Career Building http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4814/all en-US 7 Work-From-Home Jobs for People Who Hate Talking on the Phone http://www.wisebread.com/7-work-from-home-jobs-for-people-who-hate-talking-on-the-phone <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-work-from-home-jobs-for-people-who-hate-talking-on-the-phone" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/bored_office_worker_on_the_phone.jpg" alt="Bored office worker on the phone" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Many work-from-home jobs involve answering or making phone calls as customer service agents or sales representatives. But what if you don't have the noise-free environment required for many of these jobs? Or you'd simply rather walk over broken glass in bare feet than talk on the phone? Well, that's actually not such a big problem these days.</p> <p>There are many options available for people who want the freedom of a work-from-home job, without the hassle of being glued to the phone day and night. Here are some of the best options for &quot;phonephobics.&quot;</p> <h2>1. Customer service email and chat support</h2> <p>How are your people skills? Can you happily sit and chat over a messenger app, or reply to emails like a pro? Well, you could do very well in a customer service position where you write your responses to customers. Several big companies now employ work-at-home reps to assist with issues over email and chat, including AppleCare and Convergys. In fact, at the time of this writing, AppleCare at Home has positions for over 60 advisers available.</p> <p>You can make over $30,000 per year, or about $15 per hour, performing this kind of work for Apple and other companies, and all you need is a computer, reliable internet access, and good typing skills. Most of the time, you are provided a document telling you how to reply to specific questions or concerns. If you cannot handle the request, you can elevate it to an adviser with specific knowledge of the problem at hand.</p> <h2>2. Data entry</h2> <p>Perhaps the most popular choice for people who hate talking on the phone but want to work from home are data entry jobs. The typical data entry job is just as is sounds; you take data from one form, be it audio recordings or handwritten documents, and usually enter that information into a computer.</p> <p>What you get paid for this kind of work depends on the kind of data you're entering, and the skills required to do it. You'll be paid more if it's a specialized service, such as medical transcription or language translation. Standard data entry jobs usually pay minimum wage, or less (if you're working per piece, for example, and aren't particularly fast), but it's relatively easy work and you can do it any time of the day or night.</p> <p>Just beware of fraudulent data entry schemes that are really pyramid schemes or other scams that make you pay for classes or certifications that should be free. It's often hard to find reputable sources for data entry jobs, so be sure to research any potential employer company you find.</p> <h2>3. Tutoring</h2> <p>You can use your skills to make money at home doing one-on-one tutoring in a subject at which you excel. Whether it's math or physics, a musical instrument, or a foreign language, at-home tutors are in demand in every state. What's more, you can set your own hours, your own hourly rate, and the students can come to you. If you prefer, you can travel to them for an additional fee.</p> <p>If you're looking to get into this kind of work, you have a few options. You can simply place ads online, on outlets like Craigslist and Nextdoor, or you can register yourself with an institution like <a href="https://kaplan.com/work-with-us/join-our-team/" target="_blank">Kaplan</a> or <a href="https://www.pearson.com/us/higher-education/products-services-institutions/smarthinking-online-tutoring/become-a-tutor.html" target="_blank">Smarthinking</a>. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-earn-1000-a-month-or-more-as-an-online-tutor?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Earn $1,000 a Month or More as an Online Tutor</a>)</p> <h2>4. Accounting, taxes, and bookkeeping</h2> <p>If you are skilled with numbers, you can set up a home office and help clients with their books, budgets, and taxes. To do the latter, you will need to be up to speed on all the latest tax laws, and have the best tax software available. For bookkeeping and accounting, you can actually do well even if you don't have a degree in those subjects. However, it usually takes several years of experience before you can build a roster of dependable clients from whom you get regular business.</p> <p>Some of the biggest names in taxes, including Intuit and TurboTax, employ work-at-home accountants and bookkeepers, and places like AccountingDepartment.com offer full benefits. If you're self-employed, you could easily charge $250&ndash;$350 for a session that lasts just a few hours.</p> <h2>5. Freelance writing and blogging</h2> <p>If you have a way with words and research, this is a perfect gig for you. Content is king these days, and there are thousands of websites and publications that are desperate for good, well-written articles and stories.</p> <p>When you're just starting out, you should not expect to get a lot of money for your work. And if you are starting your own blog, it can take many months to even see a dime for your efforts. But blogging, and writing for the web and magazines in general, is a slow burn. Once you build an audience and get a reliable following, the money will start to trickle in. Do it well, and that trickle can become a rolling rapid. Some of the top bloggers out there earn six-figure salaries, all from the comfort of home. You can get started by browsing sites like <a href="http://www.freelancewritinggigs.com/freelance-writing-job-ads/" target="_blank">Freelance Writing Gigs</a>&nbsp;for jobs. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-easy-ways-to-make-extra-money-blogging?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Easy Ways to Make Extra Money Blogging</a>)</p> <h2>6. Proofreading and editing</h2> <p>How's your grammar? Do you have an eye for detail? Does the prospect of poring over hundreds of pages of text scare you, or could you handle the challenge? Proofreading and editing is meticulous and laborious work, and therefore it's not for everyone. But if you have a fabulous grasp of language, and know (or can learn) the various editorial style guides (such as AP), you could have a great career as a proofreader or editor.</p> <p>The money you will make depends on what you're proofing, how quickly it needs to be turned around, and how many pages there are. Some places pay around $3&ndash;$4 per page, which can be to your benefit if you're fast. Other places charge a standard hourly wage, or you could find a gig that pays an annual salary with benefits.</p> <h2>7. Social media moderator</h2> <p>Also known as a content specialist, a social media moderator is responsible for the content of a brand's Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram channels. To do this job well, you need to have a strong grasp of the brand's core values, as well as the ability to speak in a tone of voice that is appropriate. For example, the contents of Nike's social media will differ vastly in tone from Dove.</p> <p>You will also need to have almost unlimited availability, as social media is a 24/7 advertising medium. Social media monitors have to pay close attention to customer posts, and must be ready to respond quickly, even pulling posts if they cause offense or come at a bad time. The pay for this ranges from minimum wage up to $80,000 including benefits and bonuses. Just remember &mdash; you must be available day and night, and that can be stressful.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-work-from-home-jobs-for-people-who-hate-talking-on-the-phone">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-websites-that-will-pay-you-to-write-for-them">22 Websites That Will Pay You to Write for Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-money-as-a-chat-or-forum-moderator">How to Make Money as a Chat or Forum Moderator</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-stay-productive-while-working-from-home">5 Ways to Stay Productive While Working From Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-100k-jobs-you-can-do-online">8 $100k+ Jobs You Can Do Online</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-places-to-find-freelance-writing-jobs">6 Places to Find Freelance Writing Jobs</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting blogging chat customer support data entry editing phones proofreading remote jobs telecommuting Tutoring work from home writing Mon, 25 Sep 2017 08:30:10 +0000 Paul Michael 2023632 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Deal When a Job Offer Is Rescinded http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-a-job-offer-is-rescinded <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-deal-when-a-job-offer-is-rescinded" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/why_me.jpg" alt="A woman reads the bad news that her job offer was rescinded." title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You did it: You applied for the position, went through rounds of interviews, and that all-important job offer landed in your lap. Then, for some reason, the employer changed their mind.</p> <p>How did this happen? What did you do to scare them away? And is there anything you can do to fix the situation? Don't panic. Help is at hand.</p> <h2>First, take a breath and read the rejection carefully</h2> <p>It's extremely rare that you will simply get a call from an employer telling you the offer is withdrawn. Usually, it will be an email or a physical letter. When you receive it, your first reaction can feel like a punch to the gut. But take a deep breath and read the letter carefully. Was there one specific reason, like salary expectations? Was it something more vague, like &quot;We no longer believe you're a good fit at this time?&quot; Knowing why you were rejected is imperative in approaching your next move.</p> <h2>If this is about salary, hours, or benefits, you have options</h2> <p>What did you ask for that the company just could not agree to? You need to initiate a conversation with human resources or the person who sent the rescission letter, and you need to do it quickly. Don't act desperate. Be calm, ask for a call or in-person meeting, and tell that person you really want to work for the company and are flexible on the terms of the deal. How flexible is up to you, and you do not want to put yourself in a position of taking an offer that cripples you. So, have your bottom line ready.</p> <p>Can you swap salary for other benefits, like extra vacation days or the ability to work from home a few days a week? Is the company open to part-time work, allowing you to get another source of income? You could also negotiate a 90-day reevaluation, and ask for a raise if you meet certain goals or criteria by that date.</p> <h2>If this is about something more vague, you'll have to move on</h2> <p>Sometimes, you will be rejected because of company politics. Maybe you were given the job offer, but the boss has someone else he or she wants to give the job to, and that's that. You can't do much about favoritism or corporate demands.</p> <p>On other occasions, you may have been the second choice, and the first-choice candidate has suddenly become available. Again, in that situation, you're out of luck. For whatever reason, you have been replaced. If the rescission letter is vague, that's probably the reason why. You might be tempted to make a case for why you are the better candidate; you'll take less money, work longer hours, and accept less vacation time. Those are all positions of weakness on your part, and you should not make these kinds of demeaning compromises. Instead, in this situation, you should cut your losses.</p> <h2>Understand you don't really have many legal rights</h2> <p>There are three words you need to know regarding any offer letter followed by a withdrawal: employment at will. You can complain all you want, but you will get nowhere &mdash; you have no legal recourse in this situation.</p> <p>If you turned down other jobs in favor of this one, you're stuck. If you quit your current job on the back of the offer letter, once again, it's all on you. An offer letter is not a binding contract. With that in mind, never quit a current job or turn down another offer until you are absolutely certain there is a new job waiting for you.</p> <h2>Do damage control at your current job</h2> <p>Nightmare scenario: You were so confident that you had the new job in the bag, especially armed with the offer letter, that you handed in your notice at your current workplace. And boom &mdash; the offer was withdrawn. Now you don't have a job to go to, or a job to go back to. What do you do?