Career Building http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4814/all en-US 7 Careers That Pay Women More Than Men http://www.wisebread.com/7-careers-that-pay-women-more-than-men <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-careers-that-pay-women-more-than-men" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/chef_preparing_pastries_000020498947.jpg" alt="Female chef in career where she&#039;s earning just as much as men" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The good news is that as the <a href="http://www.bls.gov/spotlight/2011/women/pdf/women_bls_spotlight.pdf">gender pay gap</a> continues to narrow, women are out-earning men in new and surprising fields, helping reverse the stereotype of men as the breadwinners. Clearly, we've got a long way to go to achieve equality in the workplace. But we're making strides. Read on for our <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-high-paying-careers-with-low-educational-barriers">roundup of the careers</a> where women are bringing home the bacon. A few of them just might surprise you.</p> <h2>1. Construction Worker</h2> <p>Though they hold only about 3% of the jobs, female construction laborers, construction supervisors, and maintenance painters <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/jennagoudreau/2011/03/14/jobs-where-women-earn-more-than-men/">earn more money</a> than their male counterparts, according to a Forbes analysis of median weekly earnings for full-time workers.</p> <h2>2. Car and Airplane Mechanic</h2> <p>Forbes also found that female car and airplane mechanics earn slightly more than their male colleagues. Caren Goldberg, a management professor at American University, has an inkling as to why: &quot;Researchers have found that both sexes fare better when they are in the minority,&quot; she said. &quot;Women who choose male-dominated jobs are likely perceived as 'atypical' or less consistent with the stereotypes associated with women, which are also associated with lower-paying jobs.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Bartender Helper</h2> <p>There is perhaps no higher paid bartender than the attractive woman who treats her patrons like old friends. Female bartender helpers earn, on average, about $2,000 more per year than men who pour drinks and collect empty glasses. That works out to $40 a week in extra cash.</p> <h2>4. Teacher's Assistant</h2> <p>Women account for 92% of the nation's teacher assistants, earning a median salary of $474 a week, compared to men's $453. Teacher assistants work under a teacher's supervision to give students additional attention and instruction, a role that's projected to grow 9% &mdash; <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/teacher-assistants.htm">100,000 more jobs</a> &mdash; by 2022. If you like to travel or want to be home to raise the kids, the job comes with perks: About 4 in 10 teacher assistants work part time and get summers off.</p> <h2>5. Nutritionist</h2> <p>Women also earn more than men in higher paying jobs like nutritionists, as well as fields in the life, physical, and social sciences. The median pay for nutritionists of both genders is $55,240 per year &mdash; with women earning slightly more than men. Nutritionist jobs are in demand, with a faster than average, <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dietitians-and-nutritionists.htm">21% job growth rate</a> through 2022.</p> <h2>6. Baker</h2> <p>Baking also helps women bring home the bigger slice of bread. Female bakers earn 104% more than male bakers, taking home $18 more than men in median weekly earnings. Employment researcher Laurence Shatkin tells Forbes that baking is essentially a production job with odd hours, and women may have more flexibility to work higher-paying night or early-morning shifts.</p> <h2>7. Computer Programmer</h2> <p>Female computer programmers earn a median of $62,000 a year, and those in the top 10% of the field make a salary of $111,000. Other perks include standard 40-hour work weeks and often, the option of telecommuting. Another bonus: To start, computer programmers usually need <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-programmers.htm">no work experience</a> and no specialized certification beyond a bachelor's or associate's degree. That bodes well for women who want a well-paying career but don't want to shell out the money it takes to become a doctor or attorney.</p> <p><em>Do any of these careers interest you?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-careers-that-pay-women-more-than-men">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-facts-women-should-know-before-asking-for-a-raise">5 Essential Facts Women Should Know Before Asking for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building income jobs salary wage gap women workforce Wed, 01 Jul 2015 11:00:16 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1469519 at http://www.wisebread.com Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/crime_scene_tape_000032312458.jpg" alt="Crime scene cleaner and other trades that pay well" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>These days, the dream of owning a home with two dogs, a gaggle of kids, and a white picket fence will cost you something fierce. In most pockets of this country, the <a href="https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2014/demo/p60-249.pdf">median U.S. household income</a> of $52,000 simply won't cut it. But you needn't enroll in law or medical school to earn a fine living. In fact, there are several high-paying jobs floating under the radar that can help you earn a desirable salary &mdash; without all those lectures on ethics and anatomy. Read on for our roundup of the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-more-places-to-buy-sell-and-trade-books">top trades</a> that pay surprisingly well.</p> <h2>1. Elevator Repairer</h2> <p>The median pay for an <a href="http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes474021.htm">elevator repairer</a> in the U.S. is $78,620, and can be as high as $110,000 in places where the job is in demand such as New York, California, Illinois, Oregon, Maine, Massachusetts, and Hawaii. While only 27 people a year <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/US/woman-crushed-york-elevator-accident/story?id=15153573#.T5W5J-3U7zI">die in elevator crashes</a> &mdash; you have a better chance of getting struck by lightning &mdash; more than 10,000 people a year are injured in elevator malfunction incidents. When something goes wrong, an elevator repairer is one of the first people called on the scene for help. Even more common than injuries and deaths are cases of inconvenience: People get stuck inside elevators quite often, which is why this job is well-paid as well as important.</p> <h2>2. Geographer</h2> <p>The job of mapping the world may seem gone with the wind, but there are actually 1,700 modern-day Alexander von Humboldts in the U.S. who track human activity, chart demographic trends, study migration patterns, and, of course, sketch and edit maps of points of interest across our planet. If you're lucky enough to secure a geographer gig &mdash; they are few and far between &mdash; the rewards are handsome. In addition to enjoying a contemporary job rooted in the age of global exploration, you'll earn a <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/geographers.htm">median salary</a> of about $75,000. There's more good news: Geographer jobs have a rapid growth forecast rate of nearly 30%, which means new job opportunities are sprouting across the country.</p> <h2>3. Crab Fisherman</h2> <p>If you're looking to make fast cash, a crab fisherman's life may be for you. The dangerous work of collecting crabs from freezing, tumultuous waters is handsomely rewarded. Crab fisherman can earn $60,000 in just two to three months. If that kind of money seems worth the risk of taking on the most dangerous job in the nation, you may want to head to Alaska. Crab fishermen in the 49th state tend to be the highest earners. You do not need a high school degree for this craft, but strength and guts are all but required.</p> <h2>4. Crime Scene Cleaner</h2> <p>Crime doesn't pay. But crime cleanup certainly does. The job of <a href="http://everydaylife.globalpost.com/crime-scene-cleanup-job-duties-2469.html">cleaning up blood and shattered glass</a> and toxic hazards takes a strong stomach, but with a few years experience you can earn upwards of $80,000. It's also not a 9-to-5 gig; you need to be ready to jump into action at a moment's notice. But there are few other occupations that can give you the thrill of feeling like you're living in an episode of <em>CSI: Crime Scene Investigation</em>.</p> <h2>5. Landfill Gas Operator</h2> <p>Landfills contain tons of garbage that produce methane gas, a byproduct of the natural breakdown process. Landfill gas operators remove the gas, which can be dangerous if left unchecked. It's a stinky job &mdash; literally &mdash; but what doesn't stink is the take-home pay. You can <a href="http://www.insidejobs.com/careers/landfill-gas-collection-operator">earn as much as $148,000</a> by monitoring gas levels and diverting excess fumes that could become hazardous.</p> <p><em>Do you work in a high-paying trade? Tell us about it in the comments below!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-careers-that-pay-women-more-than-men">7 Careers That Pay Women More Than Men</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-facts-women-should-know-before-asking-for-a-raise">5 Essential Facts Women Should Know Before Asking for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building employment income labor pay salary trades Tue, 30 Jun 2015 09:00:15 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1469200 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Gadgets Every Work at Home Professional Needs http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/female_student_000056371408.jpg" alt="Woman using gadgets every work at home professional needs" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Desk jockeying from the comfort of your home? Make your home office way more awesome with these six gadgets. They can help increase your productivity, reduce boredom, and make <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-worst-work-from-home-jobs">working from home</a> much easier.</p> <h2>1. Multi Device Keyboard</h2> <p>Need to switch from iPad to laptop, and back again without fumbling for cables or constantly restarting the Bluetooth connection? This <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MUTWLW4/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00MUTWLW4&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=5CYHDAML4NWYGBQR">multi-device keyboard</a> makes it easy &mdash; as simple as turning a dial. It's wireless and completely mobile, making it easy to move around the house or pack on business trips.</p> <h2>2. Smart Light Bulb</h2> <p>I've been on spreadsheet grinds that go so long that when I look up, the sun's set and it's dark as a cave in my office. It's time to consider switching the home office lighting to the new <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00TJ4WMZE/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00TJ4WMZE&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=PXVTF3FRNDVCHGYE">GE Wink</a>, which can be controlled by both your home dimmer and from anywhere with a smartphone app. Try one in your office and one in the living room, so you can brighten, dim, or turn off the light without having to leave the desk.