Career Building http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4814/all en-US How to Prepare When Your Unemployment Is Ending http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-when-your-unemployment-is-ending <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-prepare-when-your-unemployment-is-ending" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/young_man_handled_household_expenses.jpg" alt="Young man handled household expenses" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Losing a job can be devastating. It can throw your life into a tailspin and severely delay or even kill your progress and plans for the future. Once you receive a little help through unemployment compensation, you may find yourself right back where you started when the benefit ends.</p> <p>You may have been blindsided when you first lost your job, but losing unemployment before you've found a replacement job can also be a sucker-punch. As difficult as it all is, you still have to will yourself into being proactive. Here are a few things you should do to prepare for the end of unemployment compensation.</p> <h2>Begin with the end in mind</h2> <p>The best thing to do immediately after you receive your first unemployment check is to plan on not receiving it. It is a great aid that can help keep you afloat until you find work. But, you must keep the fact that it is only temporary in the forefront of your mind. During normal economic times, unemployment lasts 26 weeks, or six months. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-long-can-you-really-live-on-unemployment?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Long Can You Really Live on Unemployment?</a>)</p> <p>Reduce your spending and live off as little as possible. And do your best not to depend on the benefit. The benefit itself makes this easier because it usually isn't enough to cover all of your living expenses. It is only assistance &mdash; similar to someone helping you up when you trip and fall. They help you to your feet. They don't carry you.</p> <p>You have to find a way to cover the shortfall and generate your own income as quickly as possible. Put yourself on a shoestring budget. Establish spending and payment priorities, because some things may have to go unpaid. Call your creditors now and alert them to the situation and try to maintain a good relationship with them throughout the process. Downsize. Sell stuff. Get a side gig and do odd jobs. Unemployment can temporarily stop or at least slow the bleeding, but remember &mdash; it's only temporary. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-budget-overhaul-tricks-for-the-recently-unemployed?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Budget Overhaul Tricks for the Recently Unemployed</a>)</p> <h2>Make getting a job your top priority</h2> <p>Job loss is so devastating because it is a loss &mdash; economically and emotionally. Dealing with the hurt, betrayal, and disappointment is a massive task by itself. Add to that coping with money issues and the instability it causes, and you've got a deep hole to climb out of. This can make looking for another job seem like a herculean effort. Try and view your unemployment compensation as a safety net and springboard. It helps ease the financial burden and it should propel you to action.</p> <p>As the six-month period begins winding down, try adjusting your employment search to include jobs you wouldn't normally consider. Think outside the box. You may even have to get two jobs temporarily to help stay afloat. The closer you get to the benefit expiration date, the less picky you should become. Get training, attend job fairs, and leverage your networks and professional relationships to assist you during your hunt. You have to be aggressive, persistent, and diligent. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-networking-tips-for-the-recently-unemployed?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Networking Tips for the Recently Unemployed</a>)</p> <h2>Get help</h2> <p>Federal and state-funded assistance programs are available specifically to help you through this period. Sadly, these programs' processes can be slow, bureaucratic, and inefficient, which is why it is imperative that you start the process ASAP. Benefits and programs vary by location, so be sure to check with your state's local agencies to understand requirements and procedures.</p> <h3>Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)</h3> <p>Formerly known as the Food Stamp Program, <a href="https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program-snap" target="_blank">SNAP</a> provides food purchasing assistance to families in need. The amount you receive is based on your household size, income, and expenses. If you qualify, this could be a great way of ensuring your family is fed. It can also free up some cash enabling you to repurpose the grocery money and use it for another need. The benefit can be used at a host of traditional grocery stores, convenience stores, and even at your local farmers market.</p> <h3>Self-Employment Assistance Program (SEAP)</h3> <p>Have you ever heard the saying, &quot;If you can't find a job, create one?&quot; That's exactly what SEAP is designed to help you do. <a href="https://workforcesecurity.doleta.gov/unemploy/self.asp" target="_blank">SEAP</a> is a state-funded grant program specifically designed to train individuals receiving unemployment the basics of launching their own small business. And the best part about this program is that in most states, participants are not required to look for a job. The training program is your employment seeking activity. To find out if you qualify, check with your local unemployment office.</p> <h3>Housing assistance</h3> <p>If you foresee yourself struggling to pay rent or your mortgage, help is available. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) offers a number of <a href="https://www.hud.gov/topics/rental_assistance" target="_blank">rental assistance programs</a> including the Housing Choice Voucher Program. This voucher program provides assistance by paying all or a portion of your rent, if you qualify. Most states also have some sort of Emergency Rental Assistance Program which provides short-term, income-based assistance. And the federal government offers assistance to those in rural areas through its <a href="https://www.benefits.gov/benefits/benefit-details/396" target="_blank">Rural Rental Assistance Program</a>.</p> <p>If you are struggling to make mortgage payments, the <a href="https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/mortgage-assistance-relief-services-rule-compliance-guide" target="_blank">Federal Trade Commission</a> offers protection for distressed homeowners from predatory and unscrupulous lending practices. There are a lot of private and nonprofit agencies that can help you refinance, negotiate a short sale, and/or keep your home if you fall behind. The key is to do your research. Understand what you are signing. And don't make decisions out of fear or under pressure. You have options. Breathe, consult an objective expert, and move forward with what works best for your situation.</p> <h3>Nonprofit and social service agencies</h3> <p>Every state has a different suite of services and resource offerings for those in need. Finding those resources can be difficult &mdash; especially when you don't know where to look. <a href="http://www.211.org/" target="_blank">211.org</a> was established to address this need. It is a repository of information containing resource offerings for every state and parts of Canada. It is a free service that can help you find federal, state, local, nonprofit, and (small) fee-for-service assistance. It doesn't matter if you get help from family and friends, your church, or a federal or state source, as long as you get help.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/denise-hill">Denise Hill</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-when-your-unemployment-is-ending">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-a-sudden-loss-of-income">How to Handle a Sudden Loss of Income</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks">Here&#039;s How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-negotiate-a-raise-out-of-the-blue">How to Negotiate a Raise Out of the Blue</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building aid assistance benefits expenses food stamps job loss loss of income mortgage assistance rent assistance snap unemployed unemployment Mon, 21 May 2018 08:31:21 +0000 Denise Hill 2140345 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Online Businesses You Can Launch In No Time http://www.wisebread.com/3-online-businesses-you-can-launch-in-no-time <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-online-businesses-you-can-launch-in-no-time" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/staying_online_up_to_date_and_productive_0.jpg" alt="Staying online, up to date and productive" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The opportunities for making money online are endless in this digital age. I'm not talking about creating the next Google or Facebook, and I'm definitely not suggesting that there are any get rich quick schemes that will land you thousands for just a few hours of work. But there are plenty of full-time businesses, as well as lucrative side hustles, that can be set up relatively quickly with little to no upfront investment.</p> <p>It takes a lot of hard work and dedication to get a business off the ground. There are lots of things to consider before even launching, such as what the business will provide, who the customers will be, what your pricing structure is, and what you're going to call it.</p> <p>Stuck for ideas? These business ideas will enable you to get set up and ready to go in 24 hours or so. Here are three online businesses you can jump-start in no time. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-anyone-can-make-money-online?ref=seealso" target="_blank">11 Ways Anyone Can Make Money Online</a>)</p> <h2>Virtual assistant</h2> <p>The role of the virtual assistant is completely open-ended, and the tasks can vary wildly depending on whom you're assisting. Assignments could be anything from replying to emails and updating social media, to editing spreadsheets and coordinating your client's schedule. If you're organized and are happy taking on smaller tasks for other people, then you can make money from anywhere in the world by being a virtual assistant.</p> <p>Timothy Ferriss's <em>The Four-Hour Work Week</em> helped to create an emerging market for virtual assistants with individuals and small companies looking to outsource the menial tasks that take up the majority of their time. This allows them to focus on growing their businesses. Once you've decided on the skillset you're going to offer, there are several ways of kick-starting your new business online.</p> <p>You can apply for a job with a virtual assistant agency and once you're hired, you'll already have a client or list of clients waiting to be connected with an assistant. This is how many VAs start, but you may also find jobs through word of mouth or from former employers. Social media is a free and easy way to advertise your services, too, and just a few posts to your professional profiles, particularly LinkedIn, can get the ball rolling. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-find-a-legit-virtual-assistant-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Find a Legit Virtual Assistant Job</a>)</p> <h2>Social media manager</h2> <p>Social media management has become so crucial to the success of businesses that for most companies, it pays to have someone in charge of their accounts who really understands the ins and outs of all the social media platforms. Though most people have personal accounts on at least a couple of the big platforms, social media for businesses is an entirely different animal. That said, in order to prove you have what it takes to help a business with their accounts, you'll undoubtedly need to have built a significant presence of your own online.</p> <p>Social media management involves building thriving communities for your clients, which ultimately generates extra revenue for them. It can involve writing and scheduling engaging content, running advertising campaigns, and replying to queries or complaints. You're probably also going to be in charge of a budget dedicated to social media growth, and therefore should know how best to spend it for the highest returns.</p> <p>Similarly to virtual assistant positions, there are online agencies where you can find social media management jobs. However, once you have some experience under your belt, it may be worth pitching clients directly. Though it can be scary at first, it's an invaluable skill to learn and gives you much greater control over your rates and schedule. It's easy to assess whether you think you can help a client by simply looking at their social media content and engagement. Then you can put a plan together for how you will quickly improve it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-make-extra-money-using-social-media?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways to Make Extra Money Using Social Media</a>)</p> <h2>Online tutor</h2> <p>If you enjoy teaching and have in-depth knowledge of a particular subject, then online tutoring could be a reliable moneymaker for you. Where previously, tutoring was all done face-to-face and relied on finding students in your local area, the internet has made it global. Thanks to video calls and online teaching programs, you can tutor anyone anywhere in the world, <em>from</em> anywhere in the world, with just a laptop and a decent internet connection.</p> <p>Languages are a fantastic starting place, as you don't necessarily need qualifications. Often, you don&rsquo;t even need to speak the student&rsquo;s native tongue, as you&rsquo;re encouraged to teach only in the language being learned.</p> <p>But tutoring is not limited to language instruction. The most open sector in tutoring is for school-aged children, and math and science tend to be subjects that children require help with. Around exam times when many parents want to give their kids a boost, tutors can be extremely busy, and you can adjust your rates accordingly to meet that demand.</p> <p>More often than not, tutoring positions are relatively short-term, so you'll likely have to continually be looking for new gigs. There are many online platforms that connect tutors to students, such as Tutor.com and Chegg.com. Apply online and set up a profile to begin finding jobs. You can also market yourself online using social media platforms, free classified ads on sites like Craigslist, online teaching directories, and even your own website or blog. Once you've successfully tutored some students, the best way to get new business is to ask for referrals, as it's likely that they know other people looking for similar help. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-earn-1000-a-month-or-more-as-an-online-tutor?