</p> <p>The first thing you can do is arrange a meeting with your current employer and tell them you made a mistake. You thought you wanted to move on, you acted hastily, but you thought it through and it really isn't something you want to do. In fact, you really regret handing in your notice (which is probably 100 percent accurate right now). If your employer is reasonable and they have been happy with your work, they will more than likely accept this and keep you on. Most of the time, these wheels can be stopped right up until you have left the building. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Ask for Your Old Job Back After Leaving</a>)</p> <p>It might not be this simple, though. If the employer doesn't want you back, you'll have to get work fast. You won't have any kind of severance package since you quit voluntarily. Take whatever you can to make money, and get yourself back on track financially. It doesn't have to be for long.</p> <h2>Leave a good impression with the employer that rejected you</h2> <p>After being rejected, it's natural to lash out. You can be overtaken by a whirlwind of emotions, and when it dawns on you that you are not getting the job, you can get angry. The temptation to tell the employer off is huge. You may even threaten to sue (you will lose) or bad-mouth them on social media. All of these scenarios will hurt you far more than the company that rejected you.</p> <p>You did enough to get a job offer, and that means the employer saw real value in you. Maybe you just weren't quite right for the role, but in a few months, they may call you about a different position. Or, maybe the person they gave the job to won't work out. If that happens, they might come back to you. However, if you have been rude, aggressive, and defensive, your file will go in the trash. Don't burn a bridge that could lead to a great future.</p> <h2>Get back out there and interview for more roles</h2> <p>It's important to get right back on the horse. Sure, you're a bit demoralized. And after doing all that work to get a job offer, you're now back to square one. But, that's just part of the job-hunting life, and you need to accept that and use the experience to become a better interviewee.</p> <p>What can you learn from the rejection? Did you knowingly ask for way more than you wanted as part of a negotiation tactic? Next time, don't shoot so high. Did you come across as aggressive or cocky? Tone it down. Did you actually appear weak and cave in to a lowball offer, only to be rejected anyway? Maybe the company was testing you. Take it all in as lessons learned, and use it to get a better offer letter from a better company.</p> <h2>Never accept anything less than what you're worth</h2> <p>If you wanted the job badly, you may start thinking about going below your bottom line. In almost every case, this is a mistake. For a start, you're devaluing yourself. You know what your experience is worth and what you can do for the company looking to hire you.</p> <p>There are businesses known to be stingy with salaries and benefits, and most of the time, this does not bode well for your future at that firm. You are basically giving yourself a mountain to climb in the hopes that one day you'll get what you're owed. But by the time you reach the salary you originally wanted, you would have naturally moved to a higher pay scale. So, stand tough. You know the bare minimum you need to make ends meet and feel valued. Anything less is not worth your time.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-a-job-offer-is-rescinded">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/beyond-silicon-valley-7-side-benefits-your-job-could-offer-soon">Beyond Silicon Valley: 7 Side Benefits Your Job Could Offer Soon</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-great-jobs-for-the-next-10-years">8 Great Jobs for the Next 10 Years</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building job offers rescinded withdrawals Wed, 20 Sep 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 2022481 at http://www.wisebread.com Beyond Silicon Valley: 7 Side Benefits Your Job Could Offer Soon http://www.wisebread.com/beyond-silicon-valley-7-side-benefits-your-job-could-offer-soon <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyond-silicon-valley-7-side-benefits-your-job-could-offer-soon" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/creative_business_team_having_meal.jpg" alt="Creative business team having meal" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Jobs usually come with an array of benefits. Depending on the size and generosity of the company, those benefits can be huge. Corporations know the value of getting and retaining good employees, and attractive benefits are one way to do that.</p> <p>But what will those benefits look like in the near future? Here are some possibilities that may be coming your way sooner than you think.</p> <h2>1. Long-term paid maternity and paternity leave</h2> <p>Sadly, the United States is at the bottom of the class when it comes to maternity and paternity leave. The U.S. has no mandated paid time off for new parents, but that could soon change. Some companies, like Amazon, Google, Starbucks, and Etsy are leading the charge by giving their employees a generous amount of paid time off when welcoming a new baby to the family. Many companies are also expanding these benefits to employees who adopt or use a surrogate. With such big name brands setting the example, we may be seeing these benefits become much more common in the near future.</p> <h2>2. A self-driving company car</h2> <p>Make no mistake, self-driving cars are going to be a mainstay of everyday life. So why wouldn't employers embrace them as benefits? Think about the upsides: For starters, self-driving cars are considered safer and more reliable. They also give you time to work or read to and from the office, which means greater productivity for the company paying your salary. Your insurance rates will go down, which adds an additional benefit that the company doesn't have to pay for. You'll never get a speeding ticket, and your chances of being in a collision go down dramatically. If your future employer wants to attract the best and brightest talent, offering a self-driving company car is a no brainer.</p> <h2>3. Identity theft protection</h2> <p>Identity theft is here, and now. It affects millions of people every year, and costs the economy billions of dollars. It's no surprise that employers around the world are already starting to offer identity theft protection as an employee benefit. When someone is a victim of ID theft, it can turn their life upside-down. There is additional stress and pressure on the employee, and that spells bad business for companies. If your employer can cover you for a small cost, it's in their best interest to do so. It's estimated that around <a href="http://thirdcertainty.com/featured-story/more-employers-offer-identity-theft-protection-as-part-of-benefits-package/" target="_blank">70 percent of employers</a> will offer this benefit by 2018. By 2020, it could be standard, just like health insurance and sick time.</p> <h2>4. Student loan assistance</h2> <p>The average college graduate leaves university carrying over $37,000 in debt. That's a heavy burden for someone just entering the workforce, and it's one that future employers might be willing to take on for the right candidate. Several companies are already helping their employees <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan?ref=internal" target="_blank">pay down their student loans</a>, including Nvidia ($6,000 annually), PricewaterhouseCoopers ($1,200 annually), and Fidelity Investments ($2,000 annually). As the acquisition of the best and brightest minds heats up, we might see large corporations start to cover the entirety of the student loan burden for qualified employees.</p> <h2>5. Free health care for healthy employees</h2> <p>Few employers would offer completely free health care to every member of staff. But, if the employee could prove they were in the peak of health, free health care would be a generous reward. How could this happen? Well, some companies are already instigating large health care discounts in return for employees taking physicals, getting skin cancer screenings, and reporting weekly exercise routines. A healthy, fit employee is far better for the employer than one who is unhealthy and takes more sick days.</p> <h2>6. A home office</h2> <p>As each year passes, more companies are giving employees the option to telecommute. It makes good financial sense, and also saves time and effort. A long commute wastes gas, leaves the employee feeling frazzled and rushed, and eats up time that could be spent doing other things. So, it will behoove companies of the future to furnish their employees with everything they need to work from home. From a computer and smartphone, to a videoconferencing system and mail station, employees of the future may increasingly be offered an office away from the office &mdash; all at the expense of the company.</p> <h2>7. Catered meals</h2> <p>Good nutrition is the foundation of good health. Companies of tomorrow could encourage this practice by offering free catered meals to every employee. This will, of course, mean that your employer will have a say in what you eat, but having two of your three meals provided free of charge, Monday to Friday, is not only saving the employee money, but the time taken to go out and get meals or prepare them at home. Some companies, like Twitter, already do catered meals for their employees. Expect this trend to catch on as employers look for out-of-the-box ways to entice top talent and encourage healthy living.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fbeyond-silicon-valley-7-side-benefits-your-job-could-offer-soon&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FBeyond%2520Silicon%2520Valley-%25207%2520Side%2520Benefits%2520Your%2520Job%2520Could%2520Offer%2520Soon.jpg&amp;description=Beyond%20Silicon%20Valley%3A%207%20Side%20Benefits%20Your%20Job%20Could%20Offer%20Soon"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Beyond%20Silicon%20Valley-%207%20Side%20Benefits%20Your%20Job%20Could%20Offer%20Soon.jpg" alt="Beyond Silicon Valley: 7 Side Benefits Your Job Could Offer Soon" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/beyond-silicon-valley-7-side-benefits-your-job-could-offer-soon">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-laid-off-a-step-by-step-guide">How to Get Laid Off: A Step-By-Step Guide</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-stay-productive-while-working-from-home">5 Ways to Stay Productive While Working From Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-biggest-mistakes-people-make-when-working-from-home">The 5 Biggest Mistakes People Make When Working From Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-companies-with-the-best-employee-discounts">8 Companies With the Best Employee Discounts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-carry-a-balance-heres-why-you-still-need-a-credit-card">Don&#039;t Carry a Balance? Here&#039;s Why You Still Need a Credit Card</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building benefits free health care identity theft protection maternity leave paternity leave perks self driving cars student loan assistance work from home Tue, 12 Sep 2017 08:30:09 +0000 Paul Michael 2017866 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i_quit_my_job.jpg" alt="I Quit My Job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>This is it: You're ready to quit. You've been dreaming of this moment for months (or years) and you are all set to let the company know you're moving on. Well, before you throw down your resignation letter and waltz out of the door, take some time to make sure you do this the right way.</p> <h2>1. First and foremost &mdash; Are you sure you're ready to quit?</h2> <p>Like, really sure? Because once you hand in your notice, you've put yourself on a path that leads directly out of that company. So, make sure you're leaving for the right reasons.</p> <p>Some people act irrationally after a major upheaval or event at work, and hand in their notice while they're still in a cloud of anger and frustration. If you have been feeling this, and have decided &quot;I've had enough,&quot; then take at least a few days to cool off and think it over. Talk to people you trust, and explain the situation. They may agree with you, and say that you're working in a toxic environment that is hurting your health. But, they may say that you have a good job with good coworkers, and that you're blowing things out of proportion.</p> <h2>2. You might not be required to give two weeks' notice</h2> <p>Most states in the U.S. have something called &quot;at-will employment.&quot; This means your employer can terminate you at any time, without any reason at all, and without any kind of warning. Conversely, you have the exact same rights with regard to leaving. You can quit at any time, for whatever reason (even if you don't have one), and walk out of the door without giving notice.</p> <p>Some employers like to have it both ways. They will be more than happy to let you go at the drop of a hat, but the company handbook states that you are required to provide a minimum of two weeks' notice. This is just something the company wants, but cannot enforce. If you live in an at-will employment state, two weeks' notice is not required. But, if you don't provide it, and leave the company in the lurch, you are potentially burning a valuable bridge. You always want to leave on good terms if you can, so unless the situation requires an immediate exit, give your employer the two weeks they expect.