</p> <h2>3. Bluetooth Headphones or Speaker</h2> <p>My Bluetooth speaker has been a lifechanger. When playing back a video for work, I can actually hear it without tethering myself to the computer with corded headphones. If you want a big sound for less, try the <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00D6OHHEE/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00D6OHHEE&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=2VIIEZBOSHOE5DCW">Photive Bluetooth speaker</a>, which is by far the best value in the Bluetooth speaker market. It also holds a single charge for days.</p> <p>For those who like lush headphones, these <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MR8Z28S/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00MR8Z28S&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=IFTL42CB5APW6QWD">Jabra Bluetooth headphones</a> are awesome. They're comfortable, have well rounded sound, and work within a decent range. You can finally enjoy work tunes and grab something from the fridge at the same time!</p> <h2>4. USB Key</h2> <p>This really handy <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00A3U7IS4/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00A3U7IS4&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=QMPCHVGQGAS6MOVJ">USB stick by LaCie</a> fits onto your key ring, but it's also shaped and sized like a key! This makes it lightweight and less bulky than your current USB drive. You'll also find it very hard to fill because it holds a sizable 32GB of drive space, making this the perfect goto on-the-go USB solution.</p> <h2>5. Desk Elliptical</h2> <p>Everyone knows it now: Sitting is a disease. But even if you work from home, you probably also need to work at a desk. There are options such as the standing desk, or the treadmill desk. But, If you want to remain sitting most of the time yet keep your blood flowing (perhaps even burning some extra calories), try this <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00SIBYETQ/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00SIBYETQ&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=E2CQUHTE3LOAKWEC">under-desk elliptical</a>. It's compact, light, and easy to use. Plus, it's a great value compared to full-size home gym equipment.</p> <h2>6. Tylt Vu Charging Pad</h2> <p>This is really cool: An affordable and convenient <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DG8NUC8/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00DG8NUC8&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=YY3JNJKHK5OP4BYB">home charging pad</a> that's good for any smartphone. No more misplacing cords, then scrounging for them in a hurry when your phone is at 3% battery. It's also small enough to keep on your desk and take along on business trips.</p> <p><em>What are some other gadgets you can't work from home without?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amanda-meadows">Amanda Meadows</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-tools-for-telecommuting">5 Essential Tools for Telecommuting</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-convince-your-boss-to-let-you-work-from-home">How to Convince Your Boss to Let You Work from Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion">5 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Next Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-do-before-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">5 Things to Do Before Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Technology freelancing gadgets home office telecommute work work from home Mon, 29 Jun 2015 09:00:13 +0000 Amanda Meadows 1467957 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways You're Sabotaging Your Next Promotion http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_saying_no_000035683416.jpg" alt="Man sabotaging his next promotion" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There's no way to know when or if you'll be promoted at work. And as promotions happen to others, you might wonder why your boss never offers you the job. Sure, some employees are more qualified and a better fit for a position, but there's also a chance that you're sabotaging <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-times-youre-better-off-without-a-promotion">your next promotion</a> without realizing it. Give yourself a better shot at a cushier position by avoiding these five moves that sabotage your chances.</p> <h2>1. You're Constantly at War With Your Boss</h2> <p>Since you and your boss work closely together, it's safe to say that you won't see eye-to-eye on every single issue. Having a minor argument or disagreement with your employer doesn't necessarily signal the end of your career. Most employers are reasonable and forgiving, and able to look past small issues with no hard feelings. On the other hand, if you're always getting into battles with your boss, your attitude and behavior could hold you back.</p> <p>If there's an employee with the same qualities and skills as you, who is also able to work well with others, your employer may feel that they're a better candidate for the promotion. You have to learn how to pick your battles and realize your employer is not your equal. In other words, slow your roll, feisty, and good things may come.</p> <h2>2. You Have a Negative, Toxic Attitude</h2> <p>Not only can arguing or fighting with your boss sabotage a promotion, but being a negative person can have similar consequences. You might not back talk to your employer, but if you're known as the &quot;office complainer,&quot; or if you constantly voice how much you hate your assignments, don't expect any promotions to come your way. Even if you're only speaking out of frustration, too much negative talk can get back to your employer. He might conclude it's safer to promote someone who's happy on the job, since this person will likely stick around longer than you.</p> <h2>3. You're Too Emotional</h2> <p>Every job has good days and bad days, and sometimes you might have to hide in your office and have a good cry. Yeah, we've all been upset or overwhelmed by work at some point, but if you've had more bad days than good days, or if you have a reputation for being fragile or too sensitive, your boss might think you're unable to handle a promotion. This is especially true if the new job is demanding and stressful. He might feel the position is a better fit for someone with a thicker skin. Plus, if you're crying in your office, there's a high probability that you'll come off looking emotionally unstable. Grin and bear it as best you can, then eat your feelings when you get home (not really, but pizza and ice cream always make me feel better). If it's a chronic problem, it may be a new job that you need, not a promotion.</p> <h2>4. You Hide in the Background</h2> <p>When the time comes to promote within, employers look for employees with the best qualities, skills, and drive for the position. Unfortunately, if you're the type of person who likes to hide in the background, your boss might not recognize your desire to move up or see you as a go-getter. As a result, your name doesn't pop into mind when it's time to promote someone.</p> <p>If your future plans involve moving up the career ladder, you have to go the extra mile and take the initiative. This is how you get noticed by employers, especially when working for a large company. You might not advance if you do just enough to get by.</p> <p>Even if you're an introvert or a low-key person, you must be willing to step outside your comfort zone. For example, you can volunteer for projects, or accept assignments that give you the opportunity to use your leadership skills and show your boss what you're capable of. The rest of the office might think you're a suck-up, but will you care when you're getting paid the bigger bucks? One, there's nothing wrong with being dedicated and enthusiastic about your job, and two, I didn't think so.</p> <h2>5. You're Not Teachable</h2> <p>It doesn't matter how much you know or how well you do your job, there's always room for growth. Moving up in the company isn't just about having the necessary skills and experience &mdash; you also have to be teachable.</p> <p>If you're a know-it-all who doesn't listen to instructions or suggestions, your employer might feel you're not the right person for a particular position. Additionally, you might miss out on new opportunities if you don't keep your skills up-to-date. Moving up within an organization might require taking a course or a workshop and gaining an understanding of new software and technology. If you're not willing to continue your education, your employer will promote someone who is.</p> <p><em>Do you have other examples of how we might be sabotaging our chances for a promotion? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work">10 Times You Should Speak Up at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs">6 Gadgets Every Work at Home Professional Needs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Office promotions raises sabotaging work Mon, 22 Jun 2015 09:00:08 +0000 Mikey Rox 1462212 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_packing_000031078772.jpg" alt="Woman learning what to do on the first day of her new job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As Plato wrote in 380 B.C., &quot;The beginning is the most important part of the work.&quot; It's a truth that still stands today: How you begin a new job sets the tone for how the rest of your work days will go. If you make the right impression, you can achieve faster, stress less, and gain a general sense of respect from your brand new peers. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-things-successful-people-do-every-morning?ref=seealso">13 Things Successful People Do Every Morning</a>)</p> <p>Read on for our roundup of the top tips and tricks on starting a new gig off right.</p> <h2>1. Be Prompt</h2> <p>The fact that your employer wants you to arrive on time for work shouldn't shock you out of your seat. But considering nearly 20% of Americans are habitually late for work, it's worth rehashing: Supervisors perceive prompt workers to be more conscientious, responsible, and productive. If you're a few minutes early &mdash; even better. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-do-before-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">5 Things to Do Before Your First Day on a New Job</a>)</p> <h2>2. Shake Hands With Your New Colleagues &mdash; Every Last One of Them</h2> <p>New neuroscience research has confirmed the power of a handshake: Strangers who meet really do <a href="http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/jocn_a_00295?prevSearch=authorsfield%253A%2528Sung%252C%2BKeen%2529&amp;searchHistoryKey=&amp;#.VW1K_WRViko">form a better impression</a> of one another if they shake hands while greeting. &quot;Be aware of the power of a handshake,&quot; says Sanda Dolcos, postdoctoral research associate for the Beckman Institute Department of Psychology. &quot;We found that it not only increases the positive effect toward a favorable interaction, but it also diminishes the impact of a negative impression. Many of our social interactions may go wrong for a reason or another, and a simple handshake preceding them can give us a boost and attenuate the negative impact of possible misunderstandings.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Project High Energy</h2> <p>Allow yourself to exhibit your true zest for the work you're doing. The most successful employees have a real love for the work, so act like it! Not only that, but happy employees lead directly to better performance and higher profits. Bottom line: you'll fare well to show your enthusiasm.