understand the interest rate, whether your loan is fixed or adjustable, and the loan&rsquo;s terms. If you&rsquo;re entering into a business deal, understand the details of what the other person or company does, so you can make sure they are doing as much as possible for you. This takes time, but it will help you get the best deal.</p> <h3>2. Read the fine print</h3> <p>People end up uninformed when they don&rsquo;t read every detail that is available to them. Sometimes, the fine print is literally so fine that it&rsquo;s hard to read. When you take the time to read and understand it, though, it will often give you additional information that you need to understand the deal you&rsquo;re getting &mdash; and to negotiate a better one if you need to.</p> <h3>3. Ask an expert</h3> <p>If you don&rsquo;t understand some aspect of a deal, ask someone who knows the subject at hand to help you out. People sometimes balk at this step because experts often charge money for their assistance (think auto mechanics, home inspectors, and lawyers). However, if you want to be sure you&rsquo;re getting a good deal, it&rsquo;s worth the investment.</p> <h3>4. Ask specific questions</h3> <p>People can always choose to lie, but many will not if you ask them a specific question. Even if they&rsquo;re willing to hide something or omit a detail, they often aren&rsquo;t willing to outright lie about it to your face. For instance, if you ask, &ldquo;Have you ever had problems with this home&rsquo;s foundation?&rdquo; you are more likely to get an honest answer than if you just ask, &ldquo;Any serious issues with the house?&rdquo;</p> <h3>5. Bring out the big guns</h3> <p>This isn&rsquo;t always possible, but sometimes it&rsquo;s appropriate to get someone with authority on your side, especially if you feel powerless. When it comes to information asymmetry, this often means paying a lawyer to represent or advise you. This can be expensive, but if you&rsquo;re in a major negotiation or you feel like something is wrong but you don&rsquo;t know what, it can save you a bundle in the end.</p> <p>You can lose a lot of money because of information asymmetry, but you don&rsquo;t have to. Train yourself to carefully gather as much information as possible before you enter into any sort of negotiation, and try to level the playing field as much as you can. Use your intuition during the transaction to gauge whether something is wrong. If you feel that way, investigate some more. In the end, you will get a deal you feel good about.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-being-uninformed-costs-you-money&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520Being%2520Uninformed%2520Costs%2520You%2520Money.jpg&amp;description=How%20Being%20Uninformed%20Costs%20You%20Money"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20Being%20Uninformed%20Costs%20You%20Money.jpg" alt="How Being Uninformed Costs You Money" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-being-uninformed-costs-you-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sometimes-i-wish-i-had-beautiful-long-blonde-hair-and-ample-cleavage">Sometimes I wish I had beautiful long blonde hair and ample cleavage.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-stuff-i-try-never-to-buy-new">The stuff I try never to buy new</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-trick-salespeople">6 Ways to Trick Salespeople</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/would-you-accept-200000-if-you-didnt-know-where-it-came-from">Would You Accept $200,000 If You Didn&#039;t Know Where It Came From?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-is-cryptocurrency-anyway">What Is Cryptocurrency, Anyway?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Consumer Affairs bargaining buying deals information asymmetry negotiation power imbalance research salespeople selling Thu, 21 Dec 2017 10:01:05 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 2074043 at http://www.wisebread.com The Secret to Better Money Management May Be in Your Past http://www.wisebread.com/the-secret-to-better-money-management-may-be-in-your-past <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-secret-to-better-money-management-may-be-in-your-past" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/girl_enjoying_photos_from_the_vacation.jpg" alt="Girl enjoying photos from the vacation" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's easy to feel out of control with your money. It happens to the best of us. But whatever the reason you're feeling this way, it's important that you regain your footing and, maybe even more importantly, that you regain your feeling of control. After all, if you don't think you can fix the problem, you probably won't even try.</p> <p>Your first line of defense is financial education. It will help you understand what actions you need to take to get back on track. But there's another tool that could boost your motivation to carry out those actions. A recent study by scientists at Creighton University shows that harnessing nostalgia can help you get in touch with your feelings, which you can use to regain control over your finances.</p> <h2>The power of nostalgia</h2> <p>The Creighton team carried out an experiment. Dr. Brad Klontz, along with his fellow researchers, divided study volunteers into two groups. One half attended a standard financial literacy presentation where they learned about saving money. The other half was told to bring an item (or a picture of an item) that they considered nostalgic.</p> <p>The latter group was led through exercises to help them come up with positive feelings and memories tied to their objects or photos. They were asked to name these emotions, identify the values that went along with these emotions, and understand how these same values formed the basis for their future savings goals.</p> <p>Over the next few weeks, the &quot;financial literacy&quot; group saved 22 percent more than they had saved before. That, in and of itself, is a significant number. But the &quot;nostalgia&quot; group saved 67 percent more &mdash; three times more than the control group. It would seem nostalgia and the emotions that go along with it have a lot of power when it comes to how we handle our money! The researchers theorized that the powerful emotions associated with the nostalgic object provided a deep, positive incentive for saving. Participants were able to make direct connections between saving money and the things they value most in life.</p> <h2>Harnessing nostalgia for yourself</h2> <p>If you are feeling out of control with your money, here are some steps you can take to engage your emotions via nostalgia and get back on track.</p> <h3>1. Find an item that has nostalgic value to you</h3> <p>This can be anything, as long as it is important to you. It can be an item from childhood, something passed down from a family member, something you found, or maybe something you purchased on vacation. If you don't have an item that fits the bill, go through old photographs until you find one that is especially meaningful.</p> <h3>2. Think about how you got that item and why it's important to you</h3> <p>Remember the moment you found or received the item (or took the photograph). Think about the people you were with or the poignancy of the moment. To the best of your ability, take the time to actually relive the moments in your life that have made this object or photo so important to you.</p> <h3>3. Name the feelings that go along with that item and your memories of it</h3> <p>Giving your feelings names can help them feel more concrete, rather than abstract and ethereal. When they are concrete, they are more useful to you as you continue this exercise. It is perfectly fine to have multiple feelings about your object. For instance, something your grandfather passed down to you may make you feel excited, because he chose you for this item, but also loving because of the relationship you had with him.</p> <h3>4. Identify the values that underlie these feelings</h3> <p>Once you pinpoint your feelings, you can identify the values that provide their foundation. If something came from a grandparent, it may be tapping into your value of close family ties. Something that reminds you of childhood could be important to you because you value wonder and joy and you haven't felt those things in a long time. An item from a trip could be important because it reminds you that you value excitement and adventure.