Career Building http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4814/all en-US 8 Ways to Turn Your Stress Into Money http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-turn-your-stress-into-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-ways-to-turn-your-stress-into-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_73912007_LARGE.jpg" alt="turning stress into money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Are you prone to stress and anxiety? Do you believe it's holding you back from being successful in your career and making money? It doesn't have to be this way. In fact, when your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/beat-stress-with-these-28-inexpensive-pastimes">stress and anxiety are properly managed</a>, there may be ways to turn them into positive things for you financially &mdash; like extra cash!</p> <p>Let's take a look at these ways you can turn stress into financial freedom.</p> <h2>1. Channel Your Stress Into Hard Work</h2> <p>Employers don't want their employees to be stressed out, but they do want people who care. So if you have a little bit of anxiety about your work, that could be a good thing. If you can find a healthy way to channel that stress into being productive and conscientious, it will pay off in the workplace. The chemical produced by stress can, at certain levels, actually enhance alertness, memory, and attention.</p> <p>Many managers even say that giving workers a small amount of anxiety can help them perform better overall.</p> <p>&quot;Without anxiety, little would be accomplished,&quot; David Barlow, founder of the <a href="http://www.fastcompany.com/3025488/how-to-be-a-success-at-everything/relax-being-anxious-makes-you-a-good-leader">Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders</a> at Boston University, told <em>Fast Company. </em></p> <h2>2. Turn Your Stress Into Excitement</h2> <p>Stress can be debilitating. But excitement can help you reach new heights. There's a fine line between stress and excitement, but researchers say you can often find ways to frame stress in a positive way. In her paper, &quot;Get Excited: Reappraising Pre-Performance Anxiety as Excitement,&quot; Alison Woods Brooks of Harvard Business School <a href="https://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/xge-a0035325.pdf">argues that you can perform better</a> in a situation simply by repeatedly telling yourself, &quot;I am excited.&quot; And the more you do it, the more it helps.</p> <p>&quot;Highly skilled individuals may be more likely to say &lsquo;I am excited&rsquo; before they tackle challenging tasks. In this way, emotional self-statements could operate in an upward spiral process in which successful individuals are more likely to express excitement, and saying &lsquo;I am excited&rsquo; then improves subsequent performance,&quot; Brooks writes.</p> <h2>3. Get a Side Hustle or Second Job</h2> <p>For many people, stressful and anxious thoughts come during downtime. It's hard to worry about things when you're busy at work, and the stressful thoughts may only come when your brain has a chance to think. If this sounds like you, maybe a second job will help you stay busy and keep your mind from wandering into Stress Town. And if you're the type of person who gets stressed about never seeming to have enough money, a second job may be what you need. It doesn't have to be another full-time job. Maybe you can take up freelance writing or design, or a craft. Anything to stay busy, keep your mind off your troubles, and make a little extra money in the process.</p> <h2>4. Become a Good Leader</h2> <p>In his book, <a href="http://amzn.to/29I0g4t">My Age of Anxiety</a>, writer Scott Stossel argues that being anxious can be helpful to people in leadership roles. He said anxious people are more likely to be tuned into other people's emotions and social cues.</p> <p>In their book, <a href="http://amzn.to/29Whaep">Wiser</a><em>, </em>researchers Cass Sunstein and Reid Hastie argue that groups can make the best decisions when they are led by an anxious and detail-oriented person. So who knows? Maybe your stress is your ticket to becoming CEO.</p> <h2>5. Save and Invest Like Crazy</h2> <p>If you are prone to anxiety, you worry about the future. That means you're probably good at preparing yourself financially for the days ahead. You may have cash set aside for every conceivable emergency, and are aggressive about saving for retirement because you stress about running out of cash as you age.</p> <p>If this sounds like you, you're probably in great shape financially and may even become quite wealthy as your investments and savings grow over time.</p> <h2>6. Become a Pet Sitter</h2> <p>If you suffer from anxiety or high stress, there's a lot of evidence suggesting that time with a pet can help you. Studies show that pets can provide the kind of unconditional love that would benefit those with mental health conditions, and may even improve social interactions.</p> <p>Pets can often be creatures of routine, demanding to be walked and fed at certain times. Being forced into that kind of routine may also be helpful to those with stress and and anxiety.</p> <p>What's more, if you <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-400-a-week-as-a-pet-sitter">make money by walking pets</a>, you'll be getting some exercise, which is also beneficial when battling stress.</p> <h2>7. Channel It Into Something Creative</h2> <p>Perhaps you've found that your stress goes away when you play the guitar, or paint, or make pottery. Maybe you feel better when you act or dance. You may think of these activities as mere outlets for your stress, but they can be moneymakers. Make some music and join a band. Sell your artwork. Join a theatre company. Take that stress and go make some dough.</p> <h2>8. Blog About Your Stress</h2> <p>About <a href="http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/prevalence/any-anxiety-disorder-among-adults.shtml">40 million adults in the United States</a> suffer from some sort of anxiety disorder, according to the National Institutes of Mental Health. That's a huge potential audience of people who may be looking to get advice, or simply connect with those who are going through similar challenges. Finding ways to write about your stress and anxiety may be therapeutic for you, and if the blog takes off, you can earn a little bit of cash in the process.</p> <p><em>What other ways can you channel stress into money? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-turn-your-stress-into-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-really-make-a-living-as-an-ebook-writer">Can You Really Make a Living as an Ebook Writer?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-part-time-jobs-to-do-while-your-kids-are-at-school">17 Part-Time Jobs to Do While Your Kids Are at School</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-68-best-ways-to-make-money-that-are-actually-fun">Flashback Friday: 68 Best Ways to Make Money That Are Actually Fun</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-great-side-jobs-for-introverts">10 Great Side Jobs for Introverts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-side-jobs-for-people-who-are-good-with-money">6 Side Jobs for People Who Are Good With Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income anxiety earnings extra income jobs part-time job side hustle side jobs stress stress relief workplace Wed, 20 Jul 2016 09:00:07 +0000 Tim Lemke 1755547 at http://www.wisebread.com Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_photographer_96052725.jpg" alt="Woman in dying industry finding modern job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>No one wants to admit that they're in a dying industry, but it's a hard fact that many of us will have to face at some point in our lives. Once upon a time, there were expert buggy-whip makers, and bowling alley pinsetters. Technology made those jobs extinct. Now, other jobs are in jeopardy, and if you are in a career that is being made obsolete, it's time to start weighing your options. Here are eight modern jobs that you should consider if your job will soon be taken over by robots.</p> <h2>1. Florists: Try Xeriscaping</h2> <p>The humble florist storefront is quickly disappearing, with those costly bouquets being replaced by cheap bunches of flowers from grocery stores and warehouse clubs. Plus, there are online retailers offering much cheaper deals on ready-made designs. If you're a florist, you're in a dying industry. But, you have great design skills that could be taken to another career. Some florists have found that transferring their skills to landscaping, specifically xeriscaping, is a transition that is fairly easy to make. Xeriscaping demands greater knowledge of plants and flowers, but the growing demand for gardens needing less water makes this an ideal industry to get into. Classes for xeriscaping are becoming easier to find in every city. And, it's in a very similar field, with beautiful end results.</p> <h2>2. Travel Agents: Try Travel Blogging</h2> <p>Let's face it, travel agents have been a dying breed for some time. But with the advent of websites like Orbitz, Expedia, Trivago, and Priceline, the need for an experienced travel agent has decreased dramatically. Why bother with the middleman, when you can go directly to the source and save time and money? However, travel agents have a wealth of experience in the travel industry, and that can be put to good use in travel writing and blogging. Contact the big players like National Geographic and the Travel Channel. Google &quot;travel journalism&quot; and you'll be hit with a plethora of sites filled with articles and guides written by experts. It can pay well to be a travel writer, and you also get to explore the world while you do it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-really-make-a-living-as-an-ebook-writer?ref=seealso">Can You Really Make a Living as an Ebook Writer?</a>)</p> <h2>3. Sewing Machinists: Try Selling on Etsy</h2> <p>Sewing machinists in the U.S., and other parts of the developed world, are quickly being replaced by people in China, Taiwan, Korea, and India. The profit margins for the manufacturers are just impossible to turn down, and that means U.S. sewing machinists are finding work much harder to come by. Even when they do, it doesn't pay well. So, if you are a skilled sewing machinist, branch out and create your own fashions on Etsy. You'll find it very easy to set up a store. You can find all the patterns you need on eBay and Amazon, and material is affordable when buying in bulk. Then sell your wares (customization can really help to increase sales, too) and keep all of the profit for yourself.</p> <h2>4. Telemarketers: Try Sales</h2> <p>Getting a call from a telemarketer as you're about to sit down for an evening meal is about as fun as having root canal work. The Do Not Call list certainly put a stop to a lot of that, and with so much selling being done online now, the need for real people making cold calls is dying out. Telemarketers often follow a script, but the successful ones have charm and know how to persuade. It is not a big leap to go from telemarketing to general sales, specifically in insurance, automotive, or real estate. The &quot;gift of the gab&quot; you have used can be transitioned easily into a sales role, and for the foreseeable future, there will continue to be a need for skilled professionals who know how to close a sale.</p> <h2>5. Tailors: Try Hairdressing</h2> <p>Although the need for a great tailor will never completely vanish, the current state of the fashion industry is not helping the tailoring business. Custom suits and outfits are expensive, and the rise of affordable fashion that can be purchased online is killing the bespoke market. Plus, many dry cleaners now offer simple alterations and other services once provided by tailors, at a fraction of the price. As a tailor, your skills could be used to create bespoke outfits that could be sold in your own eBay or Etsy store, or you can bite the bullet and try a new career. Hairdressing and barbering is growing in demand, and requires many crossover skills. Yes, you would have to retrain, but your eye for detail will work in your favor.</p> <h2>6. Photo Processors: Try Photography</h2> <p>Just as video killed the radio star, digital killed the photo processor. About 30 years ago, it was a thriving job. The rise of quality, affordable film cameras meant we were taking more pictures than ever, and that required the skills of a photo processor. Now, digital photography is everywhere, and with automated online photo ordering, photo processors are disappearing. If you have photo-processing skills, it may be time to go back into the world of photography and take pictures yourself. Professional photographers are in demand, and if you want to start with stock photo houses, you can get plenty of practice whilst earning a decent wage. Then there are weddings, engagements, births, and so many other occasions.</p> <h2>7. Typing Clerks: Try Medical Transcription</h2> <p>Typing used to be quite a valuable skill. Writing letters, with the correct formatting, was an art form. This was especially true when it was done on a typewriter, which required great planning and execution. Now, everything is done with templates on a computer, and you don't need any skills or training to produce professional quality letters, resumes, and other documents. So, take those typing skills, especially your words-per-minute rate, and apply them to transcription. Doctors and physicians continue to take notes either by hand, or on a voice recorder, and these need to be put into digital records quickly. You can also look into legal transcription and subtitling.</p> <h2>8. Telephone Operators: Try Online Community Management</h2> <p>Few qualifications were needed to have the job of a telephone operator, and it was a good entry-level job. Many people stayed on to make full-time careers of it, but as you know if you've tried to make a call to a big company, speaking to an actual human is very difficult. Sophisticated phone systems and software have replaced the job a person used to do, and now you push buttons to eventually get to the person you want to speak to.</p> <p>If you are a telephone operator, consider switching to the online world of community management. A community manager is responsible for company communication online, and can include PR, social media, content creation, and customer outreach. The skills you learned to be patient and informative can be channeled into community management, and you will create a positive public perception of the company. Digital is only going to get stronger, so now is the perfect time to enter this growing career.</p> <p><em>What other modern careers should people in dying industries try? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-guide-to-getting-a-job-right-out-of-college">Your Guide to Getting a Job Right Out of College</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance">4 Best Jobs for Work Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-common-job-hunt-tips-you-should-ignore">8 Common Job-Hunt Tips You Should Ignore</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee">12 Ways You&#039;re Being a Terrible Employee</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting career dying industry job hunting job search modern career modern jobs Wed, 06 Jul 2016 10:00:05 +0000 Paul Michael 1745834 at http://www.wisebread.com Can You Really Make a Living as an Ebook Writer? http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-really-make-a-living-as-an-ebook-writer <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/can-you-really-make-a-living-as-an-ebook-writer" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_writing_book_83658901.jpg" alt="Woman making a living as an ebook writer" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Ebooks have made self-publishing more accessible than ever. As recently as the 1990s, self-publishing meant paying to have thousands of physical books printed; a 1999 CNNMoney article pegged the cost at $12,000 to $30,000.</p> <p>Now that the majority of books sold are electronic, you can self-publish for much less &mdash; even for free. But does that mean you have a better chance now at making money on that self-published book than you did when expenses were higher?</p> <p>That all depends on how you go about it, and how lucky you are. Let's break down the process.</p> <h2>Where to Publish</h2> <p>The three main online stores that sell ebooks are Amazon's Kindle Store, Barnes &amp; Noble's Nook Store, and Apple's iBookstore. A few books are sold on other marketplaces as well, such as the Kobo US bookstore and GooglePlay Books. Authors can also sell their books directly to consumers on their own websites.</p> <p>Since <a href="http://authorearnings.com/report/october-2015-apple-bn-kobo-and-google-a-look-at-the-rest-of-the-ebook-market/">74% of all ebooks are sold on Amazon</a>, it's often the first or only place new authors think of to sell their work. And there are a lot of <a href="http://www.magnoliamedianetwork.com/sell-your-ebook-on-amazon/">benefits to selling on Amazon</a>. Kindle books are easy to buy, and the publishing process is straightforward. On the flip side, there are so many books selling on Amazon, including those from unknown new authors (like you), that it can be hard to stand out from the crowd. Amazon demands that you <a href="http://selfpublishingadvice.org/alli-watchdog-amazon-vs-apple/">exclusively sell your book</a> through them if you want to take advantage of many benefits, such as the Kindle Lending Library and Kindle Unlimited. (Keep in mind that Amazon pays authors when people check out their books; one ebook author said the Lending Library accounted for <a href="http://upfuel.com/how-much-money-can-one-kindle-book-make-1-year-case-study/">10% of his revenue</a>.) The biggest disadvantage of selling with Amazon, for many, is that they just don't like the way Amazon treats its authors.</p> <p>Apple's iBookstore is gaining market share, and as you would expect from Apple, books published on this platform look beautiful. But while Kindle books can be downloaded onto just about any device, readers can only access iBooks on an Apple device such as an iPad or an iPhone, which limits the market.</p> <p>Nook seems to be getting squeezed out by the big two ebook stores, and should probably only be considered as a secondary place to publish. The bottom line is that you may sell more books on Amazon, but some authors don't feel like that's a good enough reason to publish there.</p> <p>&quot;I may not sell as many books with Apple &mdash; yet &mdash; but it's a whole lot more fun working with them,&quot; writes author Giacomo Giammatteo.</p> <p>No matter which platform you choose, you stand to make about $2 a book if you sell your ebook for $2.99 &mdash; which is a popular price point.</p> <h2>How to Publish</h2> <p>Once you've decided where to sell your ebook, you're not done making decisions. You must decide whether to create and upload your ebook all on your own, or to pay an epublishing service or distributor to do it for you. The top services include <a href="https://www.bookbaby.com/">BookBaby</a>, <a href="https://www.smashwords.com/">Smashwords</a>, and <a href="http://www.ingramspark.com/">IngramSpark</a>. For fees of $149 or more, these services can format your book and upload it to multiple different ebook stores. You can pay more for value-added services, such as editing, cover design, and even print-on-demand paper books.</p> <p>You can also hire editing and design professionals independently for these services.</p> <h2>What to Publish</h2> <p>What your ebook is about all depends on your goals. If your motive is purely profit, there are methods of figuring out which topics are most likely to sell books. An anonymous author, who claims to be making tens of thousands of dollars a month publishing short ebooks (about 20 pages), describes his <a href="http://thehustle.co/underground-world-of-kindle-ebooks">process for choosing topics</a> on The Hustle: &quot;I find books that are selling well, check out their tables of contents, and look at the negative reviews to see what they missed.&quot;</p> <p>It may be disheartening for a hardworking writer to hear, but this successful entrepreneur says that sales are driven mainly by the cover image and the book description: &quot;[T]he book's content is the least important part of the process.&quot;</p> <p>If your motive is more to get a great idea or story out into the world, rather than just cranking out any title that will sell, you should still do your research before you sit down and start writing. If you have a blog, poll your readers on what topics they'd most like to see expanded upon in a book. If your book is in a genre or niche, such as a cookbook, study the top-selling, well-reviewed ebooks in that niche and try to figure out what you could add that hasn't already been done well. Fiction authors can also benefit by looking at already published novels in their category, to figure out both how to avoid writing books that have been done to death &mdash; and to find out what types of novels are hot right now.</p> <h2>How to Make It Sell</h2> <p>Once upon a time, writers just turned in their manuscripts to publishers and left the advertising and promotion to the company. But even authors with book contracts nowadays find themselves doing their own advertising and promotion. <em>Before</em> you publish your book, consider the investment of hiring a publicist to let media know about your upcoming release. If you're publicizing it yourself, write about your upcoming book on your blog, and ask other bloggers to write about it as well. You can also create a new blog just about the new book or about its topic, in order to drive traffic to your book.</p> <p>Don't forget good old-fashioned advertising. Mark Dawson, who says he makes six figures selling his novels on Kindle Direct, pays $370 a day to advertise it on Facebook, according to Forbes.</p> <h2>Will You Make Money?</h2> <p>Of about 200,000 authors selling ebooks on Amazon, only about 5,000 &mdash; less than 3% &mdash; consistently earn $10,000 a year or better, according to the website Author Earnings. More than half of those are traditionally-published authors. So, only around 1% of all the people self-publishing ebooks are making much money on it.</p> <p>That's not to say you can't. One approach for ending up with more money in your pocket is to keep your investment low, so that even if sales are modest, you still keep some profit. To save themselves from investing too much time, some ebook authors suggest <a href="http://www.fabfreelancewriting.com/blog/2013/06/25/writing-kindle-ficion-make-money-with-short-stories/">keeping books short</a> &mdash; since people are about as likely to pay for a 20-page book or short story as they are for a full-length novel. Others minimize their time investment by outsourcing the cover art (<a href="http://thehustle.co/underground-world-of-kindle-ebooks">this guy gets all his covers designed on Fiverr</a>) or even the content.</p> <p>Again, it's all about your goals. If your dream is to delight readers with your imaginative novel or win a literary award, you're not going to dash out an outline and hire a low-cost overseas writer to flesh it out. But if your goal is to develop a passive income stream by pumping out 50 titles a year, outsourcing is probably your best option.</p> <p>In the end, the answer is that you can make a living self-publishing ebooks, but like a lot of business ventures, most people who try it don't cash in. If you decide to enter self-publishing as a moneymaking venture, make sure to research the market first and put in the time to create a product that's optimized to sell.</p> <p><em>Have you tried selling an ebook online? What was your experience like? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-really-make-a-living-as-an-ebook-writer">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-turn-your-stress-into-money">8 Ways to Turn Your Stress Into Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-easiest-ways-to-score-free-ebooks">5 Easiest Ways to Score Free eBooks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-part-time-jobs-to-do-while-your-kids-are-at-school">17 Part-Time Jobs to Do While Your Kids Are at School</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-i-learned-about-money-after-i-went-freelance">7 Things I Learned About Money After I Went Freelance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career">6 Job Perks That Can Lead to a Dream Career</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income author books bookworm ebook author eBooks freelancer jobs novelist professional writer side hustle writer Fri, 01 Jul 2016 10:30:04 +0000 Carrie Kirby 1742406 at http://www.wisebread.com Didn't Get the Raise? Ask for This, Instead http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_strong_work_71194917.jpg" alt="Woman doing something after getting denied for a pay raise" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Getting knocked back when you've built up the courage to ask for a pay raise at work can feel like a real blow. It can seem as if your hard work has gone unnoticed, and will quickly sour working relationships if you let it. But with some segments of the economy still decidedly wobbly, every pay bump is hard-fought, and more of us than ever are getting turned down when we ask for more cash.</p> <p>If this is your situation, don't get disheartened. Instead, think about the different negotiating angles you can work, like requesting a deferred raise, extra pension or benefits, increased vacation time, a personal development payment, or even the opportunity to work from home.</p> <p>All of these can effectively put money back in your pocket, even if your boss says no to a raise.</p> <h2>Deferred or Conditional Raise</h2> <p>If you asked for a straight raise and your boss was not able (or willing) to offer it, then asking for a conditional or deferred raise is an option. A deferred raise simply means a pay raise that is delayed until an agreed date &mdash; and might be worth asking for if your company has specific short-term cash issues, or if the issue is linked to the financial year. If there is no stretch in the budget for right now, that does not necessarily mean that there won't be in future, and getting an agreement in advance is a head start.</p> <p>A conditional raise, on the other hand, is linked to your achievement on a certain task or project. This might mean that you are to receive a raise if you secure a new contract, or pass a professional qualification. You might link it to the company profits or your team performance, depending on the sort of business you work for. This gives you the opportunity to show, not only why you deserve a raise, but also how your boss can find the cash.</p> <p>But for these options to work, they should be agreed in writing, and with as much specific details as possible to back them up.</p> <h2>Boost Your Benefits</h2> <p>Depending on the type of company you work for, it might be possible to effectively boost your overall remuneration by addressing other fringe benefits instead of the salary. This is often an appealing option for bosses if the financial pots for salary and benefits are separate. Even if the one pot dries up, there might still be some wriggle room in the other!</p> <p>You should look at the benefits your company offers, and make a specific request for improvement. For example, if your business has a grading system which is linked to benefits, you might ask to be bumped up a grade &mdash; especially if this allows you access to perks like a company car or share options. If this is hard to swallow for your HR team or boss, then consider agreeing that the grade improvement now could be set off against any future entitlement.</p> <p>Think broadly when you negotiate this one. You might request company pension contributions, share options or grants, reward cards, discounts on products you actually use, or even increased vacation time. All these routes effectively boost your package and leave you with more cash in your pocket overall.</p> <h2>Invest in Yourself</h2> <p>Sometimes, investing in yourself through personal development or improved qualifications is really worthwhile. If you are struggling to get a raise at work, then why not ask for support in achieving this development or qualifications instead? Some qualifications can <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-certifications-that-add-big-to-your-salary">give your salary a huge boost</a> over the long term.</p> <p>If you have courses in mind which would give you transferable skills, and also improve your performance at work, then see if your boss will pay for them. Even better, maybe you can get some study time off to reflect the extra work you are doing. These cash investments tend to be relatively small for the company, but the end result is that you have more skills with which to negotiate a better role or raise later down the line.</p> <h2>Flex</h2> <p>Ask for improved flexibility in your work schedule. This can be an equivalent to a pay raise if you can negotiate some time working from home, and therefore cut the costs of commuting or parking. If this is not possible, then perhaps working a more flexible shift would allow you to do some longer days in return for more time off.</p> <p>The benefits here are felt in reducing the cost of commuting, but also the peripheral costs of things like buying lunch at work or stocking up on gourmet coffees. On the other hand, by reducing your travel, you win back time that can be used to boost your income if you wish. To get the biggest return from this approach, use the time you save to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-unexpected-side-benefits-of-your-side-hustle">set up a side hustle</a>, and suddenly it's like you're being paid double time.