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Earn $1,000 a Month or More as an Online Tutor</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F3-online-businesses-you-can-launch-in-no-time&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F3%2520Online%2520Businesses%2520You%2520Can%2520Launch%2520In%2520No%2520Time.jpg&amp;description=3%20Online%20Businesses%20You%20Can%20Launch%20In%20No%20Time"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;<img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/3%20Online%20Businesses%20You%20Can%20Launch%20In%20No%20Time.jpg" alt="3 Online Businesses You Can Launch In No Time" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nick-wharton">Nick Wharton</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-online-businesses-you-can-launch-in-no-time">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/16-ways-to-get-money-for-your-business">16 Ways To Get Money For Your Business</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-ways-to-use-social-media-in-business">13 Ways to Use Social Media in Business</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-three-f-rule-can-lead-you-to-happiness">The Three F Rule Can Lead You to Happiness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-fun-and-unexpected-ways-to-get-out-of-a-business-rut">5 Fun and Unexpected Ways to Get Out of a Business Rut</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-i-learned-about-money-after-i-went-freelance">7 Things I Learned About Money After I Went Freelance</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Entrepreneurship Wed, 09 May 2018 08:30:20 +0000 Nick Wharton 2139675 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Ways Work-At-Home Seniors Can Master Work-Life Balance http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-work-at-home-seniors-can-master-work-life-balance <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-ways-work-at-home-seniors-can-master-work-life-balance" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mature_woman_working_on_computer_0.jpg" alt="Mature woman working on computer" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You're retired, but maybe you still want to keep a hand in your old business. Or maybe you love consulting, or you want some extra cash, or you don't like having too much idle time on your hands. No matter the reason, working from home can be a great way for retirees to earn an income without being subject to the daily commute and grind of a traditional 9-to-5.</p> <p>Remote work can be highly rewarding and even fun. Here are some ways to keep your work-life balance while working from home in retirement.</p> <h2>1. Look for a flexible schedule</h2> <p>One of the great benefits of retiring is being able to do what you want, when you want. Don't lose that completely by ending up with a rigid work schedule. Sure, you'll need to be there for your new employers or clients some of the time, but make sure you have the flexibility to take time off for the things that matter most to you.</p> <h2>2. Start small</h2> <p>It may be tempting to jump right into a new job. However, working from home is different from going to work at a company. If you've never done it before, it can be overwhelming at first to be self-directed and spend so much time alone.</p> <p>If you think you want to work from home, start by taking on a project or two, or working a few hours a week. If you like it and can still do all of the other things that you want to do with your retirement, you can look for a more permanent gig.</p> <h2>3. Make time for family</h2> <p>Many retirees make the jump into retirement at least in part so they can spend more time with their families. If this is you, ensure that your new job doesn't interrupt this time. Even if you work from home, it's important to put child care obligations or family days on the calendar early, and make sure your new employer knows you won't be available at those times. You can keep your family first even if you're going back to work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-your-work-life-balance-is-off?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Signs Your Work-Life Balance Is Off</a>)</p> <h2>4. Unplug yourself</h2> <p>Whether you're old or young, it's easy to get sucked into the internet. You may find yourself surfing Facebook for pictures of your grandchildren, looking up decorating ideas on Pinterest, or getting lost in a sea of YouTube videos.</p> <p>Time spent online is often little more than a distraction. Ultimately, it isn't very satisfying, and it often takes you away from the things you really want or need to be doing. Limit your time online, especially when you're away from work, so you can really engage with the people and the experiences around you. If you're glued to your desk all day, you probably won't be enjoying your retirement to its fullest.</p> <h2>5. Plan vacations ahead of time</h2> <p>Some retirees enter retirement with the intention to travel. You can still do this while working from home. Make sure you get your vacations on the calendar early so your employer knows when you won't be available. This helps ensure that you'll have the free time you need to fully embrace your travel, even if you have to get right back to work when you get home.</p> <h2>6. Exercise</h2> <p>Exercise makes us feel better. It gets the blood flowing and helps boost our mood. Both of these will go far toward helping you feel like your life is in balance. When you make time for exercise, you're making time for yourself. You're also prioritizing your health, as exercise can help you live longer and avoid or minimize many of the physical problems that plague people in retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-smart-ways-to-invest-in-your-health?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Smart Ways to Invest in Your Health</a>)</p> <h2>7. Meditate</h2> <p>Make time to meditate. Clear your head. If you don't like meditation, get a journal and spend a few minutes every day writing down your thoughts. Giving yourself this space helps you remember what's important to you, and that your stated priorities are actually prioritized in your real life. It also gives you the mental clarity to fully engage with work when you're working, and with other people and things when you're outside of work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-meditation-alternatives-for-people-with-busy-minds?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Meditation Alternatives for People With Busy Minds</a>)</p> <h2>8. Walk every hour</h2> <p>When you're on the clock, make sure you stay moving. Get up every hour and take a short walk, even if it's just down the hall and back. This not only fights the dangers of a sedentary lifestyle, but it also helps you stay focused.</p> <h2>9. Schedule time to give back</h2> <p>If one of your retirement goals was to give back to the community, rest assured that you can still do that while you're working from home. Make volunteering a priority by scheduling it in your calendar, getting the time off or clearing your client list for the day, and helping out however and wherever you like. Giving back will offer a sense of fulfillment, and it will also remind you of the things that are truly important. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-benefits-of-volunteering%20?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Unexpected Benefits of Volunteering</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-ways-work-at-home-seniors-can-master-work-life-balance&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520Ways%2520Work-At-Home%2520Seniors%2520Can%2520Master%2520Work-Life%2520Balance.jpg&amp;description=9%20Ways%20Work-At-Home%20Seniors%20Can%20Master%20Work-Life%20Balance"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20Ways%20Work-At-Home%20Seniors%20Can%20Master%20Work-Life%20Balance.jpg" alt="9 Ways Work-At-Home Seniors Can Master Work-Life Balance" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-work-at-home-seniors-can-master-work-life-balance">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-find-your-new-identity-after-retirement">How to Find Your New Identity After Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-splurges-that-are-worth-every-penny">7 Retirement Splurges That Are Worth Every Penny</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-live-a-retired-life-before-retirement">How to Live a Retired Life Before Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-keep-anxiety-from-ruining-your-budget">5 Ways to Keep Anxiety From Ruining Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-simple-rules-of-excellent-houseguest-etiquette">11 Simple Rules of Excellent Houseguest Etiquette</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Lifestyle Retirement down time exercise family meditating telecommuting volunteering work-life balance working from home Fri, 04 May 2018 09:00:08 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 2131865 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Smart Moves to Make After Getting a Raise or Promotion http://www.wisebread.com/9-smart-moves-to-make-after-getting-a-raise-or-promotion <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-smart-moves-to-make-after-getting-a-raise-or-promotion" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/nothing_can_break_our_team.jpg" alt="Nothing can break our team" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You've worked hard, and you've impressed the boss: You've been rewarded with a raise, promotion, or both. That's great news.</p> <p>The worst mistake you could make right now is to use this time as an excuse to slack off at work or spend more money. Your new challenge is to figure out how to handle your new responsibilities and your new money in a way that will help you continue to succeed.</p> <p>Here are some smart career and money moves to make after your employer rewards you with a raise or promotion.</p> <h2>After a promotion</h2> <p>Getting a promotion is a sign that you've been a hardworking, valuable employee. You should pat yourself on the back for your achievement.</p> <p>But, promotions can also prove stressful. You may be managing people for the first time, or maybe you'll be taking on more responsibilities. Regardless, there are a few key things you should do immediately following a promotion. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Signs You're Making All the Right Career Moves</a>)</p> <h3>1. Be confident, but humble</h3> <p>There's a reason you earned that promotion. There's something that your employer values about you, your decision-making, and your leadership. It's great to feel confident, but don't let this make you cocky.</p> <p>You still have a lot to learn after a promotion. You'll be taking on new duties. Your job description might have swelled. You might even be overseeing others for the first time. Remain humble, grateful, and don't alienate your peers. It's harder to reach your new goals if your co-workers don't like you.</p> <h3>2. Ask plenty of questions</h3> <p>Questions are your friend after a promotion. You want to make sure that you understand all that is required of you in your new position. If you have any doubts or confusion on this matter, get concrete expectations and instructions from your superiors.</p> <p>You also want to come up with as many good ideas for improving your company's performance as you can get. Ask your co-workers &mdash; even if you are now managing them &mdash; for their input on what steps the company can take to improve morale, boost productivity, and compete more successfully in the marketplace.</p> <h3>3. Get ready to work hard</h3> <p>You'll want to reassure your boss that they made the right decision when they promoted you, so put in the hours necessary to show them how dedicated you are to your company. Now is not the time to take extra days off or leave the office early. Instead, work even harder than you did before you earned your promotion.</p> <p>Take the initiative at the next company meeting. Research what new skills would help you thrive in your role, and make a plan to learn them. Not only will this impress your boss, it will help you catch up more quickly with your new duties and responsibilities.</p> <h3>4. Start churning out the ideas</h3> <p>Does worker productivity at your office slump after lunch? Is employee morale low? Is a big project behind schedule? Come up with potential solutions to these problems. Crafting new ideas to solve important problems is the best way to show your supervisors that they were right in giving you that promotion.</p> <h2>After getting a raise</h2> <p>A promotion doesn't always come with a big pay boost, but if it does, it's the perfect reason to give your finances a makeover. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-get-a-promotion?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Money Moves to Make the Moment You Get a Promotion</a>)</p> <h3>5. Calculate exactly how much more you'll be getting each month</h3> <p>It's tempting to start spending your raise before it even shows up in your paycheck, but be careful: Taxes and other withholdings will eat up a portion of your raise before it even hits your bank account. Getting a $3,000 raise does not mean there will be exactly $3,000 extra dollars in your pocket at the end of the year. Wait until your salary increase is reflected in one of your paychecks before changing your saving or spending patterns. That extra chunk of change might not be as large you originally expected. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-withholding-the-right-amount-of-taxes-from-your-paycheck?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Withholding the Right Amount of Taxes from Your Paycheck?</a>)</p> <h3>6. Rework your household budget</h3> <p>Once you know exactly how much extra money you'll get with each paycheck, it's time to tweak your household budget. Your expenses should remain the same &mdash; lifestyle creep is a dangerous thing &mdash; but your monthly income, obviously, will change. What should also change? How much money you contribute each month to retirement and savings. Rework that budget to help you determine your new savings goals. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-budget-when-youre-no-longer-broke?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Budget When You're No Longer Broke</a>)</p> <h3>7. Boost your retirement savings</h3> <p>It's fun to imagine using your new funds to buy a high-end laptop, flat-screen TV, or shiny new car. While no one can stop you from buying those things, make sure to first use your extra funds to boost your retirement savings. Building a retirement nest egg should be your ultimate goal starting your very first day of work. That might not seem like a whole lot fun now, but you'll be thankful for the foresight as retirement grows closer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-meeting-the-2018-401k-contribution-limits-will-brighten-your-future?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways Meeting the 2018 401(k) Contribution Limits Will Brighten Your Future</a>)</p> <h3>8. Build your emergency fund</h3> <p>You should always have an emergency fund of savings that you can tap to cover unexpected expenses &mdash; whether it's a big vet bill for your dog or a blown gasket in your car. Having such a fund makes it less likely that you'll need to turn to credit cards to pay for an emergency.</p> <p>Financial experts recommend that your emergency fund have enough dollars in it to cover your daily living expenses for six to 12 months. If your fund isn't stocked to this level, use the extra money from your raise to hit that target. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-build-an-emergency-fund-from-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Easy Ways to Build an Emergency Fund From $0</a>)</p> <h3>9. Continue to live frugally</h3> <p>Too often, people boost their monthly spending as their income rises. They spend more on cars, clothing, entertainment, and meals. The problem is this lifestyle creep can quickly erase any added savings that come with a larger paycheck.</p> <p>Resist the temptation to overspend after earning a raise. Instead, focus on the less fun but more important task of building your savings, emergency fund, and retirement accounts. After getting a raise, don't spend more. Save more. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-one-nice-thing-can-ruin-your-whole-budget?