</p> <h2>4. Clear Your Desk of Clutter</h2> <p>If your new desk is housing old materials &mdash; outdated paperwork, that stack of memos from last week &mdash; throw it out. Studies show that a cluttered workspace actually hinders our ability to process information and concentrate. We aren't aware of it, but <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21228167">clutter competes for our attention</a> in much the same way as a whining child or a barking dog does.</p> <h2>5. Write Tomorrow's To-Do List</h2> <p>You'll save yourself time on morning number two if you scribble down the next day's to-dos before heading home on day one. That way when you arrive at your desk the next day, you'll have a list of tasks all ready to focus on. Experts say it's best when we begin the work day by&nbsp;<a href="http://hbr.org/tip/2012/12/19/create-rituals-to-get-more-done">crossing off tasks with a single focus</a> &mdash; something we can truly feel accomplished about. So take some time to identify what that task might be and put it at the top of your list.</p> <h2>6. Say Goodbye</h2> <p>&quot;We tend to think about the importance of checking in and saying good morning to kick off the day,&quot; international business speaker Michael Kerr told Forbes, &quot;but we forget that it can be just as important, and make us feel good as well, to say a friendly and proper goodbye to everyone rather than just silently drift off into the night. This is triply important if you are the supervisor.&quot;</p> <p><em>What do you do on your first day on the job?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-do-before-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">5 Things to Do Before Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion">5 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Next Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building employment first day hired new job Office working Tue, 16 Jun 2015 09:00:15 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1454553 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Things to Do Before Your First Day at a New Job http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-do-before-your-first-day-at-a-new-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-things-to-do-before-your-first-day-at-a-new-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_wearing_tie_000022506159.jpg" alt="Man doing things needed before first day at new job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Starting a new job can feel like the first day of school. Sure, you're excited for this new chapter in your career, but the thought of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/got-a-new-job-heres-your-financial-to-do-list">walking into a new job</a> with new faces and greater responsibilities might evoke fear and nervousness. Will you get along with your new coworkers? Will you be able to handle the job? Will your personality match the company's culture?</p> <p>Truth is, the first day (or week) at a new job can be physically and mentally exhausting, and you won't truly know what to expect until you sit down at your desk. Even so, there are things you can do to ensure your first day is as smooth as possible.</p> <h2>1. Plan Your Route a Couple Days Before</h2> <p>You might know the exact route to get to your new job, but given that traffic conditions can be unpredictable, especially during rush hour, it's important to plan your route perfectly.</p> <p>A couple of days before the start of your new job, do a test run of your commute to see how long it takes to get there. It's also a good idea to test your commute around the time you plan on leaving the house each day. This gives you a pretty accurate picture of traffic conditions at that time. Under normal conditions it might only take 10 minutes to get to your job, but during rush hour the commute might jump to 20 minutes.</p> <p>Since you don't want to be late on your first day, it doesn't hurt to have a backup route in the event of an accident or another delay. Also, you might have a friend on standby, just in case you experience car trouble the morning of your first day and you need a ride.</p> <h2>2. Know the Dress Code</h2> <p>The first day at a new job is nerve-racking enough, so you don't need any issues that can potentially add to your nervousness or make you feel uncomfortable. Knowing the company's dress code is another way to make sure everything goes smoothly on your first day.</p> <p>It can be awkward showing up in a three-piece suit while everyone else wears jeans, slacks, or a polo, and vice versa. You might be able to gauge the company's dress code during your interview, but you should always confirm this with your boss after receiving your start date.</p> <h2>3. Connect With New Coworkers on LinkedIn</h2> <p>Search for your company on LinkedIn and read the profiles of your new coworkers &mdash; and don't be afraid to connect with them. If you become familiar with their names, titles, and faces ahead of time, the first day at your new job might be less scary. It'll feel as if you already know them, and it may even reduce the amount of time it takes to learn everyone's name.</p> <h2>4. Practice Introducing Yourself</h2> <p>Some people are outgoing, talkative, and they can make friends anywhere. If this doesn't sound like you, you can practice introducing yourself and making small talk before the start of your new job.</p> <p>Depending on the size of the company, you might meet 10, 20, or 30 new people in the span of only a couple of hours. You'll likely cross paths with a coworker at the vending machine, in the elevator, and you might have lunch with coworkers on the first day. It'll be nice if you're able to say more than &quot;nice to meet you.&quot;</p> <p>Possible conversation starters might include, how long have you been with the company? What do you do here? These questions require more than a yes or no answer, and can hopefully facilitate a back-and-forth dialogue.</p> <h2>5. Know Which Documents to Bring With You</h2> <p>On the first day at a new job, you'll go through training, meet your coworkers, and you'll likely speak with human resources to fill out various employment forms. Make sure you bring the appropriate documents so you won't delay this process.</p> <p>For example, your employer will need to see and make a copy of your Social Security card and government-approved ID, such as a driver's license or passport. You should also bring your bank account information if you're planning to have earnings direct deposited into your account. You'll also complete IRS form W-4 when starting a new job, so think ahead and decide the amount of taxes you want the employer to withhold from your check.</p> <p><em>Are there other tips you'd like to suggest on what to do before the first day on the job? Let us know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-do-before-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/long-hours-and-other-employer-demands">Long Hours and Other Employer Demands</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs">6 Gadgets Every Work at Home Professional Needs</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building employment first day first impressions productivity work Mon, 15 Jun 2015 09:00:12 +0000 Mikey Rox 1452652 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/work_meeting_000049064816.jpg" alt="Coworkers using body language rules to succeed at work" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>No matter how hard you work to gain respect at your workplace, seriously unprofessional body language can send much of your hard work out the window. In fact, in face-to-face communication, research shows that your words account for only 7% percent of your interaction &mdash; 38% is in your tone of voice, and 55% is in your nonverbal cues, or body language.</p> <p>To help you succeed at work, we've compiled seven <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-body-language-mistakes-that-can-sabotage-any-social-interaction">body language rules</a> to keep in mind as you interact with coworkers, your boss, or external contacts.</p> <h2>1. Keep Your Facial Expressions in Check</h2> <p>Facial expressions speak louder than words. If you're engaged in a conversation but your facial expression is bored, angry, or confused, it's noticeable. Don't be rude &mdash; make sure your face is expressing a degree of professionalism. Don't be someone you're not, but make sure you understand the delicate balance between work and emotion.</p> <h2>2. Walk With Confidence</h2> <p>Pick up your feet when you walk. Don't shuffle or stomp. Make sure your shoes fit. One of my pet peeves is when coworkers wear shoes that are too high, don't fit, or just seem generally uncomfortable. Stand tall when you walk, with your hands at your side. If you are about to walk into a room with a lot of strangers or to give a speech, practice power posing in the bathroom or empty room.</p> <h2>3. Eye Contact is Key</h2> <p>Maintaining eye contact makes you trustworthy, likeable, and powerful. When you're in a conversation, be careful to also pay attention to what is being said. Don't stare &mdash; engage. Also, look from one eye to the other to keep from turning your eye contact into something creepy, and make sure to look back and forth slowly so the person you're talking to doesn't notice. Most importantly, look away occasionally or you'll make the other person feel uncomfortable.</p> <h2>4. Practice Your Handshake</h2> <p>For the majority of my adult life, my handshake has always been strong. It almost always results in a conversation about weak handshakes where hands go limp. Those can be embarrassing, so practice yours &mdash; it should be firm and steady. Handshakes should only last between two and five seconds, and don't forget to engage in eye contact. If you're meeting someone for the first time, be sure to repeat the name or use one of these <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tips-for-remembering-names">memory tricks</a> so you don't forget it.</p> <h2>5. Keep Good Posture</h2> <p>When you're in a meeting, pretend you're constantly in Pilates. Don't know what that means? It means to keep the crown of your head straight up and your shoulders squared. Slouching sends the wrong impression, and a lowered head gives the impression that you're not telling the truth or that you're ashamed. Keep your body upright to show you are listening and have confidence in the interaction..</p> <h2>6. Don't Cross Your Arms</h2> <p>Use open body language when you're engaging with someone professionally. Keep your body turned toward the person you're talking to and expose your torso. Crossing your arms shows weakness and nervousness. If you lack confidence in your body, don't let it show.You can use your hands to talk, but don't overdo it. This can be distracting and also show nervousness.</p> <h2>7. Quit Fidgeting!</h2> <p>I have very long hair, and I constantly touch it. (Why do I touch my hair so much? Honestly, it's because I'm always worried about how it looks.) I've been working on this slowly, but surely. Experts agree that playing with your hair, biting your nails, and playing with your jewelry shows you are embarrassed about your appearance or nervous about the interaction. So, stop! No one is going to notice your appearance unless you point it out through your nonverbals, so let it go.</p> <p><em>What other body language cues are essential to manage in the workplace? Tell us in the comments section below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jennifer-holder">Jennifer Holder</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion">5 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Next Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work">10 Times You Should Speak Up at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-warning-signs-that-it-is-not-the-job-for-you">6 Warning Signs that It Is Not the Job for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building body language coworkers jobs Office work Mon, 08 Jun 2015 09:00:16 +0000 Jennifer Holder 1445027 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Resume Rules You Should Be Breaking http://www.wisebread.com/4-resume-rules-you-should-be-breaking <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-resume-rules-you-should-be-breaking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_shaking_hands_000023014132.jpg" alt="Woman breaking common resume rules" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>America is back, baby!