</p> <h3>5. Connect these values to a financial game plan</h3> <p>When our finances are out of control, most of us know what we need to do to get them in line again. However, it's hard to find the motivation to do that when we feel hopeless and helpless in the face of financial stress. Connecting our values to the actions we know we need to take can help us find the motivation to actually tackle them.</p> <p>Think about those values you identified. If you value the safety and security of a stable home, that can motivate you to do what is necessary to provide financial safety and security in your own home. If you value adventure, it can motivate you to make the changes necessary to get your money under control now, so you can afford more adventures later. If you value joy, spend some time thinking about how you will feel when you are out of your financial hole.</p> <p>It's never too late to take control of your money. When you harness the power of nostalgia and emotion, you may find yourself making and sticking with financial decisions that you have struggled with before. This, in turn, will help you make even stronger decisions until your money is completely under your control again.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthe-secret-to-better-money-management-may-be-in-your-past&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThe%2520Secret%2520to%2520Better%2520Money%2520Management%2520May%2520Be%2520in%2520Your%2520Past.jpg&amp;description=The%20Secret%20to%20Better%20Money%20Management%20May%20Be%20in%20Your%20Past"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/The%20Secret%20to%20Better%20Money%20Management%20May%20Be%20in%20Your%20Past.jpg" alt="The Secret to Better Money Management May Be in Your Past" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-secret-to-better-money-management-may-be-in-your-past">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-manage-your-money-no-budgeting-required">How to Manage Your Money — No Budgeting Required</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-tell-youve-become-a-financial-grownup">How to Tell You&#039;ve Become a Financial Grownup</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-mental-habits-that-make-the-rich-richer">5 Mental Habits That Make the Rich Richer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-financial-basics-every-new-grad-should-know">The Financial Basics Every New Grad Should Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-science-says-money-affects-your-mind">4 Ways Science Says Money Affects Your Mind</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance emotions memories money management nostalgia psychology research saving money values Mon, 20 Nov 2017 09:30:10 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 2056086 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Ways Science Says Money Affects Your Mind http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-science-says-money-affects-your-mind <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-ways-science-says-money-affects-your-mind" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/young_woman_with_money.jpg" alt="Young woman with money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>How we think about money can make it easier &mdash; or more difficult &mdash; for us to handle our finances well. These studies reveal some interesting information on our money mentality, and how these thoughts can affect our day-to-day money decisions.</p> <h2>1. When you don't have enough money, you don't think as clearly</h2> <p>Without the money you need to pay your bills and meet your regular expenses, something strange happens to your brain. Because of the stress induced by financial scarcity, you can actually <em>lose </em>some cognitive functioning ability. That means you're less able to process information, analyze and prioritize conflicting needs, and make long-term decisions. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/poverty-makes-you-stupid?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Poverty Makes You Stupid</a>)</p> <p>In 2013 researchers conducted two different studies. One involved shoppers at a mall in New Jersey who were asked to consider a hypothetical problem, such as <a href="http://science.sciencemag.org/content/341/6149/976" target="_blank">how to pay for a car repair</a>. They were then given unrelated spatial and reasoning tasks to complete.</p> <p>In the study, lower-income individuals performed poorly on those unrelated tasks if the cost of the car repair was high. They did better on the tasks when told the cost of the repair was lower. Higher income participants performed well, no matter what the cost of the hypothetical repairs were. The greater stress the lower income participants felt when faced with high repair costs seems to have affected their ability to perform other kinds of tasks.</p> <p>In another experiment on the other side of the world, sugar cane farmers from India were asked to perform a series of tasks both before their harvest, when they were poor, and after the harvest, when they were rich. The farmers performed better at cognitive tasks after the harvest than they did before. Researchers concluded that poverty-related concerns leave less mental resources for other types of tasks.</p> <p>You, most likely, are neither a New Jersey shopper nor a Tamil Nadu sugar cane farmer. However, your brain responds in the same way to financial stress. When you lack the resources to pay bills and buy groceries, or to handle a financial crisis of some sort, a huge amount of your cognitive ability is taken up in figuring out how to handle the problem. That means, of course, that you have less cognitive ability left to make decisions in other areas of your life.</p> <h3>Take-away</h3> <p>As much as possible, avoid making big decisions in any area of your life when you're under financial stress, whether it's temporary or extended. Try to give yourself more time, and get help when possible until your financial situation is resolved. Realize that the financial stress will have a direct effect on your cognitive ability, and normal tasks may seem harder. Reduce any obligations you can.</p> <h2>2. When you have a lot of money, you think you deserve all your advantages</h2> <p>You work hard for your money; so, in a sense, you deserve the advantages you gain from it. However, other advantages and the results of chance or &quot;good luck&quot; aren't something you earn or deserve. When you're doing well financially, however, you'll tend to give yourself credit for all the good stuff that comes your way, no matter how unrelated it is to your hard work or financial smarts.</p> <p>In 2012, psychologist Paul Piff conducted an experiment on <a href="https://www.ted.com/talks/paul_piff_does_money_make_you_mean" target="_blank">wealth's impact on ethical behavior</a>. Stationed at the University of California, Berkeley, Piff had over 100 participants play a game of Monopoly. Anyone who's ever played Monopoly with competitive family members knows how dangerous that can be. In this situation, however, one player had almost no chance of winning; the two players were given different rules.</p> <p>Player One got <a href="http://nymag.com/news/features/money-brain-2012-7/" target="_blank">$2,000 at the beginning of the game</a>, received $200 every time he passed Go, and got to roll two dice. Player Two, on the other hand, received only $1,000 at the beginning of the game, got only $100 on every trip past Go, and got to roll only one die. The mood of the game was interesting; as the players progressed, Player One, who was advantaged, became increasingly dominant and rude toward the other player, smacking pieces around the board and loudly celebrating their victory.</p> <p>What does this mean for you?