Career Building http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4814/all en-US Using Times New Roman on Your Résumé Is Like Wearing Sweatpants to an Interview http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_computer_resume_000050021680.jpg" alt="Woman using times new roman on her resume" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you opt for Times New Roman on your résumé, then you may as well show up to the interview in sweatpants. At least that is what some experts say. The classic font is said to be one to avoid these days, with modern ones like Helvetica and Proxima Nova edging out more antiquated styles. <a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-04-27/the-best-and-worst-fonts-to-use-on-your-r-sum-" target="_blank">Bloomsberg asked type experts</a> to weigh in on what job candidates should be using, and they had some pretty strong opinions on what works and, more importantly, what doesn't.</p> <p>RELATED: <a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Dos-Donts-Job-Interviews-34040192" target="_blank">16 Major Dos and Don'ts at a Job Interview</a></p> <h2>Do Use:</h2> <h3>Helvetica</h3> <p>There is a resounding vote from the experts for this one. &quot;Helvetica is beautiful,&quot; said Matt Luckhurst, who is the creative director at Collins in San Francisco. Brian Hoff, creative director of Brian Hoff Design, added that the font is &quot;so no-fuss, it doesn't really lean in one direction or another. It feels professional, lighthearted, honest.&quot;</p> <h3><strong>Proxima Nova</strong></h3> <p>&quot;I never met a client that didn't like that typeface,&quot; Hoff <a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-04-27/the-best-and-worst-fonts-to-use-on-your-r-sum-" target="_blank">told Bloomberg</a>. The font does not come free, but because of how positively it is viewed in the professional world, it may be worth the cost to upgrade to the typeface if you are applying to a job at a more formal company or for a higher-up position.</p> <p>RELATED: <a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Questions-Ask-After-Interview-37367865" target="_blank">Don't Leave the Interview Before Asking These Questions</a></p> <h3>Garamond</h3> <p>This font is easy to read, compact, and simple.</p> <h2>Avoid:</h2> <h3>Times New Roman</h3> <p>This may come as shock to all the traditionalists and postgrads out there, but the usage of Times New Roman has begun to be seen by some as lazy. &quot;It's telegraphing that you didn't put any thought into the typeface that you selected,&quot; Hoff said. &quot;It's like putting on sweatpants.&quot; Definitely not what you want your potential employer's first impression to be.</p> <p>RELATED: <a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Jobs-Shy-People-35315204#photo-35315204" target="_blank">9 Jobs For People Who Hate Small Talk</a></p> <h3>Zapfino</h3> <p>This should probably be obvious, but any font that resembles cursive should be avoided. They can be hard to read, overly fancy, and generally inappropriate for a professional setting.</p> <h3>Courier</h3> <p>&quot;You don't have a typewriter, so don't try to pretend that you have a typewriter,&quot; Luckhurst told Bloomberg. &quot;You have been using a computer to do a handwritten thing. You haven't used a computer properly, and you haven't handwritten properly.&quot; Pretty much sums it up, right?</p> <h3>Comic Sans</h3> <p>Is there ever a time and place for this font? Probably not. But it's most <em>definitely</em> one to avoid when writing up a résumé. It's unprofessional, whimsical, and will most likely be dismissed right off the bat by potential employers. Seriously, steer clear of this one pretty much always.</p> <p>RELATED: <a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Become-Morning-Person-26607205" target="_blank">7 Easy Ways to Become a Morning Person</a></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-blog-teaser"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> First impressions matter, especially on a resume. What does your choice of font say about you? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p style="text-align:center;"><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com" style="border:none;"><img alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u921/POPSUGARrgb.jpg" style="height:95px; width:300px" /></a></p> <p><em>This is a guest contribution from our friends at </em><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/"><em>POPSUGAR Smart Living</em></a><em>. Check out more useful articles from this partner:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Dos-Donts-Job-Interviews-34040192" target="_blank">16 Major Dos and Don'ts at a Job Interview</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Questions-Ask-After-Interview-37367865" target="_blank">Don't Leave the Interview Before Asking These Questions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Jobs-Shy-People-35315204#photo-35315204" target="_blank">9 Jobs For People Who Hate Small Talk</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Become-Morning-Person-26607205" target="_blank">7 Easy Ways to Become a Morning Person</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/popsugar-smart-living">POPSUGAR Smart Living</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers">7 Job Search Stunts to Get You Noticed by Employers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-can-do-right-now-to-become-more-hirable">10 Things You Can Do Right Now to Become More Hirable</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-6-craziest-things-people-have-done-to-land-a-job">The 6 Craziest Things People Have Done to Land a Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview">What You Should Do If You&#039;re Stumped During an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting Style interview job search resume Thu, 21 May 2015 09:00:07 +0000 POPSUGAR Smart Living 1415380 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Times You Should Speak Up at Work http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/unhappy_male_employee_000059722000.jpg" alt="Man at work deciding if he should speak up" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are times during anyone's career when it's preferable to stay quiet, and avoid confrontations or drama. And, there are other times when staying quiet may be the easy thing to do &mdash; but not the right thing. You may be put in a situation that requires you to speak up for the good of the company, yourself, or another employee. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-hacks-to-avoid-burnout-at-work">Your job</a> could be put in jeopardy by <em>not </em>speaking up. You could simply be doing yourself a disservice by not speaking your mind, and letting others know just how you feel. Here are 10 of those times. In these situations, speak up, and do it quickly.</p> <h2>1. Any Time You Are Being Harassed</h2> <p>Whether sexually, physically, racially, or emotionally, the workplace should be harassment-free. Most employers require you to take harassment training courses these days, and with good reason. Harassment is not only disruptive to the work environment, it can lead to deep psychological scarring, lawsuits, and in the worst cases, suicide. The moment you suspect anything has gone from playful banter to something much more serious, you must arrange a meeting with someone from your HR department. If you don't have one, then you need to talk to your supervisor, or someone else in a position of authority. The longer you leave it, the worse it will get.</p> <h2>2. When You Witness Harassment</h2> <p>Look out for fellow employees who may be too afraid to take action against harassment themselves. If you notice that someone is experiencing any kind of harassment that could be contributing to a hostile work environment, follow the procedures set in place by your HR department, or superiors. This is not just a &quot;nice&quot; thing to do &mdash; it's actually your responsibility to the people you work with. Again, this needs to be nipped in the bud quickly, before it gets out of hand and creates a very serious situation.</p> <h2>3. During Brainstorming Meetings</h2> <p>If you work in an environment that requires brainstorming sessions, be they about finances, advertising, engineering, or just the holiday party, you must not make the mistake of staying quiet in these meetings. Whether it's from shyness, self-doubt, or preferring to listen instead of contribute, your lack of involvement will only be viewed in a negative light. You will be seen as someone who doesn't contribute, has no ideas, or is apathetic to the task at hand. To combat this, speak up early; ideally within the first few minutes. This is a great way to make sure you break the silence, boost your confidence, and avoid searching your brain for an idea that is not already on the table.</p> <h2>4. When You Don't Understand the Assignment</h2> <p>There's a famous episode of Seinfeld (&quot;The Bottle Deposit&quot;) that involves George receiving a very important assignment from his boss, Mr. Wilhem. As George is getting briefed, Mr. Wilhelm enters the bathroom, and George stays outside. But when he eventually follows him in, Wilhelm has finishes the briefing and thinks George heard every word. The comedy comes from George trying to figure out what on earth Wilhelm wants, without asking him to repeat the instructions.</p> <p>Don't be like George. If you misunderstand any part of the brief, go back and ask questions; explicit questions. This is not the time to beat around the bush, and your boss will appreciate you making sure you are going in the right direction. Of course, there is one caveat; don't continue to ask the same questions over and over. Getting clarification is one thing, but if you have to be told something five times before it sinks in, you may not be in the right career.</p> <h2>5. If You're in Physical Pain</h2> <p>It doesn't matter if you do a desk job, or you're out doing hard labor. If you're in pain, you must speak up, and quickly. Experiencing pain on the job can severely impact your performance, and also make the cause of the pain even worse. If it's a migraine, take the day off if you have sick days. If you don't have sick days left, see if it is possible to work from home after the pain has eased a little. If you're experiencing physical pain, like a bad back or shoulder, explain it to your supervisor. It could be work-related, in which case the company may be obligated to help you eliminate the cause of the pain. These days, many office workers find it better to stand at their desks, and your employer could provide you with the appropriate desk and equipment.</p> <h2>6. When You Witness Something Illegal</h2> <p>Your company's code of conduct will likely cover compliance issues, and how to make sure you are not breaking any laws (even accidentally) while at work. If you should notice someone breaking these rules or laws, you need to speak up. Your employer should have a whistleblower policy to cover this, and you will be able to report the incident anonymously. If there is something systemic going on, like the Enron scandal, your quick action could save hundreds of jobs. If you believe you, yourself, may have inadvertently broken a law, you must also speak up. It is far better that it comes from you, than someone who notices your genuine mistake and reports it to your superiors.</p> <h2>7. As Soon as You Know Something is Wrong</h2> <p>Wrong? How? Well, it all depends on the kind of job you have. If you're in accounting and you notice a mistake in the numbers, don't wait until the financial report is at the printers. Say something when you first notice the mistake. If you're in advertising, don't stay quiet when something is clearly wrong with the ad (or bottle&hellip; as <a href="http://www.rawstory.com/2015/05/john-oliver-mocks-bud-lights-creepy-ad-campaign-if-a-nickel-could-urinate-it-would-taste-like-a-bud-light/">Bud Light found out recently</a> to much blowback). If you're in engineering, and see something that could cause major problems later on (such as <a href="http://www.mlive.com/auto/index.ssf/2015/05/approved_death_claims_related_19.html">GM's poorly-made ignition switch</a>), for goodness sake speak up. These mistakes can cost lives. Staying quiet because it's easier than causing a fuss is not good enough. Be brave, speak up, and do the right thing.</p> <h2>8. When Someone Takes Credit for Your Work</h2> <p>It happens a lot in businesses all over the world. You have a great idea, you say something to someone, and the next thing you know, they're claiming ownership. They get the pay raise, the new account, the promotion, the accolades, and you're left holding with a whole lot of bitterness. These &quot;leeches&quot; work everywhere, and are quite happy to take the credit and climb the ladder, be it in a Fortune 500 company, or the local bakery or autoshop.</p> <p><em>How </em>you speak up is important though. It can't come down to whining and complaining. Make sure you approach your supervisor, show them the work you had done beforehand (if you have it) and calmly discuss the fact that this was your idea. You may want to approach the person who stole the idea first; sometimes, they may be unaware of their mistake. In those rare cases, they may be quite happy to speak up on your behalf. Either way&hellip; take what's yours.