</p> <h2>Try Again</h2> <p>When you're asking for a pay or benefits rise, how you ask is at least as important as what you're requesting. If you've already been knocked back for a straight raise and are going in for a second pass, then it's especially important to get your message straight.</p> <p>Here are some hints to make sure you're making your case effectively.</p> <h3>Pick the Right Moment</h3> <p>If you were refused because the business is genuinely struggling, then putting the request on ice for a few months might be best. Use the time to sharpen your skills and, if necessary, start applying elsewhere.</p> <h3>Don't Whine or Give Ultimatums</h3> <p>Avoid comparing yourself to others. Don't say, &quot;I do way more than the rest of the team!&quot; As tempting as it might be, it's not going to help your case.</p> <h3>Don't Highlight Personal Financial Problems</h3> <p>If this is a real challenge, then be honest with your boss, but don't try to use your cash flow as leverage.</p> <h3>Remember You Are Not Entitled to It</h3> <p>You won't get one because you did everything asked of you, or just because the cost of living has gone up. Assume you're making a business case for the raise and present it as such, not a demand.</p> <p>As uncomfortable as it might be, asking for a raise is part of working life. And if necessary, bouncing back from rejection should be, too. Think of it as an ongoing project to market yourself and your skills and ensure that you are paid fairly, and consider different angles to make your requests so good they can't be refused.</p> <p><em>What is your experience in asking for a pay rise? Let us know in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income ask for a raise benefits income job promotion pay increase raise salary work Fri, 01 Jul 2016 09:00:03 +0000 Claire Millard 1742408 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Career Mistakes New Grads Make http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-mistakes-new-grads-make <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-career-mistakes-new-grads-make" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/new_grad_unemployed_85374233.jpg" alt="Woman making career mistakes new grads make" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>After four long years of studying hard, budgeting every thin dime, and learning the finer points of a ramen-based cuisine, you've finally graduated. As you toss that mortar board in the air and begin the job hunt, be mindful of common pitfalls that can get your career off to a bad start. Here are eight career mistakes new grads make.</p> <h2>1. Keeping Social Media Accounts Public</h2> <p>It's called <em>social </em>media for a reason. No matter how run-of-the-mill our Facebook or Twitter posts may be, we always run the risk of offending someone for something. Assume every potential employer will attempt to review your online presence early in the hiring process. If you can't <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-break-your-social-media-habit">break your social media habit</a> completely, set your status to &quot;private&quot; across all networks and control the conversation.</p> <h2>2. Not Having a Plan</h2> <p>Without a plan, your career can take on a life of its own &mdash; and not in a good way. Think of your career as an extension of your education and design a plan for short-term and long-term success. Where do you want to be in three years? What about in 10? What are your income and lifestyle goals? What will it take to reach them? Shape every job search around specific incremental moves that will help make your plan a reality and avoid taking any job &quot;just because.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Not Dressing the Part</h2> <p>In today's hyper-casual culture, most young people have never learned how to dress for business success. Invest in an interview wardrobe that reflects the sort of professional you want to become. Choose versatile pieces that are understated, classically styled, and fit flawlessly. Oh, and two more things: Rediscover the lost art of ironing and remember that club wear is not formal wear. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-a-work-wardrobe-for-any-job-on-a-budget?ref=seealso">Build a Work Wardrobe for Any Job on a Budget</a>)</p> <h2>4. Submitting Standardized Resumes and Cover Letters</h2> <p>Hiring managers are impressed by applicants who do their research. Avoid the &quot;click-apply-submit&quot; job search method by taking a few minutes to learn about each company you're interested in and each role you're applying for. Then, customize your resume and cover letter to address the employer's specific needs.</p> <h2>5. Jumping on the First Job Offer</h2> <p>Getting your first job offer after college is exciting and flattering, but don't let that cloud your judgment. Before you accept that job, know why. How does it fit with your career plan? Is it something you'll excel at and enjoy? Is there an obvious path for advancement? Does it pay enough to cover your expenses?</p> <h2>6. Buying a New Car</h2> <p>It happens so often it's almost cliché: A new graduate receives her first real paycheck, gets a little cash drunk after four lean years of college, and rewards herself with a brand-new car. This isn't just a financial mistake; it's a career mistake, too. That new car you'll be paying off for the next five years depreciated 25% the minute you drove it off the lot. And now you can't risk even a temporary hiccup in income and wouldn't dare settle for a more fulfilling job that pays less.</p> <p>A better option is to stay lean and nimble the first few years in your career by avoiding all forms of consumer debt. Remember, you're not sure where your professional life will take you &mdash; be ready to seize new opportunities. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-reasons-why-you-should-never-buy-a-new-car?ref=seealso">3 Reasons Why You Should Never Buy a New Car</a>)</p> <h2>7. Gunning for a Promotion</h2> <p>First jobs are exciting and some newly-minted employees can get overeager to prove themselves. But trying to move up the corporate ladder too early can alienate coworkers and suggest to management that you're dissatisfied. Pace yourself by fully investing in your current role, building a strong network with colleagues, and waiting for the right opportunity to come along.</p> <h2>8. Freaking Out and Going Back to School</h2> <p>Overwhelmed by responsibility and underwhelmed by the glacial pace of career advancement, many new graduates respond by going back to school to pursue an advanced degree. A few years later, they've amassed more debt, lost valuable career-building time, and still have no clear plan for success. Be strategic. If you're unhappy with your work life, explore ways to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-a-major-career-switch-without-going-back-to-school">shift careers without further schooling</a>. And if you decide to return to college, make sure it's a proactive and not a reactive decision.</p> <p><em>What advice would you give new grads? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-mistakes-new-grads-make">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee">12 Ways You&#039;re Being a Terrible Employee</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-the-adventures-of-johnny-bunko">Book review: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career career advice career mistakes grads graduation life lessons new grads students Wed, 22 Jun 2016 09:00:04 +0000 Kentin Waits 1736431 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 $100k+ Jobs You Can Do Online http://www.wisebread.com/8-100k-jobs-you-can-do-online <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-100k-jobs-you-can-do-online" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_makeup_kit_000084480065.jpg" alt="Woman finding online jobs that can earn $100K" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Work no longer has to be a place. As the world of web-entrepreneurship and digital nomadic life becomes more and more mainstream, people are starting to realize that it's easier than ever to make good money online. These aren't get rich quick schemes by any means, and it will take a considerable amount of time and commitment to truly excel in these fields, but who doesn't want to earn $100K per year from virtually anywhere in the world? Here are five jobs that can help you do just that.</p> <h2>1. Travel Blogger</h2> <p>If you thought that travel blogging was just a hobby, you're not alone. In fact, before I started <a href="http://www.goatsontheroad.com/">my travel blog</a> in 2011, I had no idea that I would one day be earning over $10,000 a month after tax, doing what I love.</p> <p>The great thing about becoming a travel blogger is the perks that come along with the salary. $100,000 a year sounds great, but when you couple that with airlines flying you for free and tourism boards paying for all of your accommodations, food, and travel, it's pretty much the ultimate dream job.</p> <p>Travel bloggers who are doing it right barely have any day-to-day expenses, despite the fact that they&rsquo;re living a life fit for millionaires. Because there are literally thousands of travel blogs online, the market is definitely saturated, but that doesn't mean it's impossible to etch out a niche and make real money from this line of work.</p> <p>If you want to leave your cubicle behind and turn the world into your office, consider learning <a href="http://www.goatsontheroad.com/how-to-start-a-travel-blog/">how to start travel a blog</a> today. It could change your life.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Matt Karsten &mdash; <a href="http://expertvagabond.com/paid-to-travel-world/">Expert Vagabond</a></li> <li>Caz and Craig &mdash; <a href="http://ytravelblog.com/">yTravelBlog</a></li> <li>Natalie Sisson &mdash; <a href="http://suitcaseentrepreneur.com/">Suitcase Entrepreneur</a></li> <li>Nick &amp; Dariece - <a href="http://goatsontheroad.com">Goats On The Road</a></li> </ul> <h2>2. Internet Poker Player</h2> <p>If you love a good game of five-card stud, this job may just sound like it's too good to be true. The fact that you can sit on your computer and play digital poker, while looking out at a Caribbean beach, is a dreamlike thought for sure.</p> <p>But for online gamblers like Patrick Leonard, it is not uncommon to have single days where winnings break the $100,000 mark. Forget making more than six-figures per year, this guy once earned $220,000 on a rainy Sunday afternoon in Hungary (where he currently lives).</p> <p>It should be noted that most estimates point to 90% of all online poker players coming out on the losing end, which is why online poker sites make so much money. But if you're a freakishly good poker player like Patrick, you could make it rain digital dollars all over the world.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Diego Ventura</li> <li>Patrick Leonard</li> </ul> <h2>3. Web Designer</h2> <p>Designing websites can be a lucrative career, especially if you build a name for yourself and you start having big brands knocking on your door, asking you to pimp their blogs. Of course becoming a web designer isn't something you can do overnight.</p> <p>Have you ever seen the code behind a website? It's an entire language that you have to learn before you can start to customize the look of the web. But if you have a background in CSS, HTML, PHP, and other geeky web acronyms, then you can probably earn a good living from your computer, no matter where you are in the world.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Scott Eldridge &mdash; <a href="http://www.eldowebdesign.co.uk/">Eldo Web Design</a></li> <li>Preston Lee &mdash; <a href="http://millo.co/">millo.co</a></li> <li>Paul Jarvis &mdash; <a href="http://creativeclass.io/">creativeclass.io</a></li> </ul> <h2>4. Day Trader</h2> <p>For some reason, the sound of day trading on the stock market already has a wealthy ring to it. You may picture a dude with slicked back hair, holding a glass of scotch while betting on the changing stock market from a five-star hotel in Maui. Well, if you go to successful day trader <a href="http://wanderingtrader.com/about/">Marcello Arrambide's website</a>, you'll see just that.</p> <p>Like online poker playing, making money as a day trader is a gamble and if you have no prior experience, you're likely to lose before you gain &mdash; but this job is no joke. Some top earners are making upward of $20,000 a month, and they can do it from anywhere that has a decent Wi-Fi connection.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Marcello Arrambide &mdash; <a href="http://wanderingtrader.com/about/">The Wandering Trader</a></li> <li>Steve Gomez &mdash; <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/sgomez858">Today Trader</a></li> </ul> <h2>5. Travel Writer</h2> <p>The difference between a travel <em>writer </em>and a travel <em>blogger </em>is that a travel writer is getting paid to write for other publications, while a travel blogger is probably making most (or all) of their income from writing on their own site.</p> <p>Earning six figures a year as a freelance writer is a difficult job indeed. Tim Leffel, one of the world's leading experts in travel writing, explains that making money as a freelance writer is truly a world of feast and famine. One minute you can have numerous publications waiting to feature you, while the next, you may be barely earning anything, just waiting for an assignment.</p> <p>Despite the relative uncertainty of income, some of the world's top-earning travel writers do take home $100K a year or more and they live a life that many of us could only dream of. Exploring the world, getting published in big magazines, and sharing their stories and adventures with millions of people. What a life.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Tim Leffel &mdash; <a href="http://travelwriting2.com/about/">Travel Writing 2.0</a></li> <li>Carol Tice &mdash; <a href="http://www.makealivingwriting.com/about-carol/">Make a Living Writing</a></li> </ul> <h2>6. YouTuber</h2> <p>If you read the word &quot;YouTuber&quot; and immediately thought that there's no way anyone is making real money from uploading videos to YouTube, you might just pass out when I tell you that the top earning YouTuber, Felix Kjellberg, is grossing over $12 million per annum.</p> <p>The 25-year-old Swede runs the popular gaming channel PewDiePie, and he is not alone in making millions of dollars from Internet videos. Rhett McLaughlin and Charles Lincoln Neal III made over $4 million in 2015 and there are literally dozens of other creators making seven to eight figures per year from their YouTube channels.