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How One Nice Thing Can Ruin Your Whole Budget</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-smart-moves-to-make-after-getting-a-raise-or-promotion&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520Smart%2520Moves%2520to%2520Make%2520After%2520Getting%2520a%2520Raise%2520or%2520Promotion.jpg&amp;description=9%20Smart%20Moves%20to%20Make%20After%20Getting%20a%20Raise%20or%20Promotion"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20Smart%20Moves%20to%20Make%20After%20Getting%20a%20Raise%20or%20Promotion.jpg" alt="9 Smart Moves to Make After Getting a Raise or Promotion" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-smart-moves-to-make-after-getting-a-raise-or-promotion">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-goals-you-can-achieve-this-summer">5 Money Goals You Can Achieve This Summer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/money-a-mess-try-this-personal-finance-starter-kit">Money a Mess? Try This Personal Finance Starter Kit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-accomplishments-you-should-be-proud-of">5 Money Accomplishments You Should Be Proud Of</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-rules-every-working-adult-should-know">10 Money Rules Every Working Adult Should Know</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Career Building budgeting career moves emergency fund lifestyle creep money moves promotions raise retirement saving money Thu, 26 Apr 2018 08:00:13 +0000 Dan Rafter 2131008 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Subtle Signs You'd Make a Good Boss http://www.wisebread.com/12-subtle-signs-youd-make-a-good-boss <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-subtle-signs-youd-make-a-good-boss" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/smiling_woman_in_office.jpg" alt="Smiling woman in office" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are good managers and there are bad managers. Sadly, the people who would make really great managers often don't realize their potential to lead. These subtle signs &mdash; ones that you have either overlooked or never noticed &mdash; signal that you could be a fantastic boss. Don't let others miss out on your leadership. When you've checked off enough boxes, go get that promotion!</p> <h2>1. You give constructive feedback</h2> <p>There are several ways to give feedback on a project or idea. You could simply smile and say you like it, regardless of what you really think, in fear of hurting feelings. That helps no one, especially if you see glaring errors. You could be the naysayer: Whatever the idea, and whoever the project manager is, it's awful, try again. Even if a project really is bad, that kind of feedback can stop progress in its tracks.</p> <p>Genuine, constructive feedback includes specific action items and suggestions on ways to improve or expand the idea. If you have a gift for that, and people are often asking for your opinions, well done. You've got a great managerial skill.</p> <h2>2. You're already treated like a manager</h2> <p>Some people are just natural leaders. They're the alphas in the group, and have the ability to step up and take charge when others are disappearing into the bushes like Homer Simpson. These people are magnets for co-workers. Yes, there is a boss, and they will formally go to that boss to make sure everything is done by the book &mdash; but if they're coming to you for solutions to problems, advice on projects, or mentoring of any kind, you are the manager they really want.</p> <p>Think about how many bosses you've had that never quite seemed up to the task; they were promoted through nepotism, favoritism, family ties, or pure luck. Now think about the people working under them that had it all together. You could very well be that person in your company.</p> <h2>3. You care about performance more than titles and money</h2> <p>Both money and titles are important to a certain degree. You need money to live. Titles dictate responsibility and influence. However, if you put those things second to the performance you give, that's the sign of a great manager.</p> <p>For you, it's not about peacocking around the office, sucking up to the executives, and impressing people with your shiny new company car. No, you are there to do a job, and do it well. You want to see the company grow and you want your input to have impact. When you do that, the titles and money will come to you anyway.</p> <h2>4. You're a natural listener</h2> <p>Have you ever noticed that your co-workers are inclined to tell you their problems? For some reason, you're the go-to shoulder to cry on, or you're getting that phone call at midnight from a friend who really needs your advice before an interview. You clearly have a knack for not just listening to other people's problems, but making them feel like you really hear what they're saying. This is an excellent trait for a manager. It can defuse tense situations at work and help with team-building and employee motivation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-soft-skills-every-employer-values?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Soft Skills Every Employer Values</a>)</p> <h2>5. You are a cheerleader more than a naysayer</h2> <p>Are you a stop sign or a green light? Do you build up ideas or cut them down? Are you generally more positive than negative? If you're nodding, you have the mindset that makes for a great manager. This isn't to say you have to agree with everything and bury your head in the sand when bad ideas are presented. But, you see potential when others don't. You can take the acorn of an idea and help it grow into a mighty oak. Your enthusiasm for the work and the initiatives will benefit your company, your employees, and your career.</p> <h2>6. You are always looking for ways to improve yourself</h2> <p>Self-improvement should never stop. Jim Rohn, a famous motivational speaker, once said, &quot;Work on yourself more than you do on your job.&quot; By following that advice, you will not only become a better person, but a better employee and a valuable contributor. If you have a manager that believes they know it all, that's a cause for concern. The greatest thinkers and entrepreneurs from history continued to learn and improve right up until the day they died. They were smart and humble enough to know that self-improvement is a proven path to success.</p> <h2>7. You show empathy for your teammates</h2> <p>Empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of others. It's important to know the difference between that and being sympathetic, which is an internal feeling and does not take into account someone else's emotions.</p> <p>If you are blessed with great empathy, you have the natural ability to understand what someone else is going through emotionally, and usually know just how to respond to make that person feel better. You listen, you engage, you react, and you leave someone in a better state than you found them. This is a fabulous skill for a manager for obvious reasons. From helping employees with difficult and stressful situations, to dealing with anger, disappointment, and even sorrow, your empathy will take you a long way. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-skill-can-make-you-a-better-boss?ref=seealso" target="_blank">This One Skill Can Make You a Better Boss</a>)</p> <h2>8. You don't get stressed or shaken by sudden change</h2> <p>Turbulence is not just for flights. All businesses, large or small, are going to experience ups and downs. When you're plunged into boiling water, do you go soft like a carrot, hard like an egg, or create something wonderful, like coffee? If you're the latter, you are going to excel in any kind of working environment.</p> <p>Managers that react to sudden change with professionalism, positivity, and a can-do attitude will inspire a team, solve the problem, and come out smelling of roses. What's more, this is a skill that can be learned, strengthened, and refined. So if you currently turn to Jell-O when the pressure is on, find a mentor that can help you get better in a crisis. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-types-of-people-who-will-help-grow-your-career?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Types of People Who Will Help Grow Your Career</a>)</p> <h2>9. You don't get involved in gossip or company politics</h2> <p>That's not to say you don't understand the politics in a company. But there is a difference between knowing how to survive, and actively engaging in all the water cooler chitchat and backstabbing moves. Anyone who climbs the ladder by throwing other people off it will eventually find themselves on the receiving end of the same treatment. And in the process, they will lose the respect of their team. If you avoid all of the nonsense that is inherent in most corporations, you will be a better manager, and honestly, a better person.</p> <h2>10. You are always ready to step up and solve problems</h2> <p>It's always not easy; in fact, it can be downright intimidating or require a bunch of extra work and hassle. But, you do it anyway because you know you can help. That's the attitude of a great manager. You roll up your sleeves and you're not afraid to get dirty. You have no doubt had managers that were more like dictators; they were happy to bark orders, but never stepped up to the plate. Those people do not inspire the same kind of respect and confidence from their employees as the managers that dive in.</p> <h2>11. You put the team and the outcome before personal gain</h2> <p>It's not about you. It's about the end result. You don't feel the need to take credit for those times you swooped in to save the day. In fact, you'd much rather see one of your team members get rewarded for the work they did, even though you were right there with them every step of the way. This selfless attitude is a fantastic trait of a good manager. To be happy when the team does well, and be proud when their employees are getting results, is rare in many organizations. Sadly, a lot of managers are quite happy to take the credit when they've done nothing at all, and that creates awful morale and a loyalty problem. That will never be an issue when you're in charge.</p> <h2>12. You're doing a manager's job already</h2> <p>Take a look at your current task list. What is in your job description, and what are you actually doing day in, day out? You may have been doing way more than required for quite some time now, and that's often the case these days. As departments are downsized, some employees are required to take on more work. So much more that they have actually taken on a managerial role. If this is you, the time is ripe to sit down with your boss or human resources department and talk about a raise. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F12-subtle-signs-youd-make-a-good-boss&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F12%2520Subtle%2520Signs%2520You%2527d%2520Make%2520a%2520Good%2520Boss.jpg&amp;description=12%20Subtle%20Signs%20You'd%20Make%20a%20Good%20Boss"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/12%20Subtle%20Signs%20You%27d%20Make%20a%20Good%20Boss.jpg" alt="12 Subtle Signs You'd Make a Good Boss" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-subtle-signs-youd-make-a-good-boss">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-skill-can-make-you-a-better-boss">This One Skill Can Make You a Better Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-soft-skills-every-employer-values">15 Soft Skills Every Employer Values</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-types-of-people-who-will-help-grow-your-career">7 Types of People Who Will Help Grow Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-your-boss-wishes-youd-tell-them">7 Things Your Boss Wishes You&#039;d Tell Them</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building bosses empathy feedback hidden signs leadership listening managers personality traits soft skills Fri, 13 Apr 2018 08:00:07 +0000 Paul Michael 2122920 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Set Career Goals When You Lack Direction http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-set-career-goals-when-you-lack-direction <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-set-career-goals-when-you-lack-direction" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_standing_in_front_of_chalk_drawn_arrows.jpg" alt="Woman standing in front of chalk drawn arrows" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You're long past the age where people ask you what you want to be when you grow up &mdash; but you're still trying to figure out what you want to be when you grow up. Maybe you're in a dead-end job, or maybe you're out of work. You know that you need to make some positive moves, but you just can't figure out what you want in a career.</p> <p>It's time to block out some time in your calendar to sit down with yourself and make a plan. Here are some things that can help point you in the right direction of your perfect career.</p> <h2>Mark the day when you will quit your job on the calendar</h2> <p>You're about to embark on a journey of self-exploration, and just like a vacation, this journey will have a hard end date. A deadline gives you the urgency you need to figure this all out. Don't feel guilty when you come to work each day knowing that this job has a set ending point. Remember that company loyalty is rarely reciprocated; if it didn't need you anymore, the company would most likely discard you at the drop of a hat.</p> <p>Don't worry about how long you've been on the job. If you have financial reasons to stay, such as union seniority or a pension vesting, certainly take those into consideration. But do not let yourself be stuck in place out of a feeling of obligation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-its-never-too-late-for-a-career-change?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Reasons It's Never Too Late for a Career Change</a>)</p> <h2>Look for self-improvement opportunities at work</h2> <p>Before you leave your current job, explore every benefit your employer offers. If they pay for education, take a class. If they allow telecommuting, set up a day a week that you work from home to arrange your work schedule around job interviews if the need arises. If they have a mentorship program, sign up. Take advantage of every resource at your disposal while you still have them. Don't feel guilty about using these resources when you're planning to leave. Of course, you also shouldn't be slacking off or searching for a new job while on company time, either.</p> <h2>Reach out to your network</h2> <p>At work, in your neighborhood, or among college or high school alumni, ask everyone you know and trust about their workplace and their job. What do they love about it? What kind of staff can they never find enough of? What could they imagine you doing there? Can they give you a tour of their workplace?</p> <p>After college, my husband didn't know what he wanted to do with his art degree. But he met some friends who had a startup video game company, and he started visiting this company after his regular job, offering some of his skills for free and just hanging out. Once he realized how much he liked the work, he ended up pursuing a career as a game artist.</p> <p>When you ask friends and family for career advice, accept that you will get plenty of unrealistic suggestions. These people may not have researched the jobs they're suggesting, so they might not know, for example, how long it takes to start making money as a hair stylist or how long you have to study to become a veterinarian. Pass up the fluff and push people to share their firsthand knowledge about their own jobs and workplaces.</p> <h2>Assess yourself</h2> <p>Take a career aptitude test. It can help you identify what your skills and preferences are and make suggestions on what careers might be within your skill set. You may even learn about a career you didn't know existed.</p> <h2>Try volunteering</h2> <p>For obvious reasons, a volunteer job is a lot easier to get than a paid job, and the commitment tends to be low. So it can be a good opportunity to try out new roles and to uncover passions you didn't know you had. Through volunteering during the cookie sale with my daughters' Girl Scout troops, for example, I learned that I love inventory management, a career path that I never would have imagined for myself.