Career Building http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4814/all en-US Here's What to Do if You Don't Make Enough Money at Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-to-do-if-you-dont-make-enough-money-at-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/heres-what-to-do-if-you-dont-make-enough-money-at-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/stressed_tax_kid.jpg" alt="Stressed Tax Kid" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do you believe you are underpaid? Are you fed up with not earning enough? Or, is your lack of income creating financial difficulty for you and your family?</p> <p>Going to work every day and being paid less than you are worth can be emotionally and financially draining. Though you may not be able to secure the raise you think you deserve, you actually may have more control over your income than you think. Here are several things you can do if you don't make enough money at your job.</p> <h2>1. Create a list of achievements</h2> <p>Though you don't get the final say on whether you get a raise, you can take some actionable steps to bolster the process of raising your income. One way to prove to your boss that you should get a raise is to keep track of your accomplishments.</p> <p>If you don't already track your work achievements, now is the time to start. Look back on the past year or so. What stands out as impressive? Did you improve a process or system? Save the company money? Take on an additional project?</p> <p>Often, managers aren't aware of exactly how much value their employees are providing to the company. They may be impressed, or even surprised, to find out just how much you have accomplished for the company. By creating a list of achievements, you are one step closer to earning a raise.</p> <h2>2. Research salary data</h2> <p>What does someone with similar job responsibilities in your area earn? It's important to have access to up-to-date salary data when making your case for a raise.</p> <p>Every position has a going market rate. To avoid being unrealistic in what you're asking for salary-wise, do your research in advance by using websites such as Glassdoor and Payscale. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-underpaid-how-to-figure-out-what-salary-you-deserve?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Underpaid? How to Figure Out What Salary You Deserve</a>)</p> <h2>3. Take on additional work</h2> <p>Could your boss use help on some additional projects? Do you have the opportunity to earn overtime? Would taking on additional work help solidify your request for a raise?</p> <p>Volunteering for additional projects often shows how serious you are about your career and helping your company succeed. And by asking for extra work, you are likely to grow your skills by working on something that isn't a typical part of your job duties.</p> <h2>4. Talk to your boss</h2> <p>Talking to your boss about your salary can be intimidating. But it doesn't have to be.</p> <p>Depending on your relationship with your boss, you may already have great rapport. Most managers expect that their employees want to be paid more, so the conversation won't be as shocking to them as you may think.</p> <p>Simply ask your boss how you can work to increase your value to the company. Sometimes, just knowing that you are interested in taking on more responsibility is the boost you need to get the salary increase you desire. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-underpaid-how-to-figure-out-what-salary-you-deserve?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a>)</p> <h2>5. Create an additional income stream</h2> <p>Creating an additional income stream outside your regular job is a great way to increase your income relatively quickly. Plus, you can typically earn money while doing something you enjoy.</p> <p>Whether you choose to sell clothing, baby-sit, start a blog, do woodworking, or something else, there is no shortage of ways to earn money on the side. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-best-side-jobs-for-fast-cash?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">14 Best Side Jobs For Fast Cash</a>)</p> <h2>6. Slash your expenses</h2> <p>What's the quickest way to find more money in your budget? Slash your expenses.</p> <p>Take a look at your current monthly spending. What could you do without? Are there any expenses you could cut entirely? If you can't cut them out, are there at least expenses you can lower? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-spending-too-much-on-normal-expenses?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Spending Too Much on &quot;Normal&quot; Expenses?</a>)</p> <h2>7. Start searching for a new job</h2> <p>What do you do if your current company won't give you an increase in pay? It might be time to start searching for a new job.</p> <p>You owe it to yourself to earn what you think you are worth. Sure, there are things you may enjoy about your current employer. But if you're not earning enough to live comfortably, it's time to see what new and better opportunities could be waiting for you elsewhere.</p> <h2>8. Save all you can</h2> <p>If you are barely making enough money to cover your bills, you will need to budget very wisely and save whatever you are able to.</p> <p>Emergencies happen, and if you aren't earning enough income to comfortably make ends meet, it will be even harder to bounce back from an unexpected expense like a leaky roof or medical bill. Prepare yourself and protect your own finances by saving everything you can in an emergency fund. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-fast-ways-to-restock-an-emergency-fund-after-an-emergency?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Fast Ways to Restock an Emergency Fund After an Emergency</a>)</p> <h2>9. Network</h2> <p>You never know who could help you land your next gig. No matter where you are in your career, networking is key.</p> <p>Start by going to a few networking events in your area, or getting involved with a new organization. Don't forget to nurture your current network by keeping up with your peers and friends on social media and LinkedIn. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40</a>)</p> <h2>10. Ask for support</h2> <p>Emotional support is one of the best, but most underrated tools at your disposal. Without having someone to encourage and push you, your mental health could suffer.</p> <p>Talk to your family, friends, or partner about your finances, your goals, and your current position. Ask for their advice and let them know how they can help hold you accountable. Though it might not feel like it, everyone has gone through some financial stress in their life and can offer you some sort of emotional encouragement.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/rachel-slifka">Rachel Slifka</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-to-do-if-you-dont-make-enough-money-at-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise">These 10 Words and Phrases Are Keeping You From Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-sacrifices-that-will-supercharge-your-debt-payoff">8 Sacrifices That Will Supercharge Your Debt Payoff</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-reduce-debt-or-save-for-an-emergency">My 2016 Budget Challenge: Reduce Debt or Save for an Emergency?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building cutting costs earnings emergency funds employment extra income job search paycheck to paycheck raise salary saving money Wed, 21 Feb 2018 09:31:09 +0000 Rachel Slifka 2105359 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways to Bounce Back After a Work Mistake http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-bounce-back-after-a-work-mistake <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-to-bounce-back-after-a-work-mistake" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/a_suprised_man_with_hand_on_his_head.jpg" alt="A surprised man with hand on his head" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You messed up at work. We've all been there. Whether it was a small error or a huge mistake, the foremost thought in your mind is, &quot;What can I do to fix this?&quot;</p> <p>If it was a genuine mistake, you should be able to make it right. It will take some work, a little pride-swallowing, and time to help the wounds heal. But you can do it. Here's how.</p> <h2>1. Acknowledge your mistake</h2> <p>This is no time to play the blame game. You also cannot run and hide from the truth, or sweep your mistake under the rug and hope it won't get noticed. It will. If you wait until your mistake is discovered, it will be much harder to recover.</p> <p>Take, for example, the true story of John (not his real name), an account manager in a London advertising agency. After a horrendous call with the client, he slammed down the phone and started berating her to the entire department. How she was clueless, a result of nepotism, didn't know the product, and various other barbs. The thing is, John had slammed the phone but had not actually hung up. She heard everything.</p> <p>He had two options at this point; say nothing and lie about it to his boss if she reported the incident; or, go straight to the boss and admit the huge screw up. John did the latter. He was rightly screamed at; this was an important client. But, by telling the boss immediately, he gave him the chance to be proactive with the client, calling her immediately to explain that John had been under intense pressure, was taking a leave of absence to recuperate, and would not be on her account again. It worked. John kept his job and the agency kept the client. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Career Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up</a>)</p> <h2>2. Make a sincere apology</h2> <p>After fessing up to the mistake, the next step is to apologize to the right people for the error. Depending on the kind of company where you work and the management structure, you may be about to eat some hefty slices of humble pie.</p> <p>Your direct supervisor is the first on the list, and if you followed step one, the apology is a natural next step. Your supervisor will probably tell you just who to talk to next to make amends. If a customer was affected, you may have to reach out to them by phone or email and make a genuine apology. If other people at work were affected by your actions, they deserve an apology, too; especially if they had to work overtime to fix things, or their own job performance was impacted by what you did.</p> <p>Apologizing is certainly not easy; we all learned that in childhood. However, it's the adult thing to do, and can go a long way to making things right. But it must be completely sincere. Should any sarcasm creep in, or you look like you're making the statement at gunpoint, it can make matters worse.</p> <h2>3. Realize that very few excuses will do</h2> <p>Most of the time, a work mistake is just that. You messed up. You didn't check the right box, didn't see a glaring error, or did something that hurt the success of the company. Once you have admitted the mistake and apologized for it, don't be tempted to follow that with, &quot;However, in my defense &hellip;&quot; and an excuse.</p> <p>For example, you may have been working more hours than usual, but so have a lot of other people. Are they making mistakes, too? Maybe your new puppy is howling all night and you're not getting any sleep. Is this the company's issue? You may well be going through a tough time with your partner. Again, is your relationship the concern of the people paying your wages?</p> <p>The only good excuse is one that is impossible to fault you for: a sudden bereavement in the family; a major illness; an act of God. Other than that, keep the excuses for the schoolkids.</p> <h2>4. Do whatever you can to fix the mistake</h2> <p>You've admitted the mistake, you've apologized, and you haven't used an excuse. Now you have to clean up the mess you made. Hopefully, it's a small problem that can be resolved quickly and easily without the need for other members of staff to come to your aid. But if it's a bigger problem and you need help, don't be afraid to ask for it.</p> <p>Most people that you work with will understand the situation you're in, and if they were faced with the same issue, they'd want help from their co-workers, too. If it is going to require a lot of time and effort from these people, find a way to make it up to them. It could be as simple as bringing in breakfast one morning, or offering them any kind of favor in return.</p> <p>If the mistake became something newsworthy, address that as well. Talk to your boss about extending an interview to the newspapers and media outlets, explaining the mistake you made and absolving the company of any blame. It may require you to suck it up and look a little foolish for a while, but today's headlines are tomorrow's recycling. Whatever the mistake was, you need to make sure that the whole situation is resolved to the company's satisfaction, and that everyone is ready to move on.</p> <h2>5. Work diligently to ensure it never happens again</h2> <p>After the mistake has been rectified, the next step you must take is to identify why it happened, and take action to ensure it never happens again. Did you delegate a task to someone who was not ready for that kind of position or responsibility? Did you skip a step in the process that seemed pointless, but that proved to be essential? Was it an accident that could have been prevented if different safety measures had been implemented? Whatever the cause, it needs to be found, understood, and eliminated.</p> <p>You must also make sure the right people know about the changes you are making to stop the mistake from happening again. Run your plans by your superiors, and show them that you are being proactive in preventing this issue from ever arising again. They will appreciate your diligence, and it may also make them look at other possible issues within the company. In short, once you've got the horse back in the stable, you need to bolt that sucker tight.</p> <h2>6. Do not let one mistake change who you are</h2> <p>The dust has settled. Everything is back to normal. You're ready to get back to the daily routine &hellip; or are you? A significant mistake can have a lasting negative impact on your emotions, and you may have to work hard to overcome it.</p> <p>Remember: It was a mistake. It wasn't an act of malice, or something you did on purpose. Mistakes happen. If you are now terrified of making that mistake twice, you could become a much less effective employee. Do not let this one hiccup, even if it was a big one, get in the way of what you're capable of.</p> <p>Get back in the game and learn from that mistake without letting it bring you down. Even if it takes a visit or two to an occupational therapist, it's worth it.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-bounce-back-after-a-work-mistake">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-make-these-7-common-mistakes-when-choosing-a-career-path">Don&#039;t Make These 7 Common Mistakes When Choosing a Career Path</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/become-a-model-employee-with-this-10-point-work-etiquette-checklist">Become a Model Employee With This 10-Point Work Etiquette Checklist</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">8 Career Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview">10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building apologizing back on track humility missteps Mistakes oversight professionalism Mon, 19 Feb 2018 09:30:11 +0000 Paul Michael 2104964 at http://www.wisebread.com Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Work in Your Downtime http://www.wisebread.com/here-s-why-you-shouldn-t-work-in-your-downtime <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/here-s-why-you-shouldn-t-work-in-your-downtime" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/tired_woman_in_the_office.jpg" alt="Tired woman in the office" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Americans are known workaholics. We rarely bat an eye at working more than 40 hours per week, or skipping a few vacation days for the year, or answering emails from home on a Saturday.