</p> <h2>3. Write an excellent resignation letter</h2> <p>Now is the time to start working on a resignation letter. If you have been at the company less than a year, you don't have to go overboard. Be polite, explain briefly that you are moving on to a new stage in your career, and thank the company for the opportunity they gave you. If you have a lot of years under your belt with the company, you may also want to add in some of the significant achievements and successes you had at the company, and call out people who genuinely made a difference to you, and helped you grow.</p> <p>You may be tempted to throw people under the bus in this letter, or point out everything that is wrong with the company. Don't do it. This is a permanent record, signed by you, and that can come back to bite you.</p> <h2>4. Hand in your notice on a Friday</h2> <p>There are all sorts of reasons to wait until Friday to hand in your notice. Midweek is just an odd time, and on a Monday or Tuesday, you are catching people as they are about to dive into a full week of work. Doing it on a Friday is best. It gives you and your employer the rest of the day, and the weekend, to think about it and come to terms with the decision. If you are a key member of the team, your boss will likely need to come up with a game plan on how to replace you. He or she may also want to make you a counteroffer, asking you to sit on your resignation and think it over. For this reason, Friday is the most strategic day to hand in your notice.</p> <h2>5. Be positive and productive in your final weeks</h2> <p>You've handed in your two weeks' notice, and now you can just coast for the next 14 days, right? Well, not so fast. It can be tempting to slack off, take long lunch breaks, arrive late, leave early, and have a general disregard for the rules you used to obey. But that is not going to sit well with a company that is still paying your salary.</p> <p>You can have the &quot;What are they gonna do, fire me?&quot; attitude, but it's not professional. You have history with this company, it has paid your salary and probably provided health benefits, and you owe it to the company, and yourself, to act as professionally as you did before you resigned. In some cases, if you don't have another job to go to, the company may well ask you to stay on as a contractor, at a higher rate of pay, until they find your replacement. They will not offer this if you are just treating the job as a joke.</p> <h2>6. Help the company through the transition</h2> <p>After you resign, you should offer your services in finding your replacement. You should also be willing to speak to the departments you work with on a regular basis, and ask them what you can do in your final two weeks to make sure everything runs smoothly once you are gone. Do they need certain files or contact names? Do they need you to show them how certain processes are managed, from inception through completion? Take this time to ensure that when you leave, the ship is not sinking without you.</p> <h2>7. Don't use the exit interview as a complaining session</h2> <p>A lot of people who resign have some sharp words for the human resources department, or the owner of the company. And while it is OK to point out areas of improvement, you should do it in the most constructive way you can.</p> <p>This should not be the time to do corporate assassinations on people who've crossed you over the years. If you have genuine concerns about some of the people you are leaving behind due to a toxic work environment, then by all means bring those up. But be delicate about it. Talk about the need for improved communication, or more flexible working hours and telecommuting. Give them a checklist that makes them think you really want the company to flourish after you depart.</p> <h2>8. Stay in touch</h2> <p>Seriously, don't burn a bridge. You don't know what could happen in the future, and a company that you have a history with can be a powerful ally when you need help. If you ever need to pick up contract work or come back in a different role, you will want to have people to reach out to.</p> <p>So, use LinkedIn and social media to stay in touch. Send the occasional email to people you know there, asking how they're doing. Be a friend to them. It can really pay dividends should your departure become a mistake.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Keys%2520to%2520Quitting%2520a%2520Job%2520Like%2520a%2520Professional.jpg&amp;description=8%20Keys%20to%20Quitting%20a%20Job%20Like%20a%20Professional"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Keys%20to%20Quitting%20a%20Job%20Like%20a%20Professional.jpg" alt="8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-transition-to-a-new-career-after-30">6 Ways to Transition to a New Career After 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-jobs-that-robots-cant-do-yet">10 Jobs That Robots Can&#039;t Do, Yet</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building burning bridges employment human resources leaving a job professional quitting two week's notice working Mon, 11 Sep 2017 08:30:08 +0000 Paul Michael 2017192 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Great Jobs for the Next 10 Years http://www.wisebread.com/8-great-jobs-for-the-next-10-years <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-great-jobs-for-the-next-10-years" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/young_maintenance_engineer_team_working_in_wind_turbine_farm_at_sunset.jpg" alt="Young maintenance engineer team working in wind turbine farm at sunset" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The working world is in upheaval, with technology changing the way we do pretty much everything. Some careers that used to be sure things aren't so sure anymore. How do you know which jobs are worth pursuing, and which aren't? We checked in with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics to get the lowdown on fields that are projected to grow over the next decade.</p> <h2>1. Financial adviser</h2> <p>With life expectancy on the rise, more people are expected to be needing financial planning advice. The BLS gives this profession a solid <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/personal-financial-advisors.htm" target="_blank">projected growth rate</a> of 30 percent between 2014 and 2024, which it notes is &quot;much faster than average.&quot; The median salary for a personal financial adviser was just over $90,000 as of 2016.</p> <p>For this career, you'll need a bachelor's degree, but no advanced degrees are required. Becoming a Certified Financial Planner (CFP) is also helpful. Many financial advisers work for insurance or financial brokerage firms; others are self-employed.</p> <h2>2. Physical therapist</h2> <p>The demand for physical therapists is growing, too: There's an impressive <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physical-therapists.htm" target="_blank">34 percent growth rate</a> predicted over the 2014&ndash;2024 period, with more than 70,000 new physical therapist positions being added to the workforce. To become a physical therapist, you'll need to get a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree. A DPT degree is a post-baccalaureate degree that usually takes three years to complete. Worth the time? Probably. The median salary for physical therapists, as of 2016, was about $85,400.</p> <h2>3. Registered nurse</h2> <p>Becoming a registered nurse continues to be a great career choice for the next 10 years, and probably beyond. More than <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/registered-nurses.htm" target="_blank">439,000 registered nurse jobs</a> are expected to be added to the workforce by 2024. The median salary was just under $70,000 as of 2016. Approximately 60 percent of RNs work in hospitals, according to the BLS, with the remaining 40 percent working in clinics, doctors' offices, home health care roles, and other care facilities. To become a registered nurse, you'll need a degree in nursing. A four-year bachelor's degree is probably the best choice, as an associate degree may limit your career options and salary.</p> <h2>4. Physical or occupational therapy assistant</h2> <p>Assistants to therapists earn a lower wage than the therapists themselves, but it's still a good salary. The average annual pay for a physical therapy assistant was <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physical-therapist-assistants-and-aides.htm" target="_blank">just over $56,000</a> as of 2016, while occupational therapy assistants <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/occupational-therapy-assistants-and-aides.htm" target="_blank">brought in an average $59,000</a>.</p> <p>Occupational therapy is focused on helping people improve their ability to handle daily life tasks, such as cooking, or even eating. Physical therapy focuses on helping patients recover from illness or injury and regain physical ability. To be a therapist's assistant, you'll need an associate degree and perhaps a license, but that's all. Both jobs have a projected growth rate of about 40 percent between 2014 and 2024.</p> <h2>5. Computer systems analyst</h2> <p>If computer systems, information technology, and business are your thing, this is a great career choice. Systems analysts work with business managers to understand business needs and come up with information systems solutions. You'll need a bachelor's degree in information technology to get a job in this field, which has a <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-systems-analysts.htm" target="_blank">21 percent projected growth rate</a>. A master's degree may open up more job opportunities and a higher entry-level salary. The median pay as of 2016 was more than $87,000 a year.</p> <h2>6. Industrial machinery mechanic</h2> <p>The <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/industrial-machinery-mechanics-and-maintenance-workers-and-millwrights.htm" target="_blank">projected growth rate</a> for this career in the 10 years up to 2024 is a bit lower than others on this list at only 16 percent, but that's still much faster than average. You don't need any college education for this job; a high school diploma or equivalent is enough, and, of course, some mechanical capability is needed. Beyond that, you'll need appropriate training for the specialization you choose; an apprenticeship or on-the-job training are two common options. The median salary for this career was just under $50,000 as of 2016.</p> <h2>7. Computer support specialist</h2> <p>The outlook for computer support specialists shows a <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-support-specialists.htm" target="_blank">12 percent growth rate</a>, with more than 88,000 jobs expected to be added by 2024. With a median annual salary of over $62,000 as of 2016, it's a great career choice. You need some computer prowess, of course, and the ability to patiently guide people through solving their computer problems. That's probably the most challenging part! A college degree isn't always necessary, though an associate degree, or at least some computer-related courses, will help. Positions with a larger company may require a bachelor's degree, but many other support positions provide on-the-job training.</p> <h2>8. App developer</h2> <p>If you're good with code and have the business savvy to see a hole in the app market, this could be a great career choice for you. Even if you're not so great at the business side, this could still be a good career if you get a job with any number of app development companies. Mobile technology is only continuing to grow, and this job is growing along with it at a rate of over 22 percent, according to Kiplinger. The median annual salary is one of the highest on this list, coming in at over $96,000. You'll typically need a bachelor's degree in computer science to get started in this field.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Great%20Jobs%20for%20the%20Next%2010%20Years.jpg" alt="8 Great Jobs for the Next 10 Years" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/annie-mueller">Annie Mueller</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-great-jobs-for-the-next-10-years">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-careers-where-women-earn-more-than-men">5 Careers Where Women Earn More Than Men</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-jobs-that-robots-cant-do-yet">10 Jobs That Robots Can&#039;t Do, Yet</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise">The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-go-to-college-to-learn">Don&#039;t Go to College to Learn</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career fields decade education fastest growing future growth rate job markets salary successful technology Mon, 04 Sep 2017 08:00:05 +0000 Annie Mueller 2013152 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways to Prepare for Your Work at Home Gig http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-prepare-for-your-work-at-home-gig <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-to-prepare-for-your-work-at-home-gig" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/beautiful_pregnant_woman_working_from_home_office.jpg" alt="Beautiful pregnant woman working from home office" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>While telecommuting used to be somewhat of a rarity, it is now a regular part of working life for many people. Indeed, some companies are now happy to employ full-time remote staff, or offer current staff the option to telecommute.