</p> <p>It means that, if you're human (and we assume that you are), you, too, are subject to this type of mental attitude toward having plenty of money. The more financially secure you feel, the more you might assume you have the right to be financially secure. This cognitive bias could easily affect your financial future by leading you to treat your money casually and assume that everything will work out for the best.</p> <p>Perhaps more chilling is the effect that this mental response can have on how you treat other people. A 2012 study by The Chronicle of Philanthropy showed that, surprisingly, lower-income households give a bigger portion of their discretionary income to charities than the wealthy do. In other words, not only can plenty of money make you think you inherently deserve all the advantages you have, it can make you think others don't deserve them &hellip; at least, not quite as much as you do.</p> <h3>Take-away</h3> <p>It's easy, and almost automatic, to feel invincible when you're in a good financial position. But this feeling of invincibility can prevent you from doing important financial planning, making prudent decisions, making wise investments, etc. You may also become less generous and less empathetic to the needs of others if you're feeling quite wealthy.</p> <p>Generosity, however, is a key way to strengthen your social network and build a support structure that will be with you even through difficult times. You should never assume you'll always have the advantages of wealth, or that they're inherent to you somehow.</p> <h2>3. Thoughts about money ease pain and social distress</h2> <p>Money does matter, and we wouldn't pretend otherwise. But you know that money isn't the only thing that matters in life. You can have plenty of money, but without fulfilling work and deep relationships, you'll be missing out on what is essential for a happy life. Unfortunately, your brain is often convinced otherwise, and thinks of money as a substitute for connection and as a valid way to relieve pain.</p> <p>In a 2009 study on <a href="http://assets.csom.umn.edu/assets/127771.pdf" target="_blank">money's impact on pain and social distress</a>, participants were invited to a lab where they were told they would be tested for finger dexterity. One group was tasked with counting a stack of currency; the other group got to count blank pieces of paper. After they counted, some of the participants were asked to put their fingers in a bowl of hot water &mdash; 122 degrees F &mdash; and rate their level of discomfort.</p> <p>The results?</p> <p>The participants who had counted currency expressed much lower levels of discomfort than the participants who had counted paper. The study, combined with earlier research, points to a strange tendency we have to equate money with strength, acceptance, and social connection.</p> <h3>Take-away</h3> <p>When you have plenty of money, be aware of the tendency to focus on your wealth and ignore the other needs in your life. It's great to have things that make you feel better, and there's nothing wrong with being appreciative of your financial security. However, put effort, thought, and attention into the relationships and community that surround you &mdash; those last longer and ultimately do more for you than money ever could.</p> <h2>4. You think money improves the odds of getting what you want</h2> <p>It can be intimidating to ask other people for help. You don't want to be a burden. You don't want to inconvenience people. And you don't want others to help you out of some sense of obligation, when secretly they're fuming over the delay and effort. It's easier to ask people for help when you can offer them something in return; that way, you think, it's not so much &quot;help&quot; as it is a trade. And what better to trade with than cold, hard cash?</p> <p>Past research has shown that people tend to <a href="https://repositori.upf.edu/handle/10230/22000" target="_blank">underestimate their ability to get others to help</a> them, or, in other words, to say yes to whatever is being requested. In five different studies, researchers showed that the requesters don't underestimate their ability to get others to comply <em>as much</em> when they're able to <a href="http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2093&amp;context=articles" target="_blank">offer money in exchange</a>.</p> <p>In the various studies, participants were asked to make a small request of others; before they did so, they were asked to estimate the likelihood of their success. When the participants knew they could offer a monetary incentive in exchange for the request, they were much more accurate in their prediction. In other words, participants equated the ability to offer money with their own chances of success. Also interesting is that being able to offer money made participants feel more comfortable with making a request.</p> <h3>Take-away</h3> <p>You may think you have to offer value, in particular cash value, in order to get cooperation and help. However, while money is motivational, it's not the most powerful motivation by any stretch. The studies showed that monetary incentive helped the requesters more accurately assess their own ability to get help. That ability was always there; they just weren't able to accurately see it until they had cash-in-hand to offer.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F4-ways-science-says-money-affects-your-mind&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F4%2520Ways%2520Science%2520Says%2520Money%2520Affects%2520Your%2520Mind.jpg&amp;description=4%20Ways%20Science%20Says%20Money%20Affects%20Your%20Mind"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/4%20Ways%20Science%20Says%20Money%20Affects%20Your%20Mind.jpg" alt="4 Ways Science Says Money Affects Your Mind" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/annie-mueller">Annie Mueller</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-science-says-money-affects-your-mind">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-brain-is-keeping-you-in-debt-and-how-to-fix-it">Your Brain Is Keeping You in Debt (And How to Fix It)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-secret-to-better-money-management-may-be-in-your-past">The Secret to Better Money Management May Be in Your Past</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-through-a-tough-financial-emergency">How to Get Through a Tough Financial Emergency</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/recession-journal-part-ii-broke-or-poor">Recession Journal Part II: Broke or Poor?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stopping-the-student-loan-debt-stress">Stopping the Student-Loan Debt Stress</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance cognitive bias money psychology research science stress studies Tue, 05 Sep 2017 08:30:10 +0000 Annie Mueller 2013259 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/leading_a_great_team_to_success.jpg" alt="Leading a great team to success" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Some people have a dream job; others have a dream company. If your dream gig is more of a &quot;who&quot; than a &quot;what,&quot; you'll need to switch up your job-hunting technique. Use these tips, and hiring managers will be eager to extend you an offer at your dream company.</p> <h2>1. Do your homework</h2> <p>You'll give yourself a better fighting chance if you've done your homework before any face-to-face meeting. Find out who the C-level executives are and what the company's mission statement is. This ground-floor research will help you decide if the company's views are in line with your long-term objectives. It'll also demonstrate your dedication when interview day arrives.</p> <p>&quot;This means reading about the company in a variety of places &mdash; their own PR and website, articles about the company in industry publications, and the press,&quot; says human resources expert Laura MacLeod, founder of From the Inside Out Project. &quot;Try to find someone who works or has worked at the company and pick their brain. Try your connections and '2nd degree connections' on LinkedIn.&quot;</p> <p>Once you've done your research, use what you find to focus your pitch. Think about how you'll contribute to the company culture and its bottom line. Make your best case on why you're the best choice for the position.