</p> <h2>9. If Anything You Own Goes &quot;Missing&quot;</h2> <p>Make no mistake: there are sticky fingers in offices and businesses around the country. It can be as small as someone using the milk you brought in for their own cup of tea. Or, it can be more expensive items, including money, electronics, clothing, or even collectibles. When you start noticing that your things are going missing, report it immediately to HR or your superiors. It's important to at least get them alerted to the problem. It could be an internal person, someone from the cleaning staff, or anyone else trusted to walk around your business or office. HR can even install security cameras if it is serious enough.</p> <h2>10. When Rumors and Gossip Are Running Riot</h2> <p>You can't avoid water cooler chats and idle gossip in businesses. It happens in kitchens, bathrooms, conference rooms, and anywhere else people congregate to chat. However, when this gossip goes from a little harmless griping, to something much more toxic, you need to speak up. You can either put a stop to the chat instantly when you hear it (i.e. &quot;No, she didn't say that, and was never even in that meeting&quot;) or you can take your concerns to your superiors so that they can address the issues. Gossip can be very destructive, and needs to be stopped.</p> <p><em>When has speaking up at work made you most proud?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/need-a-job-try-searching-in-china">Need a Job? Try Searching in China</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-signs-that-youve-been-at-the-same-job-too-long">25 Signs That You&#039;ve Been at the Same Job Too Long</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career">Fired? Here&#039;s How to Keep It From Hurting Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-getting-what-you-want-at-work">What you need to know about getting what you want at work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-10-words-to-never-use-at-work">STOP: 10 Words to Never Use at Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building harassment Office speaking up theft work Mon, 18 May 2015 17:00:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1421691 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Easy Ways to Improve Your Online Reputation http://www.wisebread.com/6-easy-ways-to-improve-your-online-reputation <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-easy-ways-to-improve-your-online-reputation" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/two_friends_computer_000062076912.jpg" alt="Two woman managing their online reputations" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Searching for another person's online profile is common practice these days. Employers routinely use search engines to screen potential candidates. We even Google ourselves. It's totally expected and normal!</p> <p>Knowing that bits and pieces of information about your identity are floating around cyberspace should compel you to ensure your online reputation is in tip-top shape. And it's easy with these <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-improve-your-work-reputation">reputation management</a> tools.</p> <h2>1. Get <em>YourName.com</em></h2> <p>The number one way to control your search results is by purchasing your own domain name. If you have a name that is unique (like mine), this will be cut and dry. For people with more common names, you'll have to be a bit more creative. If the name Kim Smith is taken, incorporate your professional title. For example, Kim Smith, MBA could try <a href="http://www.kimsmithmba.com" title="www.kimsmithmba.com">www.kimsmithmba.com</a>, or <a href="http://www.kimsmith-mba.com" title="www.kimsmith-mba.com">www.kimsmith-mba.com</a>.</p> <h2>2. Get on LinkedIn</h2> <p>Adding your profile to popular social media sites is a surefire way to ensure the real you (that you wish to portray) shows up at the top of search results. LinkedIn is the largest social networking platform, with over 347 million users, and has great SEO power.</p> <p>Creating a profile provides the unique advantage of getting your very own, customizable vanity URL. For example, if your name is Jane Smith, your personal LinkedIn page would look something like <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/en/janesmith" title="www.linkedin.com/en/janesmith">www.linkedin.com/en/janesmith</a>. Because the LinkedIn network spans more than 200 countries worldwide, the letters preceding your name will represent your country's code.</p> <h2>3. Get on Google+</h2> <p>If you don't already have a Google account, it's time you get one to start taking advantage of the super searchable features of <a href="https://plus.google.com/">Google+</a>. It allows you to &quot;share and [be] discover[ed], all across Google.&quot; In many ways, it combines the features of popular social media networks. Users can create circles, add updates, and share posts and photos similar to Twitter and Facebook. And when someone searches for your name, your Google+ profile will be one on the first results to appear in search.</p> <h2>4. Setup Google Alerts</h2> <p>The <a href="https://www.google.com/alerts">Google Alerts</a> tool allow you to monitor content on the web by inputting the search terms you want to track. Input your name to detect any new information that appears about you. You'll be notified via e-mail with a link to the source whenever something new is found. If you're unhappy about the content, you can use tools like the ones below to bury it in search rank.</p> <h2>5. Use Brand Yourself</h2> <p>With <a href="https://brandyourself.com/">Brand Yourself</a>, users can sign-up and personally manage their online profiles or receive the guided support of a reputation management expert. The free account has limited features that allow you to control your search results by &quot;boosting&quot; three URLs you want to appear at the top of search results. Paid accounts come with more boosts and additional features. You also get instructions on how to improve the rank of certain URLs, which you can apply to all of your reputation management efforts.</p> <h2>6. Use ReputationDefender</h2> <p><a href="http://www.reputationdefendertestimonials.com/images/en/logo_reputationDefender.png">ReputationDefender</a> is a company dedicated to helping its clients improve their online reputation. Though it's a paid service, it can help you remove or minimize unwanted search results and boost positive search items. If you have serious online reputation concerns, this may be one of your best bets.</p> <p><em>What online reputation management tools have you used, and why?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/qiana-chavaia">Qiana Chavaia</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-easy-ways-to-improve-your-online-reputation">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-your-linkedin-profile-noticed-with-a-few-attention-grabbing-tweaks">Get Your LinkedIn Profile Noticed With a Few Attention-Grabbing Tweaks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/apple-introduces-most-outrageous-rewards-program-in-history">Apple introduces most outrageous “rewards” program in history</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/social-media-an-easy-source-of-coupons">Social Media: An Easy Source of Coupons</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-web-presence-will-soon-be-more-valuable-than-your-credit-rating">Your Web Presence Will Soon Be More Valuable Than Your Credit Rating</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/google-yourself-challenge-how-much-can-people-learn-about-you-online">Google Yourself Challenge: How Much Can People Learn About You Online?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Technology branding Google online reputation social media Thu, 14 May 2015 21:00:13 +0000 Qiana Chavaia 1420555 at http://www.wisebread.com Fired? Here's How to Keep It From Hurting Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/guy_fired_000052937386.jpg" alt="Guy got fired and doesn&#039;t want it hurting his career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Getting fired can destroy your self-confidence and devastate your personal finances, and that's just the start. Handled wrong, getting fired could have a long-lasting negative impact on your career, depending on the circumstances.</p> <p>But don't become discouraged, or think that no one will hire you. Keep your chin up, and check out these five ways to minimize damage to your career after getting fired.</p> <h2>1. Get Creative to Minimize Employment Gaps</h2> <p>It's vital to minimize gaps in your employment history. Even if you can't find a job right away, you might be able to volunteer with a local organization or offer your skills to companies on a freelance basis until real employment comes along. You don't need a lot of freelance clients &mdash; just enough to keep your skills sharp and show employers that you're active in your field.</p> <h2>2. Choose References Carefully</h2> <p>If you were laid off or downsized and left the company on good terms, getting a good reference from your old job likely won't be an issue. But if you were fired because of a bad attitude or poor work performance, your immediate supervisor might not put in a good word. However, if you had a great working relationship with another manager or a team leader, ask this person to provide a letter of recommendation or reference. With so much competition in the job market, the last thing you need is a bad reference slowing down your efforts.</p> <h2>3. Avoid the F-Word</h2> <p>Some people use the word &quot;fired&quot; regardless of the circumstances of their departure. Technically, &quot;getting fired&quot; can apply to any type of involuntary termination. But if you weren't let go because of poor work performance or because of anything you did wrong, avoid the F-word and use more accurate terminology, such as &quot;I was laid off,&quot; &quot;My position was eliminated,&quot; or &quot;The company downsized.&quot; These explanations sound better and might alleviate some of the stigma associated with being unemployed.</p> <h2>4. Be Honest</h2> <p>While it's understandable to downplay getting fired, it's important to be honest with the interviewer. Don't say you were laid off or downsized if you were unmistakably fired for misconduct or subpar work. The interviewer will mostly likely contact your previous employer, and if he learns that you lied or even slightly exaggerated the reasons for leaving the company, this can hurt your chances of getting the job. However, you don't necessarily have to go into extensive details. Keep your answer simple and short to avoid raising additional questions.</p> <h2>5. Exit Gracefully</h2> <p>The way you conduct yourself after getting fired can also affect how fast you're able to bounce back. If you make a scene by yelling, cursing, or acting unprofessionally in another manner, your employer will take note of this behavior. And when future employers call the company for a reference, your former employer may provide all the dirty details about your rude departure. If you exit gracefully and remain professional, this might persuade a former employer to provide a good reference, even though you weren't the right fit for the position.</p> <p><em>Have you ever been fired? Do you agree with these tips? Do you have any tips of your own to offer? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/great-ways-to-improve-your-resume-today">Great Ways to Improve Your Resume Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview">Using Times New Roman on Your Résumé Is Like Wearing Sweatpants to an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers">7 Job Search Stunts to Get You Noticed by Employers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting fired laid off resumes unemployed work Tue, 05 May 2015 09:00:25 +0000 Mikey Rox 1408957 at http://www.wisebread.com Working on the Road: A Book Review for Professional Nomads http://www.wisebread.com/working-on-the-road-a-book-review-for-professional-nomads <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/working-on-the-road-a-book-review-for-professional-nomads" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/noradunn.jpg" alt="Nora Dunn author of Working on the Road" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Nora Dunn's new <a href="http://unconventionalguides.com/cmd.php?af=1624698">Working on the Road</a> may not be the right choice for those looking for a vicarious thrill, fantasizing about a more free life. But for those looking for actionable information &mdash; who are ready to make the jump and are looking for practical tips for avoiding missteps as they change their lives &mdash; it's worth the read.</p> <p>And I should know: I took several different stabs at arranging my life to enable living as a digital nomad. (For more, see my <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/three-paths-to-being-a-digital-nomad">Three Paths to Being a Digital Nomad</a>, which ought to provide some context as a reviewer of this book. See also the disclaimer at the bottom.)</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://unconventionalguides.com/cmd.php?af=1624698"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/GumroadCover_605x340.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></a></p> <h2>The Guide to Working on the Road</h2> <p>The book is very much aimed exactly where the title suggests &mdash; at someone working on the road, or planning to. If your plans are for merely <em>going</em> on the road or <em>living</em> on the road, there will still be useful material here for you, but you'll be wasting more than half the book.