</p> <p>If you're considering telecommuting, make sure you are ready before you dive in. A work-at-home job has many benefits, as long as you know how to prepare your home and your expectations. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-biggest-mistakes-people-make-when-working-from-home?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 5 Biggest Mistakes People Make When Working From Home</a>)</p> <h2>1. Set up a professional, dedicated work space</h2> <p>You may have telecommuted occasionally, plopping the laptop down on the dining table with a few pertinent folders and a cellphone at hand. That was OK for a temporary work station. But if you're doing this full time, you need a dedicated office space in your home.</p> <p>Hopefully, you have the option of converting a room in your home into an office. If you don't, can you build a space in the basement, or convert a large portion of a room into a work space? Room dividers and clever furniture placement can help. This needs to be somewhere that you use only for work, allowing you to easily separate it from your personal and leisure time.</p> <p>What's more, if you have a family, or live with roommates, you need to set solid boundaries for your telecommuting gig. Let them know that it's extremely important for you to have a place to work without noise or distractions. Sometimes, it's possible to shut out noise with a good pair of noise-cancelling headphones, or even ear plugs. But that is not ideal. And when you need to make a call, you have to be able to do it without background noise drowning out your voice.</p> <h2>2. Invest in the best equipment that you can afford</h2> <p>You may be lucky and get a telecommuting job that supplies you with a computer, phone, and other necessary electronics and equipment. On the other hand, you may have to go out and purchase these items on your own (although, remember this is a tax write-off).</p> <p>However you get your equipment, make sure you have the best that you can currently afford. You are now on your own, without the help of an IT department or other specialist. You do not want to be at the mercy of old, glitchy equipment that could leave you in serious trouble at the worst possible time. Plus, get the latest software updates. Don't try getting by on 10-year old versions of Microsoft Office.</p> <p>You will also need to have excellent services to support this equipment. For starters, you'll need a great, high-speed internet connection. You'll also need good cellphone reception. If you're getting a lot of dropped calls or interference, you will find it frustrating to communicate with the office and any customers you may deal with. In that case, look into signal boosters, or get a landline (VOIP is an excellent, and cheap, option). (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Gadgets Every Work at Home Professional Needs</a>)</p> <h2>3. Do not ditch your office attire completely</h2> <p>A lot of people think that when they get a work-at-home gig, they'll swap the suits and professional clothing for jogging pants and a T-shirt. Depending on the kind of gig you are doing, that's not always a good idea. If you're in a very creative profession, you'll be OK. But if it's a more typical office job, something in sales, or anything that would require business attire on a daily basis, you should stick to something close to that dress code.</p> <p>While people can't see you, your attire can affect the way you work. You might feel more relaxed and laid back in lounge clothing, and that can impact your work ethic and your drive. You want to look and act the part at all times, even if your home office is in the corner of the guest room. The tie is optional, of course.</p> <h2>4. Set regular office hours for yourself</h2> <p>A work-at-home gig means a lot of flexibility. But, if you get into bad habits quickly, that flexibility can soon become a threat to your productivity and your livelihood.</p> <p>The problem with a work-at-home job is the amount of freedom and distraction that comes with it. In an office environment, you have a work space, a boss, coworkers, and very little else to do but focus on the task at hand. At home, you are literally surrounded by the comforts of home. You have a living room, a TV, music, a kitchen full of food, a garden, and a bed &hellip; oh, what a cozy bed.</p> <p>Fight the temptation to sleep in an extra hour, or take two hours for lunch. These can become dangerous habits. You won't finish your tasks on time, or you'll rush and produce sloppy work. Either way, you could soon kiss your telecommuting job goodbye, and all the perks that go with it.</p> <p>So, set your hours, and stick to them. After a while, it will become second nature. And let your family and friends know that you're at work, even though you're at home. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-stay-productive-while-working-from-home?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Ways to Stay Productive While Working From Home</a>)</p> <h2>5. Understand what your work-at-home role entails</h2> <p>This one can trip many people up, simply because the expectations they have might not align with those of their employer. If you're truly working for yourself, and you're your own boss, this will not be an issue. But if you are working for a company, you may discover that they have guidelines for you to follow.</p> <p>For instance, you may need to be available at your computer and/or phone at certain hours throughout the day. They may want you to travel into the office for big meetings, or to organize presentations. They may want you to travel to different states, or countries, depending on the kind of work you do. You may have thought that work-at-home meant that you had the freedom to set your own hours, and never set foot in the office again, but that may not be the case. Get these conditions set in stone before you start the gig.</p> <h2>6. Find ways to socialize and connect during the day</h2> <p>This doesn't mean dropping everything to hit the brunch buffet with your pals. But it is important for you to have some kind of interaction with other people during the day. You may think that these kinds of connections are not important, but isolation can set in quickly. In fact, many people cite the biggest downside of a work-at-home job is the loneliness.</p> <p>See if you can set up an instant messenger with other people in the same line of work. If you are telecommuting for a company, get yourself on conference calls now and then, even if it's just to feel like part of the team. You can even do video chats when you need help with something, or just want to kick off a project. Do what you can now to start social groups that can support you when you need them. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-freelancers-and-telecommuters-can-make-friends-and-network?ref=seealso" target="_blank">11 Ways Freelancers and Telecommuters Can Make Friends and Network</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-ways-to-prepare-for-your-work-at-home-gig&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Ways%2520to%2520Prepare%2520for%2520Your%2520Work%2520at%2520Home%2520Gig.jpg&amp;description=6%20Ways%20to%20Prepare%20for%20Your%20Work%20at%20Home%20Gig"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Ways%20to%20Prepare%20for%20Your%20Work%20at%20Home%20Gig.jpg" alt="6 Ways to Prepare for Your Work at Home Gig" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-prepare-for-your-work-at-home-gig">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-stay-productive-while-working-from-home">5 Ways to Stay Productive While Working From Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs">6 Gadgets Every Work at Home Professional Needs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tips-for-finding-legitimate-work-at-home-opportunities">Tips for Finding Legitimate Work at Home Opportunities</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-trendy-destinations-for-digital-nomads">7 Trendy Destinations for Digital Nomads</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-biggest-mistakes-people-make-when-working-from-home">The 5 Biggest Mistakes People Make When Working From Home</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building home office remote jobs self employed telecommute wah work at home work space Wed, 16 Aug 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 2003617 at http://www.wisebread.com The Ugly Truth of Workplace Success: Popularity Still Matters http://www.wisebread.com/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/another_success_for_the_team.jpg" alt="Another success for the team" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you thought the popularity contests of high school would end once you entered the workforce, you might be in for a rude awakening.</p> <p>Sadly, almost every place you will ever work places a value on popularity. They may not admit it, or even realize they do it, but managers and clients will always reward it. Here's why popularity matters so much at work, and how you should handle it.</p> <h2>Popular employees get promotions and raises</h2> <p>No manager is ever going to confess that they promote people simply because they like them, but it's a fact of working life.</p> <p>If you want to climb the ladder, you need to become a well-liked figure in your department. If you want to climb the ladder quickly, you should become one of the most well-liked figures in the whole organization. If you're highly respected, well-known, and people only have good things to say about you, then it's easier for someone in the decision-making process to sign their name on a promotion form.</p> <p>Conversely, if you're not popular, or even worse, disliked, then your hard work may never be rewarded. It sounds childish. After all, if you do your job well and make the company money, isn't that all that matters? No, it's not. People are people, and they won't want to reward someone they don't like.</p> <h2>Popularity at work can help you stay physically and mentally healthy</h2> <p>It seems like an obvious conclusion to draw, but it was actually part of a recent Duke University study performed on macaque monkeys. Macaques are close evolutionary relatives to humans, and were considered ideal subject matter for the research.</p> <p>Female macaques were introduced to an enclosure, and the order of their arrival dictated their social ranking. Newcomers were at the bottom rung of the social ladder. Researchers found that lower-ranking monkeys showed lower levels of some disease-fighting cells than their higher-ranking counterparts. When researchers changed up status rankings by reorganizing the groups of macaques, they found the same results. Monkeys moved into higher-status groups showed improvements in their immune systems. &quot;Those whose status improved became more sought-after grooming partners once they were promoted, giving them more opportunities to relieve stress through bonding,&quot; according to the university's website.</p> <p>Now, while it's clearly not possible to test this in an office environment, the results do show that the popularity and social standing of each monkey directly correlated to their health and well-being.</p> <p>This makes sense in the workplace, where we spend the vast majority of our time. If you are popular, you get the stress-busting rewards of social bonding. Your self esteem takes a boost, and you feel like an important part of the team. You look forward to coming to work, and you have a great attitude.</p> <p>Conversely, if you are excluded, you generally feel like the odd one out, and your self esteem is going to nose-dive. You will likely take more sick days, and will not attend the social functions put on after work hours. This will all have a detrimental effect on your career.</p> <h2>Being perceived to be popular carries even more weight</h2> <p>According to Alan Redman, a business psychologist at the Criterion Partnership, there are actually two different types of popularity. And for work purposes, one is much more valuable than the other.</p> <p>The first type is known as being &quot;sociometrically popular.&quot; In layman's terms, this means that you are a genuinely popular, well-liked person who socializes well. You treat people fairly, you care for your coworkers, and you may even organize events and bring in food and treats for the team. This, although helpful to your career, is not going to go over as well as the second type &mdash; &quot;perceived popularity.