</p> <p>Find out if your company offers paid volunteer time during the weekday, or carve out some evening or weekend time for volunteer jobs. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-college-courses-that-will-boost-your-career?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 College Courses That Will Boost Your Career</a>)</p> <h2>Make a list of what you're passionate about</h2> <p>If you've already tried the first few steps on this list, you've had the opportunity to explore your interests. Now have a meeting with yourself where you list those things. Rank them. You only have one life. Is it most important to you that you spend it in a career that helps children, or is it more important that you get to use your organizational skills? Once you have a short, well-edited list, post it in a place that forces you to look at it every day.</p> <h2>Look for opportunities to pursue your passions in your current job</h2> <p>Once I had a relatively boring copy editing job, but I really wanted to write. I let this desire be known in my company. I brought it up in performance reviews, and I posted a freelance article I'd published on my cubicle wall. After a few months, when a manager needed someone to write something for the company's internal website, she called upon me. It wasn't the journalistic writing I later progressed to, but it was writing, and the task helped push me to look for a real journalism job, which I soon found. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-rekindle-passion-for-your-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Ways to Rekindle Passion for Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>Remember that you're more than your job</h2> <p>Look beyond your current job description when you assess what you have to offer. Consider every positive goal and outcome you've contributed to at work, and how you helped achieve them. Keep those successes in mind &mdash; whether or not they're part of your official job title &mdash; when assessing what abilities you could bring to your next job.</p> <h2>Go back to school</h2> <p>Before you've identified your new career goal, taking a class can help you explore your interests and skills. After you've identified a career goal, taking a class can help you get there. It could be a whole new degree, but it could also be a certification in a software program, a public speaking class, or a professional training program. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-college-courses-that-will-boost-your-career?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 College Courses That Will Boost Your Career</a>)</p> <h2>Lay the groundwork for change</h2> <p>Figuring out your passions and how to use them may take time. During that time, work to prepare your landing pad for the leap you will eventually take. Set aside some money each week for an emergency fund, in case you end up quitting your job before you find a new one. Deal with any personal situation that is taking up too much of your time and energy, whether it's an unhealthy relationship or a nagging health problem.</p> <p>At the same time, don't fall into the trap of believing that conditions must be perfect before you can make your move. Remember that date on the calendar? Work every day toward being prepared when that date comes, but don't push Quitting Day back just because you don't have every single duck in a row.</p> <h2>Invest in yourself</h2> <p>Spend 3 percent of your income on professional development. Attend professional conferences even if your company won't pay for your plane ticket. Read career books. Treat potential mentors to lunch or coffee. Take courses, as mentioned above. All of these activities can help you find or hone those career goals and get you closer to reaching them. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-spending-3-on-you-will-advance-your-career?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Here's How Spending 3% On You Will Advance Your Career</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-set-career-goals-when-you-lack-direction&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Set%2520Career%2520Goals%2520When%2520You%2520Lack%2520Direction.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Set%20Career%20Goals%20When%20You%20Lack%20Direction"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Set%20Career%20Goals%20When%20You%20Lack%20Direction.jpg" alt="How to Set Career Goals When You Lack Direction" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-set-career-goals-when-you-lack-direction">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-work-at-home-seniors-can-master-work-life-balance">9 Ways Work-At-Home Seniors Can Master Work-Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving">How to Ask for Your Old Job Back After Leaving</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-bring-up-with-your-boss-at-your-annual-review">10 Things to Bring Up With Your Boss at Your Annual Review</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career goals classes direction networking passions quitting self reflection volunteering Mon, 09 Apr 2018 08:30:14 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2123013 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Quick Ways to Retrain for a New Career http://www.wisebread.com/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i_have_made_my_tablet_a_mini_workstation.jpg" alt="I have made my tablet a mini workstation" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You need more than an entry-level job to pay the bills, but you don't have the time or funds to get a four-year college degree. Or maybe you already have a college degree, but it's not helping you find work. You could be a stay-at-home parent re-entering the workforce, or a midlevel manager who's sick of your industry and wants to start fresh.</p> <p>If this sounds familiar, you could soon be one of the most in-demand types of workers in America: the &quot;middle skill&quot; worker. More than half of all available jobs fall into this category. These are jobs that require more than a high school diploma, but less than a college degree &mdash; whether it's a certificate program, an apprenticeship, or on-the-job training.</p> <p>If you're ready to switch gears and retrain for a new gig, there are some fast and affordable ways to do that.</p> <h2>1. Pinpoint your target job</h2> <p>Even if you need to get retrained quickly, that doesn't mean you should skip the planning stage. <em>Do not </em>enroll in a training program without knowing what job you're going for and how much it would pay.</p> <p>If you haven't chosen a target industry yet, look at the ones with the highest-paying jobs that don't require a college degree. Once, these jobs were mostly found in manufacturing, but now they're more likely to be in the &quot;skilled services industries,&quot; such as health care, finance, and information technology.</p> <p>Georgetown University lists the <a href="https://goodjobsdata.org/wp-content/uploads/Good-Jobs-States.pdf" target="_blank">top industries and occupations in each state</a> that don't require a BA; in Pennsylvania, for instance, the top industries are manufacturing and health services, and the top occupation is office and administrative support (median earnings: $51,000). You can also check the resources offered by your state development department; California, for example, lists the <a href="http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/customers/middle-skill-infographics.html" target="_blank">most in-demand middle skill occupations</a> for each region. Also think about the job's future; check <a href="https://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_table_103.htm" target="_blank">job growth projections</a> and find out which workers may be <a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2015/05/21/408234543/will-your-job-be-done-by-a-machine" target="_blank">replaced by robots</a>.</p> <p>Besides this online research, you should get the word on the street in your community. Ask your friends and family what type of jobs their employers have trouble filling, what those jobs are like, and what they pay. Visit your local job center and study the openings.</p> <p>Finally, consider working with a vocational counselor or career coach who could guide you. If you recently lost your job, your local workforce agency or your former employer might provide you with this kind of help for free. If not, it may be worth the money to hire one out of pocket. Make sure you find a counselor with experience in the middle-skills market &mdash; not an executive recruiter or coach &mdash; and make it clear what you want out of the relationship before you start.</p> <h2>2. Focus on fit</h2> <p>Once you have a list of promising jobs you could train for, cross out those that you know you don't have the aptitude for or would hate. If you're a couch potato, there's probably no point in trying to get certified as a personal trainer. Ask yourself which jobs could make good use of your soft skills or transferable skills from previous jobs. Take an aptitude test if you don't already know what you're best at. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-soft-skills-every-employer-values?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Soft Skills Every Employer Values</a>)</p> <h2>3. Find the right training program</h2> <p>Local research is probably your best friend here, too. If you can land an informational interview at a prospective employer, find out what certificate, associate degree, or other training they look for or require. Ask contacts who are already in your desired field where they trained and if they would recommend it.</p> <p>Perhaps the most important question you can ask about a job training program is whether it is connected with local companies that hire graduates. Programs codeveloped by hiring companies, or otherwise &quot;demand driven,&quot; produce graduates with higher employment rates.</p> <p>Having teachers who work full-time in the industry can be a plus, too; when my husband was training to be a video game artist, he ended up getting hired as a part-time game tester by one of his teachers, and that job later led to a full-time artist position.</p> <p>You should also research potential schools and programs online. Is the program recognized by a national association for the field? What do students say about the program in forums? Has the school been targeted by student lawsuits for fraud or does it have other bad press? What is the school's graduation and employment rate? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-online-certifications-worth-the-price?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are Online Certifications Worth the Price?</a>)</p> <h2>4. Don't forget the trades</h2> <p>Deciding to become a plumber, electrician, or carpenter isn't a quick fix. It takes four years of apprenticeship, for example, to become a licensed journeyman electrician. That's after passing the union application exam, which many people spend months or years preparing for. On the other hand, you can earn while you learn; the average apprentice electrician earns around $35,000 a year. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Jobs That Pay Over $50K and Don't Require a Bachelor's Degree</a>)</p> <h2>5. Try temping</h2> <p>Registering with one or more temporary agencies can be more than a way to make ends meet while researching your career move; it can be a way of conducting that research. Think about it: If you apply for a job or even attend a job interview, you get a very limited peek inside the company. But as a temp, you'll spend all day on the inside. You could be exposed to job roles you might not have even known about. Ask questions of everyone you work with, from the agency staff, to your on-site supervisor, to co-workers.</p> <h2>6. Look for retraining opportunities within your current company</h2> <p>If you like where you work, try to get trained for a better job within the organization. You might approach a manager about this, or you could ask human resources what education programs the company has.</p> <p>You might also discreetly talk to other managers, or browse internal job listings. I recently met someone who had been driving a forklift at a large grocery warehouse, until the company paid for her to get trained in refrigerator/freezer repair. Now she makes more money and has more job satisfaction, without ever having to interview for a new job.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Quick%2520Ways%2520to%2520Retrain%2520for%2520a%2520New%2520Career.jpg&amp;description=6%20Quick%20Ways%20to%20Retrain%20for%20a%20New%20Career"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Quick%20Ways%20to%20Retrain%20for%20a%20New%20Career.jpg" alt="6 Quick Ways to Retrain for a New Career" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree">5 Jobs That Pay Over $50K and Don&#039;t Require a Bachelor&#039;s Degree</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-escape-a-dying-industry">8 Ways to Escape a Dying Industry</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job">12 Things You Should Do in the First Six Months of a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-your-boss-wishes-youd-tell-them">7 Things Your Boss Wishes You&#039;d Tell Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building apprenticeships certifications job growth middle skills new job research retraining training programs Fri, 06 Apr 2018 09:00:07 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2120733 at http://www.wisebread.com What to Do If Your Employer Won't Pay You http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-your-employer-wont-pay-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-to-do-if-your-employer-wont-pay-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businesswoman_under_stress.jpg" alt="Businesswoman under stress" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Work is a formal contract. Employees dedicate their time and expertise to fulfill a set role or task. Employers compensate workers for their time with a monetary wage. In an ideal world, both parties profit from the arrangement.</p> <p>Unfortunately, not all bosses fulfill their end of the bargain. Company wage theft costs the U.S. workforce billions of dollars every year, according to The Economic Policy Institute. Employers have been known to shortchange employees by:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Refusing to pay them altogether.</p> </li> <li> <p>Handing over a non-valid check.</p> </li> <li> <p>Refusing to give paid breaks where legally required.</p> </li> <li> <p>Paying under the federal, state, or county minimum wage.</p> </li> <li> <p>Having employees work off the clock.</p> </li> <li> <p>Taking tips.</p> </li> </ul> <p>What do you do when you realize your boss isn't properly compensating you?</p> <h2>Document the problem</h2> <p>The first thing you should do is document the problem. Make a copy of your pay stub. If you have access to the time management software the organization uses, print the reported hours worked. Begin documenting any past or ongoing &quot;bad&quot; behavior.</p> <p>On top of that, keep track of any financial fallout you experience from the wage loss. This can include:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Missed bills.</p> </li> <li> <p>Missed loan payments.</p> </li> <li> <p>Late fees.</p> </li> <li> <p>Bank fees.</p> </li> </ul> <h2>Check in with the company</h2> <p>The next step is to check with the company. It might just be an honest mistake that can be remedied quickly.</p> <p>If you're currently an employee, talk with human resources or a manager about the problem. They can direct you to the right department if they can't help you themselves. If you're a former employee, you might try contacting a former manager, human resources, or a general contact email about pay discrepancy.