</p> <p>Working when we should be unwinding helps us get stuff done, right? Not really. In fact, while you might feel like you&rsquo;re &ldquo;getting ahead,&rdquo; you may actually be harming yourself, your company, and the U.S. economy. And when you think of it that way, it&rsquo;s pretty much your patriotic duty to close your laptop and turn on Stranger Things, stat.</p> <p>Here are the main reasons working during your off hours is bad for you.</p> <h2>1. It can ruin your career in the long run</h2> <p>Working more than 40 hours a week can lead to burnout, pushing you to leave your job sooner than you planned. A 2017 survey by Kronos Incorporated and Future Workplace showed that human resources professionals cited burnout &mdash; with after-hours work as one of the leading causes &mdash; as the top reason for employee turnover. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-signs-youre-burned-out-and-how-to-recover?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Signs You're Burned Out (and How to Recover)</a>)</p> <h2>2. It makes you less productive</h2> <p>Many studies have shown that overtime hours are less productive than regular hours. It&rsquo;s not a new idea; Henry Ford is reported to have cut his employees&rsquo; workweek down to 40 hours in order to maximize productivity. An analysis published by the International Game Developers Association posited that &ldquo;at approximately eight 60-hour weeks, the total work done is the same as what would have been done in eight 40-hour weeks.&rdquo; They would know; the video game industry is famous for subjecting workers to endless periods of crunchtime.</p> <p>But most of those studies analyze workers clocking time at the office or in a factory. Does productivity also benefit from putting away your work email and refusing work phone calls over the weekend? Yes, according to research by a Harvard professor working with Boston Consulting Group, who forced hard-driving consultants to take &ldquo;predictable time off&rdquo; even during busy times. At the end of multiple months-long experiments, the consultants reported that they had been able to deliver a better product to their clients with regularly enforced nights off from phone calls and emails.</p> <h2>3. It can break your heart &mdash; literally</h2> <p>A recent study published in European Heart Journal found that &ldquo;compared to people who worked a normal week of between 35 to 40 hours, those who worked 55 hours or more were approximately 40 percent more likely to develop atrial fibrillation during the following 10 years.&rdquo; Researchers adjusted for factors such as age, obesity, and smoking. Atrial fibrillation contributes to both stroke and heart failure.</p> <p>A Centers for Disease Control report linked working too many hours to other physical problems, such as unhealthy weight gain, increased alcohol use, increased smoking, and overall increased mortality. That&rsquo;s right: You can literally work yourself to death, with a relatively modest amount of extra hours.</p> <h2>4. And it can break your soul</h2> <p>A 2015 study of Korean workers linked working more than 52 hours per week with an increase in suicidal thoughts.</p> <p>And it&rsquo;s not just the number of hours worked that is burning people out: A 2016 study by Lehigh University revealed that employees who are expected to answer work emails after hours experience more &ldquo;emotional exhaustion&rdquo; &mdash; caused just as much by the anticipation that email could arrive at any time as by the actual time spent answering them.</p> <h2>5. It&rsquo;s lowering your IQ</h2> <p>Believe it or not, a 2016 Australian study found that, for people over 40, cognitive ability declines after just 25 hours of work a week. That means if you&rsquo;re putting in 40 hours in the office, and another two hours in the evening, your performance should start declining sometime around Wednesday.</p> <p>Even worse, putting in extra time may actually be shrinking your brain. If answering those late-night emails is stressing you out &mdash; and why wouldn&rsquo;t it? &mdash; that chronic stress can lead to a decrease in brain volume and cognitive impairment, Yale researchers have found.</p> <h2>6. It&rsquo;s ruining your family life</h2> <p>According to a 2015 work-life balance survey, more than half of 9-to-5 workers say that answering work emails and texts has ruined their familial meals. Nearly 40 percent say poor work-life balance is completely wrecking their time with family and friends. Another 40 percent of respondents claim they've missed life events such as weddings and birthdays due to work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-your-work-life-balance-is-off?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Signs Your Work-Life Balance Is Off</a>)</p> <h2>7. It&rsquo;s also also terrible for your company&rsquo;s bottom line</h2> <p>Most workers say they work during off hours because of company expectations &mdash; but those companies may be shooting themselves in the foot. Not only are they losing out due to decreasing productivity rates and increasing turnover, they&rsquo;re also costing themselves money. Think about all of the health issues mentioned earlier that can be brought on by stress. Companies that don&rsquo;t respect their employees&rsquo; work-life balance will end up paying for it with higher health insurance premiums and more employee absences.</p> <h2>8. You need your sleep</h2> <p>Business leaders surveyed by consultancy McKinsey reported that the expectation that they&rsquo;d always be available to answer emails and phone calls prevented them from getting adequate sleep. Sleep deprivation leads to almost every problem on this list, and what&rsquo;s more, it&rsquo;s dangerous at work: The National Sleep Foundation reports that sleepy workers are 70 percent more likely to be involved in an accident. A Swedish study even found that workers with sleep problems were twice as likely to die in workplace accidents.</p> <h2>9. It takes opportunity away from others</h2> <p>Helicopter parents deny their kids the chance to develop independence by being constantly available to help. Are you a helicopter boss or coworker? If you are completely unavailable while on vacation or a day off, the staff covering for you will have to make decisions without you, giving them the chance to grow. If you make yourself constantly available, you could be stunting that growth.</p> <h2>10. It makes you gain weight</h2> <p>Anyone who ever pulled an all-nighter in college knows that when we&rsquo;re sleep deprived, we make terrible food choices. There are scientific reasons for that, but for me, I just know that if I can&rsquo;t have my cozy bed, I deserve All. The. Chocolate.</p> <p>There&rsquo;s also the decrease in physical activity. If you&rsquo;ve been sitting at your desk for eight hours, plus an hour or more in your car to get to work and back, you should be using a good chunk of your remaining waking hours to be active. If you end up sitting in front of your home computer catching up on your team&rsquo;s Slack channel, you&rsquo;re missing out on active time.</p> <p>Working during your off hours also cuts into time for preparing healthy meals. And if you find yourself actually eating your dinner in front of your computer, so much the worse. Research shows that when we are distracted by a screen while we eat, we&rsquo;re more likely to snack later.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/here-s-why-you-shouldn-t-work-in-your-downtime">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-your-work-life-balance-is-off">9 Signs Your Work-Life Balance Is Off</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-healthy-habits-to-take-to-work">10 Healthy Habits to Take to Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-a-big-paycheck-is-not-worth-staying-in-a-job-you-hate">5 Reasons a Big Paycheck Is Not Worth Staying in a Job You Hate</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-workaholism-is-costing-you-money">6 Ways Workaholism Is Costing You Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stuck-at-the-airport-relax-with-these-14-easy-self-care-tricks">Stuck at the Airport? Relax With These 14 Easy Self-Care Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Health and Beauty burnout downtime health problems mental health overtime overworked productivity time off work life balance Mon, 12 Feb 2018 09:30:10 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2102252 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/it_is_settled_then.jpg" alt="It&#039;s settled then" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Congratulations: You have just been promoted to a management position. While you're figuring out your next steps, and how to spend that raise, take a few minutes to make sure you don't turn your first managerial position into your last. The job can be daunting, but by making the right moves early on, you can be a roaring success.</p> <h2>Spend more time listening than speaking</h2> <p>When you first enter your new role as a manager, you may be tempted to let your staff know as much as you can about yourself and your agenda. Don't go in that direction. Instead, focus on listening to people, and make sure you take it all in.</p> <p>Schedule one-on-one sessions with each of your direct reports. Ask what their pain points are. Identify the major positives and negatives that they encounter on a weekly basis, and ask them what ideas they have to deal with the biggest challenges they face. Chances are, they've had much longer to think about them, and provide a solution, than you've had.</p> <p>What's more, let your staff know that you are always ready to listen. This is not just a &quot;new boss&quot; thing, but the beginning of a relationship that will be beneficial for everyone. And when you start to act on the information you've been receiving, your staff will know that you really did listen. This will make you stand out as someone who follows through. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-skill-can-make-you-a-better-boss?ref=seealso" target="_blank">This One Skill Can Make You a Better Boss</a>)</p> <h2>Communicate your ground rules and management style early</h2> <p>Some managers are laid back. Others are methodical. Some managers like to keep things casual and conversational. Others go by the book and have strict rules. Whatever your management style may be, let your employees know.</p> <p>For example, a former manager may have been extremely strict, requiring reports at specific times throughout the week, and running meetings by the book. If you're more of an easygoing manager, tell the staff. It will make them feel at ease.</p> <p>On the other hand, a previous manager may have wanted the staff to challenge their authority, ask questions often, and work autonomously. If that's not your style, tell them as soon as possible. If they have been used to challenging directives, and that really bugs you, they'll be unknowingly ticking you off. But if you communicate your management style early on, they have no excuses later.</p> <h2>Do not be tempted to clean house</h2> <p>Whenever a new manager starts, there are fears of layoffs, and those fears are not without good reason. A lot of bad managers come into a new environment and want to surround themselves with people they know. They will quickly look into the possibility of getting rid of certain employees, and replacing them with their own hires. This happens a lot regardless of the industry you're in. Do not be one of those managers.</p> <p>Now, there may be issues with some people on the staff. Over the course of your first few months, you will figure that out. Hopefully you can correct those issues. If you can't, and those staff members are not performing as you'd like, or are disruptive to the department, talk to human resources about next steps. But make it fair, and make it known to your team that you did everything you could to turn the situation around for those employees.</p> <h2>Make positive changes as early as possible</h2> <p>They're often called &quot;easy wins&quot; or &quot;early wins,&quot; and they are action items that are easy to fix. If you have been promoted from within the department, you may already know what the issues are. They could be as simple as a broken microwave in the break room, or one of those daily meetings that lasts an hour and makes everyone miserable.</p> <p>Identify the low-hanging fruit and grab it quickly. By making these simple but much-appreciated fixes early on in your tenure, you will be seen as a go-getter and a problem solver. You've made an impact. Things are changing, and changing for the better. Morale will improve immediately, giving you time to tackle the bigger issues that will require significantly more work on your part.</p> <h2>Don't try and do everything yourself</h2> <p>You have just gone through a significant career shift. You're no longer a regular employee, you're a manager that has a staff of employees. It is now your job to spend time focusing on the bigger picture, and leave the smaller tasks to the professionals you manage. This can be very tough, especially if you were good at what you did and want to make sure it gets done your way.</p> <p>For example, let's say you're a graphic designer in an advertising agency, and have been promoted to creative director. As a graphic designer, you were very hands on. You sat in front of a computer and sketch pad, designing, editing, and producing work for clients. As the creative director, you must now step back. As tempting as it may be to move the designer out of the way and do it yourself, that's no longer your job. You need to provide feedback and let the staff figure it out. Hire smart people, then get out of their way.</p> <h2>Only make promises you can keep</h2> <p>You're new to the job. You're probably nervous, especially during your first few weeks. And on top of all that, you're going to hear about problems from the staff. Perhaps there's a particular project or process that everyone finds painful to work on. Maybe there's an issue with a supplier. There's also the eternal issue of pay raises, promotions, and benefits.</p> <p>Whatever you do, don't try and win a popularity contest by promising to fix all of the issues, or offer incredible incentives that you cannot actually provide. Sure, in the short term, it'll make you flavor of the month. Pay raises for everyone? No more weekends and late nights? Extra vacation days? Everyone will be over the moon. You may genuinely want to give the staff all of those awesome things. But what if you can't? What if you are making promises that your company cannot keep? What if those decisions are completely out of your control?</p> <p>The short term gain of happy staff will be trounced by the incredible disappointment, and distrust of you, in the long term. You can promise to look into those issues, but only offer solutions when you know 100 percent that you can follow through.</p> <h2>Remember: You're not supposed to know everything</h2> <p>As a manager, you have stepped into a leadership role, and that means you call more of the shots. However, just because you are now in a position of authority, it does not mean that you're the smartest person in the room. And if you openly admit this in a professional way, you will garner more respect than if you pretend to know about every aspect of the company.</p> <p>By all means tell the staff your strengths, but point out any knowledge gaps you have. If you are new to the company, or the department, it's only natural that you'll need to be brought up to speed on certain information. And even if you are promoted within the department, your new role comes with responsibilities you have never had before. If you want to hit the ground running, ask about the things you don't know about, and your team will be more than happy to assist you. If you're a good manager, they'll want you to succeed.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Be%2520Successful%2520as%2520a%2520First-Time%2520Manager%2520%25281%2529.