</p> <h2>2. Approach your search actively</h2> <p>If you're limiting your job search to passive online applications, you may be waiting a while for a call. Instead, take a more active approach to getting what you want by letting the decision-makers within the company's &quot;<em>hire-archy</em>&quot; know who you are and what you want.</p> <p>&quot;Your dream company is almost certainly looking for assertiveness, and this means attacking the process from the beginning,&quot; explains Ryan Naylor, CEO and founder of LocalWork.com. &quot;When you hear about the job, whether it's through online job boards or an acquaintance, find a way to make contact with someone. Reach out through your network, locate someone within the ranks, and send them an email or call them on the phone. Use networking tools such as LinkedIn and even Facebook. If you make contact, you have a much better shot at getting that prized interview.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Take advantage of social media</h2> <p>Of course, the best people to network with are those on the inside &mdash; but don't discount those on the outside, either. Creating a rapport with your dream company's clients and associates could turn into a good word on your behalf. It may be a slow build toward the end goal (you'll want to establish a relationship before asking for references or favors), but if patience is your virtue, you can succeed in this endeavor.</p> <p>Social media is a great way to make these connections. Check out the various platforms used by your dream company, and engage. Social media managers will then see that you're a constant presence and interested in the company. Leave comments and start conversations. This could be a great transition into reaching out directly via the platforms' messaging systems to inquire about how you can become part of the narrative permanently.</p> <p>Some larger companies, like Google and Huffington Post, also have separate social media accounts just for job openings. If your dream company has a Twitter, Facebook, or other social media platform just for recruiting talent, be sure to give it a follow and check the feed regularly.</p> <h2>3. Set daily progress goals</h2> <p>Looking for a new job is a marathon, not a sprint. You can't expect to land an interview because you sent over one email attachment detailing your accomplishments. Sometimes it happens like that, but companies that have their pick of the litter usual require a bit more involvement in the hiring process. You need to remind them you're in it to win it, regularly.</p> <p>&quot;Do something every day that gets you one step closer to achieving the interview and the job,&quot; advises corporate trainer Chavaz Kingman. &quot;The more often you submerge yourself in your dream company's ideals and goals, the more easily you'll be able to discuss these goals and ideals in your interview, and in turn on the job.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Adopt a &quot;whatever it takes&quot; attitude</h2> <p>Maybe you get a job offer from your dream company, but it's not exactly the position you wanted. Should you take it anyway? If your goal is getting your foot in the door by any means necessary, then yes. There are other factors to consider, such as taking a potential pay cut &mdash; you may be OK with it, or you may need to negotiate a salary you're more comfortable with. Either way, if you can make it work to accept this position, you should take it. The opportunity to work for your dream company may not come again.</p> <p>Once you're hired, you can really make an effort to shine. Keep up the good work, and it will eventually show management you'd be better suited for the position you really want. Don't go stepping on anybody's toes to get there &mdash; you won't make any friends that way &mdash; but go above and beyond whatever your current job is so your boss will see that you're a dedicated worker.</p> <h2>5. Brush up on basic job-hunting techniques</h2> <p>Getting hired by your dream company takes a little extra legwork, but that doesn't mean you can skip the basics. First, polish up your resume to make sure it's current, spell-checked, and tailored to align with the company's needs. Focus on your successes and achievements, especially any that might be relevant to the job you want. (<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a>)</p> <p>Then, prepare for interviews. Yeah, this might be old hat to you by now, but you'll only increase your chances of nailing it if you go in confident and ready to slay. Ask other professionals you know if they'd be willing to give you a practice run and an honest critique. Have them test your knowledge of the subject matter and familiarity with the company background. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-not-to-answer-10-of-the-most-common-interview-questions?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How NOT TO Answer 10 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a>)</p> <p>Kingman suggests using the S.T.A.R. method when asked to discuss previous work accomplishments. Describe the Situation you were in; the Task you were assigned; the Action you took; and the positive Result of your contribution.</p> <p>Last but not least, do a thorough <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-clean-up-your-image-on-social-media" target="_blank">social media cleanup</a>. Get rid of unflattering photos, questionable text posts, and anything else inappropriate. Double check your privacy settings, and then view your profiles as an outsider to see what's still visible. Social media searches are a fast way for a company to get an instant feel for your moral character and &quot;real&quot; personality &mdash; don't let a few drunk selfies derail your chance at your dream gig.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview">10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/video-resumes-and-5-other-cool-tricks-to-land-the-job">Video Resumes and 5 Other Cool Tricks to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting dream company dream job getting hired interviewing new job research social media strategies techniques Mon, 05 Jun 2017 08:30:13 +0000 Mikey Rox 1955702 at http://www.wisebread.com The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/confident_young_job_applicant.jpg" alt="Confident young job applicant" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Interviewing for a new position can be stressful. It's also a balancing act that can take time, and practice, to perfect.</p> <p>When it comes to salary expectations, the pressure increases exponentially. How much will they pay you? How much dare you ask for? What about benefits, and other deciding factors? The way you play this game can put thousands of extra dollars in your paycheck. So how should you bring it up?</p> <h2>When to discuss salary</h2> <p>There are a few different schools of thought on this. Some people say that you should wait until the person asking the questions mentions it. If they don't bring it up, you stay silent and wait for the next interview (if there is one). Others say that you should bring it up yourself if the interviewer doesn't mention it or skates around the subject. And some people are of the firm belief that you should only discuss salary once you've been offered the job.</p> <p>The fact is, there's no right or wrong answer here. You have to get a feel for how the interview process is going, and also the demeanor of the person doing the interview. If you have an instant rapport with this interviewer, and the meeting is going exceptionally well, you can be fairly confident that bringing up the subject of salary without being prompted will be OK.</p> <p>However, if you have one of those interviews with a cold interviewer behind the desk and very little chitchat, asking about salary in an already tense atmosphere could just make things worse.</p> <p>If the interviewer starts talking about the subject, without actually mentioning salary directly (for instance, they discuss benefits packages, paid time off, sick leave, and so on) then you have a natural &quot;in&quot; to bring it up.