&quot;</p> <p>Perceived popularity is more about balancing social activities with common strategies that lead to advancement. For example, you'll happily go to a team outing, enjoy drinks after work, play on the baseball team, and bring in snacks. But, you play office politics, too. You may manipulate situations to your advantage, work behind the scenes to remove certain people from the company, or go out of your way to be nice to people who can directly improve your position. You'll be seen as a nice person overall, but will also be seen as someone who means business.</p> <p>In short, &quot;If you just want to be popular, be socially popular, but if you want to get to the top, mix social popularity with relationally aggressive behavior,&quot; says Redman.</p> <h2>So, how do you become more popular?</h2> <p>It's not going to happen overnight. If you are already popular at work, it won't take much effort to launch yourself into the top. Attend a few more social functions, speak up a little more in meetings, show a little more empathy, bring in more treats, and basically be a more improved social version of your current self.</p> <p>However, if you are not considered popular, or worse still, you're actively disliked, then you have a mountain to climb. People formulate strong perceptions of you based on the first few encounters they have with you, compounded with the opinions of their peers. You will have to go out of your way to get into their good books without being blatant.</p> <p>If you suddenly start bringing food in every day, organizing team events, offering help on projects, and basically doing a complete 180 on your previous persona, people might smell a rat. So, be gradual. If there's a meeting and you're usually silent, or a naysayer, chime in a few times with some positive thoughts. Attend the occasional get together, without making it obvious that you're trying to fit in. Buy a round of drinks. Tell a few jokes.</p> <p>At work, occasionally bring in treats with a good reason, such as an early morning meeting that could use coffee and doughnuts. Slowly, but surely, you will start to change perceptions. Before you know it, you'll be asked to come out more. You'll be included in more lunchtime trips to the local cafe or restaurant. And people will say things like, &quot;Wow, I had no idea you could be so funny,&quot; or, &quot;You have really come out of your shell.&quot;</p> <p>Is it sad that this matters at work? Yes, it is. But we cannot change it. However, knowing that it makes a difference means we can make the system work for us. Good luck.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthe-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThe%2520Ugly%2520Truth%2520of%2520Workplace%2520Success-%2520Popularity%2520Still%2520Matters.jpg&amp;description=The%20Ugly%20Truth%20of%20Workplace%20Success%3A%20Popularity%20Still%20Matters"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/The%20Ugly%20Truth%20of%20Workplace%20Success-%20Popularity%20Still%20Matters.jpg" alt="The Ugly Truth of Workplace Success: Popularity Still Matters" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-jobs-that-robots-cant-do-yet">10 Jobs That Robots Can&#039;t Do, Yet</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-you-shouldnt-vacation-shame-your-coworkers">7 Reasons You Shouldn&#039;t &quot;Vacation Shame&quot; Your Coworkers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-high-paying-jobs-for-introverts">The 10 Best High Paying Jobs for Introverts</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building corporate ladder coworkers employment getting ahead office politics popularity promotions Wed, 26 Jul 2017 09:00:14 +0000 Paul Michael 1990504 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Jobs That Robots Can't Do, Yet http://www.wisebread.com/10-jobs-that-robots-cant-do-yet <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-jobs-that-robots-cant-do-yet" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/old_classic_tin_robot.jpg" alt="Old classic tin robot" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You may have seen movies like <em>iRobot</em>,<em> Blade Runner</em>, and even <em>Star Wars</em>, and wondered if the future of employment looks bleak for humans. Indeed, it seems every day news stories cover the progress being made in artificial intelligence, and how more factory jobs continue to be taken by robotic workers.</p> <p>But does this mean that every job will eventually be done by a robot? Well, not likely. And the following jobs are safe for the foreseeable future.</p> <h2>1. Any kind of mental therapist</h2> <p>From psychology and psychiatry, to occupational therapy and even some aspects of social work, there is one huge reason why robots cannot do these jobs right now: They're not human.</p> <p>In any kind of therapy session, you need to feel heard and understood. You need a connection with the therapist to make any kind of progress, knowing that he or she is empathetic to your issues and genuinely wants to help. And that word &mdash; genuine &mdash; is at the heart of the problem for robots. Even if they can mimic a human's responses accurately and provide excellent advice, it will always feel programmed and unnatural. Pouring your heart out to a machine will never feel the same as conversing with a human, and that will make it almost impossible for robots to replace this role.</p> <h2>2. Investigative journalists</h2> <p>While it's true that some aspects of journalism are being automated, the kind of work that Woodward and Bernstein did on Watergate is unlikely to be replaced by robots any time soon. Even with great advances in artificial intelligence, robots still don't have that sense of intrigue that humans have.</p> <p>Humans are naturally curious, and when it comes to journalism, people look for things that aren't quite right. They question, probe, dig, and make connections that robots could not do without human intervention. Not only that, but the charm and personality of journalists opens doors, gets people talking, and brings facts out into the open. How many witnesses or informants will open up to a robot in a bar over a pint of beer?</p> <h2>3. Physicians and surgeons</h2> <p>Let's face it; if you found out you were going under the knife tomorrow, how happy would you be to know a robot was performing the procedure without any kind of human involvement?</p> <p>While advances in medical science have brought robots into the operating room, they are not yet at a stage of complete autonomy. They are there to help surgeons, and facilitate in complex and arduous tasks. Sometimes a surgeon can even use one remotely to operate on a patient in a different state (or even country).</p> <p>However, while robots can be painstakingly accurate, they are not yet sophisticated enough to replace surgeons and doctors. If anything were to go wrong during the operation, a robot may not be programmed with the correct response to fix it. A surgeon relies on hundreds of hours of experience, and will often have to think laterally to solve a problem. Sometimes, a surgeon will even follow a gut reactions based on countless other surgeries.</p> <p>Yes, a robot can make precise cuts, and administer medications exactly, but robots cannot replace the human touch that comes from a physician or surgeon. And let's not even go into the kind of malpractice that could result from a defective robot that did not have human oversight.</p> <h2>4. Authors</h2> <p>If you were a publisher looking to hire someone to write a novel for you, would you choose the talents of Stephen King, J.K. Rowling, or perhaps Neil Gaiman? Or would you instead bank on the inventiveness of a robot with AI?</p> <p>Very few people would choose the latter these days. But robot-written books are improving in quality. A short novel co-written by a robot (its co-author is human) made it past the first stage in a Japanese literary contest in 2016, in which the judges did not know which novels were written by humans and which by machines.</p> <p>For now, though, robots are limited to farming data and churning out perfect sentence structures and grammatically-correct paragraphs. None can touch the level of creativity that's required for plot and character development. That comes from the human mind, and probably will for a very long time.</p> <h2>5. Advertising creatives</h2> <p>The ad world was rocked last year by the introduction of &quot;<a href="http://www.adweek.com/agencyspy/mccann-japan-finally-hires-a-robot-as-creative-director/105466" target="_blank">robotic creative directors</a>.&quot; As a creative director myself, the news was initially a hammer blow; until I read what it can do, and how it does it.</p> <p>This &quot;creative director&quot; is really nothing more than an editing assistant that offers solutions based on millions of ads that are available for viewing, coupled with data on current consumers. But the robot cannot (at the moment anyway) come up with a brilliant, innovative ad to capture the imagination and sell a lot of products. That is very much a human endeavor; to create comedy, intrigue, and a &quot;need&quot; out of thin air. AI may help creatives to crack certain problems, but robots will not be taking over the advertising world just yet.</p> <h2>6. Teachers</h2> <p>Certain aspects of the teaching profession can be automated. You just have to look online to see the many thousands of options you have for education courses that are offered without any kind of human involvement.</p> <p>But raising children into responsible, well-educated adults is about much more than rote learning. There needs to be an understanding that goes well beyond facts and figures. Teachers have to deal with emotional issues, and respond to interesting and unusual questions in a &quot;human&quot; way. Despite what you may see in sci-fi movies, teachers are not yet going to be replaced by robots.</p> <h2>7. Film and television directors</h2> <p>Like authors, advertising creatives, and other similar professions, film and television direction is a skill that requires a great deal of innovation and lateral thinking. Directors have a vision of what they want to put on the screen, and that vision is uniquely human.</p> <p>Robots can assist with editing the movie, finding the best angles for shots, and even suggest script changes and lighting techniques. But for the time being, robots will never take the place of talents like Spielberg, Scorsese, and Nolan.</p> <h2>8. Archaeologists</h2> <p>Indiana Jones and Lara Croft can expect long and fruitful careers. Well, those may be fictional examples of the archaeology professions, but even so, the job is safe.</p> <p>Much of what an archaeologist does is theorizing. Basically, they look at fragments of evidence and piece together concepts and solutions that, to the best of their knowledge, make sense based on the information in front of them. But most of the time, it's intelligent guesswork. This kind of thinking is not something in which robots excel. They can come up with solutions to complex problems in nanoseconds, but ask them to &quot;have a guess&quot; and it's a different story.</p> <h2>9. Detectives</h2> <p>Certain aspects of policing and the law could one day be replaced by robots or computers, especially as artificial intelligence becomes even more sophisticated. However, the detective that works in homicide, missing persons, burglary, organized crime, and many other areas of the industry, has a long time before they need to worry.</p> <p>Aside from the fact that a human element is needed to make links between seemingly random pieces of information (often called &quot;a hunch&quot;), it would be nearly impossible for a robot to go to the places a detective must go to find clues, investigate witnesses, and dig up leads. And when it comes to undercover work, that's even more impossible. Yes, there are robot cops around right now in some countries, but they are really just souped-up information agents. They don't solve crimes.</p> <h2>10. Actors and entertainers</h2> <p>Several people have speculated that actors, singers, dancers, comedians, and other entertainers are one day going to be replaced. True, Peter Cushing died in 1994, and was digitally recreated with convincing effects in 2016's <em>Rogue One</em>. And as technology improves, so will these animated stars.</p> <p>However, the emotion and physicality that comes from a truly gifted entertainer is going to be impossible to generate for a long, long time. Performances can be mimicked, but real authenticity and sentiment is not something that comes easy for a robot. Our entertainers will be human for many decades to come.