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Be%20Successful%20as%20a%20First-Time%20Manager"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Be%20Successful%20as%20a%20First-Time%20Manager%20%281%29.jpg" alt="How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-skill-can-make-you-a-better-boss">This One Skill Can Make You a Better Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves">9 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Career Moves</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-your-boss-wishes-youd-tell-them">7 Things Your Boss Wishes You&#039;d Tell Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-free-ways-to-impress-your-boss">10 Free Ways to Impress Your Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-rookie-mistakes-new-bosses-make">15 Rookie Mistakes New Bosses Make</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building bosses climbing the ladder empathy employees leadership management managers morale promotions Wed, 31 Jan 2018 09:30:09 +0000 Paul Michael 2091002 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways Workaholism Is Costing You Money http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-workaholism-is-costing-you-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-workaholism-is-costing-you-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_feeling_tired.jpg" alt="Man feeling tired" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Putting in long hours on the job doesn't have to be a bad thing. If you truly love what you do for a living, working at it passionately can help advance your career, build an important business, help others succeed, and even make you happy.</p> <p>But there's a line every worker can cross when burning the midnight oil starts to wreak havoc on their finances. These are some of the ways working too much can be a problem for your money.</p> <h2>1. You probably overpay for last-minute meals</h2> <p>When you work nonstop, eating is often an afterthought &mdash; which is why you end up shelling out extra money for things that you don't have time to fix for yourself, like takeout food and drinks. These quick bites add up fast. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average American household spent $3,008 on restaurant and takeout meals in 2015. If you had more time in your schedule to pack a lunch from home, imagine how much money you could be keeping in your pocket. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stop-the-takeout-meal-cycle-and-save?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Stop the Takeout Meal Cycle and Save</a>)</p> <h2>2. Your medical costs can increase</h2> <p>Patients with one or more chronic conditions account for 86 percent of health care spending by American citizens, their insurance companies, and government programs. As of 2017, U.S. total annual health care costs topped $3.4 trillion.</p> <p>You're wondering what this has to do with you? Well, if you're putting in too many hours behind a desk, chances are you're also guilty of some seriously unhealthy habits: not sleeping enough, drinking too much coffee, eating irregularly, and not exercising, just to name a few. When these habits are compounded over time, it can set you up for any number of chronic health issues that aren't cheap to manage.</p> <p>From obesity, to diabetes, to heart disease, sacrificing your health for your job is almost guaranteed to empty your wallet. According to eHealthInsurance.com, in 2016 the average annual deductible for unsubsidized individual health insurance plans was $4,358, and the average deductible for family plans was $7,983. Once you've managed to develop a chronic condition, you're more likely to have to hit that deductible earlier in the year. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-a-massive-medical-bill?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Handle a Massive Medical Bill</a>)</p> <h2>3. Your family life can crumble</h2> <p>It seems obvious that people who work too much have less time to spend with their families. But if your job is ruining your marriage and affecting your relationship with your kids, I'll let you in on a secret &mdash; divorce isn't cheap.</p> <p>Don't believe me? Sure, it's possible to have an amicable, uncontested divorce where both parties agree on everything. But the average divorce in the United States costs between $15,000 and $20,000. Most divorce spending is attributed to attorney's fees, but you'll also encounter court fees, costs related to real estate divisions, education fees (parental education is required in some states), and costs of neutral evaluations.</p> <p>That's not even counting the additional cost of housing that you'll face once split, or child care. Child care can be a <em>significant </em>expense, although costs vary greatly depending on where you live.</p> <h2>4. You eat unreimbursed business costs</h2> <p>From travel expenses to at-home office costs, anything that isn't reimbursed by your employer, or written off on your taxes, is a loss.</p> <p>Did you upgrade to business-level internet services at home to ensure that you're never without high-speed connectivity? That's a business cost. Do you need an expensive mobile data and voice plan to keep pace with work demands? That's a loss unless your business is covering it. How much of your driving is related to business (outside of a regular daily commute)? Documents? Website costs? These expenses aren't cheap, and they add up quickly.</p> <h2>5. Your career may stall if you can't delegate (or finish anything)</h2> <p>What's the point of working your butt off if you aren't making any career advancement? Some people have a tendency to tackle all the work themselves, partly because they don't know how to say no, and partly because working is in some ways an addiction.</p> <p>The problems arise when you hope to climb the corporate ladder. A good manager knows how and when to delegate, how to support a team, and how much pressure is enough to get the best work from underlings. A manager who <em>can't </em>properly delegate tasks and manage time can alienate coworkers (who don't get a chance to pitch in on important projects) and people who report to them (who feel the need to suffer under mountains of work in order to keep up appearances).</p> <p>Even though it may seem like doing everything yourself is better for your career, it's often the opposite. If your insistence on being <em>The One</em> prevents you from getting promoted and moving into a higher-paying position, your tendencies to overwork are hurting your earning potential, not helping it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a>)</p> <h2>6. You have to outsource everything else</h2> <p>Delegating tasks at work is one thing &mdash; that's part of ensuring that all work is done on time and ensures even distribution of labor. But what about your unpaid work &mdash; the work of maintaining everything else around you? Are you paying someone else to:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Do your laundry?</p> </li> <li> <p>Clean your house?</p> </li> <li> <p>Mow your lawn?</p> </li> <li> <p>Care for your children?</p> </li> <li> <p>Vacuum your car?</p> </li> <li> <p>Run errands?</p> </li> </ul> <p>If so, this is costing you big-time. There are some home-related tasks that <em>should</em> be done by professionals (electrical work comes to mind), and if you really hate mowing the lawn or vacuuming, it's fine to pay someone else to do it if you can afford it. But if you're outsourcing every single task around the house because you're never home or free to do them yourself, you're throwing hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars away per year.</p> <h2>Evaluate your work-life balance</h2> <p>Every few months, take a good hard look at the hours you spend and whether you are devoting enough time to the nonwork parts of your life. There's no magic number that fits for everyone. You have to decide what works for you and your loved ones. But do check in regularly, to evaluate your goals and consider your priorities. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-your-work-life-balance-is-off?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Signs Your Work-Life Balance Is Off</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-ways-workaholism-is-costing-you-money&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Ways%2520Workaholism%2520Is%2520Costing%2520You%2520Money.jpg&amp;description=6%20Ways%20Workaholism%20Is%20Costing%20You%20Money"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Ways%20Workaholism%20Is%20Costing%20You%20Money.jpg" alt="6 Ways Workaholism Is Costing You Money" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-workaholism-is-costing-you-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-age-to-buy-long-term-care-insurance">The Best Age to Buy Long-Term Care Insurance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-complacency-is-keeps-you-from-financial-security">How Complacency Keeps You From Financial Security</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-new-reasons-you-need-an-emergency-fund">4 New Reasons You Need an Emergency Fund</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-money-is-harder-today">Why Saving Money Is Harder Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-why-financial-planning-isnt-just-for-the-wealthy">6 Reasons Why Financial Planning Isn&#039;t Just for the Wealthy</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Career Building business costs disease divorce expenses Fast Food health care overworked Takeout workaholic Thu, 25 Jan 2018 09:00:08 +0000 Andrea Karim 2090382 at http://www.wisebread.com Don't Make These 7 Common Mistakes When Choosing a Career Path http://www.wisebread.com/dont-make-these-7-common-mistakes-when-choosing-a-career-path <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dont-make-these-7-common-mistakes-when-choosing-a-career-path" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/confused_manager_in_cafe.jpg" alt="Confused manager in cafe" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Choosing a career is no easy task. Deciding what you want to do for the rest of your life is tough to say the least. What if you make the wrong choice? What if you choose something that makes you miserable, or leads to stress and money worries? What if something terrible happens to that industry?</p> <p>There are so many <em>what-ifs</em> when it comes to choosing a career. But if you avoid making these big mistakes, you should be in a good position to make a wise choice.</p> <h2>1. Ignoring signs of industry decline</h2> <p>Industries come and industries go. At one time, there was a thriving buggy whip industry, but it disappeared when the automobile became popular. Sign painters used to get plenty of business until machine-cut vinyl and large-scale printing replaced that industry. Very few career choices are bulletproof, and you need to look to the future to see if the industry you want to be in has a good chance of being around in 20 years' time.</p> <p>For example, mortgage brokering took a big hit during the Great Recession and the number of people working in that profession fell nearly 45 percent in the decade between 2007 and 2017. While the housing market bounced back after the subprime mortgage crisis, regulations have changed the industry for good and made it harder for mortgage brokers to earn the kind of money they used to make.</p> <p>Do some research. Look at industry trends. Is yours growing, staying steady, or in decline? An unwanted career switch could be in the cards in five to 10 years if you're not careful. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-escape-a-dying-industry?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Ways to Escape a Dying Industry</a>)</p> <h2>2. Choosing money before anything else</h2> <p>They say money can't buy happiness. Tell that to all the people struggling to pay bills and put food on the table. However, while money &mdash; and the security it brings &mdash; are major considerations for any career path, they shouldn't be the only aspect you focus on.</p> <p>Taking a job purely for the money sends you down a path that will almost certainly result in unhappiness. We spend the majority of our lives working, and if you are miserable for that amount of time, you will have wasted your life. Sure, you'll have a nice car, big house, and fancy clothes, but if you spend every day hating the job that provides those things, you won't get much enjoyment out of them.</p> <p>Strike a balance between decent pay and a fulfilling career. You may make a little less money, but you'll be better for it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Times a Higher Salary Isn't Worth It</a>)</p> <h2>3. Taking a job with limited prospects for growth</h2> <p>In most industries, there are ladders to climb. You start off on the bottom rung, you work hard, pay your dues, and climb to the top. Corporate America is a prime example of that, with people coming in as junior managers and rising all the way to senior vice president, or even CEO.</p> <p>However, that may not be the case for your industry, and you must be sure you're OK with that. Are you going to be content with a career that does not have those promotions and power shifts? Are you going to struggle to get pay raises in an industry with a flat career path? If you're driven and want rewards for your hard work, you should reconsider any industry that won't give you those opportunities. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-high-paying-jobs-that-didnt-exist-10-years-ago?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 High-Paying Jobs That Didn't Exist 10 Years Ago</a>)</p> <h2>4. Doing what your parents want you to do</h2> <p>There's a certain amount of pressure that comes from upholding the traditions of the &quot;family business.&quot; Your father was a mechanic, his father was a mechanic, your two brothers are mechanics &hellip; so you'll be a mechanic. From military careers and law, to plumbing and real estate, there are thousands, if not millions, of people who have simply followed in the footsteps of their parents. And a good portion regret it.</p> <p>Is that what you really want to do? Will it make you happy? Are you doing it just to make Mom and Dad happy? Remember, this is your life, and you only get one shot at it. Follow your passion.</p> <h2>5. Picking something at random</h2> <p>&quot;I don't know what to do, but this looks OK. I can always switch careers later.&quot; Does that sound familiar? Do you have friends or relatives who have said that, and now they're stuck in a career they cannot stand, but can't get out of?</p> <p>It happens a lot. People take a job because it's convenient, pays the bills, and gets them something to put on their resume. But then they get experience in that industry, which leads to a raise or promotion. They acquire more skills that are specific to that career path, excluding them from other industries.</p> <p>As time goes on, the range of careers that are viable becomes smaller and smaller, until it finally dawns on them: They're in this for life. Sometimes you have to take a job you know you're not passionate about for a while. But set a deadline for yourself, focus on deciding what you really want to do, and get out before that temporary job turns into a lifetime profession. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-its-never-too-late-for-a-career-change?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Reasons It's Never Too Late for a Career Change</a>)</p> <h2>6. Waiting for the &quot;perfect&quot; career</h2> <p>While you don't want to take a job for the wrong reasons, you also don't want to exclude yourself from good opportunities just because they're not quite perfect. There's a line in <em>National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation</em> about the chronically unemployed Cousin Eddie that always gets a laugh: &quot;Catherine says he's been holding out for a management position.