</p> <p>If the company won't respond and won't pay you for all hours worked at the right wage, there are steps you can take to potentially recoup all or some of the money. There aren't, unfortunately, any one-size-fits-all solutions to this problem. There are, however, a variety of strategies you can try to force your former or current employer to compensate you properly.</p> <h2>Dealing with wage theft on a state level</h2> <p>Reporting wage theft is highly dependent on the individual state. Every state has slightly different laws and procedures to help employees report and recover stolen wages.</p> <p>First, you can file a wage claim through your state's Department of Labor. If you go this route, state department of labor investigators will look into your case.</p> <p>This may seem like the most obvious and easy route, but it can be a long journey that might be doomed to fail. Recently website Politico reported that six states had no investigators to look into wage violations, and 26 states have fewer than 10 investigators. The end result is that many individuals who report wage claim violations to their state never see their money.</p> <p>An alternate option is to file a civil complaint in court against the business. The court that the complaint is filed with depends on the monetary amount.</p> <h2>Dealing with wage theft on a federal level</h2> <p>If filing a complaint at the state level isn't a viable option, individuals can file a complaint with the Wage-Hour Division of the U.S. Department of Labor. According to Politico, the department has about a 90 percent success rate in recovering stolen wages.</p> <p>The success rate does seem impressive, but it should be noted that the department is very selective on the cases they take on. Investigators at the department don't accept every claim that comes through the door.</p> <p>And unfortunately, even if they do take on your case, don't be surprised if they can't recover all the money that you're owed. The U.S. Department of Labor can only recover the federal minimum wage. That means if you should have been paid above the federal minimum wage, you still might be looking at a significant loss.</p> <h2>Alternate options to dealing with wage theft</h2> <p>If you belong to a labor union, take the case to union representatives. They should, at the very least, point you in the right direction. The union might even be willing to file a grievance on your behalf if they believe the case is strong enough.</p> <p>If the wage theft is widespread at the company, employees might be able to band together to file a collective action complaint. A collective action complaint allows groups of employees with similar Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) wage violations to file a complaint against the company together. A collective action complaint, unlike a class-action lawsuit, requires employees to actively sign onto the lawsuit in writing. Employees that don't consent to join the complaint won't benefit or be bound by the ruling. Collective action complaints must be filed, in most cases, within two years.</p> <p>If you're not sure of your best option, it's recommended that you consult with and possibly hire a lawyer to represent your interests. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-times-to-hire-a-lawyer-immediately?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Times to Hire a Lawyer Immediately</a>)</p> <p>In the meantime, make it a priority to switch jobs. If your employer has been flat out refusing to pay you <em>period</em>, jump ship now. Yes, you might have to go without a paycheck for a time, but you're already experiencing that now. You deserve better than an employer that has shady business practices. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-you-should-quit-your-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Signs You Should Quit Your Job</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fwhat-to-do-if-your-employer-wont-pay-you&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FWhat%2520to%2520Do%2520If%2520Your%2520Employer%2520Won%2527t%2520Pay%2520You.jpg&amp;description=What%20to%20Do%20If%20Your%20Employer%20Won't%20Pay%20You"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/What%20to%20Do%20If%20Your%20Employer%20Won%27t%20Pay%20You.jpg" alt="What to Do If Your Employer Won't Pay You" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-your-employer-wont-pay-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise">The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-your-paycheck-bounces">What to Do If Your Paycheck Bounces</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-your-boss-wishes-youd-tell-them">7 Things Your Boss Wishes You&#039;d Tell Them</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building boss department of labor employer Fair Labor Standards Act hiring a lawyer minimum wage rights wage theft Mon, 02 Apr 2018 08:30:14 +0000 Samantha Stauf 2118486 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Things You Should Do in the First Six Months of a New Job http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/leading_a_great_team_to_success_0.jpg" alt="Leading a great team to success" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A new job comes with a lot of excitement, trepidation, and change. While you're settling into your new role, it's easy to forget the reasons you got the job, and the things you need to do to make sure you keep it, grow, and move up the ladder. Here is a guide to the first six months on the new job, with what you should aim to achieve by month one, month three, and month six.</p> <h2>The first month</h2> <p>Some would say it's the hardest month, but that's not always true. As a newbie, you'll be cut a little slack, but after the first month you'll see that wiggle room disappear. So, take advantage of it, and do whatever you can to create an excellent impression. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job</a>)</p> <h3>1. Establish yourself as a conscientious worker</h3> <p>First impressions last. During the first month on the job, get in early and leave late as often as you can. Never do that the other way around; you need to become a valued team member before you occasionally duck out early or stroll in a little late. You should also be making sure you cross every t and dot every i. No mistakes. No sloppy work. No excuses. Think of your first month as a trial period. During this time, you're still being tested, and you want an A. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-ways-to-make-a-fantastic-first-impression?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Simple Ways to Make a Fantastic First Impression</a>)</p> <h3>2. Ask as many questions as you can</h3> <p>How do things work? Who are the people you need to know? Who are the heads of the different departments, and what do they do? What are the challenges of the company? What are the strengths? Become the most inquisitive employee you can, and take notes. Learn from the people that have been at the company for years, but remember to take some comments with caution. Jaded employees can inaccurately color your view of the company. Also, don't be afraid to watch how people do certain tasks. Ask if you can shadow them; most of the time, they'll be flattered that you want their expertise.</p> <h3>3. Find out what is expected of you</h3> <p>Job descriptions are all well and good, but once you have the position, you may find out that reality is a little different from perception. The employer may have painted a glowing picture of the company, but it might not really be all smooth sailing. Also, managers and interviewers are only human, and may have forgotten a few of your duties.</p> <p>So, make sure you sit down with your supervisor as soon as you can after starting in your new position, and find out exactly what is required of you. Do you have to submit reports, and if so, when? How will your daily duties be assessed? What standards are you required to meet? Get it all down, and if possible, get your boss to acknowledge it.</p> <h3>4. Get to know your colleagues</h3> <p>Whether you're working in a massive corporation or a mom 'n' pop shop, you need to make an effort to get to know people. Do it sooner rather than later, otherwise you may come across as anti-social or aloof.</p> <p>You don't have to be the life and soul of the department, but find the time to introduce yourself to the people you'll be working with on a regular basis. Learn about their roles, and how you can help each other out. You're not looking to make best friends, you're simply laying the foundation for a good working relationship. If possible, ask for an organization chart from human resources or your supervisor, so that you can see how you fit into the company.</p> <h3>5. Show enthusiasm and passion for your role</h3> <p>The first month may present unexpected challenges, but you have to take them all in stride. You've only been on the job around 30 days, so you really haven't had the time or experiences to become jaded and downtrodden. Remember, you are fresh blood and there will be an expectation for you to inject new life into the department. So, approach your job with zeal and energy, and try to turn every challenge into an opportunity.</p> <h2>Three months in</h2> <p>Crunchtime. The honeymoon period is over. Now, you're part of the team and should know what you're doing. By now, your employer will expect to see you start walking the talk you gave in the interview. In many ways, this is your make-it-or-break-it milestone.</p> <h3>6. Find a mentor</h3> <p>After three months, you'll have a pretty good lay of the land. Now, if you haven't already done so, you need to connect with someone that can really help you get ahead in the company.</p> <p>This is not about sucking up or finding cliques to cover your back. In fact, either of those strategies can often have a negative impact on your career. Instead, consider who the shining stars are in the company. Who are the ones leading the charge? Who has a lot of common sense and business savvy? Who is respected or admired, even if he or she is not the most popular person at work? That is someone you should be looking to for advice.</p> <h3>7. Get a feel for your performance so far</h3> <p>Some organizations insist on a performance review after three months. Some are more relaxed. If you haven't been invited to a meeting with your supervisor to discuss your progress, take the initiative and set one up.</p> <p>This is a great time to establish, on paper if possible, what the positives and negatives have been about your first 90 days. Hopefully, it's way more good than bad, but don't be afraid to ask about the latter. What can you improve? Where have you made a few missteps? Your boss will appreciate your candor, and will be more invested in you if he or she believes you genuinely want to be better.</p> <p>Set some goals, but also get down your achievements and your contributions to the company so far. This is also a great time to read your boss directly. Are you getting good vibes and positive body language? Are you hearing a lot of references to the future? This means you're becoming valued.</p> <h3>8. Begin to push boundaries</h3> <p>After three months, you should know which rules to follow, and more importantly, which rules you can bend a little. This kind of flexibility will come in handy when you want to push ideas or initiatives that have, for one reason or another, never been implemented.</p> <p>As a newcomer to the business, you will have a fresh set of eyes on problems and solutions. You also aren't weighed down by the baggage of being told no a bunch of times. You will be amazed at what can be achieved simply by not having any history with the typical negativity or cynicism that can come from years of doing things the same old ways. What's more, even if your ideas don't come to fruition, the fact that you're really trying to push boundaries and make things happen will be seen as positive.</p> <h3>9. Make your voice heard</h3> <p>It's not easy to speak up during the first few months. You're new, you don't know how a lot of things work, and you could be saying things that may sound naive, or are just uninformed due to your lack of company experience. After three months, however, you should have a good grasp of the culture, the business, and the successes and failures that have come before you. Now is the time to start speaking up and get noticed for the right reasons.</p> <p>Often the people that get the promotions aren't the brightest or the most talented &mdash; they're simply the loudest. They speak up, they say what they're thinking, and they are not a wallflower in the weekly status meeting. Do likewise. Don't speak all the time and have nothing to say, but don't stay quiet and let someone else make the point you wanted to make two days earlier. You're good at your job. You have great ideas. Now &hellip; let everyone else know that.</p> <h2>Six months in</h2> <p>By this point, you can breathe a little easier. You've been accepted, you will probably have a six-month review coming up, and you'll want to reinforce the positives you've achieved. However, this is no time to rest on your laurels.</p> <h3>10. Establish a network of professionals</h3> <p>You're settled in. You've made a name for yourself. You're comfortable with your day-to-day tasks, and have a good feeling for the place. This is the perfect time to reconnect with some of your old colleagues and professional friends, for several reasons.</p> <p>First, it never hurts to have friends in other businesses. They can help you should you ever get laid off or want to switch jobs. They can also offer valuable advice. Some of these friends may help you win new business for your new company, or give you leads that turn into great opportunities.</p> <p>Perhaps most importantly, friends who know you and what you do can really help when times get tough. After six months, the bloom will definitely have gone off the rose, and you'll start to see problems that now seem impossible to solve, or challenges that the culture make impossible to change. This network of professionals will be there for you, and could help you on those days you really need a boost.</p> <h3>11. Cement your reputation</h3> <p>You have six months of solid work behind you (hopefully). It's time to use that bank of achievements to establish yourself as an indispensable member of the team. This doesn't mean bragging or constantly bringing up your wins. What it does mean is using what you have learned to have a positive and lasting impact on other initiatives. Your contributions on certain projects can be your &quot;in&quot; to larger developments. You have proved yourself on smaller jobs, now is the time to build on that success. From the foundation you have worked hard to establish, you can start looking at the next role.</p> <h3>12. Set your sights on a raise/promotion</h3> <p>If you have worked wonders for the company, you could have built up enough validation for a raise and/or promotion even though you've only been at the company for six months. Take a look at the hierarchy, talk to the human resources department (if you have one), and find out the process and procedures involved in getting promoted or adding to your paycheck.</p> <p>It's quite possible that there is a history of some people being promoted after six months, or even less. It's also possible that there are some gaps in some departments, and you are a natural for that larger role. Scope it out. Start asking for more responsibility. Begin doing the job you want, not the one you currently have. Even if it doesn't pay off right away, you will be seen as a go-getter, and someone that is valued enough to get a raise or promotion to keep you from looking elsewhere. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F12%2520Things%2520You%2520Should%2520Do%2520in%2520the%2520First%2520Six%2520Months%2520of%2520a%2520New%2520Job.jpg&amp;description=12%20Things%20You%20Should%20Do%20in%20the%20First%20Six%20Months%20of%20a%20New%20Job"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/12%20Things%20You%20Should%20Do%20in%20the%20First%20Six%20Months%20of%20a%20New%20Job.jpg" alt="12 Things You Should Do in the First Six Months of a New Job" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/starting-a-new-job-3-rules-to-live-by">Starting a New Job: 3 Rules to Live By</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">8 Career Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career">6 Quick Ways to Retrain for a New Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building coworkers expectations first impressions goals new job performance reviews six months timeline Mon, 26 Mar 2018 09:30:23 +0000 Paul Michael 2115361 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Types of People Who Will Help Grow Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/7-types-of-people-who-will-help-grow-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-types-of-people-who-will-help-grow-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/enjoying_coffee_and_good_company.jpg" alt="Enjoying coffee and good company" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The people you meet before, and during, your career can shape what kind of professional future you will have. If you meet the right people, it could lead to success after success, and a life filled with opportunity and growth.</p> <p>But who are these motivational figures? Where do you find them? And what should you be looking for? Let's uncover the people who will be instrumental in helping you forge a great career path.</p> <h2>1. A great boss</h2> <p>There are good bosses, and bad bosses. The latter won't really teach you much, other than what <em>not </em>to do to be successful. Good bosses, they're fine. They motivate you, know how to build a team, and won't stab you in the back. But a great boss is another story. Most of us will be lucky enough to have at least one great boss in our lifetime, and that person's influence can change the course of your career.</p> <p>A great boss will take you under his or her wing and want you to succeed. They will share every tip and trick they have learned over the years, and become your biggest cheerleader. They may even train you to be their own replacement. Great bosses, like great teachers, leave their mark on you. Cherish your time with this person, and learn everything you can while they are still around.</p> <h2>2. Faithful friends</h2> <p>Like great bosses, genuine friends are few and far between. We have our go-to set of mates; the ones we like to go out with to a bar or baseball game. But the friend that you can trust with your secrets, worries, and plans for the future &mdash; that's a diamond in the rough.</p> <p>A friend like this will have no problem telling you that your boss is taking advantage of you, or that you're in a dead-end job that is making you miserable. On the other hand, they could give you that push you need to ask for the raise or promotion. And after a really crappy day at work, they'll help you put things in perspective and give you a much-needed emotional crutch.</p> <h2>3. Professional career counselors</h2> <p>Now, more than ever, a career counselor can be invaluable. Industries are changing, dying, and being born at a lightning-fast pace. Careers that just 10 years ago looked promising could soon be going the way of the dinosaurs, and other industries you may never even have considered are popping up left, right, and center.</p> <p>A professional career counselor cannot only help you identify these promising careers, but also give you the advice you need to climb the corporate ladder and earn a very comfortable living. There are obviously good and bad counselors out there, so do your research and check recommendations on LinkedIn. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-great-jobs-for-the-next-10-years?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Great Jobs for the Next 10 Years</a>)</p> <h2>4. An alumnus</h2> <p>If you went to a college, university, trade school, or any other kind of learning establishment, tap into that rich source of contacts. Many of the people you met there will have gone on to get great jobs, and will have a network of people they rely upon. Not only that, but your alumni association is also an excellent resource. The services they offer go far beyond social events and newsletters. Reach out to them and you will get advice on career choices, as well as access to business prospects and friends of the alumni who are only too happy to help.</p> <h2>5. Your family</h2> <p>The support you get from your family can be invaluable. Your family sometimes knows you better than you know yourself, and they can see through some poor career choices that you may be way too close to. Never be afraid to reach out to your family for advice; even if that means mending a few bridges from some old disputes.</p> <h2>6. Volunteers</h2> <p>This can be split into two categories. First, there are the people who run volunteer organizations. From helping feed the homeless and caring for abandoned pets, to building affordable homes and caring for local parks, your state will have many ways to volunteer. Not only will you be doing good, but the people who run these organizations will have access to a network of people that may help you in your career.</p> <p>There are also the volunteers themselves. You'd be amazed at the variety of professionals that donate their time. You could bump into the CEO of a local company, or the owner of a business you've always wanted to work for. At the very least, you may make a few new friends. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-benefits-of-volunteering?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Unexpected Benefits of Volunteering</a>)</p> <h2>7. A mentor</h2> <p>Anyone can become a mentor. It could be a boss, a work colleague, a friend, a complete stranger you meet in a bar, or even your neighbor. It's not about who they are, but what they have to offer.</p> <p>Most of the time, this will be someone that has already been down the road you have chosen to travel, and can give you invaluable advice. It could also be someone from a completely different industry or background, but with an outlook and energy that gets you motivated to do better, and go further. Mentors are everywhere; you just have to be ready to answer when opportunity knocks.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-types-of-people-who-will-help-grow-your-career&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Types%2520of%2520People%2520Who%2520Will%2520Help%2520Grow%2520Your%2520Career.jpg&amp;description=7%20Types%20of%20People%20Who%20Will%20Help%20Grow%20Your%20Career"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Types%20of%20People%20Who%20Will%20Help%20Grow%20Your%20Career.jpg" alt="7 Types of People Who Will Help Grow Your Career" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-types-of-people-who-will-help-grow-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-simple-rules-of-excellent-houseguest-etiquette">11 Simple Rules of Excellent Houseguest Etiquette</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-work-at-home-seniors-can-master-work-life-balance">9 Ways Work-At-Home Seniors Can Master Work-Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job">12 Things You Should Do in the First Six Months of a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">8 Career Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-subtle-signs-youd-make-a-good-boss">12 Subtle Signs You&#039;d Make a Good Boss</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building bosses career growth coworkers family friends inspiration mentors people you meet support Wed, 21 Mar 2018 10:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 2120289 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Ways an Annual Self Review Can Boost Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-an-annual-self-review-can-boost-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-ways-an-annual-self-review-can-boost-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/young_woman_working_in_her_offfice.jpg" alt="Young woman working in her office" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are formal performance reviews, and informal performance reviews. There are also self-reviews, and many of us don't take the time to sit down and do one.</p> <p>It's crucial to spend some quality time reviewing the last 12 months of your time on the job. You should evaluate your own goals and accomplishments at work just as your boss would. This will give you a chance to be honest with yourself in a way you can't be with your boss, and use that to really hit a home run when the official review comes around. Here's how you can get started.</p> <h2>1. Recognize all that you've accomplished in the last year</h2> <p>Start your annual review by poring over everything you have worked on during the last 12 months. Hopefully, you have a way to keep track of all your projects, whether it's computer files, physical files and folders, or photographs and documentation of your work. Begin in January and really take the time to go through each month carefully.</p> <p>This list will become the foundation for any kind of raise or promotion you're looking to get, and it is also a great way to boost your self-esteem and start the review on a high note. Look at everything you did. You rocked it.</p> <h2>2. Identify the goals you did not meet</h2> <p>Moving on from that list of accomplishments, you should now be able to compare it to the goals you set for yourself last year. If you didn't actively do that, take some time to write down everything you had hoped to achieve over the year.</p> <p>Now, what did you miss? What did you do, but not as well as you'd have liked? What was a priority at the start of the year, but got thrown onto the back-burner? What was simply forgotten in the chaos? Highlight these unmet goals and add them to the top of the list of goals you want to set for the coming year. Which leads nicely into the next point.</p> <h2>3. Establish new goals for the coming year</h2> <p>You've identified what you achieved, and what you didn't get around to in the previous year. Now, it's time to make a list of new goals. How has the company changed and grown over the past year? Has it created new opportunities for you? Is there more money to play with? Do you have a larger team working under you, or with you? Has there been a significant change in management, or even a merger? Has the economy or current events created issues or challenges that need to be addressed?</p> <p>Although you don't have a crystal ball, you can make some good predictions based on your own experiences and those of your colleagues. Set new goals for yourself, and don't be afraid to aim high on a few of them. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-steps-to-achieving-all-your-goals?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Steps to Achieving All Your Goals</a>)</p> <h2>4. Get a good grasp of your strengths and weaknesses</h2> <p>There are two sides to every appraisal, just like there are two sides to every story. As you look at the accomplishments you have made over the year, and some of the tasks you didn't get around to completing, you should start to see a pattern. You'll be able to identify your greatest strengths based on the successes you had. You'll also be able to spot your weaknesses from the projects or initiatives that were not quite as successful.</p> <p>What were the commonalities in each case? Are you highly organized with superb attention to detail? Great. However, did this lead to being so focused on some tasks that others did not get the attention they deserved? Feel free to reach out to coworkers and friends and ask them to give it to you straight. Then, put a plan together to build on those strengths while building up your weaknesses.</p> <h2>5. Discover what you've learned since your last review</h2> <p>You've come a long way, baby. That's something you'll hear a lot when you're first starting out in your career, and rightly so. When you first enter the workplace you're very green and have a lot to learn. Within a year, you'll have developed a dizzying array of new skills. As technology changes, and industries evolve, so too will your abilities. Look at where you were this time last year, and think about what you know now that you didn't back then. It can be quite an eye opener.</p> <h2>6. Figure out which skills you want to develop</h2> <p>It's important to take a long, hard look at your current skill set to see what is missing and what needs to be developed. Are you right where you need to be for your particular position in the company? Are you seeing a lack of skills that are increasingly in demand, while having other skills that are slowly being phased out? There is no time like the present to act on this. If you're lucky, your employer will pay for classes that directly benefit the company, so talk to your human resources department. You may also be able to get grants or attend free classes in your area.</p> <h2>7. See yourself from the boss's perspective</h2> <p>This one is tough. You know yourself, but do you really know what the boss thinks of you? Look back and analyze the past year. What were your interactions with the boss like? Did you find yourself going to him or her with a lot of problems, but few solutions? Are you a bit of a chatterbox, or do you sneak in late and escape a little early? Are you a team player? Do you go above and beyond? Are you cynical, or known to be a naysayer? This kind of self-analysis isn't easy, but the self reflection can help you identify areas you need to work on. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-bring-up-with-your-boss-at-your-annual-review?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Things to Bring Up With Your Boss at Your Annual Review</a>)</p> <h2>8. Be one step ahead of the game</h2> <p>When you give yourself an annual review, you are setting yourself up for success when it's time for the boss to do your official appraisal. You'll already have answers to some of the most common questions, like, &quot;What have you achieved over the past year?&quot; or, &quot;What skills do you want to work on?&quot; You've done the thinking. You've gone through the year, and you know all of your strengths and weaknesses. You will be so tightly prepared that you may well knock the socks off your supervisor with your level of professionalism.</p> <h2>9. Give yourself positive reinforcement</h2> <p>At the end of the day, we're all way too hard on ourselves. We inflate small problems to be way bigger than they really are. We focus on all the things we said wrong. We cringe at comments we made that got more than a few raised eyebrows in meetings. But when all is said and done, we're all just trying to make a living, do a good day's work, and provide for ourselves and our loved ones. So pat yourself on the back. Seriously. Be proud of the year you've had, and the challenges you overcame. You may only do this once a year, so make the most of it.