</p> <p>With more and more U.S. cities <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-american-cities-with-the-highest-minimum-wage">raising their minimum wages</a>, job applicants are more excited about their employment prospects. Some people are even looking at changing their careers to chase higher pay.</p> <p>But before you start working on your CV, you should freshen up your resume writing skills. With the <a href="http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm">unemployment rate still at 5.4%</a>, you're likely to face strong competition, so you need to do everything you can to stand out from the crowd. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=seealso">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a>)</p> <p>To prevent your resume from landing in the HR black hole, here are four resume rules that you should be breaking.</p> <h2>1. One-Page Resume</h2> <p>Just like the objective statement, the one-page resume rule is a habit that you picked up way back in high school. The idea behind the one-page resume is that hiring managers have very little time to review applications so you need to be as succinct as possible.</p> <p>However, forcing your resume into a single page ignores two key facts:</p> <ul> <li>The typical U.S. worker <a href="http://www.fastcompany.com/1802731/four-year-career">changes jobs every 4.4 years</a>. Assuming you land your first job at age 21, you would have switched jobs about five times by age 40.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>90% of companies use ATS programs as resume gatekeepers.</li> </ul> <p>If you have solid and relevant work experience for the position that you're applying for, feel free to showcase it using two pages. As long as you're telling a compelling story about your employment history, the extra page will be welcomed. And it will provide extra space to include keywords directly connected the job description, effectively increasing your chances of passing the ATS test.</p> <h2>2. No Contact With Hiring Managers</h2> <p>HR professionals often feel overwhelmed. For example, Starbucks attracted 7.6 million job applicants for about 65,000 job openings and Procter &amp; Gamble received close to one million applications for 2,000 job postings.</p> <p>In hopes of keeping their sanity, hiring managers set up as many hurdles and obstacles between them and applicants. The idea is that hopefully only the &quot;truly great candidates&quot; will be left once the application-process dust settles. The reality is that's very often not the case.</p> <p>To circumvent this &quot;resume black hole,&quot; former Fortune 500 Human Resources SVP and current HR consultant, Liz Ryan recommends to craft a <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20130725040624-52594-forget-the-cover-letter-send-a-pain-letter-instead">compelling pain letter</a> to start a conversation directly with your target hiring manager.</p> <p>Ryan breaks down the pain letter into four parts:</p> <ul> <ul> <li>One to two sentence hook congratulating the hiring manager on a personal work-related achievement. For example, &quot;I was lucky enough to catch the tail-end of your presentation last week at the Miami Retailers Association and I couldn't agree more about your observation that&hellip;&quot;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Discussion of a pain point that hiring manager is currently facing. For example, a payroll coordinator could be frustrated with improper tax deductions and reporting mistakes now that her department went from servicing 25 to 350 employees.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Your one to two sentence &quot;dragon-slaying story&quot; showing how you can alleviate that pain point. Ryan provides a specific example, &quot;When I ran the payroll system at Angry Chocolates, I kept the payroll accurate and in compliance and answered dozens of employee questions every day while we grew from 15 to 650 staff members.&quot; No jargon, no buzz words, just plain language showcasing results.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Short closing inviting hiring manager to set up a meeting time.</li> </ul> </ul> <p>Hiring managers welcome messages, as long as they're hyper-personalized. Remember the Google Job Experiment? Alec Brownstein created Google ads for top advertising creative directors, so that when they would google their own names, they would receive a message from Alec asking for a job interview. By reaching out directly to the hiring managers in a creative way, Alec impressed the ad execs and landed a job at Young and Rubicam. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-6-craziest-things-people-have-done-to-land-a-job?ref=seealso">The 6 Craziest Things People Have Done to Land a Job</a>)</p> <h2>3. List Unemployment Gaps</h2> <p>Unemployed job applicants seem to never get a break.</p> <ul> <li>A study of 4,800 fake resumes at random for 600 job openings showed that employers would rather call back someone with no relevant experience and a few months of unemployment than someone with more relevant experience and <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/04/15/companies-wont-even-look-at-resumes-of-the-long-term-unemployed/">unemployment longer than six months</a>.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Anecdotal accounts from <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/18/nyregion/for-many-being-out-of-work-is-chief-obstacle-to-finding-it.html?pagewanted=all">unemployed job applicants in New York</a> support these findings.</li> </ul> <p>Whether employers do this intentionally or unintentionally, the reality is that listing yourself as unemployed may do more harm than good on you resume. However, this doesn't mean that you should lie. Misrepresenting any information on your resume may bite you back and make you subject to immediate dismissal.</p> <p>Functional resumes aren't viable solutions, either. HR veterans see them as major red flags because resumes in that format often hide lack of experience and don't provide enough information to employers.</p> <p>Instead, a resume expert at Monster recommends that applicants <a href="http://career-advice.monster.com/resumes-cover-letters/resume-writing-tips/leverage-volunteer-work-on-resume/article.aspx">leverage volunteer work</a> on a resume. While you may not having gotten paid for making traditional and online media buys for your local Red Cross, or preparing taxes at Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program, you definitely gained and demonstrated expertise in skills that employers want. Even better, you may also have professional references ready for employers.</p> <p>During unemployment periods, sign up for meaningful volunteer or internship opportunities so that you can prevent the employers' bias towards unemployment. This is a helpful technique for recent grads to avoid the challenge of having no experience.</p> <h2>4. Relying on a Traditional Resume</h2> <p>As many as 58% of employers have caught a lie on a resume. That's why more and more companies are ditching the idea of the traditional resume altogether.</p> <ul> <li>A New York venture capital firm recruits investment analysts by asking applicants to include links to their web presences, such as Twitter account or Tumblr blog.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Instead of reading resumes, a bumper and marketing stickers company uses an online survey to help screen applicants.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>By reviewing <a href="http://mashable.com/2013/11/16/hired-without-a-resume/">code posted on GitHub</a>, a web-based repository for coders, an educational technology company looks for programming candidates that have completed public projects.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Teams of recruiters for a large online lender perform &quot;road rallies&quot; in which they scout for talent at carefully selected groups of shopping malls.</li> </ul> <p>It goes to show that some resume rules are meant to be broken. If you believe that the hiring practices of your industry are outdated, there may be a company in yours or in another industry that agrees with you. That may very well be the key to landing your dream job!</p> <p>After all, nobody wants to work with a company that is completely inflexible and that prefers to stick with outdated resume rules.</p> <p><em>What are some resume rules that you broke &mdash; and still got the job? </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-resume-rules-you-should-be-breaking">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-do-before-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">5 Things to Do Before Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building cover letters CVS employment job interviews resumes Tue, 02 Jun 2015 09:00:12 +0000 Damian Davila 1443454 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Essential Facts Women Should Know Before Asking for a Raise http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-facts-women-should-know-before-asking-for-a-raise <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-essential-facts-women-should-know-before-asking-for-a-raise" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/coworkers_shared_workspace_000064256655.jpg" alt="Woman learning what&#039;s needed before asking for a raise" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>American women earn 77 cents for every dollar earned by men. And one way to close that gender-gap is to ask.</p> <p>In more than a century since the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (when women earned 59 cents for every dollar earned by men), little progress has been made to enforce equal pay. Asking for timely pay raises is a step in the right direction. It's something women can do to spearhead change and eradicate income inequality.</p> <h2>1. Don't Wait for Annual Raises</h2> <p>Don't rely on an annual 5% to 10% pay raise. Annual pay raises are discretionary and may be based on your annual review, where HR evaluates your performance and contributions to the company. Depending on your company's review process, some of your achievements could get overlooked. Instead, go to your employer directly with a list of your accomplishments and ask for the salary you want.</p> <h2>2. Ask Because You Deserve it, Not Because You Need It</h2> <p>Understandably, there are times when we all need more money. But, what's going on in your personal life does not warrant asking for a pay increase. Only ask for raises based on value to the company, not personal need. This means that asking directly after you've made one or two significant contributions to the company is a good idea. Talk up your achievements and state your goals for the company in the future.</p> <h2>3. Know Your Worth</h2> <p>Take an assessment of your worth. Find out what others in your industry who have been on the job for as long as you have earn. Investigate some of their contributions. And what are some of the skill-sets they acquired along the way that your employer deems valuable? Do they go that extra step? If so, what are they doing?