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/10%20Jobs%20That%20Robots%20Cant%20Do%2C%20Yet.jpg" alt="10 Jobs That Robots Can't Do, Yet" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-jobs-that-robots-cant-do-yet">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-amazons-alexa-can-make-your-life-easier">20 Ways Amazon&#039;s Alexa Can Make Your Life Easier</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-high-paying-jobs-that-didnt-exist-10-years-ago">9 High-Paying Jobs That Didn&#039;t Exist 10 Years Ago</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-transition-to-a-new-career-after-30">6 Ways to Transition to a New Career After 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-use-technology-to-upgrade-your-career">6 Ways to Use Technology to Upgrade Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-to-splurge-resume-writer">When to Splurge: Resume Writer</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Technology AI artificial intelligence career fields employment human workers jobs robots Mon, 24 Jul 2017 09:00:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1988260 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Job Myths Boomers Should Stop Believing http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-myths-boomers-should-stop-believing <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-job-myths-boomers-should-stop-believing" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/desperate_businessmen.jpg" alt="Desperate businessmen" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you were born between the early 1940s and the early 1960s, you are considered a baby boomer. And that means that in the year 2017, you are considered to be at the late stage of your career.</p> <p>However, as we all know, times have changed. Very few people can expect to start at a company in their 20s and retire with a gold watch in their 60s. Layoffs and downsizing are commonplace. But with these employment fears come myths that many baby boomers still firmly believe in. It's time to bust them once and for all.</p> <h2>1. Once you hit a certain age, you're unemployable</h2> <p>Let's make it clear: Getting a job in your 20s and 30s is always going to be easier than getting hired in your 50s and 60s. There are certain expectations about pay, and as we get older, we have more health concerns and less energy than we did at the start of our careers. But there's a difference between hard and impossible. If you have the skills, the drive, and the right attitude, you will be valued and you will get job offers.</p> <p>The key is to stop shooting yourself in the foot by believing that your age is an anchor. There are pros and cons for every stage of our career. Early on, we're too young and have no experience, but we're cheaper and are willing to work longer hours. At the height of our careers, we sacrifice time with our families for ladder-climbing, but the pay and rewards are there. Later, we can be considered too expensive for the open positions, but we have the experience and wisdom that employers crave. It's all give and take. Market yourself with the strengths that come from a long and successful career, and how those strengths can benefit your potential new boss.</p> <h2>2. You're too old to retrain</h2> <p>They say you can't teach an old dog new tricks, but that's a complete fallacy. In fact, to continue the analogy, skilled animal trainers can take an old dog with behavioral problems, and make it a loving, family-friendly pet. While it's true that it's a little harder to pick up certain skills later in life, it's not even close to being unmanageable.</p> <p>As <em>The Telegraph</em> reported in 2014, more middle-aged workers are <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/jobs/10555895/Youre-over-50-Great-youre-hired.html" target="_blank">retraining for new careers</a> as a response to their original careers dying out, or being too physically taxing. And in 2013, almost 12,000 people over age 50 in the U.K. found apprenticeships in health care and public services. In 2015, Time magazine reported that the job market was hot for <a href="http://time.com/money/3725034/jobs-older-workers-improved/" target="_blank">workers over the age of 50</a>.</p> <h2>3. Older workers are not as valued as their younger counterparts</h2> <p>You've probably heard some of these degrading statements thrown around the office (or even used them yourself at the start of your career): &quot;That guy's a dinosaur, don't listen to him,&quot; or &quot;She's been here for decades, she's not up on the latest news.&quot; It's complete nonsense.</p> <p>With age comes experience and wisdom, and the ability to solve problems much faster than those who are just starting to climb the ladder. Consider the story of Picasso. One day he was sketching in the park, when he was approached by a young woman who asked him to sketch her portrait. In a single pencil stroke that took just a few seconds, he captured her likeness completely. When asked how much she owed him, he said $5,000. Taken aback, she asked how he dare ask so much for something that took only a few seconds, to which he replied, &quot;Madame, it took me my entire life.&quot;</p> <p>This is so true of the experience you bring to the table. You have spent decades learning how to do things, how <em>not</em> to do things, and how to cut to the chase. Time is valued by employers, and if you can prove that your skills can save them time and money, age is just a number.</p> <h2>4. If you take time off or retire, you'll never get rehired</h2> <p>Retirement is not forever. You may decide to retire, then realize that you still want to be part of the workforce. Don't think that a gap of a few years at the end of your resume is going to tarnish it. The break between one career and a new venture is actually going to be looked upon favorably by employers. They will see that you have taken time off to reboot, clear your head, relax, and figure out how you want to spend the next decade of your life.</p> <p>So, feel free to take a break and recharge. Use the time to work out what you really want to do. Maybe retirement is just what you want. Maybe you want to try your hand at something completely different. When you start looking again, you will have options open to you.</p> <h2>5. Only part-time work is available for older workers</h2> <p>Once again, this is untrue in the present climate. In 1995, you could make a case for that argument. Back then, around 56 percent of the over-65 workforce was part time, with 44 percent being full-time. But by 2007, <a href="https://stats.bls.gov/spotlight/2008/older_workers/" target="_blank">those figures had completely reversed</a>, with 56 percent of the over-65 workforce now in full-time work, and just 44 percent doing part-time jobs.</p> <p>So, what kind of jobs are available? Well, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the majority of people over 55 are working in management positions, sales, and office jobs. Next comes the service industry, followed by production, transportation, construction, and maintenance. If the last two seem surprising, consider that we are living longer, and have made great advances in medical care. It's now possible for a 55+ man or woman to enter the construction and maintenance industries and enjoy great success, despite what they may believe about being too old for manual labor.</p> <h2>6. There are only certain jobs available to me</h2> <p>Greeter at a grocery store. Fast food server. Security guard at the mall. Delivering newspapers. Driving a cab or a school bus. The list goes on. These are the jobs many baby boomers think are in their future.</p> <p>However, while those jobs are available for those who genuinely want them, your options are much broader, and exciting. One of the most popular options right now is retraining to become an interior designer. If you have the eye for it, you can make great money on a schedule that suits you. Other options include working on a cruise ship, planning weddings, public speaking, casino work, consulting, and seasonal opportunities at ski lodges and resorts. The world is your oyster, especially if you're open to doing some traveling and taking a few leaps.</p> <p>Remember: As a baby boomer, you may have fewer years of your career in front of you than behind you, but that does not mean you have just a few paths to follow. With drive, enthusiasm, and the willingness to retrain, you can do almost anything you set your mind to.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-job-myths-boomers-should-stop-believing&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Job%2520Myths%2520Boomers%2520Should%2520Stop%2520Believing.jpg&amp;description=6%20Job%20Myths%20Boomers%20Should%20Stop%20Believing"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Job%20Myths%20Boomers%20Should%20Stop%20Believing.jpg" alt="6 Job Myths Boomers Should Stop Believing" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-myths-boomers-should-stop-believing">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-dream-jobs-youre-never-too-old-to-pursue">9 Dream Jobs You&#039;re Never Too Old to Pursue</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-awesome-websites-to-help-you-get-a-job">25 Awesome Websites to Help You Get a Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting age baby boomers experience job skills middle age myths rehired too old training unemployment Mon, 17 Jul 2017 09:00:10 +0000 Paul Michael 1981839 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Trendy Destinations for Digital Nomads http://www.wisebread.com/7-trendy-destinations-for-digital-nomads <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-trendy-destinations-for-digital-nomads" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/studying_in_the_park.jpg" alt="Studying in the park" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The ranks of digital nomads &mdash; people who use technology to work remotely and travel &mdash; are growing. Every digital nomad has a different set of criteria when they are searching for their next destination. But high up on the list of requirements are usually low living costs, a strong community of like-minded people, and workable internet speeds. If you are on the lookout for somewhere to set up or continue your online activities, then look no further. These are the hottest digital nomad spots right now.</p> <h2>1. Chiang Mai, Thailand</h2> <p>Located in the north of Thailand, Chiang Mai is the smaller, laid-back older brother to the frenetic capital of Bangkok. Built around the remaining walls and moats of the old city, Chiang Mai has fostered a reputation as the digital nomad capital of South East Asia. It has an active community of digital nomads that use this city as a base for their business activities.</p> <p>The incredibly low cost of living in Chiang Mai is one of the main reasons so many people choose to set up here. Accommodation is readily available at low prices, with the average monthly rent for a furnished studio in a normal area coming in at just $197, and utility bills at around $32, according to Expatistan.</p> <p>High speed internet is easy to install in your property, and the average download speed is around 16.7 Mbps. Alternatively, there is a huge selection of co-working spaces around the city where you can meet with like-minded individuals, and lots of cafes and bars also have good Wi-Fi connections. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/learn-how-to-travel-forever-from-these-7-digital-nomads?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Learn How to Travel Forever From These 7 Digital Nomads</a>)</p> <h2>2. Phnom Penh, Cambodia</h2> <p>Cambodia is a relatively recent addition to the South East Asia tourist trail, and its capital Phnom Penh is leading the way. There's a growing community of digital entrepreneurs taking advantage of its continuing evolution, which has seen it rapidly modernizing over the past couple of decades.</p> <p>Because of the huge amount of development that is still ongoing here, it's relatively easy to secure newly built and furnished apartments on modern blocks. Despite this, living costs in Phnom Penh are still low. Expatistan lists the average rent for a furnished studio apartment at $392 and utilities at $61.</p> <p>Internet speeds average out at an unremarkable but respectable 6.6 Mbps, but mobile internet is very quick for the region if you need to tether. Co-working spaces are a relatively new phenomenon for Cambodia but there are lots of cafes, bars, and restaurants that accommodate people wanting to work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-incredible-world-cities-you-can-afford?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Incredible World Cities You Can Afford</a>)</p> <h2>3. Medellin, Colombia</h2> <p>Colombia has grown massively in popularity over recent years as it continues its move away from its violent history. Now people are visiting for the untouched beaches, the vibrant culture, and the uber-modern cities that have quietly risen up throughout the country. No city has experienced a bigger transformation than Medellin, which has reinvented itself as one of South America's leading cities.</p> <p>Rental costs in Medellin are low considering how modern a city it is, with an apartment costing $297, but utilities for the month will set you back $132. Standards of accommodation can vary greatly, but it's possible to get quite a lot of bang for your buck depending on which area you settle in.</p> <p>Internet is generally reliable but slow throughout much of Colombia, with Medellin supposedly having the best services with speeds falling somewhere between five and 10 Mbps. Free Wi-Fi is widely available in cafes and bars and there are lots of high quality co-working spaces to choose from.