</p> <p>On the other hand, the book's focus on work is by no means limited to any stereotype of the sort of work that's typical for the digital nomad. No kind of work is excluded, meaning that this book would be ideal for anyone whose goal is to be productive on the road. For example, I think it would be excellent for someone preparing to take a sabbatical (a sabbatical in the traditional sense &mdash; taking six to 12 months away from a regular job in order to undertake a significant piece of research or complete a major project). It would also be excellent for someone who thinks getting away for a year would help them finish a novel.</p> <p>With working on the road being the focus, you won't be surprised to learn that's where the book starts &mdash; with a look at two big categories of working on the road: location-independent work, like freelancing or writing, and then work that needs to happen in a particular place, but where the places are accepting of people who come from afar and plan to move on, such as teaching English or working in the many branches of the hospitality industry.</p> <p>There are sections on brainstorming for the sorts of things that you might need to do, and on how you might quickly develop a few extra skills that would enable working on the road (either as a complement to the skills you have, or as a whole new thing). There's also a good section on the sort of abilities, work habits, and self-knowledge you need to have if you're going to be successful.</p> <h2>Cost of Living on the Road</h2> <p>One of the few bits of the book that I have a beef with &mdash; and only because it's a personal peeve of my own &mdash; is the section on the cost of living on the road. Nora points out that, &quot;Traveling full-time can actually cost far less than it does to live in one place.&quot;</p> <p>This is true in the strictly technical sense that you can always find a more expensive way of life than the one you want to call less expensive. (It's exactly the same, except we buy three times as many toothbrushes.) It's also true in the deeper sense, that almost anyone can live a lot more cheaply if they're prepared to dramatically change how they live, and the shift to living on the road is going to be the sort of dramatic change that enables all sorts of economies.</p> <p>I just always bristle at the implication that you couldn't just as easily &mdash; in fact, more easily &mdash; find all those economies without going on the road if you're prepared to make the same sort of dramatic change in the way you live. Let your lease run out, sell your car, donate all your stuff beyond what fits in a suitcase, and then rent a cheap room a few miles from your old neighborhood.</p> <p>There are other savings besides those that come from choosing to make a dramatic change toward a cheaper lifestyle. One big one that is often a source of savings for people going on the road is that if you travel to a place where people are poor, things are going to be cheap.</p> <p>However: I'd be willing to bet that there are places where people are poor very close to where you live now.</p> <p>Most of the other sources of cost savings for being on the road are very specific as to time or place. For example, favorable exchange rates can make particular places very cheap, if your income (from your work on the road, or your savings and investments) is in a strong currency but your expenses are in a weak one. There can be some large tax savings, but they are highly dependent on exactly where you live and exactly how you earn your money.</p> <p>Finally, there's the fact that being someplace that's really different provides novelty that can substitute for entertainments that you'd otherwise spend money on.</p> <p>I've written about all this before, in an article called <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/live-abroad-for-less-also-at-home">Live Abroad for Less (Also at Home)</a>. As I say, it's peeve of mine.</p> <p>But the fact that Nora manages to push this precise button of mine should not be held against the book, which actually has a great section on managing your expenses. It presents examples of several different households &mdash; single folks and families, people who travel a lot and those who have a home base for extended periods, all at a range of different income levels.</p> <h2>Work-Life Balance on the Road</h2> <p>The section on work-life balance while on the road is excellent. In fact, it takes exactly the tone I'd have liked to see Nora take for the section on how it can be cheaper to live on the road. Working on the road does not magically give you work-life balance. Whether you're on the road or not, work-life balance comes from the choices you make about what work you do and what you expect from yourself. Just like with living cheaper, choosing to work on the road is inevitably a dramatic change in your life, and making a dramatic change gives you space to choose a better work-life balance. But it still comes down to your choices.</p> <p>The stories Nora tells about her successes and failures along the way to work-life balance are instructive. She provides good tips on striving for a proper balance. (The tips are not much different than you'd come up with for someone who's not on the road, which is kind of my point, but they're good tips.)</p> <p>There's a section on dealing with the fact that you'd probably had great expectations for the magic improvement in work-life balance that was supposed to come from working on the road, and dealing with the disappointment you'll probably face. There are specific tips for people on the road with kids, covering things like education.</p> <p>There is some advice that's very specific to being on the road &mdash; for example, suggesting that housesitting can provide welcome relief for someone who's been staying in hotels or hostels or tents or RVs, and praising the advantages of slow travel.</p> <h2>Heading Out</h2> <p>There are two sections on things to do and how to do them, roughly divided into things to do when heading out and things to do <em>before</em> heading out.</p> <p>This one section alone may make the book worth buying, for a certain class of reader. If you know you want to hit the road, know what kind of work you're going to do, and know how to support yourself on the amount of money you're going to have available, there are still some practical issues to sort out, and this chapter provides a solid overview of a bunch of them:</p> <ul> <li>Dealing with official documents when you're halfway around the world from your file cabinet<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Deciding what kinds of insurance you need<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Managing your cash, and paying your bills when you don't have a local bank<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Managing your investments when you don't have a fixed address<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Figuring out visa rules as they apply to people who will be doing work of one sort or another</li> </ul> <p>The material is nicely organized with a good focus on the arrangements to be made before you head out.</p> <p>There's also a focus on things to do that will help enable a return to working at a fixed location, because you might want back into the world of working at a regular job for a regular paycheck. There are things you can do up front that will make this step easier, and this section mentions some. (I wrote an article with my own suggestions, aimed at people who were going to be working on the road for a specific length of time, who know they will want to option to return, called <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fund-your-own-sabbatical">Fund Your Own Sabbatical</a>.)</p> <p>And there's a good list of things that are easier to do while you still have a day job, such as applying for credit cards.</p> <h2>Tools</h2> <p>There are two sections on tools, divided between regular tools and business tools.</p> <p>The first is about the tools you'll want for everyday stuff (such as a phone) and for work stuff (such as a computer). It's about figuring out what you need, pros and cons of various choices, practicalities (like cables), and so on.</p> <p>This section covers things like:</p> <ul> <li>Backups for people working on the road</li> <li>Information security</li> <li>Getting paid on the road</li> </ul> <p>The second section covers the broad category of things that working on the road make less predictable, more necessary, or more expensive than they'd be for someone working in a fixed location &mdash; internet fees, hiring an accountant, shipping and receiving, etc.</p> <h2>Expanding the Package</h2> <p>The review above covers just the book. There are additional resources that can be purchased with it, including some special-topic articles on things like dealing with your stuff, paying your bills, working on the road with a family, and dealing with property. There are a couple of interviews by Nora (one of someone who built up and then sold a personal finance blog, one of parents working on the road with kids), provided in both MP3 and transcript form. That material is all good. Whether it's worth the extra cost depends on whether it addresses something you personally really need to know.</p> <p>This book is perfect for someone who has gone beyond the stage of just thinking that working on the road sounds cool, but who has not yet figured out any of the details &mdash; what they might do, how they might live, and where they should start.</p> <p><a href="http://unconventionalguides.com/cmd.php?af=1624698">Buy your copy of <em>Working on the Road</em> today!</a></p> <h2>Disclaimers</h2> <p>Nora Dunn is a fellow Wise Bread writer, and a friend of mine. The publisher provided a review copy of the book, and Wise Bread paid me to write this article (same as they pay for other articles I write). Wise Bread policy does not allow writers to benefit from affiliate links (any payment from the affiliate link will go to Wise Bread, not to me), and I have no other financial interest in the success of the book.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/working-on-the-road-a-book-review-for-professional-nomads">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-travel-full-time-for-17000-a-year-or-less">How to Travel Full-Time for $17,000 a Year (or Less!)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-the-adventures-of-johnny-bunko">Book review: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-where-the-jobs-are-now">Book Review: Where the Jobs Are Now</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-business-travel-helps-your-wallet">11 Ways Business Travel Helps Your Wallet</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/financial-iq-test-how-healthy-is-your-budget">FINANCIAL IQ TEST: How Healthy Is Your Budget?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Career Building Travel book review expenses lifestyle nora dunn working on the road Fri, 01 May 2015 17:00:25 +0000 Philip Brewer 1408868 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Low-Cost Alternatives to a 4-Year Degree http://www.wisebread.com/4-low-cost-alternatives-to-a-4-year-degree <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-low-cost-alternatives-to-a-4-year-degree" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/office_coworkers_000053393492.jpg" alt="Group of students utilizing low-cost options to four-year degree" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Education is about self-discovery, personal improvement, and professional development. And there are a whole host of ways to achieve those things outside of the traditional four-year college experience. Read on for our roundup of some of the most viable alternatives to a four-year degree.</p> <h2>1. Start a Business</h2> <p>Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and Walt Disney are just a sampling of names on the list of America's uber-successful entrepreneurs who never earned a college diploma. Their legacies are proof that higher education is not a prerequisite to building a profitable business, no matter what anyone tells you.</p> <p>Today, the barriers to launching a one-person enterprise are lower than ever. With dedication, drive, and an Internet connection, you can <a href="http://fourhourworkweek.com/2012/05/24/six-figure-businesses-built-for-less-than-100-17-lessons-learned/">start a thriving business</a> for less than $100. After all, the best way to gain experience in business is by launching one of your own. Even if it flops &mdash; 8 out of 10 <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericwagner/2013/09/12/five-reasons-8-out-of-10-businesses-fail/">new businesses fail</a> within the first 18 months &mdash; the practical experience you gain will help you become more successful in your next endeavor. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/starting-your-dream-business-is-easier-than-you-think-heres-how?ref=seealso">Starting Your Dream Business Isn't as Hard as You Think &mdash; Here's How</a>)</p> <h2>2. Learn a Trade</h2> <p>How many college grads have you met who have no idea what career they want to pursue in life? This is rarely the case with trade school students, who graduate with a clear path to gainful employment.