</p> <h2>4. Relax and Don't Become Emotional</h2> <p>Exude confidence. Go into the conversation with a clear and level head. Don't expect personal relationships to play a role in your employer's decision of whether you deserve a raise or not. It's strictly business and you should be too.</p> <h2>5. Be Prepared for &quot;No&quot;</h2> <p>Timing is a key consideration. If your company simply can't afford to boost your pay, you won't be getting a raise. Before you ask, be sure the company is reaching its performance goals (this information is often divulged during sales meetings or published as highlights in newsletters).</p> <p>If your proposed pay raise is still poorly received and you know you're worth it, be prepared to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/great-ways-to-improve-your-resume-today">give your resume a facelift</a>. It might be possible for you to exceed your salary expectation. Often small companies and start-ups will pay more to acquire and retain talented highly qualified individuals, but may offer less job security. So, look on the bright side. You can <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year">take your vacation days</a> and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers">start your job search</a>.</p> <p><em>Have you asked for a raise? How'd it go?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/qiana-chavaia">Qiana Chavaia</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-facts-women-should-know-before-asking-for-a-raise">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-careers-that-pay-women-more-than-men">7 Careers That Pay Women More Than Men</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion">5 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Next Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building employment raises salary women Fri, 29 May 2015 09:00:15 +0000 Qiana Chavaia 1433873 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Times When You Should Absolutely Quit http://www.wisebread.com/3-times-when-you-should-absolutely-quit <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-times-when-you-should-absolutely-quit" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_ripping_contract_000061725482.jpg" alt="Woman deciding to quite her job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Ask the average American about a time he or she quit something, and it's likely the answer will either be a dodge or some sort of self-deprecating joke. But as bad a reputation as quitting has, sometimes quitting while you're ahead (or before you get even further behind) can be the best, most intelligent, and bravest course of action.</p> <p>In fact, psychology professor Carsten Wrosch who has done research on the psychology of quitting has found that &quot;people who are better able to let go when they experience unattainable goals&hellip;experience less depressive symptoms, less negative affect over time&hellip;lower cortisol [the stress hormone] levels, and they have lower levels of systemic inflammation&hellip;and they develop fewer physical health problems over time.&quot;</p> <p>Whether you agonize over letting go of large or small goals, here are three times when it really does <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job">make sense for you to quit</a>:</p> <h2>You Are Worried About Your Sunk Costs</h2> <p>A sunk cost is the time, money, or resources that have already been spent, and cannot be recouped, on a particular project or goal. Sunk costs should have no bearing on whether or not you continue with a project, because the money has already been spent and cannot in any way affect the outcome.</p> <p>But something called the sunk-cost fallacy is a big reason why many people are unable to give up on a lost cause. According to Stephen J. Dubner, of Freakonomics fame, &quot;The <a href="http://freakonomics.com/2011/09/30/the-upside-of-quitting-full-transcript/">sunk-cost fallacy</a> is when you tell yourself that you can't quit because of all that time or money you spent. We shouldn't fall for this fallacy, but we do it all the time.&quot;</p> <p>For instance, a newly-minted doctor who realizes during his first year of residency that medicine is no longer the career he wants might stick with it anyway to keep from wasting all of that time he spent in school.</p> <p>What he fails to recognize is the fact that the time was &quot;wasted&quot; anyway, since he doesn't want to be a doctor. Becoming a doctor now would be wasting even more time because he'll be following a path he is not actually interested in.</p> <p>When you contemplate quitting, the only costs you should consider are <em>opportunity costs</em>. Those are the costs of continuing along your current path. For every dollar or hour or resource you spend in any endeavor, you have one less to spend elsewhere.</p> <p>Our hypothetical doctor should consider the opportunity cost of finishing his residency; he will have less time to do what he really loves to do. When he looks at the possibility of quitting in that way, it is clearer that becoming a doctor will cost him much more than just the time that has already been wasted.</p> <h2>Your Decision is Influenced by Others</h2> <p>When considering the opportunity costs of quitting, the waffling new doctor might worry that his parents will be disappointed in him for leaving the profession. That is certainly a valid concern and a real opportunity cost. But it is also making a decision based upon other people's opinions, rather than choosing what will make him happy. Unfortunately, many people give up their own happiness in order to avoid such social pressure.</p> <p>In particular, the social stigma of divorce can make unhappy couples decide to tough it out so they can claim they did not &quot;give up&quot; on the marriage. While divorce has a real opportunity cost in terms of others' disappointment and social stigma, that cost should not be weighted as heavily as the potential benefits and actual costs to the couple themselves.</p> <p>And the social pressure to persist can trickle down to much smaller decisions. For instance, I am an avid reader, but I tend to be commitment-phobic about starting to read something new &mdash; because I don't want to give up on a book halfway through. I feel an obligation to finish any book I start, but I honestly couldn't tell you why. I am not actually obligated to anyone to read a book from beginning to end. I would be happier and read more if I gave up this sense of obligation.</p> <h2>You're Not Enjoying Yourself</h2> <p>Whatever it is that you're considering quitting probably started off as enjoyable. Maybe you have been sending the novel you wrote to agents and publishers for years and have nothing but a stack of rejections to show for it. Now you dread sitting down to write and are almost afraid to check your mailbox. You're not having fun anymore.</p> <p>Often, what's going on here is <a href="http://moneyning.com/money-beliefs/how-loss-aversion-in-behavioral-economics-explains-your-irrational-money-choices/">loss aversion</a>. You have committed to the idea of becoming a published writer, and you're afraid that if you quit writing now you'll miss the big break that is just around the corner. After all, there are plenty of success stories of individuals who made it only after years and years and years of persistence.</p> <p>But if you have stopped enjoying the work, then you are committing yourself to persistence for its own sake, which is incredibly difficult to maintain. Letting go of the goal can help you be happier.</p> <h2>Quitting: The Path to Happiness (and Success)</h2> <p>Though it's unlikely that quitting will ever become socially acceptable, the fact of the matter is that becoming a strategic quitter can make your life better. Steve Levitt, the other half of the Freakonomics team, advocates learning to fail quickly. If you can quickly figure out which projects and goals are likely to fail, then you can strategically quit.</p> <p>That will help you to put your energy into the projects and goals that are most important and most likely to succeed.</p> <p><em>When was quitting the right choice for you? Tell us about it in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-times-when-you-should-absolutely-quit">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-10"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-three-f-rule-can-lead-you-to-happiness">The Three F Rule Can Lead You to Happiness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-easy-ways-to-make-someone-happy-today">25 Easy Ways to Make Someone Happy Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-key-to-happiness-a-case-study">The Key to Happiness: A Case Study</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-go-to-college-to-learn">Don&#039;t Go to College to Learn</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks Career Building happiness loss aversion quitting sunk costs Thu, 28 May 2015 17:00:06 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1432587 at http://www.wisebread.com Using Times New Roman on Your Résumé Is Like Wearing Sweatpants to an Interview http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_computer_resume_000050021680.jpg" alt="Woman using times new roman on her resume" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you opt for Times New Roman on your résumé, then you may as well show up to the interview in sweatpants. At least that is what some experts say. The classic font is said to be one to avoid these days, with modern ones like Helvetica and Proxima Nova edging out more antiquated styles. <a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-04-27/the-best-and-worst-fonts-to-use-on-your-r-sum-" target="_blank">Bloomsberg asked type experts</a> to weigh in on what job candidates should be using, and they had some pretty strong opinions on what works and, more importantly, what doesn't.</p> <p>RELATED: <a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Dos-Donts-Job-Interviews-34040192" target="_blank">16 Major Dos and Don'ts at a Job Interview</a></p> <h2>Do Use:</h2> <h3>Helvetica</h3> <p>There is a resounding vote from the experts for this one. &quot;Helvetica is beautiful,&quot; said Matt Luckhurst, who is the creative director at Collins in San Francisco. Brian Hoff, creative director of Brian Hoff Design, added that the font is &quot;so no-fuss, it doesn't really lean in one direction or another. It feels professional, lighthearted, honest.&quot;</p> <h3><strong>Proxima Nova</strong></h3> <p>&quot;I never met a client that didn't like that typeface,&quot; Hoff <a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-04-27/the-best-and-worst-fonts-to-use-on-your-r-sum-" target="_blank">told Bloomberg</a>. The font does not come free, but because of how positively it is viewed in the professional world, it may be worth the cost to upgrade to the typeface if you are applying to a job at a more formal company or for a higher-up position.</p> <p>RELATED: <a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Questions-Ask-After-Interview-37367865" target="_blank">Don't Leave the Interview Before Asking These Questions</a></p> <h3>Garamond</h3> <p>This font is easy to read, compact, and simple.</p> <h2>Avoid:</h2> <h3>Times New Roman</h3> <p>This may come as shock to all the traditionalists and postgrads out there, but the usage of Times New Roman has begun to be seen by some as lazy. &quot;It's telegraphing that you didn't put any thought into the typeface that you selected,&quot; Hoff said. &quot;It's like putting on sweatpants.&quot; Definitely not what you want your potential employer's first impression to be.