&quot;</p> <p>It's obviously ridiculous, but for some people, it rings true. They do not want to jump into anything unless it is the absolute perfect fit for them. No compromise. No wiggle room. It either checks every single box, or it's not good enough.</p> <p>This thinking can lead to disappointment and frustration, and at some point, you may pass on a great career because it isn't 100 percent &quot;right.&quot; No career is. Those people earning millions a year on Wall Street have issues with their careers. Nothing is perfect. As long as there are way more positives than negatives, you're doing well.</p> <h2>7. Assuming you need a natural talent to enter a certain career</h2> <p>There are skills that people just seem to be born with: artists and designers, mathematicians, musicians, and so on. However, never forget the famous words of George McFly in <em>Back to the Future</em>: &quot;If you put your mind to it, you can accomplish anything.&quot;</p> <p>Do not close off certain fields because you don't know the first thing about them. Do they interest you? Does the idea of working in that profession make you feel excited? Well, find a way to make it happen. Take the classes. Put in the hard work. Give it everything you've got. Believe in yourself, and you will find that there is almost no career you cannot take on.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fdont-make-these-7-common-mistakes-when-choosing-a-career-path&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FDont%2520Make%2520These%25207%2520Common%2520Mistakes%2520When%2520Choosing%2520a%2520Career%2520Path.jpg&amp;description=Dont%20Make%20These%207%20Common%20Mistakes%20When%20Choosing%20a%20Career%20Path"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Dont%20Make%20These%207%20Common%20Mistakes%20When%20Choosing%20a%20Career%20Path.jpg" alt="Don't Make These 7 Common Mistakes When Choosing a Career Path" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-make-these-7-common-mistakes-when-choosing-a-career-path">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-bounce-back-after-a-work-mistake">6 Ways to Bounce Back After a Work Mistake</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-college-courses-that-will-boost-your-career">7 College Courses That Will Boost Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-restart-your-career-with-a-returnship">How to Restart Your Career With a Returnship</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">8 Career Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career path dying industries job hunting job skills Mistakes talent wrong moves Wed, 24 Jan 2018 09:30:05 +0000 Paul Michael 2090385 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Succeed When You're the Oldest Person at Work http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-succeed-when-youre-the-oldest-person-at-work <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-succeed-when-youre-the-oldest-person-at-work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/senior_adviser_talking_with_young_businesswoman.jpg" alt="Senior adviser talking with young businesswoman" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>&quot;How long has your show been on the radio?&quot; asked one of my much younger bosses recently. I wanted to answer: &quot;Longer than you've been alive.&quot; The flippant reply would have allowed us to pretend for a little while longer that I'm not old enough to have given birth to her without scandal, but it would not have helped build professional rapport. Instead I told her the truth: &quot;Twenty-nine years.&quot; Then I watched my Music Director's face while she made the mental calculation. &quot;Wow,&quot; she said. &quot;You look good.&quot;</p> <p>If you work long enough in any industry where technological change is a factor, you will eventually end up working for a boss that is younger, sometimes much younger, than you. While cross-generational friction is bound to happen, it's part of your job, older worker, to support your boss, regardless of their youth. But how do you set aside your ego and your age and focus on the work?</p> <h2>Don't conflate age and experience</h2> <p>Just because your boss is the age of your child doesn't mean that they don't have the right skill set to manage or mentor you.</p> <p>I learned how to edit film on a Moviola and manually sync footage with a block counter when I was 20 years old. The editors I assist nowadays didn't have to wait until film school to learn how to edit video. They started learning at least one professional editing program in middle school. While I have had to learn every new digital editing system on the fly, all of my younger bosses are expert digital editors because they spent four years in high school and another four years in college learning every nook and cranny of Avid and Premiere.</p> <p>They may be younger, but they have years of experience on me in terms of the technology. This is humbling. That said, my child overlords are constantly teaching me new shortcuts and hacks, which help keep my skills up to date.</p> <h2>Do your job</h2> <p>As a worker, your job is to meet company goals and deadlines. Your job doesn't change based on the age of your boss. In order to be an effective worker, you have to build a solid relationship with your boss whether they are young or old.</p> <p>Every boss is going to have shortcomings, blind spots, and eccentricities. Whatever the age difference, it will always be part of your job to find workarounds that will help both of you successfully drive business forward. Focus on your own productivity and build a relationship with your superiors based on your own success.</p> <h2>Ageism goes both ways</h2> <p>I am not going to pretend that ageism doesn't exist, especially for women. It's a real issue in every industry and it's sucky and wrong.</p> <p>That said, don't assume that your boss is going to be a bad manager just because they are younger than you. Judging your boss by their age and not their skill set is ageism, too.</p> <p>It is entirely possible that your whippersnapper manager is also uncomfortable with the age difference between you. Recognize that it might be hard for them to give orders to someone they might see as a respected elder.</p> <p>Instead of focusing on generational differences, focus on your similarities. Both you and your boss chose to work at the same company. Why? Finding that common ground can be the basis of a great working relationship.</p> <h2>Use your experience to manage up</h2> <p>Although it can be disconcerting to always be the oldest person at the office, know that your continued employment actually means that your employer values things like &quot;life experience&quot; and &quot;creative continuity,&quot; abilities that your younger bosses have yet to unlock. One of the best skills you can bring to the table is your experience.</p> <p>However, when your young boss is floundering, it isn't helpful to point out the problem. Not only are they profoundly aware of the issue, telling them something they already know can make you sound like a nagging parent, and not like a supportive problem solver.</p> <p>My work experience gives me credibility with my younger coworkers, but I know (from experience) that no one likes getting the &quot;back in my day&quot; lecture. When I am asked to impart wisdom, I always try to approach it from the angle of what I learned from previous experiences.</p> <p>I have found that it's always better to advise rather than give advice &hellip; to anyone seeking a solution. What is the difference? Advising is giving my boss the lowdown on how I successfully managed an aggressive blowhard director in the past, and asking her how she'd like to resolve the situation. Giving advice is telling her how to manage Mr. Blowhard.</p> <h2>Don't let assumptions be the ruin of you</h2> <p>If you are horrified to find yourself reporting to a younger manager, ask yourself why you think their authority isn't legitimate. Are they actually bad at their job or are you mad because you think seniority should count for more?</p> <p>Also, be honest: Would you be upset taking orders from a younger person outside of work? For example, if you were learning how to surf, would you question the ability of your 20-something surfing instructor?</p> <p>I have a distant relative who is trying to get back into the workforce after a few years of leave. She is having a hard time and has been turned down from tons of jobs &mdash; everything from nursing assistant at the local hospital to the Whole Foods deli counter. She rails about the ageism she feels. She is sure all these employers are looking only to hire young people who, in her words, &quot;Don't ask questions.&quot;</p> <p>Although ageism is totally a real and disgusting thing, I am 100 percent sure that the real reason she's not getting hired is because her Facebook page is public and full of racist memes. She's clueless about privacy settings and completely unaware that companies regularly Google search potential employees and monitor their workers' Instagram feeds. It doesn't matter how polished she appears in the interview; her online identity is a wreck of bigotry and bad spelling.</p> <p>If you are having problems with the<em> kids these days</em>, take steps to make sure the problem isn't you. If you can't play nice with an entire generation, it's probably a personal issue.</p> <h2>The work-life balance gets harder with age</h2> <p>I don't know a lot of old workaholics. When I was in my 20s, my equally young coworkers and I would extend our workdays beyond the office by going for drinks after work or even attending weekend parties together. The fact that my social life was embedded in my work life was a feature, not a bug of working in a creative, youth-driven industry. My job was a blast and my coworkers were some of my best friends.</p> <p>Flash forward 20 years. While I still think my job is a blast, I don't want to spend 24/7 at the office. I am married, my former coworkers are now old married friends, and I have a fully realized adult identity that is not 95 percent based on my job description.</p> <p>Still, after-work socializing is where a lot of networking is done, so I cannot forgo what I now perceive as extracurricular activity if I want to stay competitive. My friend cohort has aged, but my coworker cohort has not. If I decline too many social invitations outside of work, eventually my younger bosses will stop including me on projects at work because they don't want to have to repeat the brainstorming session they had with everyone else during happy hour.</p> <p>To ensure that I have enough facetime with my officemates, I actively make time in my schedule to interface with my youthful bosses in the form of a drinks date every Monday night. In addition to catching up on all the weekend party gossip, Monday night drinks give me the chance to casually ask questions about upcoming work. Most importantly, it gives me a measure of control over my post-work, work life.</p> <p>Although this is an effective scheduling workaround for me, this might not be a good time management solution for people who have to arrange for weekly child care around cocktails. Try to find a solution that works best for you and your schedule.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-succeed-when-youre-the-oldest-person-at-work&media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Succeed%2520When%2520Youre%2520the%2520Oldest%2520Person%2520at%2520Work.jpg&description=How%20to%20Succeed%20When%20Youre%20the%20Oldest%20Person%20at%20Work"></a><script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Succeed%20When%20Youre%20the%20Oldest%20Person%20at%20Work.jpg" alt="How to Succeed When You're the Oldest Person at Work" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/max-wong">Max Wong</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-succeed-when-youre-the-oldest-person-at-work">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree">5 Jobs That Pay Over $50K and Don&#039;t Require a Bachelor&#039;s Degree</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">8 Career Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-free-ways-to-impress-your-boss">10 Free Ways to Impress Your Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-your-boss-wishes-youd-tell-them">7 Things Your Boss Wishes You&#039;d Tell Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-pride-is-keeping-you-poor">7 Ways Pride Is Keeping You Poor</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building ageism coworkers ego experience older workers pride senior staff younger boss Fri, 19 Jan 2018 09:00:06 +0000 Max Wong 2086771 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Signs You're Making All the Right Career Moves http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/having_a_positive_attitude_is_rewarding_0.jpg" alt="Having a positive attitude is rewarding" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your career is important. It provides financial stability for you and your family, and in many ways, it can dictate your future &mdash; where you live, what you can afford, and the type of lifestyle you're able to lead.</p> <p>When there&rsquo;s a possibility for career advancement on the horizon, it&rsquo;s good to be able to spot it early. That way, you won't risk jumping ship too early or passing up on a great opportunity. If you see these signs at work, that's good news; you're making all the right career moves.</p> <h2>1. Getting a raise out of nowhere</h2> <p>If you are brought into a meeting with the boss (and possibly human resources) and told you&rsquo;re getting a raise, then congratulations &hellip; you&rsquo;re climbing the ladder to success.</p> <p>Raises without notice, separate from the annual 3 to 4 percent raise every employee gets, are a surefire indicator that the company is very happy with the work you&rsquo;ve been doing. So happy, in fact, that they value you enough to spend more money to keep you around. They may also add to the pot by giving you additional vacation days, sick days, and flexible hours. All of these rewards are designed to get you to stay put, be happy, and keep the company happy. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what?ref=seealso" target="_blank">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a>)</p> <h2>2. Being invited to more meetings featuring important people</h2> <p>Is your calendar getting fuller? Are you now in meetings with those &ldquo;higher-ups&rdquo; that you&rsquo;ve only heard mentioned in annual reports and water cooler talk? Well, get ready for the big time.</p> <p>When your boss decides that you should be put in front of people that make important decisions, she is doing so because you will make her look good. She wants to show you off and attach herself to someone who is clearly making all the right moves. This, of course, may bring additional pressure. You don&rsquo;t want to mess up in front of the executives, so take the time to prepare yourself, know your stuff, and be on your best behavior both in and out of important meetings.</p> <h2>3. You&rsquo;re put in charge of more high-profile projects</h2> <p>Being put on a key initiative the company is working on says a lot about your chances of a promotion. Every business, large or small, has that one major development or client; and they only put their top people on it. If you are asked to join the team of Project X, you know you&rsquo;ve just been given a great deal of credit. Most likely, how you perform on that project, under pressure, will determine the promotion and raise your boss is planning to give you. So, don&rsquo;t let him or her down.</p> <h2>4. You&rsquo;re invited to spend more free time with the boss</h2> <p>A boss usually works longer hours than the team, although there can be exceptions to that. However, if your boss is getting in early, leaving late, and still wants to spend some of his extracurricular time getting to know you, that&rsquo;s a good sign.