</p> <h2>4. Buenos Aires, Argentina</h2> <p>Buenos Aires has a reputation as being the most &quot;European&quot; city in South America and is often referred to as the Paris of Latin America. This is largely thanks to its historic mix of Italian, Spanish, and German immigrants that helped shape the culture in so many ways, from the food to the architecture.</p> <p>Costs in Buenos Aires fluctuate a lot due to the unpredictable nature of the country's economy, but at present, rent will cost you about $476 and utilities will be around $86. Apartments here are generally quite large, as lots of them are in older buildings.</p> <p>Free Wi-Fi is available in many of the public spaces in Buenos Aires, including parks and squares. Internet speeds average at about 9.6 Mbps, though there is high-speed internet available. But beware, all services are prone to regular outages, which can be frustrating. Co-working spaces are a good solution, and though not plentiful, do manage to offer more reliable services. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-digital-nomads-can-save-for-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Digital Nomads Can Save for Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>5. Valparaiso, Chile</h2> <p>Valparaiso is a laid-back, bohemian port city famed for its colorful buildings and the outstanding street art that's visible around every corner. The city has seen plenty of modernizing development in recent years, though it's still slightly ramshackle in appearance,.</p> <p>The majority of the housing is in historic old buildings. Monthly rental prices average out at $358 for a furnished studio, with utilities adding an extra $80. Thanks to the city being built high into the hills, most apartments come with stunning views.</p> <p>Internet speeds in Chile are some of the fastest you'll find in South America, clocking in at a zippy average speed of 15.3 Mbps. You shouldn't find any connection issues whatsoever here.</p> <h2>6. Sofia, Bulgaria</h2> <p>Because one of the points on a remote worker's checklist is often cost, there aren't many cities in Europe that are hotbeds for digital nomads. But despite its burgeoning popularity, Bulgaria remains one of the cheapest destinations in that part of the world. Its capital Sofia is renowned for its young outlook and raucous night life, so it naturally attracts the &quot;work hard, play hard&quot; crowd.</p> <p>At $237 for monthly rent and just $54 for utilities per month, these are some of the cheapest living costs you will find anywhere in Europe. Being a former communist country, many of the apartment blocks aren't the prettiest to look at from the outside, but still have a good standard of decoration within.</p> <p>Internet here is reliable and fast, with download speeds averaging a smoking 60 Mbps. Wi-Fi is available in cafes and restaurants. There are free hot spots available all over the city as well, which you'll find in many parks, shopping malls, and train stations.</p> <h2>7. Mexico City, Mexico</h2> <p>Mexico, and particularly Mexico City, has something of a turbulent reputation, but it's worked hard to turn that around over recent years. Though it has a population of more than 21 million, it's cheap and easy to navigate, has a neighborhood to suit everyone, and an energetic, fun-loving vibe.</p> <p>Rental costs come in at around $496 per month plus $103 for utilities, but vary wildly depending on which area you choose within the city and how good your negotiating skills are in Spanish. Most accommodation here is a little bit old school, but has a certain charm about it.</p> <p>When it comes to telecoms, Mexico is pretty advanced and that extends to its internet speeds. At the top end, you can get up to an extremely rapid 50 Mbps high speed internet service. There are also dozens of excellent co-working spaces to choose from here, many with top notch facilities in great locations.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Trendy%20Destinations%20for%20Digital%20Nomads.jpg" width="300" height="449" alt="" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nick-wharton">Nick Wharton</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-trendy-destinations-for-digital-nomads">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-countries-where-you-can-retire-for-1000-a-month">5 Countries Where You Can Retire for $1,000 a Month</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-countries-where-you-dont-have-to-tip-at-restaurants">7 Countries Where You Don&#039;t Have to Tip at Restaurants</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-slash-the-cost-of-wi-fi-when-you-travel">6 Ways to Slash the Cost of Wi-Fi When You Travel</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-to-know-before-retiring-abroad">9 Things to Know Before Retiring Abroad</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/retire-for-half-the-cost-in-these-5-countries">Retire for Half the Cost in These 5 Countries</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Travel cities co-working countries digital nomads international Internet telecommute wi-fi working remotely Thu, 13 Jul 2017 08:30:15 +0000 Nick Wharton 1979039 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Protect Your Job When You're in a Workplace Relationship http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-protect-your-job-when-youre-in-a-workplace-relationship <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-protect-your-job-when-youre-in-a-workplace-relationship" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/work_romance_between_two_business_people_holding_a_heart.jpg" alt="Work romance between two business people holding a heart" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are various figures of speech that talk about workplace relationships, and most of them are in the negative. &quot;Don't make honey where you make money,&quot; or &quot;Never foul your own nest&quot; are just a couple fit to print here.</p> <p>It seems that the overall rule of thumb is to avoid workplace relationships like the plague. However, they happen. A lot. And if you find yourself in one, how do you ensure that it doesn't impact your job, or even your career?</p> <h2>Check the employee handbook</h2> <p>Most human resource departments have some kind of company or employee handbook that provides guidelines for behavior in and around the office. Before you get too involved in any kind of office romance, check this to see what it says about the implications of dating a coworker. It's possible your company may prohibit office relationships, although it's highly unlikely it would ever be enforced. However, you should disclose the relationship to Human Resources and your manager. It may also need to be documented, especially if the relationship brings about conflict of interest concerns. Almost every business will frown on a supervisor and his or her direct report having a romance, for obvious reasons.</p> <p>You will usually get a gut reaction to your own fledgling relationship based on other activity you've seen in the office. If you've been invited to the wedding of two coworkers, or see couples holding hands in the office with no backlash at all, you're probably fine. If you haven't seen or heard a peep about any workplace hookups, you may have to tread very carefully. Or, figure out which of you should find another place to work, if you want to keep the relationship alive.</p> <h2>Keep it between you and your partner</h2> <p>In the very early stages, only two people in the office should know about your relationship, and that's you and the person you're dating. Don't do public displays of affection. Don't leave each other little notes, or giggle in the elevator together. Don't start going to lunch with each other every day, and arrive in the same car in the morning. You want this to be kept quiet until you are sure it's nothing more than a fling.</p> <p>If it's serious, you can inform HR, and if necessary, your managers. But even after that, keep it professional. You are still in a place of business, and you were both hired to do specific tasks. Those tasks will not be improved by bringing your relationship into it. And if you are arguing, or going through a rocky patch, you also need to separate that personal side from the professional side. If it becomes clear that your romance is affecting your performance, one or both of you could be let go.</p> <h2>Set boundaries at work, and out of the office</h2> <p>That old saying &quot;Loose lips sink ships&quot; is not just for wartime. In this case, that ship could be your career, and if you do not establish firm boundaries from the get go, you could start violating trusts that lead to gossip, rumors, and a toxic work environment.</p> <p>It's possible that you know much more about a certain project or coworker than the person you're dating. They might want to know more than they are allowed to, or vice-versa. &quot;Go on, tell me, are layoffs coming soon? Which departments are affected? Is anyone getting a promotion?&quot; These questions can overstep the company boundaries and result in disciplinary action for both parties.</p> <p>Then, there's the question of favoritism. You may be dating someone who is part of your team. You may be dating someone with significant influence. If you seem to benefit from that relationship, even if it's completely unrelated, it can seem like a huge dose of favoritism. &quot;He only got promoted because he's dating the best friend of the boss.&quot; Take these things into account, because it can cause a lot of ill will and low morale among other employees.</p> <h2>Try not to date &quot;up or down&quot;</h2> <p>Obviously, it will be hard to deny certain feelings you both have for each other. But, if one of you is much higher up in the company than the other, things can get messy very quickly. Word will spread that you are in a relationship, despite your best efforts to conceal it. Then, you will be under scrutiny constantly.</p> <p>Are you receiving special treatment, or giving it to your partner? Are you sure you're making decisions based solely on the best interest of the company, or are they being swayed by your affections? Are you getting a little upset that your partner travels a lot, while you are stuck in the office? Or, that they get perks that you do not at your level? All of these problems, and many more, can happen when you date up or down.</p> <p>So, stick to relationships with people on a similar level to you in the company. And if one of you starts advancing more quickly than the other, reassess the situation. Is it going to cause problems? If you are put in charge, or report to your partner, you'll have something of an HR nightmare on your hands.</p> <h2>Document everything &hellip; just in case</h2> <p>It's sad, but true, that we now live in a world that provides us with a plethora of data on anyone we wish to investigate. Emails, Facebook profiles, text messages, Snapchat, photos, videos, you name it, it's out there. It's possible your relationship could cause jealousy among other coworkers, and wild accusations could be made.</p> <p>If you can document that your partner got a raise or promotion through his or her achievements, and not the relationship, then you can shut down those creaking gates quickly. And if you should break up, those wild accusations may come from the person you were seeing. Again, good documentation can save you from some messy, fictional scandals.</p> <h2>If the relationship ends, be professional &mdash; very professional</h2> <p>Your office romance may last until the end of your life. It may also be over in a few weeks, months, or years. If the relationship does come to an end while you are both still working for the same company, tread very carefully. You may well be in a position to make life a living hell for your ex, and if he or she left the relationship on a sour note, you may be very tempted to.</p> <p>However, it can only lead to pain and suffering for both parties, and to a lesser extent, the rest of the company. A well-oiled machine may break down due to animosity, or even hatred. If the other person is dating someone new, jealousy could drive your decision-making. When that happens, it's a slippery slope to a vendetta, and the loss of a job for one or both of you.</p> <p>So, keep it professional. If it's painful to see each other at work after the break up, find ways to avoid the other person. Can you be transferred to a department that provides less contact? Do you have to go to every meeting, or will emails and phone calls suffice? And the big question &hellip; should one of you move on to a different company?</p> <p>Remember, while it's not advisable to get involved with someone at the office, if you establish a real connection with someone, you should let nature take its course. You may find that one amazing person that you spend the rest of your life with; jobs, on the other hand, come and go.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-protect-your-job-when-youre-in-a-workplace-relationship&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Protect%2520Your%2520Job%2520When%2520Youre%2520in%2520a%2520Workplace%2520Relationship.