</p> <p>RELATED: <a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Jobs-Shy-People-35315204#photo-35315204" target="_blank">9 Jobs For People Who Hate Small Talk</a></p> <h3>Zapfino</h3> <p>This should probably be obvious, but any font that resembles cursive should be avoided. They can be hard to read, overly fancy, and generally inappropriate for a professional setting.</p> <h3>Courier</h3> <p>&quot;You don't have a typewriter, so don't try to pretend that you have a typewriter,&quot; Luckhurst told Bloomberg. &quot;You have been using a computer to do a handwritten thing. You haven't used a computer properly, and you haven't handwritten properly.&quot; Pretty much sums it up, right?</p> <h3>Comic Sans</h3> <p>Is there ever a time and place for this font? Probably not. But it's most <em>definitely</em> one to avoid when writing up a résumé. It's unprofessional, whimsical, and will most likely be dismissed right off the bat by potential employers. Seriously, steer clear of this one pretty much always.</p> <p>RELATED: <a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Become-Morning-Person-26607205" target="_blank">7 Easy Ways to Become a Morning Person</a></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-blog-teaser"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> First impressions matter, especially on a resume. What does your choice of font say about you? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p style="text-align:center;"><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com" style="border:none;"><img alt="" src="/files/fruganomics/u921/POPSUGARrgb.jpg" style="height:95px; width:300px" /></a></p> <p><em>This is a guest contribution from our friends at </em><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/"><em>POPSUGAR Smart Living</em></a><em>. Check out more useful articles from this partner:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Dos-Donts-Job-Interviews-34040192" target="_blank">16 Major Dos and Don'ts at a Job Interview</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Questions-Ask-After-Interview-37367865" target="_blank">Don't Leave the Interview Before Asking These Questions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Jobs-Shy-People-35315204#photo-35315204" target="_blank">9 Jobs For People Who Hate Small Talk</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Become-Morning-Person-26607205" target="_blank">7 Easy Ways to Become a Morning Person</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/popsugar-smart-living">POPSUGAR Smart Living</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-11"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-essential-steps-to-take-before-a-job-interview">10 Essential Steps to Take Before a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-can-do-right-now-to-become-more-hirable">10 Things You Can Do Right Now to Become More Hirable</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-6-craziest-things-people-have-done-to-land-a-job">The 6 Craziest Things People Have Done to Land a Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview">What You Should Do If You&#039;re Stumped During an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers">7 Job Search Stunts to Get You Noticed by Employers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting Style interview job search resume Thu, 21 May 2015 09:00:07 +0000 POPSUGAR Smart Living 1415380 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Times You Should Speak Up at Work http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/unhappy_male_employee_000059722000.jpg" alt="Man at work deciding if he should speak up" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are times during anyone's career when it's preferable to stay quiet, and avoid confrontations or drama. And, there are other times when staying quiet may be the easy thing to do &mdash; but not the right thing. You may be put in a situation that requires you to speak up for the good of the company, yourself, or another employee. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-hacks-to-avoid-burnout-at-work">Your job</a> could be put in jeopardy by <em>not </em>speaking up. You could simply be doing yourself a disservice by not speaking your mind, and letting others know just how you feel. Here are 10 of those times. In these situations, speak up, and do it quickly.</p> <h2>1. Any Time You Are Being Harassed</h2> <p>Whether sexually, physically, racially, or emotionally, the workplace should be harassment-free. Most employers require you to take harassment training courses these days, and with good reason. Harassment is not only disruptive to the work environment, it can lead to deep psychological scarring, lawsuits, and in the worst cases, suicide. The moment you suspect anything has gone from playful banter to something much more serious, you must arrange a meeting with someone from your HR department. If you don't have one, then you need to talk to your supervisor, or someone else in a position of authority. The longer you leave it, the worse it will get.</p> <h2>2. When You Witness Harassment</h2> <p>Look out for fellow employees who may be too afraid to take action against harassment themselves. If you notice that someone is experiencing any kind of harassment that could be contributing to a hostile work environment, follow the procedures set in place by your HR department, or superiors. This is not just a &quot;nice&quot; thing to do &mdash; it's actually your responsibility to the people you work with. Again, this needs to be nipped in the bud quickly, before it gets out of hand and creates a very serious situation.</p> <h2>3. During Brainstorming Meetings</h2> <p>If you work in an environment that requires brainstorming sessions, be they about finances, advertising, engineering, or just the holiday party, you must not make the mistake of staying quiet in these meetings. Whether it's from shyness, self-doubt, or preferring to listen instead of contribute, your lack of involvement will only be viewed in a negative light. You will be seen as someone who doesn't contribute, has no ideas, or is apathetic to the task at hand. To combat this, speak up early; ideally within the first few minutes. This is a great way to make sure you break the silence, boost your confidence, and avoid searching your brain for an idea that is not already on the table.</p> <h2>4. When You Don't Understand the Assignment</h2> <p>There's a famous episode of Seinfeld (&quot;The Bottle Deposit&quot;) that involves George receiving a very important assignment from his boss, Mr. Wilhem. As George is getting briefed, Mr. Wilhelm enters the bathroom, and George stays outside. But when he eventually follows him in, Wilhelm has finishes the briefing and thinks George heard every word. The comedy comes from George trying to figure out what on earth Wilhelm wants, without asking him to repeat the instructions.</p> <p>Don't be like George. If you misunderstand any part of the brief, go back and ask questions; explicit questions. This is not the time to beat around the bush, and your boss will appreciate you making sure you are going in the right direction. Of course, there is one caveat; don't continue to ask the same questions over and over. Getting clarification is one thing, but if you have to be told something five times before it sinks in, you may not be in the right career.</p> <h2>5. If You're in Physical Pain</h2> <p>It doesn't matter if you do a desk job, or you're out doing hard labor. If you're in pain, you must speak up, and quickly. Experiencing pain on the job can severely impact your performance, and also make the cause of the pain even worse. If it's a migraine, take the day off if you have sick days. If you don't have sick days left, see if it is possible to work from home after the pain has eased a little. If you're experiencing physical pain, like a bad back or shoulder, explain it to your supervisor. It could be work-related, in which case the company may be obligated to help you eliminate the cause of the pain. These days, many office workers find it better to stand at their desks, and your employer could provide you with the appropriate desk and equipment.</p> <h2>6. When You Witness Something Illegal</h2> <p>Your company's code of conduct will likely cover compliance issues, and how to make sure you are not breaking any laws (even accidentally) while at work. If you should notice someone breaking these rules or laws, you need to speak up. Your employer should have a whistleblower policy to cover this, and you will be able to report the incident anonymously. If there is something systemic going on, like the Enron scandal, your quick action could save hundreds of jobs. If you believe you, yourself, may have inadvertently broken a law, you must also speak up. It is far better that it comes from you, than someone who notices your genuine mistake and reports it to your superiors.</p> <h2>7. As Soon as You Know Something is Wrong</h2> <p>Wrong? How? Well, it all depends on the kind of job you have. If you're in accounting and you notice a mistake in the numbers, don't wait until the financial report is at the printers. Say something when you first notice the mistake. If you're in advertising, don't stay quiet when something is clearly wrong with the ad (or bottle&hellip; as <a href="http://www.rawstory.com/2015/05/john-oliver-mocks-bud-lights-creepy-ad-campaign-if-a-nickel-could-urinate-it-would-taste-like-a-bud-light/">Bud Light found out recently</a> to much blowback). If you're in engineering, and see something that could cause major problems later on (such as <a href="http://www.mlive.com/auto/index.ssf/2015/05/approved_death_claims_related_19.html">GM's poorly-made ignition switch</a>), for goodness sake speak up. These mistakes can cost lives. Staying quiet because it's easier than causing a fuss is not good enough. Be brave, speak up, and do the right thing.</p> <h2>8. When Someone Takes Credit for Your Work</h2> <p>It happens a lot in businesses all over the world. You have a great idea, you say something to someone, and the next thing you know, they're claiming ownership. They get the pay raise, the new account, the promotion, the accolades, and you're left holding with a whole lot of bitterness. These &quot;leeches&quot; work everywhere, and are quite happy to take the credit and climb the ladder, be it in a Fortune 500 company, or the local bakery or autoshop.</p> <p><em>How </em>you speak up is important though. It can't come down to whining and complaining. Make sure you approach your supervisor, show them the work you had done beforehand (if you have it) and calmly discuss the fact that this was your idea. You may want to approach the person who stole the idea first; sometimes, they may be unaware of their mistake. In those rare cases, they may be quite happy to speak up on your behalf. Either way&hellip; take what's yours.</p> <h2>9. If Anything You Own Goes &quot;Missing&quot;</h2> <p>Make no mistake: there are sticky fingers in offices and businesses around the country. It can be as small as someone using the milk you brought in for their own cup of tea. Or, it can be more expensive items, including money, electronics, clothing, or even collectibles. When you start noticing that your things are going missing, report it immediately to HR or your superiors. It's important to at least get them alerted to the problem. It could be an internal person, someone from the cleaning staff, or anyone else trusted to walk around your business or office. HR can even install security cameras if it is serious enough.</p> <h2>10. When Rumors and Gossip Are Running Riot</h2> <p>You can't avoid water cooler chats and idle gossip in businesses. It happens in kitchens, bathrooms, conference rooms, and anywhere else people congregate to chat. However, when this gossip goes from a little harmless griping, to something much more toxic, you need to speak up. You can either put a stop to the chat instantly when you hear it (i.e. &quot;No, she didn't say that, and was never even in that meeting&quot;) or you can take your concerns to your superiors so that they can address the issues. Gossip can be very destructive, and needs to be stopped.