</p> <p>For instance, being invited to lunch to discuss your role and your contributions to the team is great for you. If your boss asks you to play a round of golf over the weekend, that&rsquo;s another great sign that you&rsquo;re being considered for a bigger role. He is looking to get to know more about you than the day-to-day work stuff. How&rsquo;s your family life? Are you happy in your position? How do you treat people when you&rsquo;re out of the office? You&rsquo;re being eyed up for a promotion. Of course, if there is any hint of impropriety, and this feels like anything other than business, talk to HR immediately.</p> <h2>5. The boss wants to know about your goals within the company</h2> <p>One of those tricky interview questions we often get is, &ldquo;Where do you see yourself five years from now?&rdquo; That question takes on a different meaning once you&rsquo;re within the company.</p> <p>Now, it&rsquo;s not just about loyalty to the company, but your ambitions within it. Are you driven? Do you have your eye on a management position? Do you have plans that could increase the growth of the business? Are you a go-getter, or are you happy to coast? Chances are, if you respond with &ldquo;I&rsquo;ll be happy just doing what I&rsquo;m doing now,&rdquo; you&rsquo;ll throw a huge red flag up for the boss. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-you-might-be-sabotaging-your-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Ways You Might Be Sabotaging Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>6. You&rsquo;re going on more business trips and conferences</h2> <p>Here&rsquo;s a cold, hard fact: Businesses do not like to invest in people that are not important to them. Budgets for conferences and business trips are watched carefully, and a select few get to take advantage of these benefits. If you&rsquo;ve gone from sitting in an office all day to jet-setting and attending industry events, all on the company&rsquo;s dime, you&rsquo;re sending the right signals to management. They are investing in you, and they want you to stay.</p> <h2>7. Co-workers have nothing but praise for you</h2> <p>Are you suddenly the apple of everyone&rsquo;s eye? Are people actively coming to you just to tell you what a great job you did on that last big project, or asking you to help them on other projects? Do your co-workers, some of whom have been fairly cold or hands-off in the past, now want to hang out at lunch? Well, guess what? Someone, somewhere, knows that you&rsquo;re popular with the people that matter. They want to be associated with a winner.</p> <p>If people suddenly <em>stop</em> talking to you, and you cannot get anyone to return a call, that&rsquo;s a sure sign that the opposite is true &mdash; you&rsquo;re on the way out.</p> <h2>8. The boss is in line for a promotion</h2> <p>When your boss starts hinting that she is about to get a cushy new role within the company, don&rsquo;t panic. While it may seem like things are about to change, they could very well be changing for the better.</p> <p>Promotions have a knock-on effect, meaning that the boss&rsquo;s shoes will be filled by a direct report. If that&rsquo;s you, or you&rsquo;re one of the contenders, you are almost certainly in the running to fill that spot. All you have to do now is prove you can do the job. Volunteer for more tasks. Assume a mentoring role in meetings. Look the part, act the part, and chances are, you&rsquo;ll get the job.</p> <p>Even if you don&rsquo;t, your relationship with your boss could be an asset in the future. Perhaps there are other projects or roles she could refer you for, in which case her newly enhanced status makes you look even better.</p> <h2>9. Your annual appraisals are off the charts</h2> <p>If your company has a review or appraisal system in place, you can quickly see what your chances are of a promotion from the grades and comments you get. For example, if you&rsquo;re judged on a scale of one to five for specific skills, and you are hitting mostly fours and fives, you&rsquo;re excelling. This is used as a bargaining chip by your boss when it comes time to recommend departmental promotions.</p> <p>If you&rsquo;re hovering around the threes and fours, you&rsquo;re doing well, but are probably going to stay put for a while. That&rsquo;s OK too. At least you know what you need to work on. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-bring-up-with-your-boss-at-your-annual-review?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Things to Bring Up With Your Boss at Your Annual Review</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520Signs%2520Youre%2520Making%2520All%2520the%2520Right%2520Career%2520Moves.jpg&amp;description=9%20Signs%20Youre%20Making%20All%20the%20Right%20Career%20Moves"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20Signs%20Youre%20Making%20All%20the%20Right%20Career%20Moves.jpg" alt="9 Signs You're Making All the Right Career Moves" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-facts-women-should-know-before-asking-for-a-raise">5 Essential Facts Women Should Know Before Asking for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion">5 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Next Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters">The Ugly Truth of Workplace Success: Popularity Still Matters</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building climbing the ladder employment good signs management meetings promotions raises Thu, 18 Jan 2018 10:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 2087012 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Ways to Balance Work and Travel While On the Road http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-balance-work-and-travel-while-on-the-road <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-ways-to-balance-work-and-travel-while-on-the-road" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/young_woman_working_on_laptop.jpg" alt="Young woman working on laptop" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The concept of working from anywhere in the world, often referred to as digital nomadism, is on the rise. More staffers are looking to break free from the office cubicle, and more companies are opening up to the idea of employees working remotely. All you need is a laptop and Wi-Fi, and you can work from virtually anywhere in the world. Unfortunately, working while traveling can be more difficult than it seems.</p> <p>Unsuitable working environments, poor internet connections, and disorganization are the downfall of many a remote worker. If you're not careful, trying to balance work and travel while you're on the road can become an almighty juggling act resulting in you doing neither one effectively. But don't despair, it is possible to get the mix just right to allow you to be a productive worker and intrepid traveler at the same time. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-live-the-location-independent-lifestyle?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Live the &quot;Location Independent&quot; Lifestyle</a>)</p> <h2>1. Organize your day planner</h2> <p>Many people confuse having a to-do list with all of their daily tasks as having an organized day planner, but they're two separate things. A to-do list doesn't have time frames on it and it can end up being an overwhelming reminder of how much you have to do. An organized day planner will break your to-do list down into manageable chunks with set times in which to complete those tasks.</p> <p>Allocate each task a certain amount of time, and adjust if necessary. You can then also move these blocks around if something crops up that you don't want to miss. You can either manage your days with a handwritten planner or digitally using a task management app. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/organize-8-key-areas-of-your-life-with-these-17-smart-apps?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Organize 8 Key Areas of Your Life With These 17 Smart Apps</a>)</p> <h2>2. Establish a routine</h2> <p>Getting into a steady routine is helpful for any working environment, but it becomes crucial when you're traveling at the same time. It can be all too easy to head out and see the sights in the places you're visiting, only for work to fall by the wayside. By establishing routines, you automatically start to prioritize certain tasks and they become a normal part of your daily or weekly workflow.</p> <p>Your routine is a personal thing, but try and get into the practice of doing certain things at the same time on a regular basis so they become habits rather than chores. For example, I routinely check and reply to my emails when I get up in the morning, then I exercise, and then eat breakfast before starting my day.</p> <h2>3. Find the right accommodations</h2> <p>As appealing as a secluded beach hut on a deserted island may sound, if it has no Wi-Fi, or even electricity, it'll effectively ruin your ability to do any work. Also, accommodations with too many distractions like a buzzing bar and social pool area might be just as hard to work in, so settle for something that offers a quieter working environment. It should still be close enough to the local action that you're able to head out and explore when you want.</p> <p>In addition, a winning accommodation should have all of the conveniences that you need to feel at home and help you save time. That means a kitchen where you can prepare food if you want to, facilities to do your own laundry instead of having to find a laundromat, and above all, a speedy internet connection.</p> <p>If you want to avoid spinal injuries from working hunched over your computer on your bed all day, then you should also look for somewhere with a good workspace, preferably a desk. Airbnb is a great place to start your search for somewhere that meets your needs, because it mainly lists houses and apartments. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-vacation-rental-alternatives-to-airbnb?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Vacation Rental Alternatives to Airbnb</a>)</p> <h2>4. Plan ahead</h2> <p>I used to plan my time on a day-to-day basis around which tasks happened to be the most pressing. It didn't take me long to realize this is a chaotic way of doing things, and in fact, can't really be considered planning ahead at all. In my experience, the most effective way of working on the road is by organizing your day planner for a whole cycle. Most of my work is done on a monthly basis, so toward the end of each month, I plan out my working days for the entire following month.</p> <p>To do this, it's best to work backward, starting with all of the tasks that you have to complete for the month. Then around the larger tasks, you can start to fit in all of the smaller things you need to complete. Planning ahead for a whole month also means that you can accommodate any large events or travel activities you have planned and rearrange your work tasks before and after those activities. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-timing-is-everything-when-saving-money-on-travel?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Why Timing Is Everything When Saving Money on Travel</a>)</p> <h2>5. Use your travel time wisely</h2> <p>The time spent actually traveling from points A to B can often feel like dead time in your work schedule. Flights, train rides, bus transfers &mdash; whatever mode of transportation you take, that's time you could be spending doing something far more productive than just staring out the window. Unless the particular journey is something you want to experience, like a bus ride through a beautiful countryside, then it's time to start using your travel time to get some work done. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-get-free-or-almost-free-airline-tickets?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Ways to Get Free or Almost Free Airline Tickets</a>)</p> <p>Choose the tasks that you're going to be able to do most easily when you're in transit, ideally things you can do offline, so you're not relying on an internet connection that may not materialize. It takes practice to be able to work in less than ideal situations, so don't expect to immediately be at your most effective the first time you try it. However, once you get used to working with distractions around you, you'll find you can get things done virtually anywhere. <a href="http://amzn.to/2AXdjZp" target="_blank">Noise-cancelling earbuds</a> can be a big help.</p> <h2>6. Make the most of your technology</h2> <p>Technology undoubtedly has its dangers, and it's easy to fall into the trap of mindlessly scrolling through your Facebook feed and watching endless cat videos instead of knuckling down to work. But as much as it can be distracting, technology is also a powerful tool to harness for your own good.</p> <p>Upgrading your travel electronics can have a huge impact on your work efficiency. If your laptop and phone are constantly bogging down, then you're wasting time on them. You might be surprised just how much time you spend looking at that hour glass or color wheel while waiting for programs to load or perform a task. Once you make the necessary upgrades, you can cut down your work time considerably.</p> <p>Buying a local sim card can also give you both freedom and a reliable connection, and often packages are cheaper in foreign countries. This will allow you to tether your laptop from your smartphone, meaning you're not reliant on intermittent Wi-Fi or holing up in coffee shops for days on end.</p> <h2>7. Travel slowly</h2> <p>Slow travel is amazing in not just allowing you to spend more time exploring each destination, but you also spend less money on average while you're there. It's also ideal for balancing your work with travel because you don't have to rush around fitting a lot of things into a short span of time. You have enough time to focus on both your work and your travels so you don't have to sacrifice one to do the other.</p> <p>Setting yourself up in a destination for a good period of time, say a few weeks or months rather than a few days, allows you to establish routines. Being settled can provide you with the stability you need to get organized and stay focused. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/savor-your-trip-and-save-big-with-these-5-slow-travel-tips?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Savor Your Trip and Save Big With These 5 Slow Travel Tips</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-ways-to-balance-work-and-travel-while-on-the-road&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Ways%2520to%2520Balance%2520Work%2520and%2520Travel%2520While%2520On%2520the%2520Road.jpg&amp;description=7%20Ways%20to%20Balance%20Work%20and%20Travel%20While%20On%20the%20Road"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Ways%20to%20Balance%20Work%20and%20Travel%20While%20On%20the%20Road.jpg" alt="7 Ways to Balance Work and Travel While On the Road" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nick-wharton">Nick Wharton</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-balance-work-and-travel-while-on-the-road">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/working-on-the-road-a-book-review-for-professional-nomads">Working on the Road: A Book Review for Professional Nomads</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/here-s-why-you-shouldn-t-work-in-your-downtime">Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Work in Your Downtime</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-get-free-or-almost-free-airline-tickets">10 Ways to Get Free (or Almost Free) Airline Tickets</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-credit-cards-that-transfer-points-to-airline-miles">The Best Credit Cards that Transfer Points to Airline Miles</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-essentials-every-business-traveler-needs-to-pack">11 Essentials Every Business Traveler Needs to Pack</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Travel travel travel for work work and travel work life balance working on the road Thu, 11 Jan 2018 09:30:10 +0000 Nick Wharton 2077763 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Jobs That Pay Over $50K and Don't Require a Bachelor's Degree http://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_repairing_electrical_component_of_a_computer.jpg" alt="Woman repairing electrical component of a computer" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Growing up, you probably heard the same thing from parents, teachers, and friends: You need a four-year college degree to earn a good living. However, that's not always true. Although higher education can be valuable, the high cost of tuition makes going to college cost-prohibitive for many. Students increasingly rely on loans to pay for school and are saddled with crippling debt for years after graduating.