</p> <p>Trade and vocational schools offering programs in fields like information technology, culinary science, construction, woodworking, and hairdressing will set you on the fast track for a skilled and potentially high-paying job. They're also usually much more reasonably priced than a four-year college and typically have more lenient acceptance requirements.</p> <p>In fact, vocational schools are so successful in placing graduates in high-earning jobs that they have become the norm in countries like Switzerland, where young adults view the practicality of learning a trade as much more valuable than a more traditional college education. Whether your passion lies in auto mechanics or makeup artistry, you can launch a successful career by enrolling in a trade school that will help you hone your skills in a specific pursuit &mdash; without all those liberal arts requirements.</p> <h2>3. Go Straight to Work</h2> <p>The benefit of moving into the workforce rather than the college dorms is that you'll be honing new job skills, racking up experience, and &mdash; this is the big one &mdash; actually making money. That's pretty huge, considering the average college graduate is responsible for $30,000 in student loan debt. Loan officer, firefighter, web developer, retail or restaurant manager, commercial pilot, and criminal investigator are just a sampling of the bright and lucrative careers that don't require a four-year degree. Among the <a href="http://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_table_107.htm">highest paying gigs</a> that don't require a diploma are purchasing agent ($59,000), insurance claims adjuster ($60,000), and construction site supervisor ($60,000).</p> <h2>4. On the Job Training</h2> <p>Many employers provide educational credits and on-the-job training that can help you develop valuable skillsets without investment in a college degree. Others will offer financial support or rebates for continuing education at local colleges. Take advantage of this opportunity to learn for free or at a reduced cost.</p> <p><em>What other alternatives to a college degree have you enjoyed?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-low-cost-alternatives-to-a-4-year-degree">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tips-for-my-career-clueless-college-self">5 Tips for My Career-Clueless College Self</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-signs-its-time-to-make-your-side-gig-your-career">6 Signs It&#039;s Time to Make Your Side Gig Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-great-jobs-that-offer-college-loan-forgiveness">7 Great Jobs that Offer College Loan Forgiveness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/need-a-job-try-searching-in-china">Need a Job? Try Searching in China</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Education & Training business college degrees entrepreneurs job hunting trade schools work Wed, 29 Apr 2015 17:00:25 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1400877 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_side_job_000020816287.jpg" alt="Woman using her side hustle to further her career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do you feel stuck in a career rut but not sure what needs to change? Your job likely pays the bills and quitting a steady paycheck just because you're bored or unchallenged doesn't seem like a smart option. You still have to pay the rent, after all.</p> <p>This is where a side hustle can be both financially rewarding and creatively stimulating. But balancing a full time job and a side hustle is not always easy.</p> <p>Here are five ways a side hustle can expand your career and give you more options.</p> <h2>1. Learn New Career Skills</h2> <p>One of the main benefits to starting a side hustle is that you can expand your knowledge by acquiring new skills. This can include learning how to start a website, optimizing social media channels, seeking out new clients, and even taking courses on copywriting, SEO, bookkeeping, and the like.</p> <p>You always have the opportunity to learn something new. Even after four years of having a side-hustle turned full-time gig, I still find new programs, books, and courses that help me learn new skills and increase my knowledge about certain subjects.</p> <h2>2. Manage Multiple Projects</h2> <p>When you work as a traditional employee, you generally only have a certain amount of tasks each day, and you're often doing the same things each month. But when you have a side hustle, things are lot less consistent. You're not only an employee but also the boss, the bookkeeper, the receptionist, the manager &mdash; and everybody else.</p> <p>As a side hustler, you wear a lot more hats and are able to balance many types of projects. Not only are you working for clients, but you're also managing multiple deadlines, and perhaps even outsourcing to other contractors. All of these things will help you learn to balance lots of priorities while still getting things done on time.</p> <h2>3. Streamline Your Workflow</h2> <p>If you don't have a side hustle yet, you may not understand the importance of managing your time wisely. When you have a full time job, family, household chores, errands, and a side hustle, you have to be <em>very efficient </em>with where you spend your time and energy.</p> <p>When I started my side hustle alongside my day job, I began noticing holes in my workday productivity routine. I was able to streamline the processes at my job, in order to get more done in less time.</p> <p>This allowed me to reduce my workload overall, so I could make room for other personal and professional tasks. My employer appreciated this too, as I helped them save money and increase productivity in the office.</p> <h2>4. Diversify Your Income and Career Path</h2> <p>Your career and income are tightly woven together and we all need to make a living to support our families. So what happens when your boss needs to cut costs, or you're handed a pink slip? A side hustle alleviates some of this risk by diversifying the types of income streams you have.</p> <p>Finding another job can take a lot of time and effort, not to mention the additional time it takes to get paid from when you were first hired. This period of stress can be eased by having some money coming in from your side hustle, and a side gig can be a viable second career option, should you need it. It can also take off the pressure while giving you the chance to take your time in pursuing the best opportunity.</p> <h2>5. Broaden Your Network</h2> <p>Working in a traditional office setting means you see the same people day in and day out, which doesn't leave much room for expanding your network. With a side hustle though, specifically one that's online based, you're able to broaden your network everyday.</p> <p>Whether it's meeting up at a local coffee shop, or connecting with new people at an industry conference, a side hustle offers the chance for you to broaden your list of contacts and like-minded individuals. This list of contacts could come in very handy in the future if you get laid off, need to switch jobs, or even take your side hustle full-time.</p> <p><em>Do you have a side hustle? How has it helped expand your career?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-smith">Carrie Smith</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise">These 10 Words and Phrases Are Keeping You From Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bosses-say-these-are-their-6-favorite-qualities-in-employees-do-you-have-them">Bosses Say These Are Their 6 Favorite Qualities in Employees — Do You Have Them?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income career career skills promotion raise side hustle Fri, 24 Apr 2015 13:00:05 +0000 Carrie Smith 1400450 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Ways to Actually Take All Your Vacation Days This Year http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_boat_000034795992.jpg" alt="Man taking the opportunity to use his vacation days this year" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Nearly everyone recognizes the importance of taking a break from work. Time off makes workers happier, helps them rest, allows them to do things that they love, and improves their attitude and focus at work when they return.</p> <p>Why, then, did 41% of American workers plan to <a href="http://www.projecttimeoff.com/research/overwhelmed-america">not use their vacation time</a> in 2014?</p> <p>There are a zillion reasons, and some of them are even good. However, most of these have some easy workarounds, assuming you give it a little thought and put in a little effort. You shouldn't have to compromise on the breaks you've earned &mdash; and deserve.</p> <h2>1. Plan Ahead</h2> <p>Sometimes, people don't take their vacation days because they can't get the weeks off that they want, or because they don't have time to plan the trip that they'd really like to take. This doesn't have to derail your vacationing efforts, though.</p> <p>If the days you really want are days everyone else is going to want off too, make your best effort to accommodate this. As an example, some workplaces have a lottery for these days, so make sure you participate. Avoid the most congested vacation weeks, and opt for nearby time slots. For instance, it's usually easier to get the week before Christmas off than the week of Christmas.</p> <p>When in doubt, get some vacation days on the calendar even if you don't know what you want to do with them. If nothing else, you can play tourist in your own town and sleep in every day!</p> <h2>2. Work Ahead</h2> <p>Many people don't take their vacation days because they're worried about getting behind at work and returning to a mountain of tasks. While you can't completely counteract this, it's possible to complete most work in advance, or to otherwise plan around your absence.</p> <p>It's perfectly acceptable to plan your vacation during a slow time of year at work, in order to avoid a backlog while you're gone. You can also plan your schedule and make budgets, schedule events, meet with clients, etc., before you go so those tasks aren't hanging over your head when you return.</p> <h2>3. Empower People Around You</h2> <p>If the people around you know that you have confidence in them, they will work just as well when you're gone as they do when you're in the office. This will hold true even if you're a manager or own a business.</p> <p>Make sure that the people you work with know that you trust them to make good decisions even if you're not there. Explicitly explain your trust and expectations. Doing this may also mean that they'll have your back while on vacation, taking care of pressing tasks in your absence.</p> <h2>4. Stop Saving</h2> <p>About 38% of the people who don't use their vacation days are saving time off in case they need it. While it's good to be judicious with your vacations, most companies won't let you save your vacation time forever (and increasingly, many companies won't let you save much at all!). This means that you either use your vacation time, or you risk losing it.</p> <h2>5. Be a Great Employee</h2> <p>Employees also worry about being seen as expendable or as not committed to their jobs when they use all of their vacation time (or worse, when other people don't use theirs). The truth is, your employer is not allowed to fire you for using your allotted vacation time. Still, people worry that this will happen to them.</p> <p>Nip this in the bud by being a superb employee. If you're good at your job and clearly focused and committed when you're there, no boss will begrudge your well-deserved time off. Most companies know that employees who use vacation time are <a href="http://www.today.com/money/importance-taking-vacations-1D80097348">happier and more productive</a> on the job, and taking time off doesn't imply disloyalty.</p> <h2>6. Open Communication With Your Supervisor</h2> <p>Some supervisors seem to discourage employees from taking the time off that they've earned. If this is your boss, talk to him or her about it. You don't have to make it into a confrontation. Simply say something like, &quot;Hey, I'd really like to take my kids to go do X, but I've noticed you seem a little stressed. Is there anything I can do to help you out so that my leaving won't make things worse?&quot;</p> <p>You can also offer to coordinate time off with other employees or with your boss, in order to ensure all bases are covered and everyone gets their due vacation. The goal here is to make this a topic you and your boss can talk about, rather than one that everyone tries to avoid.</p> <h2>7. Remember: A Job Is a Job</h2> <p>In the end, your job is not your life. Your job is your job, and a vacation can help you remember that when you're tempted to put all your time and energy into work. Even if you love your job and it's one of the most satisfying parts of your life, it's still a job. Remember this, and it will help you choose to take every single bit of vacation time you're entitled to, without worrying about what might happen later.</p> <p><em>Do you plan to use all of your vacation this year? What do you want to do with your time off?