</p> <p>For channels to earn this much money, they have to have a huge following. The top 10 YouTubers have a combined subscriber base of more than 230 million viewers and their most watched videos have had more views than the 2015 Super Bowl.</p> <p>Taking all of this into consideration, it's no surprise that these artists are making big money. If you're just starting out as a YouTuber, it may feel like you have nobody watching your videos, but if you promote yourself and market your channel properly, you could one day earn a solid income from embedded ads and sponsorships.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Felix Kjellberg &mdash; <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/PewDiePie/videos?view=0&amp;flow=grid&amp;sort=p">PewDiePie</a></li> <li>Rhett and Link &mdash; <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/rhettandlink2">Good Mythical Morning</a></li> </ul> <h2>7. App Programmer</h2> <p>Have you ever played the game Candy Crush on your smartphone? While you were aligning jelly beans and stopping chocolate blockers, you probably weren't aware that the app currently earns $277,500,000 yearly. That's right, the addictive finger swiping platform earns two hundred seventy-seven million five hundred thousand dollars every year. That's $3.5 million per day.</p> <p>Of course, the average programmer isn't going to make as much as Toby Rowland, the creator of the Sugar Crush Saga, but there are many app developers out there making good money from their digital creations.</p> <p>Simon Fairbairn and Erin McNeaney of <a href="http://www.neverendingvoyage.com/">Never Ending Voyage</a> have created a brilliant travel app called <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/trail-wallet-travel-budget/id547171665?mt=8">Trail Wallet</a> that is selling very well in the App Store and earning them a reliable income. The app helps travelers to track their budget and has been downloaded thousands of times from the app store.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Tasnim Ahmed &mdash; <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/santa-claus-merry-christmas/id764935420?mt=8">Santa Claus Photo Booth</a></li> <li>Ethan Nicholas &mdash; <a href="http://appadvice.com/appnn/2009/02/ishoot-developer-makes-600000-in-one-month">iShoot</a></li> </ul> <h2>8. Affiliate Marketing Guru</h2> <p>What is affiliate marketing? According to Pat Flynn, founder of the <a href="http://smartpassiveincome.com/">Smart Passive Income Blog</a>: &quot;It's the process of earning a commission by promoting other people's (or company's) products. You find a product you like, promote it to others, and earn a piece of the profit for each sale that you make.&quot;</p> <p>Forget earning $100,000 a year, Pat earns that every month and he does so using a passive income model, which means he doesn't spend every waking hour of his life on his computer. His blog is the most informative on the subject and he helps to teach others how to make a full-time income from affiliate sales.</p> <p>While having a blog with a huge amount of traffic like Pat's definitely helps to generate sales, there are plenty of people with much less traffic who are still making a lot of money through affiliate marketing. If earning money in your sleep sounds appealing to you, you may want to check out Pat's blog and consider starting your own blog today.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Pat Flynn &mdash; <a href="http://www.smartpassiveincome.com/">Smart Passive Income</a></li> <li>Steve Scott &mdash; <a href="http://www.stevescottsite.com/affiliate-marketing-strategies">SteveScottSite.com</a></li> </ul> <h2>You Can Do It &hellip;</h2> <p>These jobs may have once been reserved for people with fancy degrees, a background in technology, or Internet geniuses, but these days there are enough resources online that pretty much anyone can make money from their computers.</p> <p>Like the people in the examples above, you could work hard and one day be earning a six-figure income from your laptop. The great thing about computer work is that you can start it in your free time, while you&rsquo;re still working your normal job. If your online business takes off, you can retire to a life of digital freedom.</p> <p><em>Have you or someone you know earned a good income online? How did it work? Share with us in the comments below.</em></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like This Article? Pin it!</h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="//www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-100k-jobs-you-can-do-online&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8.jpg&amp;description=Here%20are%208%20Online%20jobs%20that%20can%20earn%20you%20%24100K%20%2F%20year%20or%20more!" data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-config="above" data-pin-color="red" data-pin-height="28"><img src="//assets.pinterest.com/images/pidgets/pinit_fg_en_rect_red_28.png" alt="" /></a> </p> <!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><script type="text/javascript" async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8.jpg" alt="$100K online jobs" width="200" height="300" align="middle" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nick-wharton">Nick Wharton</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-100k-jobs-you-can-do-online">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-websites-that-will-pay-you-to-write-for-them">22 Websites That Will Pay You to Write for Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-find-a-legit-virtual-assistant-job">How to Find a Legit Virtual Assistant Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting day trader high paying jobs online jobs poker six figures travel work from home YouTube Mon, 20 Jun 2016 10:30:05 +0000 Nick Wharton 1721733 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Ways You're Being a Terrible Employee http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/10275265.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You may think that being a good employee is all about doing great work, and nothing more. Actually, that's quite far from the truth. A great employee builds great relationships at work, takes the initiative, and cares about the success of the company. If you are making four or more of the following blunders at work, you're quickly on your way to becoming a terrible employee. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired?ref=seealso">12 Reasons You Deserve to Get Fired</a>)</p> <h2>1. You're All About the Gossip</h2> <p>Every workplace has gossip and rumors. Good employees will ignore it, brush it off, or just avoid talking about anything that is idle chatter. Bad employees, however, relish the opportunity to talk about anything from company problems and other coworkers, to rumors of layoffs, mergers, or people about to get fired.</p> <p>If you find yourself being drawn into watercooler gossip, you have several options. First, you can simply make an excuse and walk away. Or, you can deftly change the subject to something non-gossip related. Finally, you can always talk to HR about some of the malicious gossip flying around, and they should look into it.</p> <h2>2. You Are Never on Time</h2> <p>Late for work. Late for meetings. Late for everything. Some people consider lateness to be the height of bad manners, and they have a point. When you are late, you are saying, &quot;my time is more important than your time,&quot; or even &quot;I really don't care what you think, I'll turn up when I'm ready.&quot; Maybe you're just really bad with time management, or you have a rotten commute that makes it hard to get in on time. But if everyone else in the office can get in on time, you really have no excuse. Use your smartphone to give you alerts well before your workday begins, so you have plenty of time to get where you're going. Do what you can to be on time, because nothing says &quot;terrible employee&quot; like someone who isn't even around.</p> <h2>3. You Complain &mdash; A Lot</h2> <p>We all have gripes with our jobs. There is no perfect workplace, and there will always be things that could be better. Yes, it's fine to bring up issues when they need to be addressed. But there is a big difference between occasionally alerting your boss to an issue, and whining in every meeting and one-on-one. They say that the &quot;squeaking wheel gets the grease&quot; and to some extent, that's true. However, in a work environment, it is usually much easier to replace that squeaking wheel. If you have complaints, see what you can do by yourself to solve them. If the issue is with a coworker, talk it out with them first. If there is a problem with equipment, or scheduling, bring solutions to the table. Don't be &quot;that&quot; employee &mdash; the one everyone avoids talking to because they cannot stand the tirade of negativity coming their way.</p> <h2>4. You Won't Do Anything Beyond Your Job Description</h2> <p>No doubt you have heard something like this coming from a coworker; &quot;Look, I'm not paid to do that, so I'm not doing it.&quot; Or, &quot;That's not my job, why should I?&quot; It is not uncommon these days for job descriptions to be very fluid as technology advances, and cutbacks hit firms everywhere. Sometimes, what you're being asked to do may be well beyond your job description, but if you can do what is being asked of you, step up and do it. The chances are, everyone is being asked to hit a few curveballs, and deal with things outside of their usual scope of work. Do your part, chip in, and you'll be valued. If it gets ridiculous, though, then you have the right to say something. You should not be doing the jobs of two or three people, but at least show your commitment before raising concerns.</p> <h2>5. You Spend Too Much Time Slacking Off</h2> <p>The distractions are everywhere. Many of us work on computers every day, and the Internet is right there, beckoning us. A few minutes shopping on Amazon, read the latest headlines, then a quick check of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and SnapChat. Before you know it, you've spent an hour or more doing nothing productive. This is actually stealing. Your employer is paying you for that time, and you should be doing the work they pay you for.</p> <h2>6. You Take Credit for Work Others Have Done</h2> <p>Nothing kills morale in a workplace like someone else taking the glory for a project that isn't theirs. If you have ever done this, or do it often, you are being a terrible employee. Businesses operate on the idea that it's a team environment, with each person doing his or her part to make the whole company successful. By swooping in and taking credit for the hard work other people have done, you are creating an atmosphere of distrust and negativity. Coworkers will be less likely to share with you, communication will break down, and the whole department you work in can become soured and tough to work for. If you are given credit for a job by accident, step up immediately and tell the boss who actually did the work.</p> <h2>7. You Abuse Those Sick Days</h2> <p>Coming in to work sick is bad enough. You're not going to be at your best, and you run the risk of giving other people in the office your illness. But what's worse is doing it so you can call in sick when you're perfectly healthy to enjoy a day off. Sick days are there for a reason. The company is giving you paid time off to heal, or feel better. To abuse this so you can go to a ball game or spend a day by the pool is just not fair, to anyone. Next time you're sick, use a sick day. When you need a personal day, use one of your vacation days.</p> <h2>8. You Make a Lot of Mistakes</h2> <p>We're all human. We all make mistakes, and the occasional error here or there should never be cause for concern (unless those errors result in something catastrophic). However, if your work is always coming back to you for revisions, or your manager receives constant complaints of poor quality work, then you need to get your act together. Whether it's constant grammatical errors in an office environment, to shoddy work on a building site, mistakes made weekly, or even daily, should not be tolerated. Plus, it often falls on other employees to fix your errors, burdening them with extra work because you can't get it right. In this case, you must try harder to clean up your act.</p> <h2>9. You Play the Blame Game</h2> <p>Finger pointing is one aspect of office politics that never fails to cause problems. When something goes wrong, if you're one of the first people to start assigning blame to others, you're not being a team player. Yes, maybe it was Janice in accounting who messed up. But maybe you should talk to her first and see what happened. Maybe it was really you, but you know you can slime your way out of it by throwing blame in someone else's direction. Don't be a finger pointer. If you made a mistake, own it. If someone else did, let him or her fess up. You don't want to be seen as the one who rats at the first opportunity.</p> <h2>10. You Swear Like a Sailor</h2> <p>Admittedly, there are some workplaces that have no problem with this kind of language. Certainly most places involving manual labor are not going to care about f-bombs. But in a professional environment, swearing constantly is just not&hellip; well, professional. Imagine having a meeting with a lawyer about an important case, and being greeted with a tirade of colorful language more at home in a Guy Ritchie movie. Would you trust this lawyer? Does he or she seem like the best person for the job? Maybe you'll go with the lawyer who doesn't sound like Vinnie Jones. Swearing in meetings can also make people feel uncomfortable, to the point that they will speak to HR about it. This will reflect badly on your manager, and your department, and bad language can actually be viewed as harassment.</p> <h2>11. You Steal</h2> <p>What's a few paperclips, right? Or a ream of paper? And hey, why pay for toilet paper when you can grab a couple of rolls from the bathroom? It may not feel like you're doing anything wrong when you take a items worth pennies. However, multiply this by every employee in the building, and suddenly your company is losing thousands of dollars every year in &quot;liberated&quot; goods. If you need the items to work from home, that's fair enough. But if you're snagging paper from the copier to print out your tax returns, or taking coffee filters for your machine at home, you are stealing from your employer. It's not a gray area. It's theft.</p> <h2>12. You're Not Proactive</h2> <p>Imagine being a firefighter and walking into a burning building only to see a fellow firefighter standing there watching it burn. &quot;Why aren't you putting out this fire?!&quot; you yell. He or she responds with, &quot;You didn't ask me to.