</p> <p>Thankfully, you don't necessarily need a bachelor's degree to earn a comfortable salary. Several fields pay above-average wages while only requiring an associate degree or high school diploma. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the mean salary in the U.S. as of 2016 was $49,630. Each of the jobs on this list pays more than the national mean; in fact, you could earn nearly double that number. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-low-cost-alternatives-to-a-4-year-degree?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Low-Cost Alternatives to a 4-Year Degree</a>)</p> <h2>1. Electrician</h2> <p>The nation is currently facing a nationwide shortage of skilled workers, particularly electricians. Thousands of baby boomers, including skilled electricians, are retiring. At the same time, outdated, negative stereotypes about blue-collar jobs persist. The result is that fewer people are entering the field, leaving companies scrambling to hire what workers they can find.</p> <p>That demand can work in your favor. Electricians need a high school diploma, and you will have to complete either a trade program or an apprenticeship. However, because there is such a shortage of candidates, many companies are paying entry-level workers to receive their education and on-the-job training. As of 2016, the mean wage for electricians stood at $56,650.</p> <h2>2. Insurance sales agent</h2> <p>As an insurance sales agent, you'll contact potential customers and try to sell insurance policies. Depending on the agency you work for, you could be selling individual policies, such as car insurance or renters insurance, or you could sell policies that cover businesses.</p> <p>The mean annual wage for insurance sales agents in 2016 was $67,760. There is also the potential to earn bonuses and commissions, which can increase your income even more. Best of all, entry-level positions only require a high school diploma or its equivalent.</p> <h2>3. Web developers</h2> <p>Web developers create and design user-friendly websites. They handle the behind-the-scenes aspects of a site, such as coding, security, and speed.</p> <p>Although some developers have an associate degree, there are a growing number of coding boot camps that provide a cost-effective alternative. These tend to be accelerated, intensive programs that teach you how to code and get your first job within a few months, rather than years. It's a field where your talent and ability is far more important than your education. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-employers-care-about-more-than-your-degree?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Things Employers Care About More Than Your Degree</a>)</p> <p>The mean wage of web developers in 2016 was a whopping $72,150, with the potential to earn six-figures as your career progresses.</p> <h2>4. Dental hygienist</h2> <p>If looking into people's mouths doesn't gross you out, and you're willing to get an associate degree, a career in dental hygiene can be a lucrative option. Dental hygienists earned a mean wage of $73,440 in 2016, though some can earn salaries well into six figures.</p> <p>In your role, you'll clean patients' teeth and look for signs of oral diseases or dental issues. This position is in high demand. The Bureau of Labor Statistics expects the job outlook to grow by 20 percent &mdash; far more than the national average. That means it will be easier to find a job and maintain job security when you're out of school. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-great-jobs-for-the-next-10-years?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Great Jobs for the Next 10 Years</a>)</p> <h2>5. Elevator installer and repairer</h2> <p>Think of all of the buildings you see each day during your commute. Most of them have elevators, which means someone has to install, repair, and maintain those elevators. A career in elevator installation and repair can provide job stability, as the industry is expected to grow at a higher-than-average rate (12 percent).</p> <p>To enter the field, you only need a high school diploma or its equivalent, along with an apprenticeship. That's a very budget-friendly way to earn the highest mean salary on the list: $76,860 as of 2016.</p> <h3>Choosing an alternative career path</h3> <p>While pursuing a trade job is a nonconventional choice today, it can be a smart decision. With lower education costs and little to no student loan debt, you can begin working and building your financial future sooner.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Jobs%2520That%2520Pay%2520Over%2520%252450K%2520and%2520Don%2527t%2520Require%2520a%2520Bachelor%2527s%2520Degree.jpg&amp;description=5%20Jobs%20That%20Pay%20Over%20%2450K%20and%20Don't%20Require%20a%20Bachelor's%20Degree"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Jobs%20That%20Pay%20Over%20%2450K%20and%20Don%27t%20Require%20a%20Bachelor%27s%20Degree.jpg" alt="5 Jobs That Pay Over $50K and Don't Require a Bachelor's Degree" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kat-tretina">Kat Tretina</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-high-paying-jobs-for-introverts">The 10 Best High Paying Jobs for Introverts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-simple-negotiating-trick-puts-money-in-your-pocket">This Simple Negotiating Trick Puts Money in Your Pocket</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-myths-boomers-should-stop-believing">6 Job Myths Boomers Should Stop Believing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-succeed-when-youre-the-oldest-person-at-work">How to Succeed When You&#039;re the Oldest Person at Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting apprenticeships bachelor's degree experience high-paying jobs insurance job growth no degree salaries sales skilled labor web developers Tue, 09 Jan 2018 09:30:10 +0000 Kat Tretina 2083336 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways You Might Be Sabotaging Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-you-might-be-sabotaging-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-you-might-be-sabotaging-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/office_worker_filing_asleep_at_the_job.jpg" alt="Office Worker Filing Asleep at the Job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You've been fired &mdash; again. Are you starting to sense a pattern? The solution to any problem is to look at the root cause. While the job might simply not have been a good fit, people who have suffered a string of job terminations might want to consider that they may be a <em>small </em>part of the problem.</p> <p>No, I'm not saying you deserved to be fired &mdash; but you may be engaging in sloppy or naive behaviors that don't do you any favors in the workplace.</p> <p>Here are five bad behaviors that might be sabotaging your job.</p> <h2>1. Sharing your future career plans</h2> <p>Do you have grand plans to escape your current job? Do you plan to jump ship in two or three months?</p> <p>Stop and think before you mention it to any coworkers &mdash; including those you consider friends. Word gets around the office quickly, and sooner or later, the news will make its way to management.</p> <p>Next time the higher-ups need to lay someone off, individuals with one foot out the door might be the first to go. Even if you don't seriously plan to start sending out resumes tomorrow, your company won't be incentivized to keep someone around that they suspect is actively looking for another job.</p> <p>Can you afford to be pre-emptively fired? If you can't, wait until you actually have a new position lined up and intend to put in your two weeks' notice.</p> <h2>2. Engaging in gossip</h2> <p>Unfortunately, people can be pretty mean, and high school behaviors aren't always left in the past. Water cooler gossip runs rampant in many professional settings, but don't let that be an excuse to join in. As tempting as gossip can be, you need to steer far, far away from it.</p> <p>Unfounded rumors and gossip can hurt not only your coworkers, but come back to bite you as well. If you're constantly earning a reputation as a big mouth and a backstabber, none of your colleagues will want you around &mdash; and management probably won't, either. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Career Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up</a>)</p> <h2>3. Imitating your coworkers' bad habits</h2> <p>Your colleagues may have some bad habits. They might watch movies on their computer, or mess around on Twitter all day while on the job. Don't assume that because they're getting away with it, it's fine for you to do the same.</p> <p>There may be more to the story than you realize. Maybe management doesn't care if your coworkers are messing around on Twitter, because they do their job well and turn in assignments on time. Maybe office politics are at play. Maybe your office mates are just good at not getting caught. Regardless of their situation, if you're regularly following in their footsteps and slacking off, you could be putting your job at serious risk.</p> <h2>4. Inability to take criticism with grace</h2> <p>No one is immune to criticism, and at many jobs, you'll be subject to regular performance reviews. Savvy professionals should keep an open mind, make note of the manager's suggestions, and work to create an actionable plan to improve their performance.</p> <p>Workers should, in most cases, never:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Blame everyone else without looking at their own part in a problem.</p> </li> <li> <p>Verbally attack the manager.</p> </li> <li> <p>Deny knowing about an issue if the manager has brought it up a dozen times.</p> </li> <li> <p>Refuse to acknowledge a problem and discuss improvement.</p> </li> <li> <p>Act put-upon, as if expectations of doing an assigned task is a hardship, or;</p> </li> <li> <p>Try to shift the subject by bringing up coworkers' issues.</p> </li> </ul> <p>If you don't quite understand why the manager has an issue, you can initiate a respectful discussion. Just make sure that the manager understands the discussion is to help you grasp the problem, so a solution can be properly discussed.</p> <p>If you genuinely believe the change isn't needed, it might be better to concede for now. Do it the manager's way. You can fight the battle to change any inefficient norms later. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">Ace Your Next Performance Review With These 7 Tricks</a>)</p> <h2>5. Bad attitude</h2> <p>Yes, jobs can be soul-sucking grinds. Yes, the managers might be slimy ladder climbers. Yes, you might feel that the organization takes every chance to whittle away at your quality of life.</p> <p>No, you shouldn't aggressively express your displeasure with every word and action.</p> <p>Why? One individual with a bad attitude can insidiously infect the quality of the entire workplace. An unhappy employee can pass on their discontent and anger to their coworkers. Weeks of murmurs about all the perceived problems will eventually negatively affect everyone around you.</p> <p>A bad attitude can also lead to subpar work and rude behavior toward customers or coworkers; both of which can eventually lead to a job termination.</p> <p>No one expects you to be upbeat and perky all the time. Just try to rein in the attitude a tad.</p> <p>By eliminating a few bad habits, you'll be on the road to a less ruinous career path. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-a-personal-problem-from-hurting-your-career?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Keep a Personal Problem From Hurting Your Career</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-ways-you-might-be-sabotaging-your-job&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Ways%2520You%2520Might%2520Be%2520Sabotaging%2520Your%2520Job.jpg&amp;description=5%20Ways%20You%20Might%20Be%20Sabotaging%20Your%20Job"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Ways%20You%20Might%20Be%20Sabotaging%20Your%20Job.jpg" alt="5 Ways You Might Be Sabotaging Your Job" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-you-might-be-sabotaging-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-unprofessional-habits-that-could-kill-your-career">10 Unprofessional Habits That Could Kill Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-fired">How to Get Fired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves">9 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Career Moves</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building bad behaviors bad habits employment fired gossip job termination morale performance reviews unprofessional Mon, 08 Jan 2018 09:30:16 +0000 Samantha Stauf 2081071 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Restart Your Career With a Returnship http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-restart-your-career-with-a-returnship <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-restart-your-career-with-a-returnship" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/working_at_home_2.jpg" alt="Working at home" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 2008, a talent recruiter at Goldman Sachs noticed that the finance industry was ignoring a pool of highly-educated job applicants with years of experience: women who wanted to return to work after rearing children.</p> <p>To make it easier for these women to return to the workforce, Goldman Sachs created the<em> returnship program</em> (a name that they have now trademarked).</p> <p>The idea behind the returnship program is simple: The company offers qualified candidates, who have been out of the workforce for at least two years, eight weeks of work at competitive salaries. The returning workers get paid to refresh their skill sets and rebuild their professional networks. At the end of eight weeks, Goldman Sachs gets first choice to hire the top candidates, who have been trained to be optimal Goldman Sachs employees.</p> <p>Based on the success of Goldman Sachs' program, companies in various business sectors have created their own versions. Also, a number of headhunting and career development companies have sprung up, like <a href="https://www.irelaunch.com/" target="_blank">iRelaunch</a> and <a href="https://www.corpsteam.com/corps-team-home/about-us/team" target="_blank">Corps Team</a>, that specialize in staffing returning workers. Returnships are a new avenue for older workers to either rejoin the workforce or jump to another career, and there are some excellent perks to these programs. There are also a few downsides.</p> <h2>Returnship programs look for experienced workers</h2> <p>Unlike standard internships that are optimized for recent college graduates, returnship programs are geared toward retraining workers with established skill sets. They are looking for people who fit a specific niche within an industry. While returnships are as wildly competitive as internships, the competition for jobs is confined to one age cohort. Because returnship recruiters are actively searching for workers with experience-based knowledge, you will not have to compete with the kids these days in these programs. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-moms-should-do-before-returning-to-work?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Things Moms Should Do Before Returning to Work</a>)</p> <h2>You get paid to learn</h2> <p>All industries are constantly evolving. Technology, and even jobs, can become obsolete in a matter of months. Figuring out which skills are important for job re-entry can be daunting. Returnships offer the opportunity to learn the required computer programs, workflow, and culture of a company in an efficient, immersive manner.