</p> <h2>Salary research is imperative</h2> <p>Chances are you already know the salary range for this position. If you don't, be prepared. Before you go into the first interview, or even apply for the job, do your research. Look on sites like Salary.com and Glassdoor.com to find the salaries of people in the position for which you're applying. Get a good range. Then, look at what different companies are paying for that role, and how that salary differs from state to state (or even country to country).</p> <p>You need to understand what you are worth and what the market will pay for someone with your skills and expertise. When you have that information, you put yourself in a position of confidence. Knowledge is power, and you will have a much stronger negotiating position if you have the research to back you up.</p> <h2>Use the anchoring technique</h2> <p>It's a technique widely used by people in sales, advertising, and marketing, and it works. Contrary to popular opinion, <em>you</em> need to come out with the first number in the interview. Old school interviewers and interviewees will say this is risky because you could name a number so high it disqualifies you, or so low you'll miss out on more money. Actually, as long as you've done your research, it's good business, and puts you in control of the discussion. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-simple-negotiating-trick-puts-money-in-your-pocket?ref=seealso" target="_blank">This Simple Negotiating Trick Puts Money in Your Pocket</a>)</p> <p>Let's take a hypothetical: You know that this position is worth, say $95,000 a year plus benefits. You also know that you are highly-qualified, have a superb resume, impeccable references, and that the company in question has had trouble filling the role. Therefore, you ask for much more than $95,000. Start at $120,000, or more. You have good reason to want this much money. You are worth it, and every day the company does not have this role filled, they are wasting time and money looking for a candidate. If they really want you, they'll pay it. If they don't, they won't.</p> <p>By anchoring the interviewer to a higher figure, you can eventually haggle your way to a salary that you are comfortable taking &mdash; say $100,000, which may be $5,000 more than the company wanted to spend, but $20,000 less than your asking price. Everyone's a winner.</p> <h2>How to tackle some of the tricky salary questions</h2> <p>You are going to get asked about salary in a variety of ways. Remember, you're in a negotiation; you want the most money for the role and they want to pay as little as possible. Here are some typical questions, and how to handle them.</p> <h2>&quot;What kind of salary range are you looking for?&quot;</h2> <p>Think about that for a second. It's a ridiculous question. They're asking you, &quot;What is the least amount of money you would be willing to take for this role, and what is your high-end?&quot; Do you think they're going to give you the top end of your salary range? Of course not, you've already told them how cheaply they can get you.</p> <p>So, narrow the answer down to something that gives very little wiggle room. For example, &quot;I'm looking for a salary in the high $90s&quot; focuses on a salary that's at least $97,000 a year. If you say &quot;$90,000&ndash;$100,000,&quot; guess what &hellip; you're getting $90,000.</p> <h2>&quot;How much are you currently making?&quot;</h2> <p>This is another nasty question, although it may seem like a perfectly innocent one to ask. You may currently be earning $60,000 a year, but so what? After doing the research, paired with your experience, you know you should be getting at least $80,000 a year for the job to which you're applying.</p> <p>Don't fall into this trap, because you are selling yourself short. Simply answer with something like, &quot;It's an apples to oranges comparison to compare my current salary to this role. If you supply me with more information about the role, the benefits package, the hours, the workload, and so on, I can let you know what salary I am looking for.&quot;</p> <h2>&quot;What are your salary expectations?&quot;</h2> <p>&quot;Ummm &hellip; I'd like as much money as possible please!&quot; Clearly, that's not the right answer, but that's what you're thinking. Again, you need to be realistic based on the research you've done, your current level of experience, and what you can bring to this new firm. There is no harm in saying &quot;That's not a question I can answer until I have a much better grasp on the requirements of the position, and what benefits come with it.&quot;</p> <h2>&quot;We really want you, but can't afford you. Would you take a pay cut?&quot;</h2> <p>If you've already named your price and they ask you this question, don't give up. If they really want you, they should be willing to pay. This is a sly way of setting your expectations low. They're saying &quot;We're cheap, we want to pay the minimum.&quot;</p> <p>Well, until you know what that minimum is, you cannot possibly answer this question. Never say, &quot;I'd consider it,&quot; or, &quot;Sure, if that's what it takes to get my foot in the door.&quot; That's just rolling over for them. Instead, make them put the entire offer on the table first, including benefits, travel allowances, vacation time, sick time, and so on. It's possible that you could take less money than you're earning now if they give you other concessions, like working only four days a week, working remotely, or getting six weeks of paid time off.</p> <p>Remember, salary negotiation is a crucial part of the interview process, but you should not be chastised for wanting a good living wage. Good luck out there.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting advice anchoring technique interviewing negotiations new jobs pay questions research salary strategies wages Tue, 23 May 2017 09:00:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1951908 at http://www.wisebread.com Your Brain Is Keeping You in Debt (And How to Fix It) http://www.wisebread.com/your-brain-is-keeping-you-in-debt-and-how-to-fix-it <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/your-brain-is-keeping-you-in-debt-and-how-to-fix-it" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_stressed_thinking_84125877.jpg" alt="Woman learning how her brain is keeping her in debt" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your debt never seems to shrink. Each month you resolve to ditch your credit cards, spend less, and devote more money to paying down your outstanding debts. When next month rolls around? You're staring at even more debt.</p> <p>What's the problem? Blame your brain.</p> <p>Recent research from Scientific American suggests that our brains are wired so that when we do decide to pay off our debt, we tend to focus on our smallest ones first. But it'd make much more sense to pay off highest-interest debt first.</p> <h2>Your Brain on Debt</h2> <p>Scientific American, which published the results of its <a href="https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/mind-guest-blog/why-don-t-people-manage-debt-better/">debt study</a> in February of this year, started its research by concluding that the most effective way to battle debt is to pay off those debts that come with the highest interest rates first. Usually, that'd be the debt piling up on one of your credit cards.</p> <p>The reason that this makes the most sense is that higher-interest-rate debt grows more quickly. If you pay that debt down first, your overall debt load will not rise as fast.</p> <p>But instead of attacking higher-interest-rate debt first, consumers usually focus on paying down what they consider the most manageable of their debts, generally the smallest ones they face. They do this even if the interest rates attached to these smaller debts are lower.</p> <p>How did Scientific American determine this? They performed an experiment in which participants were asked to pay multiple debts, all of which came with varying interest rates. Researchers gave these participants a paycheck at the beginning of each round of this game, asking them to use it to pay off their imaginary debts in whatever way they deemed best.