&quot; That may seem like a ridiculous scenario, and it would never happen because firefighters know better. But in other places, it happens all the time. Good employees will take the initiative. They will solve problems without being asked. They will initiate new projects that can benefit the company. Bad employees will wait for the order, and do nothing until it is given. Don't sit there waiting to be asked. What can you do to help? What can you do to create opportunities? Be the go-getter.</p> <p><em>Does this sound like you or any of your coworkers? </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career">Fired? Here&#039;s How to Keep It From Hurting Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-mistakes-new-grads-make">8 Career Mistakes New Grads Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career career advice fired horrible boss job hunting job performance terrible employee unemployed work Mon, 13 Jun 2016 10:30:04 +0000 Paul Michael 1727885 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Ace Your Next Coffee Interview http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000051956032_Large.jpg" alt="acing her coffee interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Ah, the modern job hunt. You've optimized your online profiles, mastered the art of digital networking, and figured out how to stay on the right side of the line between using the Internet to research a hiring manager, and full-on stalking. So far, so good.</p> <p>And you've even landed an interview, but there a catch. Your first face-to-face contact with your prospective dream boss is a &quot;coffee interview.&quot; Say what?</p> <p>Using an informal screening stage in recruiting isn't new, but since this important kind of meeting has moved to a cafe setting, it has become an etiquette minefield.</p> <p>If you've got a coffee interview booked and you're stumped by such vital questions as what to wear, how to identify your interviewer, and, if it's okay to order a double skinny lactose free caramel latte, read on. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview?ref=seealso">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a>)</p> <h2>Be Informal, Not Relaxed</h2> <p>Don't be fooled into feeling that the informal environment will lead to a <em>relaxed </em>meeting. One of the most common mistakes job seekers make is to underestimate the expectation of the interviewer and arrive underprepared at this type of interview. If you don't want to fail at the first hurdle, you need to get prepped!</p> <p>Ask the interviewer what the format of the interview will be, and if there is anything in particular you can prepare in advance, or bring along, such as references or a portfolio. Often the first meeting will be a gate keeping exercise, to test basic suitability for the job, and to sound out candidate expectations about salary, working conditions, and availability. Expect to be asked practical questions, and have answers in mind, so they don't become a barrier.</p> <p>Preparing for the meat of the conversation starts with research. Pick out the key skills and experience detailed in the job posting, and make sure you're clear on your unique selling point &mdash; what makes you suited to the role. Learn everything you can about the company, and think of ways you can make your mark even at this early stage. You might consider visiting a competitor, for example, or preparing some thoughts on the biggest challenges and opportunities facing the company. By having knowledge and unique ideas, you will stand out for the right reasons.</p> <h2>Map It Out</h2> <p>The logistics of a coffee interview can feel somewhat daunting. Make sure you know exactly where you're going &mdash; especially if you're meeting in a chain cafe that has several different locations in town &mdash; and arrive a little early if possible.</p> <p>Identifying your interviewer from an anonymous crowd is the next challenge. If you know exactly who you're meeting in advance, have a look at their social media presence to find a picture to increase your odds of picking them out in a crowd. Take a seat facing the door if you can, and text or call your interviewer a few minutes before you're due to meet, to describe your location. Be aware that recruiters often batch meetings, so your interviewer might already be in the cafe with another candidate.</p> <p>Once you've found the right person, remember it's an interview, not a date. Take your lead from them when ordering, and don't order anything too wacky! If you're eating, spend a second figuring out what on the menu is suitable. Spraying yourself with spaghetti sauce, or trying to talk while gnawing on ribs isn't a good look!</p> <p>Although you're there to talk about the position, remember that you're creating an impression before you're ever been asked a question. More so than in an office environment, your interviewer will pick up on your interactions with others. Treat everyone with <em>real </em>respect. This is no time to get snarky with your waitress, even if the order is muddled up.</p> <p>Similarly, what you choose to wear is more open in a coffee interview. While office attire is fairly well defined, anything goes in a cafe. Choose something that makes you feel good and that fits with your perception of the company culture. If you're in any doubt, err on the side of more formal. Unless you habitually hang out in your tux, it's hard to be overdressed, in any interview situation.</p> <h2>Exit Gracefully</h2> <p>As your meeting is coming to an end, hopefully you've developed a great rapport with your interviewer, and are parting on good terms &mdash; but you still need to avoid an etiquette fail. Getting the bill is the first challenge. It's pretty common for the recruiter to pick up the tab, but have some cash just in case. Having to borrow a few dollars from your prospective boss is not the best start to a working relationship.</p> <p>When you're done, shake hands and part ways. Even if you might really want to hang round in the same cafe, or grab a bite to eat, it's usually best to leave. If your interviewer has another meeting lined up directly after you, they won't want you in a position to spy on the competition. Make a dignified exit and get your lunch elsewhere!</p> <h2>Always Follow Up</h2> <p>As with any interview, it's a good idea to follow up with a thank you note. An email is fine in such an informal scenario, just to reiterate your interest in the role, and say thanks for the meeting. If you touched upon anything in your conversation that really resonated with you both &mdash; maybe a book you mentioned, or an interesting article about a mutual passion &mdash; then mention this as an anchor to your conversation, and to help your interviewer remember the connection you had.</p> <p>A coffee interview is never going to be quite as much fun as hanging out with friends over a latte and lunch, but it shouldn't be too terrifying, either.</p> <p><em>What do you think? Have you had coffee interview successes, or disasters? Tell us in the comments.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting coffee interview how to interview etiquette job interview tips job interviews job search Thu, 02 Jun 2016 09:00:11 +0000 Claire Millard 1722227 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Signs You Aren't Making Enough Money http://www.wisebread.com/6-signs-you-arent-making-enough-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-signs-you-arent-making-enough-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_stressed_computer_000044901658.jpg" alt="Woman learning signs she isn&#039;t making enough money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Living paycheck to paycheck can take a toll on your stress levels and emotional wellbeing. It can also greatly impact your financial wellbeing both in the present and in the future. If you aren't confident about your financial future, then it's time to make a change. Here are a few signs that you need to spend less &mdash; or make more.</p> <h2>1. Your Bills Are Overwhelming</h2> <p>If you don't make enough to pay your bills every month, then you need to make more. Even paying the minimum amount on your bills is not enough. You should be working to pay off your debt, without having to worry about making enough to buy food every month.</p> <p>Overdrawing your checking account, paying your bills late every month, or ignoring your financial obligations altogether can make the problem much worse. If you commit any of these bad habits, then you'll have to worry about overdraft fees, bounced check fees, and may even be sent to collections. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-late-payments-affect-your-credit?ref=seealso">How Late Payments Affect Your Credit</a>)</p> <h2>2. Your Budgeting Isn't Enough</h2> <p>The best way to get more out of every paycheck is to simply spend less. Creating a budget can be the right step towards making lasting changes that will pay off big in the end. However, what do you do if you have already created a budget and cut out all the unnecessary spending you can, but still aren't making enough? You'll need to find a way to make more money.</p> <h2>3. You Have No Savings</h2> <p>If you aren't able to pay down your debt and set aside money for your savings and retirement accounts, then you simply need to make more. In the event that there is a large unexpected expense coming your way, you should have some savings to cover it. It is crucial that you set aside money for your future, and if you aren't, then you need to do something to change the present.</p> <p>It's important to keep your money goals and future finances in mind. It's essential that you are saving for your future, in the event that you experience a pay cut or layoff. Saving for retirement is also one of the most important things you can do for your future self. If you aren't reaching your short and long-term financial goals, then you aren't making enough money.</p> <h2>4. You Keep Relying On Credit Cards</h2> <p>If you find that you are relying on your credit cards just to make ends meet, and are only paying the minimum on your credit cards month after month, you're heading towards prolonged debt and a host of other problems. This can result in a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-increase-your-credit-score-quickly" target="_blank">lower credit score</a> and less money available for your savings account. In the long run, you'll also be responsible for higher interest charges and credit card payments.</p> <h2>5. Your Paycheck Disappears in No Time</h2> <p>If you spend the bulk of your paycheck in the first couple of days, then there's a problem. You should have more than just enough to pay your bills. There should be money left to save and invest towards retirement. Everyone has a bad month from time to time, but if you find that your paycheck runs out within the first week of every month, then you may be overspending or simply not making enough.</p> <p>Special occasions occur for most people several times per year. During these times, you'll want to have a little money set aside (for holidays, anniversaries, birthdays, and other occasions that can cut into your pay). The last thing you want to worry about is breaking out the credit cards just because you need to buy gifts for the kids.</p> <h2>6. You Feel Undervalued</h2> <p>If you feel you aren't being paid enough at your current job, then you may get resentful and less productive. Consider speaking with your manager about what you bring to the table and ask for a raise. The worst they can say is &quot;No.&quot;</p> <p>If you decide to ask for a raise, then you need to first determine <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-underpaid-how-to-figure-out-what-salary-you-deserve">what your time is worth</a>. Use a salary calculator or salary comparison site, and find out what the average salary is for your career so that you have that information on your side when you speak with management. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-the-most-out-of-salary-comparison-sites?ref=seealso">Getting the Most Out of Salary Comparison Sites</a>)</p> <h2>Is It Time to Make a Move?</h2> <p>If you realize it's time to make a move, then there are several steps you can take. If you haven't <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-your-first-budget-in-5-easy-steps">worked on a budget</a> yet, then it's time to do so. You can also take steps to reduce your rent, find alternate forms of transportation, or simply spend less. You may also need to consider changing employment or taking on a weekend or side job.</p> <p><em>Do you know of other signs that a person just isn't making enough? Please share your thoughts in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-signs-you-arent-making-enough-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-your-financial-habits-just-bad">Are Your Financial Habits Just Bad?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-keep-holiday-spending-from-blowing-debt-repayment">6 Ways to Keep Holiday Spending From Blowing Debt Repayment</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-to-make-as-soon-as-you-conquer-debt">7 Money Moves to Make as Soon as You Conquer Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-escape-the-paycheck-to-paycheck-cycle">How to Escape the Paycheck-to-Paycheck Cycle</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Career Building Debt Management asking for a raise bills paycheck to paycheck salary underpaid wages Mon, 23 May 2016 09:30:20 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1714251 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Job Perks That Can Lead to a Dream Career http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000041367248_Large.jpg" alt="taking advantage of job perks that can lead to a dream career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Work can be a necessary evil. Individuals might dream of being an award winning writer or inventor, but those dreams &mdash; without any pursuit to make them a reality &mdash; do not provide money for nourishment, shelter, and other financial obligations. Short of being independently wealthy or having a family you can lean on, the budding entrepreneur or artist might need to procure a day job as they pursue their professional goals.</p> <p>When applying for jobs, think beyond yearly salary and hourly wage. The right job perks can streamline how fast it might take to achieve your dreams.</p> <h2>1. Free Education</h2> <p>Higher education can be the key to professional success. For some, a degree is a necessity to break into a new field. For others, college can provide face-to-face mentorship time with award winning professionals in their field. Despite these benefits, the cost of college often leads students to either acquiring thousands in <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-easy-ways-to-avoid-student-loan-debt">student loan debt</a> or forgoing a college education altogether.</p> <p>There is another option. You can pursue a job at a company that has a <a href="https://collegeplus.org/blog/33-companies-that-can-save-you-from-college-debt">tuition reimbursement program</a>. Before choosing a potential company to pursue, look at the fine print.