</p> <p>Although returnship compensation varies wildly, companies like Goldman Sachs pay a competitive wage, even during training, in order to recruit top talent. By the way, returnship compensation is a good method of separating the companies that are just exploiting workers for cheap labor from companies that are seriously recruiting older workers. Companies don't pay top dollar for people to do busywork. The best returnship programs want their graduates to have a running start at their new jobs. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-companies-with-the-highest-paid-interns?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Companies With the Highest Paid Interns</a>)</p> <h2>Networking is easier at the office</h2> <p>It's much easier to get a job if you have regular face-to-face contact with the people who do the hiring. Returnships give workers the opportunity to interface with their possible future boss, and it's also easier to network with people in your industry, outside of your company, if you already have a job. Returnships are a great way to quickly build up a network of business contacts.</p> <h2>Even the best programs can be exploitive</h2> <p>High achievers, especially high achieving women, often fall prey to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-combat-impostor-syndrome?ref=internal" target="_blank"><em>impostor syndrome</em></a>, the psychological phenomenon where competent individuals second-guess their abilities and question their accomplishments. Returnship programs inadvertently feed on self-esteem and self-confidence issues.</p> <p>The Goldman Sachs returnship program accepts 19 out of every 1,000 applicants, making entry to the program more competitive than admission to most universities. Obviously, anyone who is accepted into the program, whether or not they get hired at the end of the eight weeks, is already functioning at the top level of their game.</p> <p>If you have the confidence to apply to a top-tier returnship program, you may not actually need the experience to get hired at that company. Has an internal recruiter told you that a returnship is your only avenue toward getting hired? If not, you might be second-guessing your abilities.</p> <h2>A returnship can hurt your job prospects</h2> <p>Due to their competitive nature, most returnships will not result in a permanent position. While a returnship can freshen up a stale resume, it's important to approach a returnship as one part of a bigger job search. Don't let a temporary returnship divert your attention from other leads that could result in a job elsewhere.</p> <h2>A temp job might be just as effective and more convenient</h2> <p>Temp jobs allow workers to test drive the culture of companies before they apply for a permanent position. Like returnships, a temp job can give you an immersive experience with a company. And, like a returnship, temp jobs pay you for your work. What temping gives you is flexibility. If you hate your returnship, you will have to tough it out until the bitter end of the program to maintain social and professional connections. If you hate your temp job, you can just quit without any interpersonal weirdness.</p> <h2>Labels can help or hurt you</h2> <p>My best friend just successfully engineered a full-time, paid position at her favorite charity. Because she has a special needs kid, she had been a stay-at-home mom for 18 years before re-entering the workforce. Although her charity has paid internship positions, my BFF decided that she would work for free as a volunteer instead. In her mind, the word &quot;intern&quot; implies training, while the word &quot;volunteer&quot; is open to interpretation.</p> <p>Since highly trained professionals often volunteer their expertise to charities, she thought the title &quot;Volunteer&quot; would look better on her resume. As it turns out, she did not have to write a resume, because the charity hired her based on her work performance alone.</p> <h2>Create your own returnship if you don't like the existing program</h2> <p>My best friend approached her job search strategically. Volunteering for her favorite charity, although unpaid, gave her more benefits than the internship program. For example, she was able to set her own hours that worked with the rest of her family's schedule, while the interns are beholden to the program supervisor for scheduling and work assignments.</p> <p>As a volunteer, no one bothered to check her resume for work experience. Since she was efficient and competent with every task she was given, everyone assumed that she had worked in a related field and gave her plum assignments. She purposefully volunteered for the two departments that appeared to be the most short-handed so she could maximize her face time with two separate department heads.</p> <p>Fewer than 90 days after she started volunteering, the charity created a full-time, interdepartmental position for her with salary and benefits. Not only had she successfully tailor-made a returnship for herself, she also managed to segue seamlessly into a job that had been designed around her skill set. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-benefits-of-volunteering?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Unexpected Benefits of Volunteering</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-restart-your-career-with-a-returnship&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Restart%2520Your%2520Career%2520With%2520a%2520Returnship.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Restart%20Your%20Career%20With%20a%20Returnship"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Restart%20Your%20Career%20With%20a%20Returnship.jpg" alt="How to Restart Your Career With a Returnship" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/max-wong">Max Wong</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-restart-your-career-with-a-returnship">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-make-these-7-common-mistakes-when-choosing-a-career-path">Don&#039;t Make These 7 Common Mistakes When Choosing a Career Path</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-online-certifications-worth-the-price">Are Online Certifications Worth the Price?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-freelancers-and-telecommuters-can-make-friends-and-network">11 Ways Freelancers and Telecommuters Can Make Friends and Network</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-career-advice-sites-you-should-know-about">15 Career Advice Sites You Should Know About</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building back to work getting hired internship job skills lob leave networking raising children returnships Tue, 02 Jan 2018 09:30:09 +0000 Max Wong 2080125 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Things Your Boss Wishes You'd Tell Them http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-your-boss-wishes-youd-tell-them <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-things-your-boss-wishes-youd-tell-them" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/business_people_at_the_cafe_restaurant.jpg" alt="Business People at the Cafe Restaurant" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most of us have a boss of some kind. And a lot of people think that bosses only want to hear good news all of the time, but that's not the case.</p> <p>Positive information is nice, but negatives are just as important. If issues are preventing you, your coworkers, or your company from doing a job well, it makes life harder on everyone &mdash; including your boss. As long as you are bringing solutions with the problems, your boss will thank you for pointing out areas that need improvement. So, speak up on the following things, and do yourself and the boss a favor.</p> <h2>1. You want to be challenged more often</h2> <p>Most of us don't want to coast through our careers without learning, growing, and climbing the ladder. To do that, we need to face new challenges, step outside of our comfort zones, and take on tasks that will sometimes throw us into the deep end. While it's a scary prospect at times, it's essential for genuine advancement.</p> <p>However, your boss may not realize that you are not being challenged enough throughout the week. He or she may think you have just enough on your plate to cope; bosses are not mind readers, and may not realize you are lacking the trials and tests needed to gain experience. Tell the boss what you want to be doing. Ask if you can take on projects that are beyond what is expected of you. If you put in an honest effort, a promotion may even follow. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Career Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up</a>)</p> <h2>2. Any major issues you have with other employees</h2> <p>The boss needs to know this ASAP, because small problems can become big problems, and those big problems can lead to lawsuits and dismissals. You only have to look at the issues plaguing Hollywood right now to know that keeping things hidden could hurt you in the long term. So, whether it's unwanted attention, inappropriate comments, discrimination, or bullying, tell your boss as soon as you notice the problem. Furthermore, document the issues when they happen, as this gives your boss solid evidence that can help with human resources and dealing with an employee that is making your life difficult.</p> <h2>3. The current state of employee morale</h2> <p>In many companies, bosses aren't privy to the day-to-day events and processes that their employees are going through. If your boss is in and out of meetings all day, traveling weekly, and working on large projects, it will be hard for them to know what the morale situation is like. Maybe it's great. Maybe it's awful and people are ready to quit. Either way, if you can give the boss a regular temperature reading on morale, you will be doing everyone a favor. And even if morale is great, there's nothing wrong with asking for team building events to keep it there.</p> <h2>4. Your daily frustrations</h2> <p>Your relationship with your boss is in some ways like a relationship with a romantic partner. Little things here and there can get on your nerves, and you bottle up your feelings. These small frustrations can eat away at you day after day, and become overwhelming. So, find the time to bring them up in a weekly status report or one-on-one. Don't whine. Don't complain. And don't do it without having possible solutions up your sleeve. The boss will be thankful that you addressed it sooner rather than later.</p> <h2>5. How they are doing</h2> <p>One of the biggest reasons people leave a job is their relationship with the boss, and in some instances this could have been repaired long before it became an issue. So, find ways to tell the boss what they're doing right, and what they could be doing better.</p> <p>Suggest things the other employees are asking for. Maybe they would like more transparency, and weekly updates on the status of the company. Perhaps they want a simple night out every month, together as a team, to help with morale. Let the boss know.</p> <p>Of course, judge each case by its merits, and never insult. If your boss is known to be sensitive, you should throw a lot of great compliments out before hitting them with a problem.</p> <h2>6. What you like, and don't like, about the job</h2> <p>Start with what makes you happy and excited to come to work every day (and if you can't think of anything, you should probably start looking for a new job immediately). Are there certain projects that really get you going? Are there challenges you enjoy taking on? Make a list of all the reasons you enjoy coming to work, and let your boss know about them. He or she will not only appreciate it, but may throw more of those things at you when the opportunity arises.</p> <p>Similarly, make a list of the things that stop a good job from becoming a great job. Are there tasks that are boring? Are there systems in place that make your life hell? Tell the boss while offering solutions, and it will give them a chance to fix the issues. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>7. How you could be an even better employee</h2> <p>Nothing stirs a boss quite like an employee who is driven to do better, be better, and go further. Self-improvement is an admirable quality, and if you see ways in which you could grow and become a greater asset to the company, talk to your boss about it. Is there a conference coming up that would be invaluable to you? Ask if you can attend. Are there skills you would like to learn? Research workshops and online training.</p> <p>In many cases, bosses are happy to pay for some, or even all, of the cost of these events, as they are a direct benefit to the company. What's more, many businesses actually put aside money for employee training, so you would be making your boss look good by taking advantage of this benefit. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-certifications-that-add-big-to-your-salary?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Certifications That Add Big $$ to Your Salary</a>)</p> <p>Remember, at the end of the day, if you make your boss look good, you will prosper. So talk to him or her about any of these topics in a cordial way, and work together to resolve any problems. You will do your career a world of good.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-things-your-boss-wishes-youd-tell-them&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Things%2520Your%2520Boss%2520Wishes%2520Youd%2520Tell%2520Them.jpg&amp;description=7%20Things%20Your%20Boss%20Wishes%20Youd%20Tell%20Them"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Things%20Your%20Boss%20Wishes%20Youd%20Tell%20Them.jpg" alt="7 Things Your Boss Wishes You'd Tell Them" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-your-boss-wishes-youd-tell-them">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-free-ways-to-impress-your-boss">10 Free Ways to Impress Your Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree">5 Jobs That Pay Over $50K and Don&#039;t Require a Bachelor&#039;s Degree</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-succeed-when-youre-the-oldest-person-at-work">How to Succeed When You&#039;re the Oldest Person at Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building advice boss company politics coworkers honesty job growth managers morale Wed, 13 Dec 2017 10:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 2069778 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 College Courses That Will Boost Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/7-college-courses-that-will-boost-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-college-courses-that-will-boost-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/confident_female_college_students_raise_hands_in_class.jpg" alt="Confident female college students raise hands in class" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The job market is full of college-educated Americans. With so many people boasting bachelor degrees, associate degrees, and even master's degrees, it's no longer safe to assume that a college degree is the magic ticket that will kick-start a career.</p> <p>According to the Association of American Colleges and Universities, 90 percent of businesses value skills far more than they do any particular degree. That means that individuals, regardless of the level of education they are pursuing, should carefully choose classes that will not only help their degree, but also their future employability. (See also <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-skills-todays-employers-value-most?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Skills Today's Employers Value Most</a>)</p> <p>Here are a few great skills-boosting electives to consider.</p> <h2>1. Business writing</h2> <p>Not all business writing classes include the same curriculum, but this type of course typically teaches students how to write memos, professional emails, reports, grant applications, presentations, cover letters, and resumes. These classes occasionally also focus on utilizing word processing software, creating technical graphics, and developing a professional online portfolio.