</p> <p>According to the study, only 3% of the participants &mdash; just five out of 162 &mdash; focused on paying down the debt with higher interest rates. Scientific American reported that the majority of participants paid off their smaller debts, instead.</p> <p>This isn't just bad money management. It's psychological. Your brain does you no favors when you're battling multiple debts.</p> <p>The Scientific American story says that people are naturally averse to debt accounts. This means that consumers with many different debts naturally want to reduce the total number of these accounts. This pull is so strong, it overwhelms the more rational approach of first paying down those debts that cost the most.</p> <h2>Teach Your Brain to Battle Debt</h2> <p>Can you fight your brain? Can you resist the natural temptation to close out those smaller debt accounts first? Sure, if you focus.</p> <p>Consider the avalanche approach to debt repayment: Consumers pay off those debts with the highest interest rates first, making only the minimum monthly payments on the rest. Once they pay off the debt with the highest interest rate, they then move on to the debt with the second-highest rate. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/snowballs-or-avalanches-which-debt-reduction-strategy-is-best-for-you?ref=seealso">Snowballs or Avalanches: Which Debt Reduction Strategy Is Best for You?</a>)</p> <p>The benefit here is obvious: Debt with higher interest rates cost consumers more. Eliminating it first saves lots of money in the long run.</p> <p>And if you want to outwit your brain's natural tendency to steer you in the wrong direction? You'll go with the avalanche method, too.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Lik this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fyour-brain-is-keeping-you-in-debt-and-how-to-fix-it&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FYour%2520Brain%2520Is%2520Keeping%2520You%2520in%2520Debt%2520%2528And%2520How%2520to%2520Fix%2520It%2529.jpg&amp;description=Your%20Brain%20Is%20Keeping%20You%20in%20Debt%20(And%20How%20to%20Fix%20It)"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Your%20Brain%20Is%20Keeping%20You%20in%20Debt%20%28And%20How%20to%20Fix%20It%29.jpg" alt="Your Brain Is Keeping You in Debt (And How to Fix It)" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-brain-is-keeping-you-in-debt-and-how-to-fix-it">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-first-steps-to-paying-off-debt">7 Easy First Steps to Paying Off Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-science-says-money-affects-your-mind">4 Ways Science Says Money Affects Your Mind</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tough-questions-about-debt-answered">7 Tough Questions About Debt, Answered</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-use-peer-to-peer-lending-to-pay-down-credit-card-debt">Should You Use Peer-to-Peer Lending to Pay Down Credit Card Debt?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-manage-your-debt-in-10-minutes-a-week">How to Manage Your Debt in 10 Minutes a Week</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Debt Management avalanche method brain psychology repayment research science thought process Mon, 21 Nov 2016 11:00:06 +0000 Dan Rafter 1835352 at http://www.wisebread.com Make Your Food Taste Better With Rituals http://www.wisebread.com/make-your-food-taste-better-with-rituals <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/make-your-food-taste-better-with-rituals" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/eating-4726534-small.jpg" alt="eating marshmallows" title="eating marshmallows" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I always thought it didn't matter how you eat &mdash; it all ended up in the same place, anyhow.</p> <p>Turns out, I was wrong.</p> <p>Not about where the food ends up (whew!), but about the importance of what you do when you eat. According to a <a href="http://pss.sagepub.com/content/early/2013/07/17/0956797613478949.abstract">study conducted at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis and Harvard University</a>, the small rituals you do before you eat can enhance your enjoyment of the food. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/imagine-eating-to-lose-weight-and-save-money">Imagine Eating to Lose Weight (and Save Money)</a>)</p> <p><a href="http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/09/rituals-make-our-food-more-flavorful/">Says Catherine Saint Louis</a> of the <em>New York Times</em> Well blog:</p> <blockquote><p>Far from being mere quirks of personality, rituals like these may actually enhance how much people savor what they eat or drink, new research shows. Flavor is intensified. The meal is enjoyed more. It may be one reason why birthday cake is savored more than the stumbled-upon 4 p.m. brownie, because of the singing and candle blowing that precedes it.</p> </blockquote> <h2>The Rituals</h2> <p>What kind of rituals are we talking about, exactly? Donning a ceremonial cow costume, singing a prayer over a carton of milk, and finishing off with a cereal baptism? Will that make my original Cheerios taste less like cardboard?</p> <p>Actually, yeah, it might. But a ritual doesn't have to be as elaborate as that. In fact, you may already have some food rituals under your belt:</p> <ul> <li>Sing before eating a birthday cake.</li> <li>Tap a can before pulling the tab.</li> <li>Scrape wooden chopsticks together before digging in. (Watch out for splinters!)</li> <li>Separate an Oreo cookie before dunking it into milk. (Wait, so it's NOT just a marketing ploy?)</li> <li>Unwrap and uncork a wine bottle yourself.</li> <li>Anything you always make sure to do before you eat a certain food. Anything. Seriously, the sky's the limit!</li> </ul> <h2>The Study</h2> <p>The study consisted of four experiments:</p> <ol> <li>Participants were divided into two groups. Both were given chocolate. One group was asked go through a series of chocolate-unwrapping motions, while the other just at the bar.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Participants were given baby carrots. Some were told to knock twice, grab a bag of carrots, knock again, breathe, <em>then</em> eat the carrots. Others were instructed to perform other, similarly not-related-to-actual-eating motions. Some had to wait between carrots, and others did not.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>One set of participants mixed lemonade as another set watched.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Researchers asked the participants how fun and interesting it was to eat the chocolate.</li> </ol> <p>The participants who were asked to perform some kind of gesture &mdash; unwrapping chocolate just so, knocking and waiting before eating carrots &mdash; rated their pleasure higher than those who simply ate the food they were given. And as the baby carrot experiment showed, any old ritual will work &mdash; it doesn't have to be related to eating the food. Also, watching someone perform the ritual doesn't do anything for your own enjoyment &mdash; unless you're laughing at their silliness, in which case, joke's on you! The lemonade mixers enjoyed the drink more than those who watched from the sidelines. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-luscious-ways-to-enjoy-lemonade">12 Luscious Ways to Enjoy Lemonade</a>)</p> <p>So, why is this roundabout way of eating more enjoyable than a direct approach? By way of Experiment 4, the researchers found:</p> <blockquote><p>[O]ne reason food rituals enhance flavor and enjoyment is their ability to focus people's interest on the ensuing consumption. The researchers called this focus &quot;involvement.&quot;</p> </blockquote> <h2>The Application</h2> <p>OK, great. So I might enjoy lobster more if I took the trouble to de-shell the crustacean myself (groans, many groans), but are there any other benefits to this culinary ritual business?</p> <p>Why, yes, there are.</p> <p>The New York Times brings up the possibility of finally enjoying a food you &mdash; or a picky preschooler &mdash; previously disliked. Fun rituals, like singing a broccoli song or dancing bitter squash style (no idea what that entails), can make the food go down easier. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-cut-waste-when-feeding-kids">10 Ways to Cut Waste When Feeding Kids</a>)</p> <p>Plus, taking the time to savor your food can give you better control over how much you eat:</p> <blockquote><p>[Dr. Susan Albers], the author of <em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/160882330X/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=160882330X&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20" target="_blank">Eating Mindfully</a></em>, noted that rituals may also help in portion control, something the University of Minnesota researchers did not address in their experiments. She noted that in a <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22243980">small randomized controlled trial</a> at the University of Texas in Austin, researchers found that teaching restaurant diners to focus on awareness of hunger and taste, along with other strategies, was effective at promoting weight management. &quot;When you savor food you enjoy it more, and sometimes you eat less,&quot; she said.</p> </blockquote> <p>Then again, some foods don't need the flavor boost. The researchers caution that the extra kick in some tastes may repel some eaters.</p> <p>I think I'll hold off on choreographing that bitter squash dance for now.</p> <p><em>What food rituals do you engage in? Are there any foods that you want to enjoy more, enough to create a ritual for it?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-your-food-taste-better-with-rituals">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-portion-control-to-lose-weight">How to Use Portion Control to Lose Weight</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/23-fantastic-uses-for-apples">23 Fantastic Uses for Apples</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-tasty-and-cheap-meals-for-one">14 Tasty and Cheap Meals for One</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-these-5-diet-moves-now-or-youll-regret-it-in-20-years">Make These 5 Diet Moves Now or You&#039;ll Regret It in 20 Years</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-meals-that-make-terrific-leftovers">11 Meals That Make Terrific Leftovers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink eating healthy research Thu, 15 Aug 2013 18:34:46 +0000 Amy Lu 981311 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Thrive Before, During, and After Job Fairs http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-thrive-before-during-and-after-job-fairs <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-thrive-before-during-and-after-job-fairs" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/career_fair_1.jpg" alt="Girls at fair table" title="Girls at fair table" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I remember my first job fair very well. During my senior year of college, I entered the large room with a folder full of resumés and a map of where in the room each employer was located. As I looked at the map, I realized two things: I had no idea what any of these companies did, and I had absolutely no plan. Panic started to set in.</p> <p>After some wandering, I made up a pitch about my experience and goals and headed over to a table that surprisingly had nobody waiting in line. After giving my 30-second life story, I found out that the company was only interested in graduate students. Rejected! The only positive that came out of it was that I gained some practice without ruining and potential opportunities. But it showed just how unprepared I was.</p> <p>After having little success, I went home dejected. Three months later, I was given another opportunity, and this time, I wasn't going to let it go to waste. So I developed a plan of attack. Mission &mdash; find a job.</p> <p>Here are tips I used for that job fair, and ones that you can use to ace your job fair experience.</p> <h2>Research, Research, Research</h2> <p>As much as a suit and great resumé will help, knowing which companies are going to be there and how you could fit in is much more important. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/standout-stuff-to-put-on-your-resume">Standout Stuff for Your Resumé and LinkedIn Profile</a>)</p> <p>Make a list of companies you are interested in, find out what they do, and if you can, go a step further and find positions you are well suited for. You'll really impress them if you bring up a position you have skills for and describe how you would be a perfect match.</p> <p>Mark the companies you like on a map. You'll spend less time wandering while looking clueless, and you'll maximize the time spent talking to employers.</p> <h2>Interact</h2> <p>The goal of a career fair is not to simply hand your resumé to a company representative and walk away. There are no prizes for giving away all of your resumés, and you want to make an impression that will last all the way through the review process.</p> <p>Ask questions! You're not simply hoping to get hired, you're also looking for a company that you want to work for. Bonus points for targeting questions to specific companies. At the end of the conversation, ask for a business card or contact information so you can follow up later.</p> <p>After leaving an employer's station, spend a few moments taking notes. Write down positives, negatives, and the things discussed before running off to another employer. This will help you later when you're trying to remember which companies you'd like to continue pursuing and which ones you shouldn't waste your time with.</p> <h2>Follow Up</h2> <p>In about ten minutes, you can craft a personalized email or better yet, a handwritten letter. Sending a note a day or two after the fair will show you're genuinely interested, and thanking someone for their time is always polite and sheds a positive light on you. Try to incorporate some part of your conversation (that you took notes on!), and you'll show that you were paying attention and would be someone great to work with!</p> <p>As it turned out, I was <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tips-to-acing-an-interview">interviewed</a> by one of the companies at the job fair, and that ultimately turned into my current job. Mission accomplished.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/daniel-packer">Daniel Packer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-thrive-before-during-and-after-job-fairs">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-awesome-websites-to-help-you-get-a-job">25 Awesome Websites to Help You Get a Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting job fairs research resumes thank you cards Tue, 10 May 2011 10:24:13 +0000 Daniel Packer 540284 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Timeless Tips for Resisting the Upsell http://www.wisebread.com/8-timeless-tips-for-resisting-the-upsell <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-timeless-tips-for-resisting-the-upsell" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000003275965XSmall.jpg" alt="Store cashier" title="Store cashier" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The art of upselling is regarded in the sales world as one of the easiest ways to increase sales, and that's why you encounter this tactic often. A waiter may try to sell you a nice bottle of wine when you order a steak dinner, a car salesmen may try to sell you paint protection packages when you buy a car, and the McDonald's cashier will always ask &quot;Would you like to make that a meal today?&quot; They ask because in the moment, most people don't think about the additional expense and just see the additional benefit. If you want to save some money this holiday season and beyond, know these rules that will help keep those add-on costs down:</p> <h3>1. Think twice before you give out your contact information.</h3> <p>From signing up for email newsletters to flat-out leaving the other party with every conceivable way of reaching you, providing your contact information allows salespeople to contact you and pitch products and services again and again. Last week I got a call from a dealership pitching a maintenance package for my car. If even car dealerships have started doing this, you know every company can potentially spam you with these calls.</p> <h3>2. Do your research ahead of time.