</p> <h2>2. Skill Building</h2> <p>Before you start applying for jobs, sit down to determine what skills will help you score your dream job. You can decrease the time it takes you to land that job if your day job will allow you to learn and practice new skills that will be necessary for your chosen path to success.</p> <p>If you don't have the credentials to start in a position that allows you to utilize those desired skills, make it clear to managers what types of opportunities you would be interested in pursuing. Many companies, in a bid to keep good employees happy, will offer professional opportunities to individuals as the need arises.</p> <h2>3. Making Valuable Contacts</h2> <p>One very crucial aspect of achieving success is knowing the right people. An ideal day job would place you in a position to build personal and professional relationships, both inside and outside of the organization.</p> <p>At work, be friendly with individuals from various departments. Don't just talk shop. You want to cultivate relationships, so you can (if necessary) call in a favor down the road. If you cut right to asking them to help you, it can seem a tad selfish.</p> <p>You should also keep an eye out for jobs where cultivating a social media presence is a requirement. A large personal LinkedIn or Twitter following can lead to a larger pool of people that will see posts about your future art, book, product, or company.</p> <h2>4. Telecommuting Allowed</h2> <p>Daily commutes can steal several hours from your life. On average, the daily commute is <a href="http://mbaonline.pepperdine.edu/evolution-of-the-daily-commute/">around 25 minutes</a>. Some spend even more time commuting. My average daily commute is around an hour. That's one less hour every day I can devote to pursuing my personal goals.</p> <p>Telecommuting jobs allow individuals to cut travel time out of their daily lives and dedicate that time to other professional pursuits. As an added bonus, the elimination of the commute will allow you to decrease the amount you spend on gas every month.</p> <h2>5. Flexible Schedule</h2> <p>Some jobs not only allow you to determine where you work, but they also allow you to dictate when you work. The ability to work when you want will allow you more freedom to work towards your ultimate goals.</p> <p>If you know you have a meeting with a potential investor or publisher on a Monday, you won't need to figure out how to convince your boss to give you a few hours off of work. Instead you simply let them know you'll work the hours later in the day on Monday or over the weekend. This can be useful if you don't particularly want the higher-ups at your company to know how close you might be to quitting your day job.</p> <h2>6. Condensed Work Week</h2> <p>The 9-to-5 is the traditional time frame in which corporate America works. While it can be far better than the rotating schedule dished out in many retail and food service jobs, individuals can be more productive if they try to find a job where they work four, 10-hour shifts.</p> <p>The benefit of working 10-hour shifts is the ability to dedicate three full days to your money making side projects. You no longer need to fight with yourself to muster up the motivation to dedicate a few hours to your side-hustle every night after work. That can be hard due to lingering work stress, physical exhaustion (depending on how much physical labor is involved), and the desire to spend time with family. You now have one work-free day to diligently work on completing your other projects.</p> <p><em>What other work perks can make you more money? Share with us! </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-turn-your-stress-into-money">8 Ways to Turn Your Stress Into Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee">12 Ways You&#039;re Being a Terrible Employee</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-really-make-a-living-as-an-ebook-writer">Can You Really Make a Living as an Ebook Writer?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income career career path job perks perks professional goals side hustle work Mon, 09 May 2016 09:30:29 +0000 Samantha Stauf 1705098 at http://www.wisebread.com Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000020079119_Large.jpg" alt="using guerrilla tactics to land a job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Guerrilla job hunting means: adopting unconventional tactics to land the job of your dreams. This method hits the headlines every now and again. And occasionally, we hear about a stroke of brilliance and a deserving candidate landing the job. But all too often, these stories are about job seekers who go to enormous lengths to catch the eye of a prospective employer, only to have it backfire horribly.</p> <p>Did you hear about the one where the candidate back-flipped into the interview room? Or where she arrived armed with items purchased from the interviewer's Amazon wishlist? Those tales did not have happy endings. But even if your usual approach is a little more low key, you can still use some guerrilla skills without needing to hire a billboard to advertise yourself, or tattoo your resume on your forehead.</p> <p>Here's how to make this job seeking approach actually work for you, without making a total fool of yourself. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked?ref=seealso">6 Extreme Interview Tactics That Worked</a>)</p> <h2>Make Yourself Stand Out</h2> <p>Recruiting managers might receive hundreds of applications for any single position advertised. Even with the most rigorous screening process in place, resume number 357 has to be pretty special to stand out. Some job seekers have gone to great lengths to make sure their applications memorable, including one famous tale of a job hunter sending a note asking for a coffee meeting, inside a coffee cup, using a FedEx tracking number. Monitoring the delivery notes online, she was able to see the exact moment it was received and signed for, and placed a call immediately to follow up. But don't panic. You don't need to do anything so extreme to make sure you get noticed.</p> <p>Make sure all the basics are covered first. Write a tailored resume and cover letter, making your enthusiasm for the role clear. Using a resume template is a great way to create a resume that stands out for the right reasons.</p> <p>Then try this:</p> <ul> <li>Make an effort to find out the name of the individual recruiting, and use it.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If you can start adding value to the business at this early stage, you'll be remembered. Is there a business improvement idea, or some customer insight you can share as part of your application?<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Have an &quot;elevator pitch&quot; summing up your unique abilities, ready to use whenever you get the ear of a potential recruiter.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Gather intelligence. If you send an email application, follow up with a call. Ostensibly this is to check that the email was received, but take the chance while you're on the phone to get any insight into the business that you can.</li> </ul> <h2>Leverage Your Contacts</h2> <p>Once upon a time, &quot;it's not what you know, but who you know&quot; was the embodiment of a system that favored the elite. With the democratization of information resulting from Internet use, this is no longer the case. If don't have contacts who can help you in some way, then it's probably because you're not trying hard enough.</p> <p>First of all, think through your real-life connections. Do you have friends, family, or previous business contacts who might be able to help you? Can they put you in touch with managers at businesses you're interested in applying to, or who you can tap for information and ideas? Even if your direct connections don't work directly at the company in question, they may be partners, suppliers, or contractors, who can still offer valuable insight.</p> <p>Then try this:</p> <ul> <li>If you want to pump connections for ideas, ask to meet for a coffee. An informational interview sounds too formal and demanding.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Follow the right people: businesses, recruiters, industry insiders, and the trade press, on social media. The knowledge you gain can be game-changing. For example, if you learn about an organization's expansion plans, reach out directly even before they start to officially recruit, to get ahead of the game.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>A referral opens doors. If you have an inside contact, ask them to send your resume directly to the recruiter with a recommendation.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If you have the nerve, call the CEO (or another senior manager) directly. Ask them where you should address your application. And when you do send in your resume you can legitimately say, &quot;the CEO recommended I apply to you directly.&quot; It's cheeky, but this implied recommendation has been known to work.</li> </ul> <h2>Follow Up</h2> <p>Recruiting managers are only human. There's research to show that if you've scored an interview, you're more likely to be selected if you are the first or last person seen, as memories are sharper, and the recruiter's mood is perhaps more forgiving. You can't necessarily dictate the order in which your interview falls, but you can increase your chances of being remembered with a polite follow-up note after an interview. Failing to follow up is a common <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">complaint of recruiting managers</a>, so don't miss the chance to do so.</p> <p>Try this:</p> <ul> <li>Handwritten notes, in more traditional businesses, are preferred. In more modern or tech-focused organizations, an email is fine. Include a link to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired">your LinkedIn profile</a>, and you'll be able to see if the reader clicks through to check you out.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Thank the interviewer for their time, and reiterate your interest in the role in authentic terms. If something came up in the conversation that impressed you about the business, then say so.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Refer to a point of connection. If you mentioned an interesting article or book during your conversation, pass over the link in your message.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If you felt you did not get across some skills, or answers as well as you could have, this is a chance to elaborate. The interviewers are likely to be flattered that you're still thinking of them after the meeting.</li> </ul> <p>Traditionally, a job search follows a regular pattern: find a relevant role advertised, apply, interview, and if all goes well, receive an offer. These days, finding a job is a more fluid process. Many roles are not even openly advertised, putting the ball firmly in the job seekers' court. Use your intuition, employ some of these tactics, and you will stand out for the right reasons. No backflips required.</p> <p><em>What tactics have you tried to get a job? Did they work for you? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">How to Ace Your Next Coffee Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting interview etiquette job application Job Interview job interview questions job search resume unemployed Thu, 05 May 2016 09:30:26 +0000 Claire Millard 1703709 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000064158607_Large.jpg" alt="her company is going under" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you have ever read <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0399144463/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0399144463&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=BESEB2MCRG366GKZ">Who Moved My Cheese?</a> you'll know that there are warning signs everywhere about an impending job loss. But what about the company itself? Is it safe? Or is it in real trouble? If you're having a few doubts about the future of your company, look out for these 10 red flags. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-financial-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-get-fired?ref=seealso">11 Financial Moves to Make the Moment You Get Fired</a>)</p> <h2>1. There's a Hiring Freeze</h2> <p>When a company is doing well, it will be actively looking to expand and add talented new people to the roster. When times are tough, the HR department will initiate a hiring freeze. This is never a good sign. It can be done in a few ways. If the company management does things in a transparent way, they'll be up front about it. You'll be told that there is a hiring freeze until things stabilize. </p> <p>However, most of the time, you'll be given no warning. Positions that should have been filled will be left vacant. When an employee quits, one or two other people will take on their responsibilities. Take a look at the current openings at your company &mdash; they should be listed on an intranet, or publicly on job boards. If you don't see any positions out there, or there are positions that have been open for many months, or years, then your company is probably in the midst of a hiring freeze.</p> <h2>2. Closed Door Meetings Are Everywhere</h2> <p>You walk through the halls of the company and office doors are closed, or sometimes slammed in your face. You peek in to see people clearly upset with raised voices, red faces, and there's a lot of shrugging shoulders and hair pulling. Unless your company has a specific reason to keep a lot of secrets &mdash; perhaps there's a top secret new product in development &mdash; then this can only mean one thing: bad news. Management will not want rumors to start running rampant, and will tell the decision makers to keep everything under wraps. Not only that, but when you ask questions about it, you'll get vague replies. These closed door meetings are not only bad for morale, but a sure sign that there are conversations happening about the future of the company.</p> <h2>3. The Good Employees Start Leaving</h2> <p>Good is a relative term, but in your company you will have employees who are known to be excellent at their jobs. They are good for the business, they are passionate and driven, and they are working on the important projects. When these employees start leaving on their own accord, for jobs that may be seen as a lateral move (or even a downward move), you know something is wrong. The rock stars of any company have a good handle on things, and their gut (plus inside information) will tell them to escape while they can. If upper management starts quitting, that's an even bigger sign of trouble ahead.