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-ways-an-annual-self-review-can-boost-your-career&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520Ways%2520an%2520Annual%2520Self%2520Review%2520Can%2520Boost%2520Your%2520Career.jpg&amp;description=9%20Ways%20an%20Annual%20Self%20Review%20Can%20Boost%20Your%20Career"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20Ways%20an%20Annual%20Self%20Review%20Can%20Boost%20Your%20Career.jpg" alt="9 Ways an Annual Self Review Can Boost Your Career" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-an-annual-self-review-can-boost-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job">12 Things You Should Do in the First Six Months of a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-set-career-goals-when-you-lack-direction">How to Set Career Goals When You Lack Direction</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/create-a-reverse-bucket-list-to-improve-your-money-management">Create a Reverse Bucket List to Improve Your Money Management</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building accomplishments appraisals goals job reviews performance reviews self evaluation self reflection skills strengths weaknesses Tue, 20 Mar 2018 09:30:17 +0000 Paul Michael 2116587 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Manage Two Jobs (Without Burning Out) http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-manage-two-jobs-without-burning-out <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-manage-two-jobs-without-burning-out" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/the_many_crumpled_papers_on_desk.jpg" alt="The many crumpled papers on desk" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Many households these days have two incomes. The thing is, it's not uncommon for those two income streams to come from the same person.</p> <p>If you're in that boat &mdash; working two jobs that eat up most (or all) of your time &mdash; you could be headed for burnout. When that happens, your risk your health, your mental wellbeing, and losing the money those jobs provide. Here are some tips to bring back some balance and stability to your hectic schedule.</p> <h2>You must make time for yourself</h2> <p>Just as it's important to put away a little money each month for your savings, it's equally important to tuck away some personal time as well. You may be thinking that there aren't enough hours in the day, but all work and no play is a recipe for serious burnout. When that happens, you could lose one or both of those jobs you depend on.</p> <p>Even if you just take your lunch outside and eat it in the sunshine, away from the hustle and bustle, that small act of getting a breather can really cheer you up. Ideally, you should set aside time away from both jobs so that you can destress naturally. See a movie, hang out with friends for a few hours, take a hike, ride a bike, soak in the tub, or take up a fun hobby. If you don't make some time to yourself, you are going to suffer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-signs-youre-burned-out-and-how-to-recover?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Signs You're Burned Out (and How to Recover)</a>)</p> <h2>Treat yourself when you can</h2> <p>If you are constantly working to pay bills and nothing else, you're living to work. That's no kind of existence. By working night and day on two or more jobs, but not seeing any of that hard work result in some kind of happiness, you'll resent it so much that you could have a breakdown.</p> <p>So, spend a little of that money on something that makes you genuinely happy. You don't have to run out and buy a Louis Vuitton watch or a pair of Gucci shoes. Something small and inexpensive, but wonderful for you and your state of mind, is all that you need. Maybe it's a massage or a manicure. It could be a treat from the local candy store, or a special delicacy you enjoy. You put tremendous effort and sacrifice into earning a living &mdash; you deserve to enjoy those earnings once in a while. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/treat-yourself-with-these-7-free-self-care-routines?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Treat Yourself With These 7 Free Self-Care Routines</a>)</p> <h2>Think positive</h2> <p>Easier said than done, right? After all, what's fun about working two jobs just to make ends meet? Having said that, this is the reality you're living with. You can either do two jobs feeling miserable and hating life, or approach it with a positive state of mind.</p> <p>One of the easiest ways to do this is to keep a daily list of the good things that happened to you that day. Even if it's as simple as, &quot;Today I paid all my bills and did not get charged a late fee,&quot; it's something that lifts you up. Are you healthy? Is your family happy and doing well? Are you doing a job that is way better than other ones out there? Remember, many people are paid awful wages and cannot afford some of life's basics. In comparison, are you thriving? Find the good and write it down.</p> <h2>Release the pressure</h2> <p>Just like a pressure cooker, if you don't let off steam, you could blow. Now, how you do that will depend on what motivates you. Some people release all that pressure by working out, which is very beneficial to your health. Others party hard every Friday night. You could even take up boxing, or buy a punching bag and beat the living daylights out of it. Scream into a pillow if you have to, or find a friend to help you share your problems.</p> <p>You could also think about seeing a therapist if you can afford it. Many insurance plans offer mental health copays as low as $20. Talking it out with an objective third party can be a great way to cope with the two job burden. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-tricks-to-avoid-workout-burnout?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Tricks to Avoid Workout Burnout</a>)</p> <h2>Do whatever you can to make the jobs enjoyable</h2> <p>Again, this is not always easy. Some jobs really are awful, and that is difficult to ignore on the best of days. But if you can find ways to make either job even a little more tolerable, you'll find it easier to juggle them both.</p> <p>Can you play fun games with colleagues while you're working? For example, many copywriters in ad agencies will take bets on who can put the most ridiculous word or phrase into a piece of copy that actually gets approved. Are there challenges you can set yourself? Records you can break? Tasks that, with a slight tweak, can be made interesting, or even fun? Your job, or jobs, may suck, but a slight paradigm shift could make them much easier to tolerate.</p> <h2>Finally, keep your house in order</h2> <p>It sucks to think about housework and chores when you're busy, but it's even worse to come home to a messy house with a sink full of dishes and piles of laundry everywhere. Working two jobs gives you even less time to spend cleaning and tidying, which is a little ironic as a tidy home is essential when you're always working.</p> <p>Make a schedule and stick to it. Create a task list in order of importance and focus on that. Do tidying &quot;as you go,&quot; such as washing kitchen utensils as you're making the meal. If you live with other people, get everyone in the habit of cleaning their own plate, and get everyone to do their share. Kids are not helpless; they can certainly be helping clean up long before they are 10 years old. You can reward them with time in front of the TV, computer, or video game system if you have one. By keeping a clean house, you can actually come home and relax after a very busy and stressful day.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-manage-two-jobs-without-burning-out&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Manage%2520Two%2520Jobs%2520%2528Without%2520Burning%2520Out%2529.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Manage%20Two%20Jobs%20(Without%20Burning%20Out)"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Manage%20Two%20Jobs%20%28Without%20Burning%20Out%29.jpg" alt="How to Manage Two Jobs (Without Burning Out)" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-manage-two-jobs-without-burning-out">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-your-work-life-balance-is-off">9 Signs Your Work-Life Balance Is Off</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/here-s-why-you-shouldn-t-work-in-your-downtime">Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Work in Your Downtime</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-keep-anxiety-from-ruining-your-budget">5 Ways to Keep Anxiety From Ruining Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-stay-calm-in-stressful-moments">7 Ways to Stay Calm in Stressful Moments</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/long-hours-and-other-employer-demands">Long Hours and Other Employer Demands</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Lifestyle burnout employment exhaustion overworked self care stress time management two jobs Wed, 14 Mar 2018 09:31:18 +0000 Paul Michael 2114570 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Negotiate a Raise Out of the Blue http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-negotiate-a-raise-out-of-the-blue <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-negotiate-a-raise-out-of-the-blue" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/business_people_at_the_cafe_restaurant_0.jpg" alt="Business People at the Cafe Restaurant" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>I want a raise.</em> It's a thought that most people have at some point or another. After all, you're an outstanding employee. You work hard. Of course you deserve a raise.</p> <p>A yearly or biyearly raise is common, but not a guarantee. In certain instances, it may fall upon you as the employee to ask for an increase in pay.</p> <p>Raises outside the normal pay structure should be treated like salary negotiations. The more leverage you bring to the table, the higher the chance you'll get something out of the negotiation. Here are a few things to keep in mind as you build your case.</p> <h2>Consider the company</h2> <p>Before you waste time cooking up a strategy, be realistic about the organization that employs you. Is it the type of company that works hard to cultivate and keep talent? Or is there a high turnover rate with little value placed on individual contributions?</p> <p>If the company doesn't value its workers, you can certainly open the topic of a raise, but the chances of a successful negotiation may not be in your favor. After all, why pay an employee more when there are countless individuals that will do the same job for less? In these circumstance, you would be better served focusing your time on looking for a job elsewhere.</p> <p>There's also the issue of financials. Is the organization financially stable enough to give you an unplanned raise? If the company isn't in a good place, the chances of obtaining a raise might be less likely. In these instances, you should come to the table with concrete evidence of how you've exceeded expectations in your contributions to the company. It's vital that you prove that a raise will be a long-term investment that could turn the company around. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise</a>)</p> <h2>Consider your performance</h2> <p>Now, you must ask yourself objectively: Do you deserve a raise?</p> <p>A raise, especially an unplanned raise, is a financial investment by your employer. Before you even broach the topic, analyze your last six to eight months with the company. Here are a few questions to ask yourself:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Have you taken on new tasks that are outside of your normal duties?</p> </li> <li> <p>Do you outperform your coworkers?</p> </li> <li> <p>Do you consistently get verbal or written praise by management for a job well done?</p> </li> <li> <p>Do you contribute to the development and performance of coworkers?</p> </li> <li> <p>Do you earn extra financial gains for the company?</p> </li> <li> <p>Is your current wage below the normal pay for the profession in the surrounding area?</p> </li> </ul> <p>You should, ideally, be able to answer yes to at least a few of the above questions. If you can't answer yes to <em>any</em> of the questions, you probably don't have enough leverage to negotiate a raise successfully. It would be smarter to wait until you have more evidence in your corner before approaching management about a salary negotiation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a>)</p> <h2>Preparing for a salary negotiation</h2> <p>As you prepare to ask for a raise, begin to collect evidence that you deserve one. Make a list of your noteworthy projects or accomplishments over the past year. You can write your accomplishments out in a resume, but it's not required. You should at least be able to speak about them in detail if necessary. You can start by:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Making note of any tasks that have been added to your regular duties.</p> </li> <li> <p>Listing any big projects you successfully completed or led.</p> </li> <li> <p>Quantifying above-average productivity or success.</p> </li> <li> <p>Documenting any positive remarks from individuals in management about your performance over the past year.</p> </li> </ul> <p>If you don't already know it, research what the average salary is for other professionals in your field <em>and</em> region. You don't want to try to argue that you deserve a wage equivalent to a big city salary if you work in an area with a lower cost of living and lower salaries overall. You can check Glassdoor or Salary.com for average salary stats in a number of fields and regions.</p> <h2>Be flexible during negotiations</h2> <p>When you do engage in salary negotiations, be flexible. Salary negotiations might not lead to a direct monetary raise. The company might not be prepared to invest more in personnel salaries or they might have a very strict pay structure that management doesn't have the power to override.</p> <p>Don't be afraid to explore other types of perks or benefits that the company could offer to ensure a long-term partnership. Other perks that might be negotiated are:</p> <ul> <li> <p>The ability to telecommute.</p> </li> <li> <p>A more flexible work schedule.</p> </li> <li> <p>Company-funded education or training opportunities.</p> </li> <li> <p>An increase in paid or unpaid vacation time.</p> </li> <li> <p>A new cash or share bonus.</p> </li> </ul> <p>If management cannot offer a new perk or benefit, it might be a good opportunity to move the discussion to preparing for potential promotion opportunities. It's not uncommon for management to groom interested individuals for higher level positions within the company.</p> <p>A salary negotiation, at its core, is a means to talk about how a company and individual can work together to pursue a mutually beneficial long-term partnership. Professionals who approach the conversation from that mindset have a higher chance of success and lower chance of walking away disappointed.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-negotiate-a-raise-out-of-the-blue&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Negotiate%2520a%2520Raise%2520Out%2520of%2520the%2520Blue.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Negotiate%20a%20Raise%20Out%20of%20the%20Blue"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Negotiate%20a%20Raise%20Out%20of%20the%20Blue.jpg" alt="How to Negotiate a Raise Out of the Blue" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-negotiate-a-raise-out-of-the-blue">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-to-do-if-you-dont-make-enough-money-at-your-job">Here&#039;s What to Do if You Don&#039;t Make Enough Money at Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-signs-you-arent-making-enough-money">6 Signs You Aren&#039;t Making Enough Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building asking for a raise benefits employment negotiations pay bump promotion salary Mon, 26 Feb 2018 09:30:10 +0000 Samantha Stauf 2107893 at http://www.wisebread.com Here's What to Do if You Don't Make Enough Money at Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-to-do-if-you-dont-make-enough-money-at-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/heres-what-to-do-if-you-dont-make-enough-money-at-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/stressed_tax_kid.jpg" alt="Stressed Tax Kid" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do you believe you are underpaid? Are you fed up with not earning enough? Or, is your lack of income creating financial difficulty for you and your family?