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-getting-what-you-want-at-work">What you need to know about getting what you want at work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/earn-more-money-by-demanding-it">Earn More Money by Demanding It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/need-a-job-try-searching-in-china">Need a Job? Try Searching in China</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building job time off vacation days work Tue, 14 Apr 2015 21:00:08 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1380880 at http://www.wisebread.com The 9 Types of Horrible Bosses – And How to Manage Them http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-types-of-horrible-bosses-and-how-to-manage-them <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-9-types-of-horrible-bosses-and-how-to-manage-them" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/horrible_bosses_000032969296.jpg" alt="Woman at work dealing with horrible boss" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Unless you happen to be self-employed or independently wealthy, you will have a boss. I have had many different bosses over my 20 years in the ad business, and they have ranged from the sublime to the just plain awful.</p> <p>Here are nine types of frustrating bosses you can expect to encounter, and the strategies you can use to help deal with them. Remember, they're just people. And that means they are both flawed, and have feelings. You just have to find the right way to approach them.</p> <h2>1. The Manipulative Boss</h2> <p>Many people say manipulative bosses are extremely intelligent, but this is not necessarily the case. After all, if they were that good at manipulation, they wouldn't let you realize they're manipulating you. However, they do possess a set of skills that make them very tough to deal with. For starters, they can turn any situation into their advantage. Their failures become your failures, and your successes become theirs. They are usually passive aggressive. And, they always have a hidden agenda; they will do whatever it takes to get a promotion, and they consider you a simple step on their way to the top.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>First, don't try to play them at their own game. Not only are they better at it, they know more than you due to their position. Your best bet here is to appear open and honest with them, whilst making it clear you are not a threat. Keep your distance whenever possible, don't appear weak or easily bullied, and know your rights. If they push it too far, your HR department can help.</p> <h2>2. The Desperate-to-Be-Popular Boss</h2> <p>If you've ever seen BBC's excellent The Office, which was remade for the U.S. and many other countries, you will know the name David Brent. Played superbly by Ricky Gervais, he portrayed this kind of boss perfectly; the boss who only wants to be loved will always fail in that regard, because they are never doing their job well. They'll go out of their way to try and make you laugh, or get praise, but they won't have their eyes on the prize. They will want to leave early with you to go to the bar, or have long meetings talking about movies and football. At the end of the day, you will have a harder time doing your job well because of this boss, and will even find yourself making excuses for them.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>The key here is setting boundaries. It's fine to go out occasionally with this kind of boss, or indulge in a little extra chitchat. But, you are at a place of business, and you have a job to do. Keep focused on that, and avoid getting too buddy-buddy with him or her. When they eventually go down, you do not want to be there taking the fall with them.</p> <h2>3. The &quot;Me, Me, Me&quot; Boss</h2> <p>This boss has an ego the size of a planet, and yet will often try to downplay it. Somehow the conversation always comes back to them, their achievements, their weekend plans, their family, their awards, their office, and anything else involving their number one subject. Meetings will invariably be steered in the direction of this boss, and they will be more than happy to steal the spotlight. You'll hear things like &quot;Well, I don't like to brag, but&hellip;&quot; and &quot;Oh, I always know how to&hellip;&quot; and you'll have to grin and bear another 10 minute diatribe on their awesome life and career.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>You basically have to take everything with a grain of salt. Sure, they will always want to talk about themselves, but if they are good in other ways, let it slide. Maybe they were the middle child and didn't get a lot of attention, or have other inadequacies that they're making up for. As long as it doesn't affect you, your position, or your career, just let them have their many moments in the sun.</p> <h2>4. The Martyr Boss</h2> <p>If there's a sword around, expect them to tell you how often they have fallen on it. Seriously, these bosses should have &quot;Take One for the Team&quot; emblazoned on a t-shirt. They will work weekends and late nights without extra pay. They will volunteer for the worst projects or assignments. They will come into the office with a severe bout of Ebola and won't even take a lunch break. The problem is, they work unnecessarily hard and expect you to do the same; &quot;I was here at 4:00 a.m. even though I had a broken leg and my dog passed away&hellip;where were you!?&quot;</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>You will never, ever be able to compete with a martyr boss, and if you try, you'll only make them work even harder (if that's possible). You can't play their game, so instead play up how much you think they rock. The martyr loves being recognized for his or her actions, and if you do so often, they'll appreciate you for it. They also know more about the company than the CEO and the board put together, so listen when they talk, and you may pick up some very useful info.</p> <h2>5. The MIA Boss</h2> <p>You know you have a boss. You have seen their office, you receive their emails, and occasionally, you talk with them on the phone. But you can never, ever find them. It's like they went into the Witness Protection Program and are now living under an assumed identity. When you pass by their office, no one's home. When you call, you usually get voicemail. They will send you an email demanding you work the weekend, and yet you can't remember the last time they stepped foot through the front door. These bosses are experts in sucking the marrow out of life, and will do as little work as possible whilst making it seem like they are too busy to eat or sleep.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>It's tough to have a &quot;Missing in Action&quot; boss. You can't really talk to them about issues face to face, because they're never around. Getting approvals can be hard work, and nailing them down on an issue is like nailing Jello to a wall. With a boss like this, get an action plan in writing. If they're not around, who is in charge? Who can sign off on invoices, or projects? Can you go directly to their superior, if they have one? On the plus side, you won't have a boss constantly looking over your shoulder.</p> <h2>6. The Micromanaging Boss</h2> <p>Of all the bosses named on this list, this is one of the toughest you'll encounter. A micromanaging boss does not trust you to do anything correctly. In fact, they are absolutely convinced that if it wasn't for them, the entire company would grind to a halt. The irony is, they become a bottleneck and will slow everything down, precisely because they have their hand in every pie. Micromanagers will assign you tasks, and then proceed to check in on your progress constantly. They will redo things you have already done (even if done well). They will put their stamp on everything, and of course, take credit because they believe they have done it all themselves. This kind of boss is toxic to any work environment.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>You need tact and diplomacy on this one. First, play up to the fact that you recognize their many strengths. Then, give them the impression that the ideas you want to go forward with are actually their ideas. From a stockroom clerk to the highest levels of corporate power, if they believe they thought of it, they'll go with it. You should also ask for specific direction on every project, in writing. Finally, keep records of everything; emails, voicemails, and the rounds of adjustments or revisions. If it looks like you're incompetent because of their lack of trust, you need evidence to back up your side of the story.</p> <h2>7. The &quot;Fear Me&quot; Boss</h2> <p>If asked, &quot;Would you rather be feared or liked?&quot; most bosses would say, &quot;Neither, I'd rather be respected.&quot; But this boss chooses the first option every time. They rule with an iron fist in a flaming, spiked gauntlet, and they love their scary reputation. They will shout and scream on occasion, just to get their own way. They will show up late to meetings to impose their authority. They will use name-calling, sarcasm, and threats to control everyone around them (watch <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Swimming-With-Sharks-Special-Edition/dp/B0009A40EI">Swimming With Sharks</a> for a better idea of this kind of boss). Sadly, they temper all of this behavior around the people who matter, so that only the workers beneath them feel like they are being abused.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>I'm sorry to say these bosses cannot be dealt with by you alone. Sadly, most of the time the people underneath them either request a transfer, lose it and get fired, or quit. The turnover in their department will be a big indicator that something is wrong, and they will eventually have to answer for their actions. Until then, you just have to smile, be polite, and avoid them whenever you can.</p> <h2>8. The Stuck-in-the-Past Boss</h2> <p>Bob Dylan famously wrote &quot;The times, they are a-changin.'&quot; This boss does not like it, and is in no hurry to play catch up. He or she will always be the last to figure out the new copier or email system, and refuses to keep up with modern trends. &quot;Twitter? Facebook? In my day, a letter in the mail worked wonders.&quot; If these opinions were kept personal, it would be okay. Sadly, their opinions influence your business decisions, and that is often why you will be working on things in a way that would seem archaic to your grandma.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>Usually, these bosses mean no harm, they are just set in their ways. The best way to deal with a boss like this is to demonstrate the advantages of new systems and equipment. They may be old school, but they're not dumb. Demonstrate that a new methodology will save time and money, and they'll ask for it to be implemented in no time. Just have a little patience.</p> <h2>8. The Debbie Downer Boss</h2> <p>This boss, and it can be a man or a woman, never looks on the bright side. If you do an excellent job on something, you could have done it a little sooner. If you fix a problem, you were partly responsible for creating it. If you improve company morale, you're guilty of not working hard enough. If you work too hard, you're trying to embarrass him or her. The company will always be on the verge of folding, or people are always about to get fired. This boss is about as fun to be around as a funeral home.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>Don't try and change who they are as a person. That's not your job, and it is a mission doomed to fail. If you want to stay on their good side, sympathize when they have problems. Don't try to be too &quot;up&quot; or enthusiastic, but don't let their awful mood swings and poor outlook on life get you down. They are happy in their misery; don't get pulled into that sinkhole.</p> <h2>9. The &quot;I'm Not Sure&quot; Boss</h2> <p>Many of the bosses listed here are flawed, but they at least know how to make a decision. This boss spends most of their day sitting on the fence. The basic premise here is &quot;If I don't make a specific decision, I can't be held accountable for it.&quot; They will worm out of decisions day and night, and will always find ways to answer questions in a non-committed kind of way. Ultimately, everyone suffers, because they are leaving everyone hanging. But in many businesses in corporate America, these people can have very lucrative careers.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>You have to force their hand. If they say &quot;I'll trust your judgment,&quot; make sure you get confirmation that they agree with your decision. Nailing them down is tough, but make it impossible for them to avoid. The way you phrase your questions must give no room for error, and at every stage of the project, insist on a sign-off. If they won't say yes to one option, then ask them to say no to the others. You can get blood out of a stone if you apply a little pressure.</p> <p>Now&hellip;the one type of boss who will actually improve your career.</p> <h2>The Great Boss</h2> <p>In my experience, and those of my friends and colleagues, great bosses are few and far between. These are the bosses who encourage independent thinking, foster an atmosphere of mutual respect, and always have an open door. They don't scream or shout, they don't belittle people, and they don't manipulate or play politics. They're not perfect; they make mistakes, occasionally lose their cool, or make you work extra hours when required. But, they're good eggs.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>When you are fortunate enough to work for a great boss, make the extra effort to remember his or her birthday as a department. Let them know their feedback means a lot. And never be afraid to let the people above them know what a great job they're doing. Their behavior should be nurtured, and hopefully it will spread to other people in the company.