</p> <h2>4. Layoffs and Reorganizations Are Constant</h2> <p>A company doing well does not need to lay people off, or continually restructure. A company performing poorly will look to cut staffing costs, and shuffle the remaining employees around. It's a Hail Mary approach that rarely works. Layoffs may result in some of the better employees being let go due to salary, or internal politics. The increased pressure on the remaining staff to do more work will take its toll. Mistakes will be made. Problems will escalate. Before you know it, six months have passed and the company is in even worse shape. And then there will be more layoffs, and more reorganization. When this loop occurs, the doors will be closing imminently.</p> <h2>5. Playing It Safe Is Encouraged</h2> <p>Taking risks is part of the business &mdash; any business. After all, starting a company is a risk, and risks are often required in order to grow and succeed. When risk-taking is suddenly frowned upon, you know the company is on shaky ground. What was once considered a bold move will be rebranded as dangerous, or problematic. Your company will slide into patterns of doing only what worked in the past, despite market changes and demographics shifting. Instead of making decisions that will elevate the company, management will pull back, and &quot;play it safe.&quot; Expansion disappears. Innovation crumbles. Everything that made your company a success will be relegated to the back benches, with &quot;tried and tested&quot; solutions taking the lead. When playing it safe is the mantra, it's a big sign of weakness.</p> <h2>6. Everyone Is Unhappy</h2> <p>The conversation in the kitchen is all about how much the culture sucks. At lunch, employees everywhere are complaining about the state of the company, and the future it probably doesn't have. Smiles are in short supply. Everyone is stressed out. The entire staff is walking around with the weight of the world on their shoulders. This is not the kind of culture you'd see at Pixar or Google. Energetic, enthusiastic employees are the sign of a thriving company; the opposite is true of companies that are on the ropes. When everyone is down, the company is going in that very same direction&hellip; and quickly.</p> <h2>7. There's No Money to Do Anything</h2> <p>Cash flow is extremely important to any company. It's the lifeblood of the business, and without it, it's hard to pay salaries, order products, and advertise. In the past, getting the money you needed to get the job done was no problem. Now, it's a struggle. Your requisition for new supplies is denied. Pay raises are eliminated. People are asked to take salary cuts, or even worse, work for free &mdash; furloughs are very real, and very scary. Bills are not being paid. Vendors call you angry about not receiving money they are owed. These are all classic signs of serious money troubles. They are usually followed by closing the doors, for good.</p> <h2>8. The Company Stock Is in Free Fall</h2> <p>If your company is on the stock market, you can track the share price. Every stock has its ups and downs, but if the only way is down, your company has issues. Now, this may be because of a recent press release, or a piece of news that directly impacts your industry. However, if your company is in good shape, it should be a small fluctuation. When the stock starts tanking, and continues on that downward trajectory, things are bad. What's even worse is when major shareholders, including management, start selling off a majority of their shares. If they want out, the end is near. Get out now while you can, and don't let what happened to <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enron#Post-bankruptcy">Enron</a> employees happen to you.</p> <h2>9. Benefits and Freebies Dry Up</h2> <p>Your company was once great at giving employees the benefits they deserved. Not just health care and vacation, but things like free sodas and snacks, parking reimbursements, college tuition, and matching 401K. When times are tough, the perks disappear. If you now have to pay for a lot of the things you used to get for free, your company is in financial trouble. What's worse is that these perks, or lack of them, impact employee morale. Being asked to do more for less is never going to result in a great workforce, which then results in poor performance.</p> <h2>10. You're Not Busy</h2> <p>Your days used to fly by. You were frantic at times, but always had a lot on your plate. Now, you find yourself staring out of the window, or sending emails to people asking for something to do. When it's just you, it could be a clear sign that your position is about to be eliminated. But when there are many people in the company twiddling their thumbs, things are looking bleak. No business can afford to pay a staff to do nothing. If you're not busy for a long period of time, it's time to move on.</p> <p><em>What are some other signs that a company is in trouble? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">How to Ace Your Next Coffee Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting company employee morale employee turnover going out of business job loss job search job stress laid off lay offs Fri, 29 Apr 2016 09:30:30 +0000 Paul Michael 1699776 at http://www.wisebread.com 13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000090506469_Large.jpg" alt="looking for a good reason to quit his job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>How many times have you rehearsed that &quot;I quit&quot; speech in your head? How often do you stare out of the window, wishing you were in a different job, or pursuing a more interesting career? So many of us want to be in a job that really fulfills us, but so few of us dare to make that leap. Well, if you are looking for a reason to quit, here are 13 that should fire you up. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-super-cool-ways-people-have-quit-their-jobs?ref=seealso">6 Super-Cool Ways People Have Quit Their Jobs</a>)</p> <h2>1. There's a Better Job Out There</h2> <p>The grass is always greener, right? This is often a justification to stay in your current position, because things could always get worse. But things could also get a whole lot better, and the chances of you currently being in the best job you'll ever have are slim. It's easy to become complacent and accept that this is the job for you, but there are other jobs out there with your name on them. Amazing jobs, and careers, that will make you look back on the one you have now and wonder why it took you years to move on. Of course, you won't know unless you look, so start checking out what's available.</p> <h2>2. You're Doing More Work for Less Money</h2> <p>When a company starts asking you to take on extra responsibilities, for the same money (or even less), then you may want to consider looking into another job. It's always good to take on extra work if it means you grow and learn new skills, but it should be rewarded. If the company is dangling a possible promotion in front of you, do whatever you can to find out it's a real offer. Some people work 60+ hour weeks for years on the promise of a promotion that will never come.</p> <h2>3. Your Job Is Literally Killing You</h2> <p>Stress is considered one of the biggest killers of modern times. It weakens our immune system, leads to higher blood pressure, and can be the cause of a lot of heart problems. It can also lead to substance abuse and marital troubles, and can break up friendships. If the job you are in right now is causing you so much stress that life is becoming hard to take, you need to find another job, or a different career. It's just not worth the risk.</p> <h2>4. You're Starting Your Own Business</h2> <p>What better reason is there to quit your job than to become your own boss? We've all dreamt of that freedom, the flexible hours, the satisfaction of creating something successful. But, so few of us do it because it's a risk. Quitting a corporate job, or one with steady hours and health benefits, in favor of going it alone &mdash; well that's tough.</p> <p>What if you fail? What if no one buys your product or service? What if you quit a good job only to be out of work soon after? That &quot;what if&quot; game can be paralyzing, but think of it the other way. What if you're laid off next week? What if your business could be the next Google, or Pixar? What if you are holding on to something safe for something that could be amazing? Think about it.</p> <h2>5. You're Not Wanted</h2> <p>Your opinion used to be valuable. Now, it's not required, or it's straight-up ignored. You used to be at important meetings. Not so any more. You used to travel to different locations, and meet with clients. Now you're permanently stuck behind your desk. All of these are signs that you are being overlooked. Or worse, the company is getting ready to let you go. If you feel like you are no longer wanted, you should move to a place that really does want you.</p> <h2>6. Your Company Is in Trouble</h2> <p>It could be financial trouble. It could be legal trouble. It could be a corporate takeover, or a merger that will result in massive layoffs. You should have a good feel for this, and if you sense danger, it may be time to pull the plug and move on, before you're caught in the crossfire. You certainly don't want to be in a situation where your 401K or severance package disappears.</p> <h2>7. You're Phoning It In</h2> <p>If you are on autopilot, doing just enough to keep your job, or are giving the minimum amount of effort, you need to move on. First, it's possible that your lack of effort could actually be dangerous, especially if you're working in a field that requires maximum concentration. Your apathy could also put others in danger &mdash; imagine a doctor who doesn't pay attention. But even in an office job, phoning it in is a big sign that you are in the wrong position.</p> <h2>8. Other Locations Are Calling Your Name</h2> <p>It's scary to move to a different city, or state. And another country, well, that's a mighty big leap. But what a leap! There is so much of the world to see, and every country has different opportunities, and new people waiting to meet you. Realistically, is it more likely that the place you're currently in is the pinnacle of existence? Or is it more likely that you're settled, and moving would be a lot of stress and headaches? Start thinking about those places you always wanted to see when you were a kid. Can you do the job you're doing now in one of those places? Can you move there? A completely different, and exciting life is waiting for you in another part of the world.</p> <h2>9. You're Going Nowhere</h2> <p>In any career, whether it's in a corporate office, or under the hood of a car, you want to go places. Not literally &mdash; although travel is a great perk &mdash; but you should be learning, growing, and being promoted. When your job stops giving you those opportunities for growth, you have to assess the situation. How long has it been since you learned something new? Do you think you'll ever get a promotion again? Are you simply treading water? If you are going nowhere, you need to find a job that will give you those opportunities again.</p> <h2>10. You Just Hate It</h2> <p>If you dislike certain aspects of your job, but overall it's still a good position, well, you just have to suck it up. Very few jobs are perfect. However, if you dread going to work every morning, and every waking hour at your company is a living hell for you, then you have to quit. Life is too short to spend 40 hours of every week being miserable. What else can you do? Where can you go? Is a career change possible? You may feel trapped, but there are always options.</p> <h2>11. You're Done With Office Politics</h2> <p>The gossip. The rumors. The back-stabbing. Having to play favorites. If it's all getting too much for you &mdash; and let's face it, it shouldn't even exist &mdash; then you should start looking for a new place to work. However, before you move to another place, do some digging. Ask around. Look at reviews on a website like Glassdoor. The last thing you want to do is make a move only to find the office politics even worse at your new job.</p> <h2>12. You're Ready for a New Challenge</h2> <p>It's not that you dislike the job you're in. It's not even that you're unhappy with the pay, the people, or the work. It's just that what you're doing is no longer challenging you. You can do this job, and do it well, but you feel the need to dive into something that will really push you. Something that will often get your pulse racing, or make you experience that &quot;can I really do this?&quot; feeling. Well, yes, you can. If you push yourself. And think of the satisfaction you'll get from that.</p> <h2>13. You Just Won the Lottery</h2> <p>Hey, weirder things have happened.</p> <p><em>What are some other great reasons to quit your job? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-you-quit-your-job">6 Questions to Ask Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-4-jobs-people-quit-the-most">The 4 Jobs People Quit the Most</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career path job job search quit quit your job quitting Wed, 27 Apr 2016 10:30:04 +0000 Paul Michael 1698448 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Ways to Spring Clean Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-spring-clean-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-ways-to-spring-clean-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000081453541_Large.jpg" alt="spring cleaning her career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It turns out, <a href="http://www.cleaninginstitute.org/spring_cleaning_survey_reveals_consumers_dirty_little_secrets/">72% of U.S. households</a> spring clean every year. The annual ritual of tidying up your home is a healthy habit that improves your way of life, increases your productivity, and provides you with a serious self-esteem boost.</p> <p>Just like you take care of your home each spring, take this time to spruce up your career to make the very best out of it. Here are the eight moves to spring clean your career.</p> <h2>1. Search Your Name on the Web</h2> <p>According to Google, its users do <a href="http://searchengineland.com/google-1-trillion-searches-per-year-212940">100 billion searches per month</a>, which adds up to about 1.2 trillion searches per year. What's even more surprising is that it has been estimated that <a href="http://www.slideshare.net/jennifermcclure/hiring-onboarding-done-right-nky-chambernkyshrm-7-24-2012/17-CAREERS_SITE_the_hub_30">30% of searches on Google</a> are job-related.</p> <p>What are those people searching for <em>your </em>name finding? Hopefully, it's important websites, publications, or projects that can help you land your next position, or land a promotion. Find out what is currently available under your name so that you can be prepared for questions about those search results, ask not to be mentioned in undesirable places, and build up your online presence. Besides Google, search your name on other search engines, including Yahoo and Bing.