</p> <p><em>When has speaking up at work made you most proud?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-12"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion">5 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Next Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs">6 Gadgets Every Work at Home Professional Needs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building harassment Office speaking up theft work Mon, 18 May 2015 17:00:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1421691 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Easy Ways to Improve Your Online Reputation http://www.wisebread.com/6-easy-ways-to-improve-your-online-reputation <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-easy-ways-to-improve-your-online-reputation" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/two_friends_computer_000062076912.jpg" alt="Two woman managing their online reputations" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Searching for another person's online profile is common practice these days. Employers routinely use search engines to screen potential candidates. We even Google ourselves. It's totally expected and normal!</p> <p>Knowing that bits and pieces of information about your identity are floating around cyberspace should compel you to ensure your online reputation is in tip-top shape. And it's easy with these <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-improve-your-work-reputation">reputation management</a> tools.</p> <h2>1. Get <em>YourName.com</em></h2> <p>The number one way to control your search results is by purchasing your own domain name. If you have a name that is unique (like mine), this will be cut and dry. For people with more common names, you'll have to be a bit more creative. If the name Kim Smith is taken, incorporate your professional title. For example, Kim Smith, MBA could try <a href="http://www.kimsmithmba.com" title="www.kimsmithmba.com">www.kimsmithmba.com</a>, or <a href="http://www.kimsmith-mba.com" title="www.kimsmith-mba.com">www.kimsmith-mba.com</a>.</p> <h2>2. Get on LinkedIn</h2> <p>Adding your profile to popular social media sites is a surefire way to ensure the real you (that you wish to portray) shows up at the top of search results. LinkedIn is the largest social networking platform, with over 347 million users, and has great SEO power.</p> <p>Creating a profile provides the unique advantage of getting your very own, customizable vanity URL. For example, if your name is Jane Smith, your personal LinkedIn page would look something like <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/en/janesmith" title="www.linkedin.com/en/janesmith">www.linkedin.com/en/janesmith</a>. Because the LinkedIn network spans more than 200 countries worldwide, the letters preceding your name will represent your country's code.</p> <h2>3. Get on Google+</h2> <p>If you don't already have a Google account, it's time you get one to start taking advantage of the super searchable features of <a href="https://plus.google.com/">Google+</a>. It allows you to &quot;share and [be] discover[ed], all across Google.&quot; In many ways, it combines the features of popular social media networks. Users can create circles, add updates, and share posts and photos similar to Twitter and Facebook. And when someone searches for your name, your Google+ profile will be one on the first results to appear in search.</p> <h2>4. Setup Google Alerts</h2> <p>The <a href="https://www.google.com/alerts">Google Alerts</a> tool allow you to monitor content on the web by inputting the search terms you want to track. Input your name to detect any new information that appears about you. You'll be notified via e-mail with a link to the source whenever something new is found. If you're unhappy about the content, you can use tools like the ones below to bury it in search rank.</p> <h2>5. Use Brand Yourself</h2> <p>With <a href="https://brandyourself.com/">Brand Yourself</a>, users can sign-up and personally manage their online profiles or receive the guided support of a reputation management expert. The free account has limited features that allow you to control your search results by &quot;boosting&quot; three URLs you want to appear at the top of search results. Paid accounts come with more boosts and additional features. You also get instructions on how to improve the rank of certain URLs, which you can apply to all of your reputation management efforts.</p> <h2>6. Use ReputationDefender</h2> <p><a href="http://www.reputationdefendertestimonials.com/images/en/logo_reputationDefender.png">ReputationDefender</a> is a company dedicated to helping its clients improve their online reputation. Though it's a paid service, it can help you remove or minimize unwanted search results and boost positive search items. If you have serious online reputation concerns, this may be one of your best bets.</p> <p><em>What online reputation management tools have you used, and why?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/qiana-chavaia">Qiana Chavaia</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-easy-ways-to-improve-your-online-reputation">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-13"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs">6 Gadgets Every Work at Home Professional Needs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-spot-a-social-media-snake-oil-salesperson">7 ways to spot a social media snake oil salesperson</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-web-presence-will-soon-be-more-valuable-than-your-credit-rating">Your Web Presence Will Soon Be More Valuable Than Your Credit Rating</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/apple-introduces-most-outrageous-rewards-program-in-history">Apple introduces most outrageous “rewards” program in history</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-silly-internet-mistakes-you-need-to-stop-making-today">10 Silly Internet Mistakes You Need to Stop Making Today</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Technology branding Google online reputation social media Thu, 14 May 2015 21:00:13 +0000 Qiana Chavaia 1420555 at http://www.wisebread.com Fired? Here's How to Keep It From Hurting Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/guy_fired_000052937386.jpg" alt="Guy got fired and doesn&#039;t want it hurting his career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Getting fired can destroy your self-confidence and devastate your personal finances, and that's just the start. Handled wrong, getting fired could have a long-lasting negative impact on your career, depending on the circumstances.</p> <p>But don't become discouraged, or think that no one will hire you. Keep your chin up, and check out these five ways to minimize damage to your career after getting fired.</p> <h2>1. Get Creative to Minimize Employment Gaps</h2> <p>It's vital to minimize gaps in your employment history. Even if you can't find a job right away, you might be able to volunteer with a local organization or offer your skills to companies on a freelance basis until real employment comes along. You don't need a lot of freelance clients &mdash; just enough to keep your skills sharp and show employers that you're active in your field.</p> <h2>2. Choose References Carefully</h2> <p>If you were laid off or downsized and left the company on good terms, getting a good reference from your old job likely won't be an issue. But if you were fired because of a bad attitude or poor work performance, your immediate supervisor might not put in a good word. However, if you had a great working relationship with another manager or a team leader, ask this person to provide a letter of recommendation or reference. With so much competition in the job market, the last thing you need is a bad reference slowing down your efforts.</p> <h2>3. Avoid the F-Word</h2> <p>Some people use the word &quot;fired&quot; regardless of the circumstances of their departure. Technically, &quot;getting fired&quot; can apply to any type of involuntary termination. But if you weren't let go because of poor work performance or because of anything you did wrong, avoid the F-word and use more accurate terminology, such as &quot;I was laid off,&quot; &quot;My position was eliminated,&quot; or &quot;The company downsized.&quot; These explanations sound better and might alleviate some of the stigma associated with being unemployed.</p> <h2>4. Be Honest</h2> <p>While it's understandable to downplay getting fired, it's important to be honest with the interviewer. Don't say you were laid off or downsized if you were unmistakably fired for misconduct or subpar work. The interviewer will mostly likely contact your previous employer, and if he learns that you lied or even slightly exaggerated the reasons for leaving the company, this can hurt your chances of getting the job. However, you don't necessarily have to go into extensive details. Keep your answer simple and short to avoid raising additional questions.</p> <h2>5. Exit Gracefully</h2> <p>The way you conduct yourself after getting fired can also affect how fast you're able to bounce back. If you make a scene by yelling, cursing, or acting unprofessionally in another manner, your employer will take note of this behavior. And when future employers call the company for a reference, your former employer may provide all the dirty details about your rude departure. If you exit gracefully and remain professional, this might persuade a former employer to provide a good reference, even though you weren't the right fit for the position.</p> <p><em>Have you ever been fired? Do you agree with these tips? Do you have any tips of your own to offer? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-14"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/great-ways-to-improve-your-resume-today">Great Ways to Improve Your Resume Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs">6 Gadgets Every Work at Home Professional Needs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-awesome-websites-to-help-you-get-a-job">25 Awesome Websites to Help You Get a Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting fired laid off resumes unemployed work Tue, 05 May 2015 09:00:25 +0000 Mikey Rox 1408957 at http://www.wisebread.com Working on the Road: A Book Review for Professional Nomads http://www.wisebread.com/working-on-the-road-a-book-review-for-professional-nomads <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/working-on-the-road-a-book-review-for-professional-nomads" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/noradunn.jpg" alt="Nora Dunn author of Working on the Road" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Nora Dunn's new <a href="http://unconventionalguides.com/cmd.php?af=1624698">Working on the Road</a> may not be the right choice for those looking for a vicarious thrill, fantasizing about a more free life. But for those looking for actionable information &mdash; who are ready to make the jump and are looking for practical tips for avoiding missteps as they change their lives &mdash; it's worth the read.</p> <p>And I should know: I took several different stabs at arranging my life to enable living as a digital nomad. (For more, see my <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/three-paths-to-being-a-digital-nomad">Three Paths to Being a Digital Nomad</a>, which ought to provide some context as a reviewer of this book. See also the disclaimer at the bottom.)