</p> <p><em>So, do you have a specific type of boss who isn't on this list? What do you do to deal with them? Let us know in the comments.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-types-of-horrible-bosses-and-how-to-manage-them">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/boost-your-career-how-to-be-happier-and-more-likeable-at-work">Boost Your Career: How to Be Happier and More Likeable at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-to-splurge-resume-writer">When to Splurge: Resume Writer</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building bad bosses employment work strategies Tue, 31 Mar 2015 09:00:02 +0000 Paul Michael 1359565 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Ways to Act Like a Leader -- And Get Ahead at Work http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/teamwork_000020741550.jpg" alt="Two people working as a team at the office" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I have worked for organizations with as few as four employees, and others with as many as a couple of thousand. In each of those companies, employees who were good &quot;team players&quot; were valued and rose quickly into leadership roles. If you want to move ahead in your workplace, here are 10 ways to become a better team player.</p> <h2>1. Get to Know Your Team</h2> <p>You may not think this is job #1, but it's really important. In order to accomplish your company's directives, it is helpful to better know and understand your coworkers. For example, employee &quot;A&quot; may love all things data-driven, but &quot;B&quot; might excel in social media and marketing, and hate crunching numbers. Meanwhile, &quot;C&quot; might be the organizer of the group, who will keep everyone on track. If you don't already know your team, you might ask them to take an <a href="http://www.tracomcorp.com/solutions/by-element/social-style/model/">interpersonal self-assessment</a> such as Social Style. If you are out to accomplish a common goal, understanding personalities is very helpful.</p> <h2>2. Share a Vision</h2> <p>What is it that you are all trying to accomplish? Has management shared its mission? A good team leader will map out and share goals and a timeline. Communicate! Weekly huddles, monthly meetings, emails, and texts keep the flow of information going. Be patient and do your best to be friendly. Keeping a positive outlook and sharing your enthusiasm will keep your team moving in the same direction.</p> <h2>3. Be Ready to Pitch In</h2> <p>This is one of my favorite &quot;teamwork&quot; quotes: &quot;Sympathizers are spectators; empathizers wear game shoes.&quot; &mdash; John Eyberg</p> <p>If you aren't pitching in on a project, this is going to be noted by your team, and it will result in gossip, resentment, and a &quot;Why should I?&quot; attitude. You will lose respect. So what if you're the big cheese? Get your hands dirty. File, copy, crunch numbers, make phone calls &mdash; whatever it takes.</p> <h2>4. Motivate the Team</h2> <p>If you are the team's leader, or eventually want to be that person, you need to motivate the team. What you need to do is to <em>figure out what motivates your team members.</em> Don't you have your own &quot;carrots?&quot; To motivate, you need to get to know them. Personally, I would rather have a bonus than a pizza party. Some team members will love being recognized at a meeting, but shy ones will be embarrassed. The point is, one size does not fit all. A strong team player knows their team, and knows what motivates them.</p> <h2>5. Take the Initiative</h2> <p>Somebody has to do it: Whether the project is cleaning out the office refrigerator, auditing the I-9's, changing the toner, or working on Saturday, there are going to be those take-one-for-the-team projects. Once in a while, that person needs to be you. Put your hand up. Everyone will be grateful.</p> <h2>6. Say Thanks</h2> <p>Don't just say it during reviews, or when something gets done. Unexpected thank-yous are a great morale-booster. Writing someone a heartfelt note is very meaningful. Pick up Starbucks coffees, grab McBreakfast for everyone, or thank your team publicly in a staff meeting. Say it, write it, or find creative ways to show that gratitude.</p> <h2>7. Make it FUN</h2> <p>By fun, I don't mean &quot;Let's go outside for team-building and build a team pyramid!&quot; I personally abhor team-building exercises, both physical and mental (remember the stranded plane exercise of the '80s?). Most people like potlucks, office &quot;pools,&quot; or silly games in the breakroom. You might join together on a food drive, or a fundraising walk to better the community. Several departments in my workplace have special t-shirts they wear on casual Fridays. Mix it up &mdash; while some will love Zumba in the conference room, others would rather do a craft.</p> <h2>8. Help Each Other</h2> <p>Isn't helping each other a huge part of teamwork? I really like knowing I can go to certain team members for IT assistance, navigating new software, or ordering a particular office supply. Everyone has their area of expertise and your work life is greatly simplified by knowing who can help you. Be the person that people can go to. Are you approachable and helpful? If not, then get to it.</p> <h2>9. Brainstorm</h2> <p>Stuck on a problem? Get together with the team, a lot of paper, and start throwing out possible solutions. The trick with this is to make sure everyone's voice is heard. A good leader will ask the quiet staff members, if they have not contributed, for their input. Be respectful of everyone's ideas. Type them up, prioritize, and move ahead.</p> <h2>10. Reward!</h2> <p>Most companies, no matter their size, have some sort of recognition. Some offer bonuses; many larger ones throw ceremonies. If your team member, or entire team, has done great work, make sure that information gets in front of management. Successes need to be celebrated. Everyone wants their efforts to be recognized and praised.</p> <p><em>How does your company promote and inspire teamwork?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-10"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-getting-what-you-want-at-work">What you need to know about getting what you want at work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-the-adventures-of-johnny-bunko">Book review: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-survive-and-thrive-in-a-job-you-hate">How to Survive (and Thrive!) in a Job You Hate</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bosses-say-these-are-their-6-favorite-qualities-in-employees-do-you-have-them">Bosses Say These Are Their 6 Favorite Qualities in Employees — Do You Have Them?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building coworkers job office morale team building teamwork Thu, 26 Mar 2015 09:00:03 +0000 Marla Walters 1354183 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Times a Higher Salary Isn't Worth It http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_stressed_office_000043549226.jpg" alt="Man stressed out at the office" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Money isn't everything. Having the extra funds for foreign travel and designer shopping splurges can be nice &mdash; to say the least &mdash; but not when the tradeoffs include scientifically backed side effects such as insomnia, death, and divorce. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-times-youre-better-off-without-a-promotion?ref=seealso">12 Times You're Better Off Without a Promotion</a>)</p> <p>So if you're facing a job offer that comes with an attractive salary bump, be sure the new gig won't catapult you into any of the following problems.</p> <h2>1. The Commute Would Kill You</h2> <p>Americans spend more time commuting (100+ hours per year) than they do vacationing (80 hours). According to reserach out of Sweden, long commutes also cause a wealth of <a href="http://www.slate.com/articles/business/moneybox/2011/05/your_commute_is_killing_you.html">horrible side effects</a>, including&nbsp;neck pain, obesity, loneliness, divorce, stress, and insomnia. So if the twice daily traffic jam you'd have to endure to get to your higher paying gig seems likely to drive you mad, then it's probably best to stick with the job you've already got. Sure, the extra money would be nice. But research shows you very well may end up spending a good portion of that salary increase on your newfound needs for physical therapy, sleep doctors, and a divorce attorney.</p> <h2>2. The Office Culture is Toxic</h2> <p>If you've ever said, &quot;My job is killing me!&quot; &mdash; you could be right. Research shows that people in&nbsp;<a href="http://healthland.time.com/2011/08/10/study-your-hostile-workplace-may-be-killing-you/">hostile work environments</a> are more likely to die sooner than those who work in atmospheres that are more favorable. Death aside, toxic work environments are also known to provoke aches, stress, and signs of depression. So before accepting a new job offer with a dazzling salary, do your homework.</p> <h2>3. Your Work-Life Balance Would Be Out of Whack</h2> <p>Work has a way of getting in the way of what matters most: family time. These numbers offer a glimpse at the epidemic: 55% of all employees say they don't have enough time for themselves, 67% of employed parents say they don't have enough time with their kids, and 63% of married employees say they don't have enough time with their spouse, according to Families and Work Institute's <a href="http://www.familiesandwork.org/context-matters-insights-about-older-workers-from-the-national-study-of-the-changing-workforce/"><em>National Study of the Changing Workforce</em></a>. If a higher paying gig would mean severely under-serving yourself or your loved ones, it may be best to stick with a lower paying job that offers more flexibility.</p> <h2>4. You Don't Believe in the Work</h2> <p>All the money in the world can't make you feel pride in the job you're doing unless you truly believe in the work. And if you're being offered a better-paying gig at a company whose ideals are in conflict with your beliefs, be they religious, social, or otherwise, your time would be well spent to figure out how to reconcile that &mdash; which could mean declining the job. You'll never reach your potential if you're doing something you don't stand behind 100%.</p> <h2>5. You Don't See Eye to Eye With Your Boss</h2> <p>If the person who's supposed to be raising you up seems set on bringing you down, it might be time to skedaddle. Studies show that <a href="http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10869-011-9253-2">unsupportive bosses</a> affect how your whole family relates to one another, your physical health, and your morale while in the office. They also raise your risk for heart disease. No job is worth putting up with woes like that &mdash; no matter how many zeros are included in the salary.</p> <h2>6. The Company is on the Fritz</h2> <p>There's no need to go down with a sinking ship. If the company trying to pad your pockets is on its way out, it may be wise to stay in control and decline the job offer rather than suffer a layoff in the future.</p> <p><em>Have you ever taken the higher salaried job only to regret it later? Tell us about it in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-11"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential">6 Simple Steps to Discovering Your True Salary Potential</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-should-always-negotiate-a-raise-here-are-10-reasons-why">You Should Always Negotiate a Raise: Here Are 10 Reasons Why</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back">5 Career Tactics That Are Actually Holding You Back</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise">These 10 Words and Phrases Are Keeping You From Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building promotion raise salary Fri, 13 Mar 2015 08:00:09 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1334919 at http://www.wisebread.com The 5 Worst Career Mistakes — and How to Avoid Them http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-worst-career-mistakes-and-how-to-avoid-them <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-5-worst-career-mistakes-and-how-to-avoid-them" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/work_mistake_000029945840.jpg" alt="Business man upset over mistake" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Figuring out how to get ahead in modern corporate environments can sometimes feel like an entirely separate (and full-time) career. Politics change, mergers reset the playing field, and bosses come and go. It's enough to make you want to pull out your hair. But stay on-track and get ahead by avoiding these five career-killing moves. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year?ref=seealso">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a>)</p> <h2>1. Wearing Club Couture</h2> <p>Ever notice how business attire is gradually getting confused with clubwear? It's a strange phenomenon that new college graduates are especially susceptible to. In our hyper-casual culture, it's as if folks mistakenly conclude that anything better than jeans and a T-shirt <em>must be</em> formal wear. It's hard to succeed professionally when your clothing says, &quot;Let's go to the VIP room, order a couple dirty martinis, and show each other our piercings.