</p> <p>This elective should leave you with a large collection of sample writing for your online portfolio, a few more writing skills to add to your resume, and an enhanced ability to communicate non-verbally.</p> <h2>2. Communication and public speaking</h2> <p>Communication skills can help you speak with confidence, interact effectively in groups, and deliver speeches and presentations. The ability to communicate effectively can be vital to landing jobs, building professional relationships, and kick-starting a career.</p> <p>These classes give formal training in group communication, creating and delivering presentations and speeches, and delivering an effective interview. Individuals learn soft skills like how to interact with an audience, how to dress professionally, and how to read body language, too.</p> <p>Classes that focus on business communication might also focus on communicating effectively over a variety technological platforms, including social media sites, phones, presentation programs, and visual communication programs. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-public-speaking-less-terrifying?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Make Public Speaking Less Terrifying</a>)</p> <h2>3. Digital communication and electronic marketing</h2> <p>As of 2017, well over two billion people use social media. Due to that staggeringly high number, the importance of social media communication has grown significantly over the last decade. New jobs, like social media managers, have been created. Even if individuals don't pursue a social media job, expertise in digital communication and electronic marketing is a valuable skill.</p> <p>Nonprofessional social media experts can still use social media to locate jobs, engage in social networking, and promote their own work online.</p> <p>Classes typically start by examining the basic principles and concepts behind the use of digital information and communication technology. Once a baseline is laid, students often learn about the marketing and communication use of various digital tools (from email, to text, to social media). By the end of the class, students will know the best marketing and communication strategies using these various digital tools. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-high-paying-jobs-that-didnt-exist-10-years-ago?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 High-Paying Jobs That Didn't Exist 10 Years Ago</a>)</p> <h2>4. Computer software skills</h2> <p>Computer software skills can be imperative to career success in many traditional office jobs. People (even those who don't have a college degree) can increase their employability if they have advanced software skills. Community colleges, in particular, tend to have a few courses that focus primarily on walking students through the ins and outs of various software programs.</p> <p>These courses tend to focus on presentation, spreadsheet, and document processing software. The curriculum also tends to focus on current business standards for document creation and formatting.</p> <h2>5. Web development and programming</h2> <p>While not all office jobs require programming skills, basic knowledge of web development can be a useful career enhancer. Editors, web managers, writers, and various other positions prefer to hire candidates that already know the ins and outs of creating or at least maintaining a website.</p> <p>These classes cover programming languages such as Python, HTML5, JavaScript, and C++. Individuals can utilize these new skills to create a website, build an online portfolio, spruce up a resume, and pursue projects that require sophisticated website or tool development. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-certifications-that-add-big-to-your-salary?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Certifications That Add Big $$ to Your Salary</a>)</p> <h2>6. Entrepreneurship</h2> <p>Budding entrepreneurs or self-employed professionals could benefit from a course that focuses on the practical aspects of startups. Before diving headfirst into their world-changing business idea, hopeful entrepreneurs can arm themselves with knowledge that can help them succeed.</p> <p>This class typically teaches students about the challenges of opening, running, financing, and marketing a successful startup or small businesses. The class also delves into the typical behaviors and beliefs of successful business owners, and leaves students with the knowledge they need to succeed on their own. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-top-7-blogs-for-entrepreneurs?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Top 7 Blogs for Entrepreneurs</a>)</p> <h2>7. All-encompassing professional skills classes</h2> <p>Not all, but some colleges have begun to create classes that focus entirely on helping students build the necessary skills to thrive in a professional work environment. If you can't work a few skill-oriented classes into your schedule, you might want to see if you can find a class that just focuses on general skill development.</p> <p>Boise State University, for example, offers a series of courses on professional development. Some of the skills these courses focus on include self-awareness, teamwork, leadership, networking, and interviewing. Students tackle individual and team-based activities. Many of the activities are designed to mimic typical workplace scenarios, so that students can develop skills and experiences that are relevant to a professional workplace.</p> <p>Individuals, no matter their current educational status, may benefit from attending college classes that teach useful career skills. If a college class isn't possible for you at this point, you can search for the multitude of free or cheap books, websites, or video resources out there to help build your skills.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-college-courses-that-will-boost-your-career&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520College%2520Courses%2520That%2520Will%2520Boost%2520Your%2520Career.jpg&amp;description=7%20College%20Courses%20That%20Will%20Boost%20Your%20Career"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20College%20Courses%20That%20Will%20Boost%20Your%20Career.jpg" alt="7 College Courses That Will Boost Your Career" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-college-courses-that-will-boost-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-make-these-7-common-mistakes-when-choosing-a-career-path">Don&#039;t Make These 7 Common Mistakes When Choosing a Career Path</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-tips-for-going-back-to-school-as-an-adult">8 Tips for Going Back to School as an Adult</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-restart-your-career-with-a-returnship">How to Restart Your Career With a Returnship</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-pursuing-an-overcrowded-career-field">Are You Pursuing an Overcrowded Career Field?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-smart-about-money-with-these-18-free-online-courses">Get Smart About Money With These 18 Free Online Courses</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Education & Training business writing college courses courses electives employability entrepreneurship job skills programming public speaking web design Fri, 01 Dec 2017 09:30:09 +0000 Samantha Stauf 2063301 at http://www.wisebread.com 11 Essentials Every Business Traveler Needs to Pack http://www.wisebread.com/11-essentials-every-business-traveler-needs-to-pack <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/11-essentials-every-business-traveler-needs-to-pack" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_traveling_abroad.jpg" alt="Woman traveling abroad" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Business travel usually sounds like a lot of fun, until you're on the road constantly. Living out of a suitcase often means leaving some of your favorite things behind, and one delayed flight can throw off meetings, hotel reservations, and more.</p> <p>Whether you're an experienced business traveler or new to this particular adventure, there's a way to make the traveling life easier &mdash; by packing smart. Here are some things that the savvy business traveler should always have along for the ride. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-business-travel-helps-your-wallet?ref=seealso" target="_blank">11 Ways Business Travel Helps Your Wallet</a>)</p> <h2>1. A filtered water bottle</h2> <p>It's easy to forget just how essential water is for health and happiness. Make sure that you have safe, clean water to drink wherever you go by investing in a <a href="http://amzn.to/2mTf33g" target="_blank">water bottle that will filter contaminants</a> on its own.</p> <h2>2. A Wi-Fi hot spot</h2> <p>Airport and airplane Wi-Fi can be expensive and, if you happen to be in the wrong part of the airport, it can be spotty, too. Some places, it's also an unsecured network. While you can almost always turn your smartphone into a wireless hot spot, many business travelers prefer to carry a <a href="http://amzn.to/2mTtHY7" target="_blank">separate hot spot device</a>. Sometimes, work will even pay for it! (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/technology-hacks-for-the-international-traveler?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Technology Hacks for the International Traveler</a>)</p> <h2>3. A surge protector</h2> <p>Many power cords these days come with surge protection built in, but you can never be too safe (especially when traveling overseas). Carry a small surge protector with you, and you'll know that your devices won't get fried when you need them most. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-power-surge-protectors?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 5 Best Power Surge Protectors</a>)</p> <h2>4. A power bank</h2> <p>You never know when your phone, tablet, or laptop is going to run out of battery life, but it's almost guaranteed to be at the worst possible time. Save yourself the hassle of finding a charging station in an airport or bumming a charge off another traveler by making sure you have your power bank packed. Make sure yours is fully charged before you leave. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-power-banks?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 5 Best Power Banks</a>)</p> <h2>5. A small carry-on bag</h2> <p>Save money and hassle by investing in a <a href="http://amzn.to/2A0309b" target="_blank">carry-on bag</a> that conforms to TSA's standards, and fit everything you need for your trip into it. You could save between $50 and $100 per flight by not bringing extra luggage, and you'll have it all with you so you won't have to wait in line at baggage claim or have to worry about lost luggage. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/21-unexpected-items-you-should-always-pack-in-your-carry-on?ref=seealso" target="_blank">21 Unexpected Items You Should Always Pack in Your Carry-On</a>)</p> <h2>6. A first aid kit</h2> <p>You never know when you'll trip or something unusual will happen and you'll need a Band-Aid or some ibuprofen. And you don't want to be heading into an important business meeting with an open cut or a splitting headache that could've easily been taken care of, had you planned ahead. Gather a few first aid items in a baggie before you leave, so these small inconveniences don't become bigger problems. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-first-aid-kits?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 5 Best First Aid Kits</a>)</p> <h2>7. Wrinkle releaser</h2> <p>Sure, many hotels now stock irons and ironing boards for travelers, but what if you end up running straight from the plane to a big meeting? Get rid of wrinkles on-the-go by bringing your own <a href="http://amzn.to/2zfx9yg" target="_blank">wrinkle-release spray</a> along. It's also useful when you don't feel like ironing in your hotel or you forget to send your clothes out for cleaning.</p> <h2>8. Travel apps</h2> <p>There are many apps out there geared toward business travelers. Apple's <a href="https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204003" target="_blank">Wallet</a> lets you organize your boarding passes and other important data so you always have access to them. Send your confirmation and travel emails to <a href="https://www.tripit.com/" target="_blank">TripIt</a> and the app will create your itineraries for you.</p> <p>The point is, if you want to find an app to do something that will make your business travel easier, you probably can. Take the time to figure out what tasks you would like to do digitally, and download the apps that will work best for you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-apps-for-the-tech-challenged-traveler?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Apps for the Tech-Challenged Traveler</a>)</p> <h2>9. Travel-size personal care products</h2> <p>Hotels are always stocked with shampoo, conditioner, and soap for guests to use, but they don't usually have other essentials like face wash, deodorant, or hair styling products. These are must-haves for business travelers who need to be presentable and professional at all times, so make sure you have TSA-approved sizes of the personal care items you like to use.</p> <h2>10. The right travel rewards card</h2> <p>Some companies will let you book your own business travel and will reimburse you later. Whether this is true for you or not, it can pay to have a good travel rewards credit card along with you. Even if you can't book your own travel, these cards can offer rewards for things like dining out, entrance fees, and other travel costs you might incur on your own. Figure out what you will use your card for most and which type of points would help you the most, then get the card and reap the benefits. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/which-credit-cards-have-the-best-travel-redemption-value?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Which Credit Cards Have the Best Travel Redemption Value?</a>)</p> <h2>11. Plastic bags</h2> <p>These are useful in so many ways. Use them to cover your shoes, store your dirty laundry, keep your toiletries from bursting all over your bag, and more. You may feel a little silly when you pack them the first time, but you're likely to find yourself using them over and over again during your trip.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F11-essentials-every-business-traveler-needs-to-pack&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F11%2520Essentials%2520Every%2520Business%2520Traveler%2520Needs%2520to%2520Pack.jpg&amp;description=11%20Essentials%20Every%20Business%20Traveler%20Needs%20to%20Pack"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/11%20Essentials%20Every%20Business%20Traveler%20Needs%20to%20Pack.jpg" alt="11 Essentials Every Business Traveler Needs to Pack" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-essentials-every-business-traveler-needs-to-pack">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-things-you-should-always-pack-in-your-carry-on">8 Things You Should Always Pack in Your Carry-On</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-you-should-always-carry-on-an-economy-flight">9 Things You Should Always Carry on an Economy Flight</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-these-9-things-now-to-make-holiday-air-travel-easier">Do These 9 Things Now to Make Holiday Air Travel Easier</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-simple-ways-to-travel-greener-that-could-save-you-money">8 Simple Ways to Travel Greener That Could Save You Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-get-more-out-of-business-trips">10 Ways to Get More Out of Business Trips</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Travel business traveler business trip carry-on luggage packing tips travel tips what to pack Thu, 30 Nov 2017 09:30:10 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 2063302 at http://www.wisebread.com