</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://unconventionalguides.com/cmd.php?af=1624698"><img src="/files/fruganomics/u5171/GumroadCover_605x340.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></a></p> <h2>The Guide to Working on the Road</h2> <p>The book is very much aimed exactly where the title suggests &mdash; at someone working on the road, or planning to. If your plans are for merely <em>going</em> on the road or <em>living</em> on the road, there will still be useful material here for you, but you'll be wasting more than half the book.</p> <p>On the other hand, the book's focus on work is by no means limited to any stereotype of the sort of work that's typical for the digital nomad. No kind of work is excluded, meaning that this book would be ideal for anyone whose goal is to be productive on the road. For example, I think it would be excellent for someone preparing to take a sabbatical (a sabbatical in the traditional sense &mdash; taking six to 12 months away from a regular job in order to undertake a significant piece of research or complete a major project). It would also be excellent for someone who thinks getting away for a year would help them finish a novel.</p> <p>With working on the road being the focus, you won't be surprised to learn that's where the book starts &mdash; with a look at two big categories of working on the road: location-independent work, like freelancing or writing, and then work that needs to happen in a particular place, but where the places are accepting of people who come from afar and plan to move on, such as teaching English or working in the many branches of the hospitality industry.</p> <p>There are sections on brainstorming for the sorts of things that you might need to do, and on how you might quickly develop a few extra skills that would enable working on the road (either as a complement to the skills you have, or as a whole new thing). There's also a good section on the sort of abilities, work habits, and self-knowledge you need to have if you're going to be successful.</p> <h2>Cost of Living on the Road</h2> <p>One of the few bits of the book that I have a beef with &mdash; and only because it's a personal peeve of my own &mdash; is the section on the cost of living on the road. Nora points out that, &quot;Traveling full-time can actually cost far less than it does to live in one place.&quot;</p> <p>This is true in the strictly technical sense that you can always find a more expensive way of life than the one you want to call less expensive. (It's exactly the same, except we buy three times as many toothbrushes.) It's also true in the deeper sense, that almost anyone can live a lot more cheaply if they're prepared to dramatically change how they live, and the shift to living on the road is going to be the sort of dramatic change that enables all sorts of economies.</p> <p>I just always bristle at the implication that you couldn't just as easily &mdash; in fact, more easily &mdash; find all those economies without going on the road if you're prepared to make the same sort of dramatic change in the way you live. Let your lease run out, sell your car, donate all your stuff beyond what fits in a suitcase, and then rent a cheap room a few miles from your old neighborhood.</p> <p>There are other savings besides those that come from choosing to make a dramatic change toward a cheaper lifestyle. One big one that is often a source of savings for people going on the road is that if you travel to a place where people are poor, things are going to be cheap.</p> <p>However: I'd be willing to bet that there are places where people are poor very close to where you live now.</p> <p>Most of the other sources of cost savings for being on the road are very specific as to time or place. For example, favorable exchange rates can make particular places very cheap, if your income (from your work on the road, or your savings and investments) is in a strong currency but your expenses are in a weak one. There can be some large tax savings, but they are highly dependent on exactly where you live and exactly how you earn your money.</p> <p>Finally, there's the fact that being someplace that's really different provides novelty that can substitute for entertainments that you'd otherwise spend money on.</p> <p>I've written about all this before, in an article called <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/live-abroad-for-less-also-at-home">Live Abroad for Less (Also at Home)</a>. As I say, it's peeve of mine.</p> <p>But the fact that Nora manages to push this precise button of mine should not be held against the book, which actually has a great section on managing your expenses. It presents examples of several different households &mdash; single folks and families, people who travel a lot and those who have a home base for extended periods, all at a range of different income levels.</p> <h2>Work-Life Balance on the Road</h2> <p>The section on work-life balance while on the road is excellent. In fact, it takes exactly the tone I'd have liked to see Nora take for the section on how it can be cheaper to live on the road. Working on the road does not magically give you work-life balance. Whether you're on the road or not, work-life balance comes from the choices you make about what work you do and what you expect from yourself. Just like with living cheaper, choosing to work on the road is inevitably a dramatic change in your life, and making a dramatic change gives you space to choose a better work-life balance. But it still comes down to your choices.</p> <p>The stories Nora tells about her successes and failures along the way to work-life balance are instructive. She provides good tips on striving for a proper balance. (The tips are not much different than you'd come up with for someone who's not on the road, which is kind of my point, but they're good tips.)</p> <p>There's a section on dealing with the fact that you'd probably had great expectations for the magic improvement in work-life balance that was supposed to come from working on the road, and dealing with the disappointment you'll probably face. There are specific tips for people on the road with kids, covering things like education.</p> <p>There is some advice that's very specific to being on the road &mdash; for example, suggesting that housesitting can provide welcome relief for someone who's been staying in hotels or hostels or tents or RVs, and praising the advantages of slow travel.</p> <h2>Heading Out</h2> <p>There are two sections on things to do and how to do them, roughly divided into things to do when heading out and things to do <em>before</em> heading out.</p> <p>This one section alone may make the book worth buying, for a certain class of reader. If you know you want to hit the road, know what kind of work you're going to do, and know how to support yourself on the amount of money you're going to have available, there are still some practical issues to sort out, and this chapter provides a solid overview of a bunch of them:</p> <ul> <li>Dealing with official documents when you're halfway around the world from your file cabinet<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Deciding what kinds of insurance you need<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Managing your cash, and paying your bills when you don't have a local bank<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Managing your investments when you don't have a fixed address<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Figuring out visa rules as they apply to people who will be doing work of one sort or another</li> </ul> <p>The material is nicely organized with a good focus on the arrangements to be made before you head out.</p> <p>There's also a focus on things to do that will help enable a return to working at a fixed location, because you might want back into the world of working at a regular job for a regular paycheck. There are things you can do up front that will make this step easier, and this section mentions some. (I wrote an article with my own suggestions, aimed at people who were going to be working on the road for a specific length of time, who know they will want to option to return, called <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fund-your-own-sabbatical">Fund Your Own Sabbatical</a>.)</p> <p>And there's a good list of things that are easier to do while you still have a day job, such as applying for credit cards.</p> <h2>Tools</h2> <p>There are two sections on tools, divided between regular tools and business tools.</p> <p>The first is about the tools you'll want for everyday stuff (such as a phone) and for work stuff (such as a computer). It's about figuring out what you need, pros and cons of various choices, practicalities (like cables), and so on.</p> <p>This section covers things like:</p> <ul> <li>Backups for people working on the road</li> <li>Information security</li> <li>Getting paid on the road</li> </ul> <p>The second section covers the broad category of things that working on the road make less predictable, more necessary, or more expensive than they'd be for someone working in a fixed location &mdash; internet fees, hiring an accountant, shipping and receiving, etc.</p> <h2>Expanding the Package</h2> <p>The review above covers just the book. There are additional resources that can be purchased with it, including some special-topic articles on things like dealing with your stuff, paying your bills, working on the road with a family, and dealing with property. There are a couple of interviews by Nora (one of someone who built up and then sold a personal finance blog, one of parents working on the road with kids), provided in both MP3 and transcript form. That material is all good. Whether it's worth the extra cost depends on whether it addresses something you personally really need to know.</p> <p>This book is perfect for someone who has gone beyond the stage of just thinking that working on the road sounds cool, but who has not yet figured out any of the details &mdash; what they might do, how they might live, and where they should start.</p> <p><a href="http://unconventionalguides.com/cmd.php?af=1624698">Buy your copy of <em>Working on the Road</em> today!</a></p> <h2>Disclaimers</h2> <p>Nora Dunn is a fellow Wise Bread writer, and a friend of mine. The publisher provided a review copy of the book, and Wise Bread paid me to write this article (same as they pay for other articles I write). Wise Bread policy does not allow writers to benefit from affiliate links (any payment from the affiliate link will go to Wise Bread, not to me), and I have no other financial interest in the success of the book.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/working-on-the-road-a-book-review-for-professional-nomads">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-15"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-budget-for-summer-vacation">7 Easy Ways to Budget for Summer Vacation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-travel-full-time-for-17000-a-year-or-less">How to Travel Full-Time for $17,000 a Year (or Less!)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-ways-to-save-money-by-tracking-your-receipts">6 Simple Ways to Save Money by Tracking Your Receipts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-forget-to-budget-for-these-unexpected-moving-expenses">Don&#039;t Forget to Budget for These Unexpected Moving Expenses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-business-travel-helps-your-wallet">11 Ways Business Travel Helps Your Wallet</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Career Building Travel book review expenses lifestyle nora dunn working on the road Fri, 01 May 2015 17:00:25 +0000 Philip Brewer 1408868 at http://www.wisebread.com