&quot; College administrators take note: There needs to be an entire semester-long course on proper business attire with a few hours of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/reclaiming-etiquette-dining-basics-for-young-professionals">basic dining etiquette</a> thrown in for good measure. Your students will thank you.</p> <p>Dress to succeed by building an <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-a-work-wardrobe-for-any-job-on-a-budget">appropriate work wardrobe</a> and avoiding anything too tight, too dramatic, too embellished, or too branded. Oh, and invest in a good iron and learn how to use it.</p> <h2>2. Over-Celebrating</h2> <p>Office parties can be a great way to get to know coworkers on a more casual level &mdash; just don't let things get too casual. Today, a temporary embarrassment can echo on social media forever. Avoid those drunken lampshade-wearing moments by being acutely aware of your personal thresholds with alcohol and embracing nearly puritanical limits during work celebrations.</p> <h2>3. Being Complacent</h2> <p>Even for those who do their jobs well, getting too comfortable in a role can be a career killer. While dependability matters, employers don't promote bookends. To get ahead, it helps to stay just a little bit hungry. Avoid complacency by going a few steps beyond what's required, anticipating and responding to needs that may technically be outside the scope of your role, and distinguishing yourself from the crowd subtly but consistently.</p> <h2>4. Getting Angry</h2> <p>Passion is good. Anger is bad. And while the two may overlap from time-to-time, an angry employee can quickly be dubbed a &quot;loose cannon&quot; and passed over for any role that involves managing people, clients, or complex projects. Learn how to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-manage-powerful-emotions">manage powerful emotions</a> and re-channel negative energy to create solutions that help improve communication and resolve conflict. Remember, effective and diplomatic peacemakers are rare animals. Their skills get noticed.</p> <h2>5. Going Solo</h2> <p>There's a fine line between distinguishing yourself (a must for career advancement) and being ruthlessly independent (a no-no in most situations). Employers reward effective team players who can &quot;lead and lift.&quot; That means positively taking control of team dynamics and motivating others. Instead of tooting your own horn, demonstrate the effectiveness of your team. Share strategies that helped win a new account or meet an impossible deadline. The simple act of communicating this information will set you apart and show that you're tuned in to the power of positive group psychology.</p> <p>No matter what field you're in, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-office-politics-goofs-that-can-set-your-career-back-years">office politics goofs</a> can set your career back years, and in tough economic times, that makes you an easy lay-off target. Remember, you invested a lot of effort and money in your degree and took the time to find the right &mdash; or at least okay for right now &mdash; job. Don't sabotage your success by falling prey to a single career-killer.</p> <p><em>Have you ever made a career-killing move? How did you recover? What missteps have you seen in the workplace that sealed someone's fate?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-worst-career-mistakes-and-how-to-avoid-them">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-12"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview">Using Times New Roman on Your Résumé Is Like Wearing Sweatpants to an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers">7 Job Search Stunts to Get You Noticed by Employers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/working-on-the-road-a-book-review-for-professional-nomads">Working on the Road: A Book Review for Professional Nomads</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career mistakes job killers Tue, 10 Mar 2015 09:00:10 +0000 Kentin Waits 1329652 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/frustrated_paper_000026250736.jpg" alt="Woman frustrated trying to write the perfect resume" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2015/01/04/the-job-outlook-for-2015/21208321/">U.S. job outlook</a> is looking much improved for 2015, and most economic indicators suggest a continued, healthy pace of hiring in the year ahead.</p> <p>If you're still job hunting, it's time to polish your resume and ensure it stands out from the competition. While it can be tempting to pull outlandish stunts to convince employers to hire you, we don't recommend them as a prudent job search strategy. Instead, stick to what works &mdash; like having a crisp, error-free CV. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-6-craziest-things-people-have-done-to-land-a-job?ref=seealso">The 6 Craziest Things People Have Done to Land a Job</a>).</p> <p>To make your resume really stand out from the competition, here are ten mistakes that will hurt your job search.</p> <h2>1. It Starts With a Career Objective Statement</h2> <p>Sometime back in high school, one of your instructors forced you to write a resume that included a career objective statement. Since habits die hard, you probably still include a career objective statement on your resume today.</p> <p>Career objective statements are dated and don't belong in the modern business world. Hiring managers recommend leaving objective statements off your resume because they're irrelevant for the initial screening process. It's all about what the company wants, not the other way around. If you make it past the screening process, then you will have a chance to talk about your objective(s).</p> <h2>2. It Features Quirky Job Titles</h2> <p>While TeaEO may have worked for the founder and CEO of Honest Tea, quirky job titles are often a bad idea.</p> <p>There are three reasons why quirky job titles do more harm than good on your resume.</p> <h3>Quirky Job Titles Lack Context</h3> <p>If you're a &quot;Marketing Ninja,&quot; what happens when you request or get a promotion? Do you become a &quot;Marketing Jōnin?&quot; Also, are you above a samurai? Did you report to a shogun?</p> <h3>Applicant Tracking Systems Search for Specific Keywords</h3> <p>Your &quot;Word Guru&quot; title will leave you out from an &quot;associate editor&quot; query.</p> <h3>Great Performances Trump Job Titles</h3> <p>Any customer would still prefer to be taken care of by an effective, yet boringly named &quot;customer service representative&quot; than by a happy but hopeless &quot;happiness advocate.&quot;</p> <h2>3. It Includes Too Much Work History</h2> <p>A recent study found that recruiters spend only six seconds reviewing a resume. This means that most of the time your resume should be no longer than a single page, especially if you're just starting your career. If you include pages and pages of work history, then you're more likely to go over the one-page limit.</p> <p>Unless it is 100% relevant, nobody wants to hear about your first job selling lemonade on your street or being a &quot;sandwich artist&quot; in college. Keep your job history relevant to the position that you're applying to.</p> <h2>4. It Has Big, Unexplained Gaps in Employment</h2> <p>If you experienced a layoff, decided to take a long leave to raise your children, or took a year off to travel around Latin America, you will have a big gap in employment. Life happens and recruiters are fine with that. What they're not okay with is that you leave them wondering about those gaps.</p> <p>Include a single line description, such as &quot;Family Care&quot; or &quot;Volunteer for Red Cross&quot; that helps your potential employer to review your job history, and then move on.</p> <h2>5. It Lacks Specifics</h2> <p>Focus on accomplishment, not job duties. Recruiters don't want to hear about menial tasks and duties. Anybody in that job would have done those. Instead, recruiters would like to read about what you got done.</p> <p>Here are three tips on how to provide specifics in your job history.</p> <h3>Avoid iPhrases</h3> <p>Resumes are never written in the first person. Use dynamic verbs instead.</p> <h3>Leverage Numbers to Provide Context</h3> <p>For example, &quot;Redesigned a trading platform used by 2,500 investment managers,&quot; or &quot;Launched a grassroots email marketing campaign that grew sales 25% to $500,000 the next quarter.&quot;</p> <h3>Provide Specific Dates</h3> <p>&quot;White lies&quot; about length of employment are still lies.</p> <h2>6. It Contains Misspellings and Grammar Mistakes</h2> <p>Misspellings and grammar mistakes are the easiest ways to get your resume ignored. Use your word processor's spell check, take advantage of online grammar checkers, and have at least two people proofread your resume before you deliver it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-grammar-mistakes-that-are-making-you-look-stupid?ref=seealso">12 Grammar Mistakes That Are Making You Look Stupid</a> and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-more-grammar-mistakes-that-are-making-you-look-stupid?ref=seealso">12 More Grammar Mistakes That Are Making You Look Stupid</a>)</p> <p>By taking the time to proofread your resume, you will stand apart from the <a href="http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?sd=9%2F11%2F2013&amp;id=pr780&amp;ed=12%2F31%2F2013">58% of resumes</a> that have typos.</p> <h2>7. It's in the Wrong Format</h2> <p>As many as 75% of qualified applicants are <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2014/03/18/how-to-get-your-resume-read-by-an-employer/">rejected by ATS programs</a> because they submitted resumes can't be read correctly, or at all. Avoid rejection with some simple steps.</p> <ul> <li>Use .doc or .txt format instead of .pdf or image formats.</li> <li>Avoid graphics and tables that may confuse an ATS.</li> <li>List the name of your employer, then the dates of employment.</li> <li>Upload your resume, instead of typing it out, because ATS prefers the first.</li> <li>Include relevant keywords from the job posting contextually throughout your resume.</li> </ul> <h2>8. It Shares Confidential Information</h2> <p>This is a big no-no and is never okay By disclosing confidential details to a potential employer, you're telling them that they should never hire you, unless they want their own trade secrets revealed to their competitors.</p> <p>When in doubt about whether or not to include something in your resume, use the <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20140917045901-24454816-the-5-biggest-mistakes-i-see-on-resumes-and-how-to-correct-them">New York Times test</a>: if you wouldn't want to see it on the cover on the New York Times with your name attached, leave it off your resume.</p> <h2>9. It Promises &quot;References Upon Request&quot;</h2> <p>Don't waste space on your resume to state the obvious. Remember that you only have about a page worth of resume real estate to impress your potential employer.</p> <h2>10. It Ignores Specific Requests From the Posting</h2> <p>Consider these surprising statistics about recruitment:</p> <ul> <li>First applications are received 200 seconds after a job goes online; and</li> <li>An average of 250 resumes are received for each job position.</li> </ul> <p>To avoid drowning in a sea of resumes, on top of leveraging an ATS, recruiters include special requests on job postings. For example, an employer may ask you to <a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052748704684604575381010512997300">include a specific phrase </a>on your email subject line or cover letter.</p> <p>If you ignore specific requests from a job posting, you're never giving your resume a fighting chance.</p> <p><em>What are other resume mistakes that hurt any job searcher?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-13"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview">Using Times New Roman on Your Résumé Is Like Wearing Sweatpants to an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers">7 Job Search Stunts to Get You Noticed by Employers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview">What You Should Do If You&#039;re Stumped During an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-to-splurge-resume-writer">When to Splurge: Resume Writer</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building employment hiring job search resume Mon, 09 Mar 2015 09:00:10 +0000 Damian Davila 1325191 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Career Tactics That Are Actually Holding You Back http://www.wisebread.com/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/career_000026674434.jpg" alt="Coworkers using career tactics that are holding them back" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>What if all your efforts to become the shining star of your organization were having the opposite effect? Sometimes even our best-intentioned ploys to climb the ladder higher and faster can result in an unfortuitous fall down to the lower rungs. Just like over-exercising can harm your body rather than help it, there are repercussions to trying too hard to get ahead at work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today?ref=seealso">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a>)</p> <p>Sometimes our career advancement tactics may be causing you more harm than good.