</p> <h2>2. Buy Your Name as a Domain</h2> <p>An effective way to establish a hub for your online presence is to purchase your own domain name. Take me as an example. If you look for &quot;Damian Davila&quot; you will find two main individuals: a talented drummer/photographer, and an experienced personal finance writer. While I enjoy the surf photographs of my doppelgänger, I want to make sure that people learn more about my writing when looking up my name. That is why I bought my own domain name, DamianDavila.com and plan to use it to showcase my writing portfolio.</p> <p>Owning your own domain name allows you stand out from the crowd, particularly when you have a very popular name. Keep in mind that it may take some time to be able to buy your domain name &mdash; in my case it took two long years until it became available!</p> <h2>3. Clean Up Your Social Media Accounts</h2> <p>Speaking of search results and websites, you'll notice that social media accounts rank heavily on all search engines. For example, when looking up my name on Google, three out of the nine results from the first page are links to social media accounts.</p> <p>While you may think that your private business is for your eyes only, be aware that <a href="http://thehiringsite.careerbuilder.com/2015/05/14/employers-checking-candidates-social-media/">35% of employers</a> who screen via social networks have requested to become a friend or follow candidates who have private accounts. Depending on the details on the position that you're applying for, your potential employer may have a valid concern for your online activity. Don't let an <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-stop-doing-on-social-media-by-30">inappropriate comment or photo</a> become an obstacle in your path to career success.</p> <h2>4. Invest in a Professional Headshot</h2> <p>While most recruiters recommend that you don't include a photograph when submitting your resume, most social media sites, company directories, and PR organizations do request a headshot. Take the time &mdash; and the expense &mdash; to get a professional headshot. You can hire a professional photographer, ask a favor from your photog friend or relative (do return the favor when they ask!), or request one from the HR department of your company.</p> <p>Be prepared for those times when your boss wants to make an announcement of your promotion in the local newspaper, you want to show yourself in your own domain name, or you submit an article for a website as a guest blogger.</p> <h2>5. Edit Your LinkedIn Profile</h2> <p>Also, <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/careers/articles/2015/02/19/what-recruiters-think-when-they-see-your-linkedin-profile">94% of recruiters use LinkedIn</a> to source and vet candidates, making this professional network a great opportunity to showcase your work skills and career history. What do recruiters find on Linkedin when looking up your name? If your name doesn't show up, you could be making the life of that recruiter a bit more difficult. Beef up your LinkedIn profile by:</p> <ul> <li>Growing your professional network with peers in your company and industry, alumni from your alma mater, or individuals sharing your interests in LinkedIn groups;</li> <li>Including links to any publications, presentations, or projects that are available online;</li> <li>Request recommendations from current or past clients, supervisors, peers, or teachers, and;</li> <li>Demonstrating your analytical and writing skills through articles that you have written.</li> </ul> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired?ref=seealso">30 Minutes to a LinkedIn Profile That Gets You Hired</a></p> <h2>6. Touch Up Your Paper Resume</h2> <p>Despite the popularity of online resumes, some employers and recruiters still stick to paper resumes. Tailor your application to the details laid out on the job post. Insisting on emailing a URL to your domain name or LinkedIn profile instead of mailing out a printout of your resume via regular mail when the recruiter clearly indicated so, is the fastest way to get your application ignored completely. Here are some tips:</p> <ul> <li>Be prepared for requests of paper resumes by formatting yours so it prints nicely on a standard sheet of 8 x 11 paper.</li> <li>Test out the printout before sending a file via email.</li> <li>Keep both Word and PDF versions of your resume because some employers prefer one format over the other.</li> <li>Maintain a text-only version of your resume for those times that you have to copy and paste your resume into an HR online portal.</li> </ul> <h2>7. Work on Your Elevator Pitch</h2> <p>Comedian George Burns said it best, &quot;The secret of a good sermon is to have a good beginning and a good ending; and to have the two as close together as possible.&quot; Brevity in writing and speech is very powerful and makes you look centered and well-prepared. Take a cue of from startup entrepreneurs and develop your own elevator pitch, which is a succinct and persuasive sales pitch that will lead into a deeper dialogue about what you can offer. Test your elevator pitch with people that you trust so they can offer you feedback. And fine tune your elevator pitch until you can deliver it effectively over the phone, in person, or via email.</p> <h2>8. Learn a New Skill That Employers Want</h2> <p>Many organizations have well defined salary payscales with specific requirements, so take the time to investigate what those requirements are. Unless they involve longevity in the company, you can work in attaining them in a shorter amount of time.</p> <p>Some examples are completing a teaching certification, finishing modules towards a professional license, accumulating hours in a list of job-related assignments, or attending a series of industry-required seminars. By completing those skills, you're effectively not only improving your chances of a promotion or salary bump, but also making yourself more desirable to other potential employers.</p> <p><em>What are other ways to spring clean your career?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-spring-clean-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-10"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee">12 Ways You&#039;re Being a Terrible Employee</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-mistakes-new-grads-make">8 Career Mistakes New Grads Make</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career career aspirations career goals growth potential job growth spring clean spring cleaning Mon, 25 Apr 2016 09:00:05 +0000 Damian Davila 1695996 at http://www.wisebread.com My 2016 Budget Challenge: Am I Ruining My Career? http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-am-i-ruining-my-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/my-2016-budget-challenge-am-i-ruining-my-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_mad_computer_000022967694.jpg" alt="Woman wondering if her work strategy is completely stupid" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>[Editor's Note: This is the another episode in Max Wong's journey to find an extra $31,000 this year. Read the whole series </em><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/max-wongs-budget-0"><em>here</em></a><em>.]</em></p> <p>As a freelancer, I never know when my next job is going to come or how much it's going to pay. Some of my jobs pay me $8,000 for one day's work, or have incredible perks like international travel &mdash; but that kind of gig comes around about once a year. Should I spend more time looking for higher paying work that only comes intermittently, or keep working low paying gigs as they come?</p> <p>I recently had dinner with a business acquaintance who revealed that he is also $30,000 in debt. When I mentioned all the little side jobs I am doing in an effort to make an extra $31,000 this year, he laughed &mdash; and not in a good way. He is actually considering not taking a six-month job that he had been offered because it would only pay him $17 an hour.</p> <p>His argument for not taking the job was this: It would take away his ability to accept <em>better </em>offers for half a year. Did I mention that this person has already been unemployed for four months?</p> <h2>Are My Side Hustles Keeping Me From Better Offers?</h2> <p>The dinner put me in a bad mood. Mainly because when I brought up my $31,000 budget challenge, he was critical of my work strategy. According to him, I spend way too much of my time and brain space working odd jobs, instead of focusing on landing a &quot;primo salaried gig.&quot;</p> <p>When I asked him what a primo salaried gig pays, he responded: $75,000.</p> <h2>I Hated Working 9 to 5</h2> <p>I used to have that primo salaried gig. I hated it. Not the primo aspects of the work, such as flying business class and free office supplies, of course &mdash; just every other single thing about it. I am not cut out for corporate life.</p> <p>Had I stayed a corporate cookie, I would probably be several hundred thousand dollars richer. I would have, no doubt, paid down my house by now.</p> <p>But had I stayed the obvious course, would I be able to leave the U.S., as have done twice in the last five years, and travel abroad for three months at a time? More importantly, would I be as happy as I am now? I don't know one documentary filmmaker or beekeeper who does the job expecting a huge payday.</p> <h2>Am I Wasting Money or Gaining Opportunity?</h2> <p>Aside from the fact that I think his ideal $75,000 primo salaried gig sounds like <em>the worst</em>, I am still trying to parse out whether his argument that I am wasting my time, and by extension my life, on activities that offer a terrible return on investment.</p> <p>I often wonder if crazy side jobs always find me because I am free to take them. For example, would I have been able to spend four days interning for a photographer last month if I had a regular day job? If I had a 9-to-5 job, would I be able to devote as much time to activities like architectural photography that bring me pleasure, that I can potentially grow into a business? Have I exchanged a regular paycheck for more free time?</p> <h2>Is There Such a Thing as Good Personal Debt?</h2> <p>I do feel like, in my current situation, any income is better than no income. The faster I pay down debt, the less my debt will cost me in interest payments.</p> <p>My $31,000 budget shortfall contains $15,000 in debt from a loan with a 4% interest rate (my housing costs and camera fund don't carry interest). My husband and I have been steadily paying down this loan with $800 monthly payments. Using a debt repayment calculator, I know that at our current rate, we will pay off this debt in 20 months, but end up paying an additional $515 in interest. In order to pay down this $15,000 by the end of this year, we are going to have to increase this payment to $1,695 for the next nine months. If we pay off this debt by December 31, 2016, we will pay up to an extra $251 in interest. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-to-do-a-balance-transfer-to-pay-off-credit-card-debt?ref=seealso">How to Stop Paying Interest on Your Credit Card Debt</a>)</p> <p>By comparison, my dinner companion has $30,000 in credit debt over several cards with an average of APR of 11.9%. To pay off this debt in 20 months, he will have to pay $1,740 every month, and he will pay $3,063 in interest.</p> <p>When I pointed out the high cost of using credit cards as a slush fund, my dinner companion did not bat an eyelash. He argued that I am letting my fear of debt overly influence my financial decisions. What if I am so busy putting my nose to the grindstone for small jobs, that I am missing out on bigger job opportunities? For example, although I had wanted to attend this year's Palm Springs Photo Festival, a major educational and networking event, I cannot afford it. Just the cost of the lodging and transportation for the festival would cut into my savings by $1,000. But, by not putting the cost of the festival on my credit card, am I losing out on leads for photography jobs or giving up the opportunity to learn new skills that would immediately improve my work? Am I being pennywise but pound foolish?</p> <h2>Work vs. Unemployment</h2> <p>Since January 1, 2016 I have made $5,190 in extra cash. This averages out to $1,730 per month. For the last four months, my dinner companion has been making $1,800 per month on Unemployment Insurance. (My dinner companion's assessment that I am a financial loser is undoubtedly colored by this fact.) His search for the primo salaried job, as far as I can tell, has also been much more leisurely than my constant hustle to rustle more side work.</p> <h2>Who Am I to Criticize?</h2> <p>Well, I am a financial writer who understands the concept of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-most-valuable-thing-debt-takes-from-you-isnt-money-its-this">compound interest</a>. As unpleasant as it was to get unasked for advice on my debt-killing plan, I made a major effort to listen to my dinner companion, if only so I could passive-aggressively complain about it in this post, and monetize my annoyance.</p> <p>But I still wonder: Is he just really stupid or am I a rube for accepting minimum wage gigs when I'm strapped for cash? Dear reader, what is your opinion on my employment strategy?</p> <h2>Progress Report</h2> <p>Because our business taxes were due on February 29th, my husband and I decided to complete our tax prep for our personal taxes by that due date as well. Why suffer through tax prep twice? Our accountant just filed our personal taxes. We are getting a $2,934 refund from the IRS and a $1,654 refund from the state of California. We paid <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-reasons-why-an-accountant-is-worth-the-money">our accountant</a> $470 for her work.</p> <p><strong>Goal:</strong> $31,000.00</p> <p><strong>Amount Raised:</strong> $13,478.00</p> <p><strong>Amount Spent:</strong> $5,303.72</p> <p><strong>Amount Left to Go:</strong> $22,825.72</p> <p><em>Should Max continue hustling up wacky side jobs she adores or should she buckle down and find a regular job, like everyone else?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/max-wong">Max Wong</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-am-i-ruining-my-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-11"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-budget-challenge-2016-how-to-live-frugally-when-you-have-no-time">My Budget Challenge 2016: How to Live Frugally When You Have No Time</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee">12 Ways You&#039;re Being a Terrible Employee</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/day-job-or-freelance-which-is-right-for-you">Day Job or Freelance: Which Is Right for You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Career Building freelance job hunting max wongs budget odd jobs unemployment Fri, 15 Apr 2016 10:00:06 +0000 Max Wong 1687438 at http://www.wisebread.com