</p> <p>Going to work every day and being paid less than you are worth can be emotionally and financially draining. Though you may not be able to secure the raise you think you deserve, you actually may have more control over your income than you think. Here are several things you can do if you don't make enough money at your job.</p> <h2>1. Create a list of achievements</h2> <p>Though you don't get the final say on whether you get a raise, you can take some actionable steps to bolster the process of raising your income. One way to prove to your boss that you should get a raise is to keep track of your accomplishments.</p> <p>If you don't already track your work achievements, now is the time to start. Look back on the past year or so. What stands out as impressive? Did you improve a process or system? Save the company money? Take on an additional project?</p> <p>Often, managers aren't aware of exactly how much value their employees are providing to the company. They may be impressed, or even surprised, to find out just how much you have accomplished for the company. By creating a list of achievements, you are one step closer to earning a raise.</p> <h2>2. Research salary data</h2> <p>What does someone with similar job responsibilities in your area earn? It's important to have access to up-to-date salary data when making your case for a raise.</p> <p>Every position has a going market rate. To avoid being unrealistic in what you're asking for salary-wise, do your research in advance by using websites such as Glassdoor and Payscale. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-underpaid-how-to-figure-out-what-salary-you-deserve?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Underpaid? How to Figure Out What Salary You Deserve</a>)</p> <h2>3. Take on additional work</h2> <p>Could your boss use help on some additional projects? Do you have the opportunity to earn overtime? Would taking on additional work help solidify your request for a raise?</p> <p>Volunteering for additional projects often shows how serious you are about your career and helping your company succeed. And by asking for extra work, you are likely to grow your skills by working on something that isn't a typical part of your job duties.</p> <h2>4. Talk to your boss</h2> <p>Talking to your boss about your salary can be intimidating. But it doesn't have to be.</p> <p>Depending on your relationship with your boss, you may already have great rapport. Most managers expect that their employees want to be paid more, so the conversation won't be as shocking to them as you may think.</p> <p>Simply ask your boss how you can work to increase your value to the company. Sometimes, just knowing that you are interested in taking on more responsibility is the boost you need to get the salary increase you desire. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-underpaid-how-to-figure-out-what-salary-you-deserve?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a>)</p> <h2>5. Create an additional income stream</h2> <p>Creating an additional income stream outside your regular job is a great way to increase your income relatively quickly. Plus, you can typically earn money while doing something you enjoy.</p> <p>Whether you choose to sell clothing, baby-sit, start a blog, do woodworking, or something else, there is no shortage of ways to earn money on the side. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-best-side-jobs-for-fast-cash?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">14 Best Side Jobs For Fast Cash</a>)</p> <h2>6. Slash your expenses</h2> <p>What's the quickest way to find more money in your budget? Slash your expenses.</p> <p>Take a look at your current monthly spending. What could you do without? Are there any expenses you could cut entirely? If you can't cut them out, are there at least expenses you can lower? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-spending-too-much-on-normal-expenses?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Spending Too Much on &quot;Normal&quot; Expenses?</a>)</p> <h2>7. Start searching for a new job</h2> <p>What do you do if your current company won't give you an increase in pay? It might be time to start searching for a new job.</p> <p>You owe it to yourself to earn what you think you are worth. Sure, there are things you may enjoy about your current employer. But if you're not earning enough to live comfortably, it's time to see what new and better opportunities could be waiting for you elsewhere.</p> <h2>8. Save all you can</h2> <p>If you are barely making enough money to cover your bills, you will need to budget very wisely and save whatever you are able to.</p> <p>Emergencies happen, and if you aren't earning enough income to comfortably make ends meet, it will be even harder to bounce back from an unexpected expense like a leaky roof or medical bill. Prepare yourself and protect your own finances by saving everything you can in an emergency fund. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-fast-ways-to-restock-an-emergency-fund-after-an-emergency?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Fast Ways to Restock an Emergency Fund After an Emergency</a>)</p> <h2>9. Network</h2> <p>You never know who could help you land your next gig. No matter where you are in your career, networking is key.</p> <p>Start by going to a few networking events in your area, or getting involved with a new organization. Don't forget to nurture your current network by keeping up with your peers and friends on social media and LinkedIn. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40</a>)</p> <h2>10. Ask for support</h2> <p>Emotional support is one of the best, but most underrated tools at your disposal. Without having someone to encourage and push you, your mental health could suffer.</p> <p>Talk to your family, friends, or partner about your finances, your goals, and your current position. Ask for their advice and let them know how they can help hold you accountable. Though it might not feel like it, everyone has gone through some financial stress in their life and can offer you some sort of emotional encouragement.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fheres-what-to-do-if-you-dont-make-enough-money-at-your-job&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHeres%2520What%2520to%2520Do%2520if%2520You%2520Dont%2520Make%2520Enough%2520Money%2520at%2520Your%2520Job.jpg&amp;description=Heres%20What%20to%20Do%20if%20You%20Dont%20Make%20Enough%20Money%20at%20Your%20Job"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Heres%20What%20to%20Do%20if%20You%20Dont%20Make%20Enough%20Money%20at%20Your%20Job.jpg" alt="Here's What to Do if You Don't Make Enough Money at Your Job" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/rachel-slifka">Rachel Slifka</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-to-do-if-you-dont-make-enough-money-at-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise">These 10 Words and Phrases Are Keeping You From Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-smart-moves-to-make-after-getting-a-raise-or-promotion">9 Smart Moves to Make After Getting a Raise or Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building cutting costs earnings emergency funds employment extra income job search paycheck to paycheck raise salary saving money Wed, 21 Feb 2018 09:31:09 +0000 Rachel Slifka 2105359 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways to Bounce Back After a Work Mistake http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-bounce-back-after-a-work-mistake <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-to-bounce-back-after-a-work-mistake" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/a_suprised_man_with_hand_on_his_head.jpg" alt="A surprised man with hand on his head" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You messed up at work. We've all been there. Whether it was a small error or a huge mistake, the foremost thought in your mind is, &quot;What can I do to fix this?&quot;</p> <p>If it was a genuine mistake, you should be able to make it right. It will take some work, a little pride-swallowing, and time to help the wounds heal. But you can do it. Here's how.</p> <h2>1. Acknowledge your mistake</h2> <p>This is no time to play the blame game. You also cannot run and hide from the truth, or sweep your mistake under the rug and hope it won't get noticed. It will. If you wait until your mistake is discovered, it will be much harder to recover.</p> <p>Take, for example, the true story of John (not his real name), an account manager in a London advertising agency. After a horrendous call with the client, he slammed down the phone and started berating her to the entire department. How she was clueless, a result of nepotism, didn't know the product, and various other barbs. The thing is, John had slammed the phone but had not actually hung up. She heard everything.</p> <p>He had two options at this point; say nothing and lie about it to his boss if she reported the incident; or, go straight to the boss and admit the huge screw up. John did the latter. He was rightly screamed at; this was an important client. But, by telling the boss immediately, he gave him the chance to be proactive with the client, calling her immediately to explain that John had been under intense pressure, was taking a leave of absence to recuperate, and would not be on her account again. It worked. John kept his job and the agency kept the client. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Career Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up</a>)</p> <h2>2. Make a sincere apology</h2> <p>After fessing up to the mistake, the next step is to apologize to the right people for the error. Depending on the kind of company where you work and the management structure, you may be about to eat some hefty slices of humble pie.</p> <p>Your direct supervisor is the first on the list, and if you followed step one, the apology is a natural next step. Your supervisor will probably tell you just who to talk to next to make amends. If a customer was affected, you may have to reach out to them by phone or email and make a genuine apology. If other people at work were affected by your actions, they deserve an apology, too; especially if they had to work overtime to fix things, or their own job performance was impacted by what you did.</p> <p>Apologizing is certainly not easy; we all learned that in childhood. However, it's the adult thing to do, and can go a long way to making things right. But it must be completely sincere. Should any sarcasm creep in, or you look like you're making the statement at gunpoint, it can make matters worse.</p> <h2>3. Realize that very few excuses will do</h2> <p>Most of the time, a work mistake is just that. You messed up. You didn't check the right box, didn't see a glaring error, or did something that hurt the success of the company. Once you have admitted the mistake and apologized for it, don't be tempted to follow that with, &quot;However, in my defense &hellip;&quot; and an excuse.</p> <p>For example, you may have been working more hours than usual, but so have a lot of other people. Are they making mistakes, too? Maybe your new puppy is howling all night and you're not getting any sleep. Is this the company's issue? You may well be going through a tough time with your partner. Again, is your relationship the concern of the people paying your wages?</p> <p>The only good excuse is one that is impossible to fault you for: a sudden bereavement in the family; a major illness; an act of God. Other than that, keep the excuses for the schoolkids.</p> <h2>4. Do whatever you can to fix the mistake</h2> <p>You've admitted the mistake, you've apologized, and you haven't used an excuse. Now you have to clean up the mess you made. Hopefully, it's a small problem that can be resolved quickly and easily without the need for other members of staff to come to your aid. But if it's a bigger problem and you need help, don't be afraid to ask for it.</p> <p>Most people that you work with will understand the situation you're in, and if they were faced with the same issue, they'd want help from their co-workers, too. If it is going to require a lot of time and effort from these people, find a way to make it up to them. It could be as simple as bringing in breakfast one morning, or offering them any kind of favor in return.</p> <p>If the mistake became something newsworthy, address that as well. Talk to your boss about extending an interview to the newspapers and media outlets, explaining the mistake you made and absolving the company of any blame. It may require you to suck it up and look a little foolish for a while, but today's headlines are tomorrow's recycling. Whatever the mistake was, you need to make sure that the whole situation is resolved to the company's satisfaction, and that everyone is ready to move on.</p> <h2>5. Work diligently to ensure it never happens again</h2> <p>After the mistake has been rectified, the next step you must take is to identify why it happened, and take action to ensure it never happens again. Did you delegate a task to someone who was not ready for that kind of position or responsibility? Did you skip a step in the process that seemed pointless, but that proved to be essential? Was it an accident that could have been prevented if different safety measures had been implemented? Whatever the cause, it needs to be found, understood, and eliminated.</p> <p>You must also make sure the right people know about the changes you are making to stop the mistake from happening again. Run your plans by your superiors, and show them that you are being proactive in preventing this issue from ever arising again. They will appreciate your diligence, and it may also make them look at other possible issues within the company. In short, once you've got the horse back in the stable, you need to bolt that sucker tight.</p> <h2>6. Do not let one mistake change who you are</h2> <p>The dust has settled. Everything is back to normal. You're ready to get back to the daily routine &hellip; or are you? A significant mistake can have a lasting negative impact on your emotions, and you may have to work hard to overcome it.</p> <p>Remember: It was a mistake. It wasn't an act of malice, or something you did on purpose. Mistakes happen. If you are now terrified of making that mistake twice, you could become a much less effective employee. Do not let this one hiccup, even if it was a big one, get in the way of what you're capable of.</p> <p>Get back in the game and learn from that mistake without letting it bring you down. Even if it takes a visit or two to an occupational therapist, it's worth it.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-ways-to-bounce-back-after-a-work-mistake&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Ways%2520to%2520Bounce%2520Back%2520After%2520a%2520Work%2520Mistake.jpg&amp;description=6%20Ways%20to%20Bounce%20Back%20After%20a%20Work%20Mistake"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Ways%20to%20Bounce%20Back%20After%20a%20Work%20Mistake.jpg" alt="6 Ways to Bounce Back After a Work Mistake" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-bounce-back-after-a-work-mistake">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">8 Career Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview">10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-make-these-7-common-mistakes-when-choosing-a-career-path">Don&#039;t Make These 7 Common Mistakes When Choosing a Career Path</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/become-a-model-employee-with-this-10-point-work-etiquette-checklist">Become a Model Employee With This 10-Point Work Etiquette Checklist</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building apologizing back on track humility missteps Mistakes oversight professionalism Mon, 19 Feb 2018 09:30:11 +0000 Paul Michael 2104964 at http://www.wisebread.com