</p> <h2>1. Volunteering for Every Assignment</h2> <p>If you're volunteering for every assignment in hopes of projecting yourself as the tireless, tenacious worker you think your boss wants you to be, you're at risk of stretching yourself too thin. You're right, your boss probably <em>does</em> want a go-getter. But not a burnt out one.</p> <p>Research shows that we actually need rest to not only perform at our peak, but to perform well, period. A 2010 LexisNexis survey of 1,700 white collar workers from the U.S., China, South Africa, the U.K., and Australia revealed that employees spend more than half their workdays receiving and managing information. What's more, half of those surveyed workers confessed that they were <a href="http://www.lexisnexis.com/en-us/about-us/media/press-release.page?id=128751276114739">reaching a breaking point</a> after which they would not be able to accommodate the deluge of data. The takeaway is this: Man is not machine, and if you keep pushing yourself to act like the Energizer Bunny, it's only a matter of time before you crash and burn.</p> <h2>2. Personal Websites That Highlight Your Lack of Experience</h2> <p>If you've got it, flaunt it, as the saying goes. But when it comes to all things ranging from your physique to your personal website, it's best not to accentuate what you're lacking.</p> <p>Yes, a resume site can help advance your career by showcasing your skills and accomplishments. But it can also ward off potential job and networking opportunities if it merely serves as a cyber billboard promoting the fact that you haven't got much experience under your belt. So if you're having trouble compiling a list of your work-related talents, it's probably best to hold off on building that website and instead bide your time trying to gain more experience. Then, once you've got something to boast about, get back to creating that website and shout it from the virtual mountaintops.</p> <h2>3. Unabashedly Trying to Be the Best</h2> <p>In professional team sports like soccer and football, <a href="http://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/cbs-directory/sites/cbs-directory/files/publications/Too%20much%20talent%20PS.pdf">too many elite players</a> can hinder a&nbsp;team's overall performance, according to a recent study by researchers at Columbia University. The same is true in the workplace. When teams of any sort need to come together, the study authors concluded, a deluge of talent can tear them apart. Infighting over dominance is just one of many negative outcomes of what researchers dubbed the &quot;too-much-talent-effect.&quot; So if you're currently on a mission to assert yourself at the head of the office talent pool, it might be beneficial to take a step back, gain some perspective, and consider whether you'd be better off branding yourself instead as the all-star team player.</p> <h2>4. Branding Yourself as Someone You're Not</h2> <p>If you're lying, or even just slightly embellishing, to qualify yourself for a raise, promotion, or new gig, you're running the risk of setting yourself back five steps rather than one ahead. Whether it's saying you're an expert at using a computer program you're actually unfamiliar with or asserting that you speak fluent Spanish when you really don't, you're probably going to suffer some serious repercussions when it comes time to perform on those skills and you fall short. Half of all employers said they would automatically <a href="http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?sd=8%2F7%2F2014&amp;id=pr837&amp;ed=12%2F31%2F2014">dismiss a job candidate</a> if they caught a lie on his or her resume, according to a nationwide survey by CareerBuilder.</p> <h2>5. Over-Extending Yourself Financially</h2> <p>Maybe you broke your budget by self-funding a flight to Colorado for a meet-and-greet with company executives that very well may not hire you. Or you joined the ritzy golf club you can't really afford because your boss belongs there and you're hoping to get some more face time. Perhaps it was a new business suit you splurged on in hopes that it might improve the outcome of your annual performance evaluation meeting. If you're spending money you don't have on things that very well may do nothing to advance your career, stop. Long shots aimed at making gains in the office aren't worth the risk of financial ruin.</p> <p><em>What career tactics have you tried &mdash; only to have them backfire? Please warn others in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-14"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise">These 10 Words and Phrases Are Keeping You From Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it">6 Times a Higher Salary Isn&#039;t Worth It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers">7 Job Search Stunts to Get You Noticed by Employers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career growth promotion raise Tue, 03 Mar 2015 10:00:06 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1316589 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Ways to Improve Your Work Reputation http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-improve-your-work-reputation <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-ways-to-improve-your-work-reputation" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/young-businesspeople-team-office-Dollarphotoclub_78278791.jpg" alt="businesspeople office" title="businesspeople office" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Developing a strong work reputation is a bit like tending a garden: Your commitment to maintaining it over time is what yields the best results. If your work rep needs some fine-tuning, however, it's not too late to make a few improvements. Here's how. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-ways-to-suck-up-at-work-that-wont-make-you-feel-slimy?ref=seealso">15 Ways to Suck Up at Work That Won't Make You Feel Slimy</a>)</p> <h2>1. Prove Your Intent to Be Taken Seriously</h2> <p>If you've earned a not-so-flattering reputation around the office, it's time to do damage control. In other words, take Missy Elliot's advice: Flip it and reverse it.</p> <p>&quot;The best way to improve your work reputation is to prove your desired reputation with actions,&quot; advises Michelle Burke, marketing supervisor for WyckWyre Food Industry HR Systems. &quot;Are you looking to be reputable in project management or leadership? Take a project and over-deliver on all expectations to prove yourself. Have you been late a lot and want to change that view? Show up extra early continually to prove you are working on past mistakes.&quot;</p> <p>It's not easy to undo some of the more unsavory work blunders in your past, but it's also not impossible. Dedicate yourself to changing your actions and attitude, and others will start to see and respect your efforts.</p> <h2>2. Consistently Meet Your Deadlines</h2> <p>Just like Rodney Dangerfield, you'll get &quot;no respect&quot; if you're always missing deadlines &mdash; especially if it's because you tend to manage your time poorly. Get back on track and start turning things in on or before the due date, without exception.</p> <p>The quickest way to improve your reputation with your peers and supervisors alike is to execute successfully on the timeline you have laid out &mdash; and if you can't, to openly and proactively communicate the cause behind the delayed execution,&quot; says Kathryn Prusinski, VP of integration and development at Vision Alignment. &quot;Reputation in large part is based upon two things: One, your style &mdash; the way you approach your job, and two, whether or not you do what you say you will. Failing on the second half instantaneously impacts your credibility, regardless of how charming you may be in your approach.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Under Promise and Over Deliver</h2> <p>&quot;Man, when he say he be there; he be there.&quot; That's a quote from an old episode of Spencer for Hire, which means, in essence, keep your promises &mdash; no excuses.</p> <p>Words to live by according to Boston-based photographer Matt McKee.</p> <p>&quot;Under promise and over deliver by delivering the goods the day before you promised them, under budget, and better than they expected &mdash; because you set the expectations,&quot; he says. &quot;And always say thank you. It doesn't cost anything and makes everyone feel appreciated.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Keep Your Criticism to Yourself</h2> <p>It's easy to be a Negative Nancy (or Ned) when things don't go your way at work, but the office is the last place you want to let your salty attitude show.</p> <p>Money Crashers' David Bakke agrees.</p> <p>&quot;Save your complaints for when you get home &mdash; no one at work wants to hear them and you come off as a whiner,&quot; he says. &quot;Get all of your assignments completed without mistakes and on time. On that note, don't take on a new responsibility unless you're confident that you can deliver. Don't always be the first one to take credit on a job well done, even if it mostly came about because of your individual work. Be humble and mention anyone else who might have helped.&quot;</p> <h2>5. Invite Your Coworkers to Activities Outside of Work</h2> <p>This is one of my favorite suggestions on how to improve your reputation at work because it's totally how I roll.</p> <p>&quot;Someone can improve their reputation by being involved in activities outside of work and by letting your coworkers know about it,&quot; says Brian Vanderlip, director of compliance analysis at Zenith Education Group. &quot;Being part of a non-profit, starting a side business, or even having interesting hobbies can increase someone's work reputation by saying 'Here is something I'm passionate about, talk to me if you want to know more.' Not everyone can be an expert at something within their company; generally those individuals are already identified, but you can establish yourself as an expert on something outside of work.&quot;</p> <p>Yes, yes, and yes. I'm definitely that guy who will invite you to after-work activities so we can form a better work bond. Besides, if I'm spending most of my waking hours with my coworkers, shouldn't we know a little more about each other than what flavor coffee we like?</p> <h2>6. Engage in Active Listening</h2> <p>Guilty, party of one.</p> <p>I have quite a bad reputation about never remembering anyone's name the first time I meet them &mdash; usually because I just don't listen. It's in one in ear and out the other, and then I have to embarrass myself by asking a second time. Thus, active listening is as much a lesson for me as it may be for you. And Timothy J. Trudeau, active listening enthusiast and CEO of Syntax Creative, is about to school us.</p> <p>&quot;The most important thing someone can do for me is to make it clear to me that they understand (not necessarily agree) what I am saying,&quot; he says. &quot;Active listening &mdash; which is simply repeating back to the person what they said and how you understand it, as part of your answer &mdash; will either help the person you're talking with feel listened to (which is one of the best ways to build a relationship) or it will allow the person to try again, and differently, to help you understand what they're saying. This is important. Things don't get done, and people are not motivated when they don't feel heard or understood. When someone has a history of making you feel heard or listened to, that's the person you go to when you have a choice.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Be Firm But Kind</h2> <p>You want your coworkers or employees to respect you if you're in a position of responsibility, but that doesn't give you authority to be a jerk. Try to be firm but flexible, and always come from a positive and genuine place.</p> <p>&quot;Disciplined kindness requires a broad approach,&quot; says writer and editor Susan Froetschel. &quot;For example, don't brag about vacations or gifts or possessions when colleagues might be struggling or worried about losing their jobs. Listen to others and offer your best professional advice to keep them calm while supporting the overall organization. Do not gossip, and try to tamp down gossip by other employees by gently pointing out how observations might be unsubstantiated. Work hard, look for solutions, and be positive &mdash; because colleagues, competitors, or any of their acquaintances can someday be in a position to hire or extend special recognition.&quot;</p> <p>Words to live by.</p> <p><em>How do you brighten up your reputation at work?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-improve-your-work-reputation">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-15"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/need-a-job-try-searching-in-china">Need a Job? Try Searching in China</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-signs-that-youve-been-at-the-same-job-too-long">25 Signs That You&#039;ve Been at the Same Job Too Long</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career">Fired? Here&#039;s How to Keep It From Hurting Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-getting-what-you-want-at-work">What you need to know about getting what you want at work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-10-words-to-never-use-at-work">STOP: 10 Words to Never Use at Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building image reputation status work Mon, 02 Mar 2015 10:00:07 +0000 Mikey Rox 1315215 at http://www.wisebread.com