</h3> <p>To avoid spending more due to the hoopla of the shopping experience, try to figure out exactly what you need to purchase before you ever step out the door. Many people go to a restaurant because they are hungry or walk into Best Buy because they would like a new TV. The more prudent buyers know that they actually want a nice rib-eye steak because of its flavor, or that they want a LED TV from Samsung for Christmas.</p> <h3>3. Have a clear understanding of why you want it.</h3> <p>When you are able to articulate the reasons why you want to purchase a product, you can find the best place to purchase it. When you know exactly why you want a certain product, it's also much easier to tune out the sales pitches that will surface during the buying process.</p> <h3>4. Have a budget.</h3> <p>Most people should have a budget anyway, but it can be especially helpful in avoiding an upsell. Have a strict budget for items you want to buy, and if the price of an add-on still falls within budget, you can buy it. Otherwise, forget about it, no matter how useful it seems at the time.</p> <p>Be mindful of setting too loose a budget though. When there is a limit, it sometimes becomes a game of &quot;How close you can get to the limit without going over.&quot; Set the budget to $300? You will spend $297. Set it to $500? You will likely end up spending $485, even if you are trying to buy the same type of product. That's why research is so crucial.</p> <h3>5. Learn to say no to time limits.</h3> <p>It's easy to spend more at the time of purchase because you're drowning in the happiness of buying something new. When salespeople add a time limit on those add-on offers, they can suddenly become must-haves. In reality, almost no discount is ever a once-in-a-lifetime deal, so just say no and decide whether you really need it when you are in a more relaxed environment.</p> <h3>6. Try the 30 day rule.</h3> <p>This is just taking the &quot;say no&quot; rule up a notch. Basically, you limit yourself to not buying anything that wasn't planned or isn't needed until 30 days later, when you are past the time that you will likely act on impulse. If you still want it after 30 days, then you can have it!</p> <h3>7. Always find a way to self-serve.</h3> <p>I love self-service because of its convenience, but there's another benefit &mdash; the lack of upsell. Sure, computers can be programmed to ask questions in an attempt to get you to buy more, but they will never compare to a highly trained salesperson. And when the choice is presented by a computer, you also have a bit less pressure and thus can spend more time thinking about the offer.</p> <h3>8. Don't shop as much.</h3> <p>If you don't want to pay more for an upsell, then reduce the chances that you are being sold to. The less you are in the checkout line, the fewer small purchases you will see. The less you eat out, the less you will buy a premium beverage to go with your entree. The less you buy, the less you will pay more.</p> <p>Learn the rules, and you will spend less. Really.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/david-ning">David Ning</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-timeless-tips-for-resisting-the-upsell">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/90-off-is-not-a-deal-if-you-don-t-need-it">90% off is not a deal if you don’t need it.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/regifting-a-simple-how-to-guide">Regifting: A Simple How-To Guide</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-secrets-of-amazons-pricing-strategy-will-help-you-find-the-best-buys">These Secrets of Amazon&#039;s Pricing Strategy Will Help You Find the Best Buys</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/cheat-sheet-retail-markup-on-common-items">Cheat Sheet: Retail Markup on Common Items</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-spare-a-square-5-quick-tips-on-toilet-paper-usage">&quot;Can you spare a square?&quot; 5 quick tips on toilet paper usage.</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Consumer Affairs Shopping balanced spending frugal shopping research smart shopping Thu, 16 Dec 2010 14:00:21 +0000 David Ning 385317 at http://www.wisebread.com One genius little button that's saving me a whole bunch of time http://www.wisebread.com/one-genius-little-button-thats-saving-me-a-whole-bunch-of-time <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/one-genius-little-button-thats-saving-me-a-whole-bunch-of-time" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/61780671_1574a5db01.jpg" alt="Happy Brit button smiley flag" title="Happy Brit button smiley flag" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="254" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>How many times do you click on a link to an article, video, image or anything else of interest and want to visit the homepage of that site? It happens to me all the time. Sometimes finding the homepage link is fairly easy, on other occasions it&#39;s buried. And then you have to go up to the address bar, delete all of the information before the domain name and hit enter. Well, not any more with the help of this &quot;bookmarklet.&quot;</p> <p>It is the brainchild of Billy Chasen, author of  <a href="http://anerroroccurredwhileprocessingthisdirective.com/2008/03/22/go-to-home/">[anerroroccurredwhileprocessingthisdirective].com</a> (nice and easy url Billy). Billy explains the simplicity behind his idea:</p> <blockquote><p><em>The best ideas come from finding something you do all the time, realize you do it, and then automate it.</em></p> <p><em>With me, I discovered that I frequently go to the base domain of a website by going to the URL, highlighting and deleting the junk on the end of the domain name and then pressing enter. I HATE doing it. I also have to do it when websites don’t link to their home page.</em></p> </blockquote> <p>As someone who does a lot of research online for Wisebread, and my job, I&#39;m coming up against this on a daily basis. Countless links lead to websites that I just want to know more about, but I end up having to spend valuable time editing the web address (which doesn&#39;t always work either, usually because I delete an extra letter or symbol by mistake). </p> <p>The &quot;bookmarklet&quot; Billy has devised uses a simple piece of code, that I don&#39;t pretend to understand, to get around all of that. To get this simple little button, <a href="http://anerroroccurredwhileprocessingthisdirective.com/2008/03/22/go-to-home/">visit Billy&#39;s site here</a> . You&#39;ll be greeted with the image below. Simply drag the &quot;go to home&quot; button to your bookmark bar, and hey presto, now you can get to the homepage of any site just by clicking it. </p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u17/Go_to_Home_1220074418884.png" alt="go to home" title="go to home" width="500" height="168" /> </p> <p>It&#39;s already saved me a bunch of time this evening. And as we all know, time is money.If you have Firefox, you can also<a href="https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/869"> try this little add-on</a> that basically navigates you up one level. Enjoy, and thanks Billy. </p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/one-genius-little-button-thats-saving-me-a-whole-bunch-of-time">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-do-you-spend-money-to-save-time">How do you spend money to save time?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-have-a-sven-sandy-might-be-the-next-best-thing">Don&#039;t Have A Sven? Sandy Might Be the Next Best Thing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/quick-vista-hack-to-get-you-browsing-at-high-speed-again">Quick Vista Hack to Get You Browsing at High-Speed Again</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/three-quirky-search-tools-to-help-you-get-results">Three Quirky Search Tools to Help You Get Results</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-essential-tools-for-getting-work-done-anywhere">7 Essential Tools for Getting Work Done -- Anywhere!</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks Productivity Technology application bookmark browsing Internet research save time web Sat, 30 Aug 2008 05:38:39 +0000 Paul Michael 2384 at http://www.wisebread.com