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Protect%20Your%20Job%20When%20Youre%20in%20a%20Workplace%20Relationship"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Protect%20Your%20Job%20When%20Youre%20in%20a%20Workplace%20Relationship.jpg" alt="How to Protect Your Job When You're in a Workplace Relationship" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-protect-your-job-when-youre-in-a-workplace-relationship">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters">The Ugly Truth of Workplace Success: Popularity Still Matters</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/starting-a-new-job-3-rules-to-live-by">Starting a New Job: 3 Rules to Live By</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-focused-at-work-despite-your-chatty-coworkers">How to Stay Focused at Work Despite Your Chatty Coworkers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building conflict of interest coworkers Dating employees human resources love privacy work relationships Thu, 13 Jul 2017 08:30:10 +0000 Paul Michael 1981390 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Ways Your Customer Service Job Can Help You Win at Life http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-your-customer-service-job-can-help-you-win-at-life <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-ways-your-customer-service-job-can-help-you-win-at-life" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/waitress_holding_tray_with_cappuccinos.jpg" alt="Waitress holding tray with cappuccinos" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Maybe you'd hoped for a different job by this point in your life, but here you are, still waiting tables, and it feels like you will never move up in the world.</p> <p>But here's the good news: While serving people may not be what you want to do forever, you will learn some important lessons along the way. These will not only make you a better person, but are also likely to make you more successful later in life.</p> <h2>1. You learn to be polite to everyone</h2> <p>When you're serving people, you have to be polite, even when they aren't polite to you. Customers can do and say some horrible things, but you still have to smile and do your best to get them what they want. Sure, it's frustrating at the time, but these are skills that you need to learn. There are, unfortunately, rude people in every walk and station of life, and learning how to deal with them will make you happier and less likely to lose your cool later, when it could matter more.</p> <h2>2. You learn to prioritize</h2> <p>When the restaurant rush is on and you're slammed, you have to figure out how to be as efficient as possible. Instead of running to the kitchen seven separate times, you learn to do things in batches. Instead of bringing all of the condiments individually, you learn to grab them all at once. Working in the service industry, especially during busy times, helps you decide quickly what is important, what can wait, and which tasks best go together.</p> <p>No matter what you do later in life, these skills will help you do it better. They will make you a more productive employee, whether you are deciding which arguments are the most important in legal cases, or triaging injuries in an emergency room.</p> <h2>3. You learn which battles are worth fighting</h2> <p>At some point in your service industry job, people are probably going to treat you poorly. While these can be miserable experiences in the moment, they can help you learn when you need to stand up for yourself and when it's better to just smile, nod, and be on your way. This will help you to be a calmer person, and also to be more confident about when you should take a stand.</p> <h2>4. You learn to embrace pressure</h2> <p>Service industry jobs come with a lot of pressure, especially when it's busy and people are putting in complicated orders or making very specific requests. If you stay long enough, you will learn to thrive under this kind of pressure. You will become someone who is unruffled, even when things get hectic, and someone who can be relied upon even when life is challenging.</p> <p>And life<em> is</em> challenging. So learning how to function well, how to control your stress reactions, and how to be kind and polite even when the heat is on will serve you throughout life. It will make you the kind of person who doesn't melt down simply because things got hard for a little while.</p> <h2>5. You learn empathy</h2> <p>I have found it to be universally true that everyone you meet is fighting a battle of some sort. When you work in the service industry, you will eventually learn this. That customer who reordered her food five times just found out she has a severe allergy and is terrified of eating something that will make her sick. The child who screams for the entire dinner just got out of the hospital. The harried parent is involved in a messy divorce.</p> <p>As you work, you will hear people's stories and sometimes they will involve hard, awful things. Hearing these, and seeing how so much of our bad behavior comes from stress and pain, will teach you empathy. It will help you see things from a different perspective, which makes you a better person overall.</p> <h2>6. You learn humility</h2> <p>You are more than your job. But while you're at work, you still have to do that job. And service industry jobs are not about you, but about whatever product you are offering, and about the people you are offering it to. Service industry jobs teach you to step outside of yourself and be about something else for a little while.</p> <p>Anyone who can step outside of themselves for a job can also do it for their spouse, their children, or for another job that means more to them. While you should never sacrifice yourself long term, being able to do it for a period of time means that you understand that it's not all about you all the time, and you can let life &mdash; even your life &mdash; be about someone or something else in certain times and under certain circumstances.</p> <h2>7. You learn the importance of manners</h2> <p>It only takes someone being rude to you once or twice for you to learn the importance of good manners. Even the difference between an order given gruffly and one with a &quot;please&quot; will astound you. As you take these lessons to heart, you will learn to use your own manners, no matter the circumstances. Being rude never makes things better.</p> <h2>8. You learn to work with people you don't like</h2> <p>You will be on a team throughout life. Even in your home, as you marry and maybe have children, you will be part of a team. Sometimes, you won't like the other people on your team (even when that person is your spouse!). But you will still have to work with them. A service industry job can help you learn how to do that.</p> <p>There will most likely be people you don't like at work. But learning how to communicate with them, and how to break up the necessary workload with them, will help you succeed later in life, when working as a team may be even more important.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-ways-your-customer-service-job-can-help-you-win-at-life&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Ways%2520Your%2520Customer%2520Service%2520Job%2520Can%2520Help%2520You%2520Win%2520at%2520Life_1.jpg&amp;description=8%20Ways%20Your%20Customer%20Service%20Job%20Can%20Help%20You%20Win%20at%20Life"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Ways%20Your%20Customer%20Service%20Job%20Can%20Help%20You%20Win%20at%20Life_2.jpg" alt="8 Ways Your Customer Service Job Can Help You Win at Life" width="250" height="374" /></p> <div align="center"> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-your-customer-service-job-can-help-you-win-at-life">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-myths-boomers-should-stop-believing">6 Job Myths Boomers Should Stop Believing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-out-of-social-obligations-that-break-your-budget">How to Get Out of Social Obligations That Break Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-benefits-of-volunteering">9 Unexpected Benefits of Volunteering</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-life-skills-your-kids-wont-learn-in-school">7 Life Skills Your Kids Won&#039;t Learn in School</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-freelancers-and-telecommuters-can-make-friends-and-network">11 Ways Freelancers and Telecommuters Can Make Friends and Network</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Lifestyle better person customer service empathy job skills life lessons manners server service job teamwork waiter waitress Mon, 10 Jul 2017 09:00:09 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1980031 at http://www.wisebread.com What to Do If Your Paycheck Bounces http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-your-paycheck-bounces <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-to-do-if-your-paycheck-bounces" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/photo_of_a_young_woman_receive_bad_news.jpg" alt="Photo of a young woman receive bad news" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>British actor Noel Coward said it best: &quot;If you must have motivation, think of your paycheck on Friday.&quot; All the hard work that you put in day after day really pays off when that paycheck hits your bank account.</p> <p>But what happens when you get the &quot;insufficient funds&quot; memo from your employer, of all people? Here's your play-by-play on what do if your paycheck bounces.</p> <h2>1. Contact your employer right away</h2> <p>Go straight to the source and politely explain what happened. In the best case scenario, your employer or payroll administrator will apologize for the mistake and cut you a new check within a few days. If not, then you'll need to complete a few more steps to get your hard-earned dollars.</p> <p>Write down who you talked to, when you talked, and what you both agreed to. Remain calm at all times and ask if you can get a written confirmation that you'll receive a replacement check by a <em>specific date</em>. This is important.</p> <h2>2. Inform your bank</h2> <p>While you wait on your replacement check, call your bank's customer service line and explain the situation. You'll need to do this because depending on your type of account and balance at the time of deposit, your financial institution may hit you with an overdraft or insufficient funds fee. These fees can range from $27 to $35.</p> <p>Here's when that written confirmation from your employer will come in handy: Request a one-time waiver of that pesky fee for depositing a bad check. Your bank is legally entitled to deny your request, but it's worth a shot when you have a clean record or have been a customer for several years. Once again, write down who you talked to, when, and what was said (aka The 3W's).</p> <h2>3. Make sure that bills get paid</h2> <p>This is particularly important if you had any automatic payments that were timed with your paycheck. Immediately contact all people and organizations to which you were going to pay using your paycheck. If you set up automatic bill payments online, you may be able to cancel some or all of them through your customer portals as long as they haven't been processed already.</p> <p>If those payments have already been processed, then your best bet is to contact customer service right away over the phone. Explain the situation to your rep and ask for options to arrange alternate forms of payment, including paying at a physical location, providing a routing number and checking or savings account over the phone, or mailing a check (FYI, that mailing address may be available on your statement). Remember to track The 3W's for all of these calls.</p> <p>Don't forget to politely request to have any applicable penalty fees waived or reversed. Some companies are able to stop the fee from hitting your account at all and others will revert a fee generally within 48 hours. If you're still hit with a penalty, document it.</p> <h2>4. Gather proof that the check had insufficient funds</h2> <p>Just in case you may have to lawyer up, start a &quot;Bad Check&quot; folder. Include in this folder:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Notes from your initial talk with your employer.</p> </li> <li> <p>Notes from the visit or call with your bank.</p> </li> <li> <p>Notes from your talks with people and companies that were counting on that payment;</p> </li> <li> <p>Proof that the check bounced (printout of your bank statement, physical paycheck mailed back to you, or photo from check with insufficient funds stamp if available on your statement or online portal).</p> </li> <li> <p>List of fees applied from your bank (if any).</p> </li> <li> <p>List of fees applied from companies (if any).</p> </li> </ul> <h2>5. Check back with your employer on the promised date of payment</h2> <p>Hopefully, you don't have to wait until the very day of payment. But when you do, then you have every right to remind your employer about the deadline.</p> <p>Got your payment? Good.</p> <p>Is your employer &quot;ghosting&quot; you? Then, keep on reading.</p> <h2>6. Beware over 15- to 30-day late payments</h2> <p>If there's a major bill that you just can't cover, such as rent, car loan payment, or mortgage payment, be proactive and reach out to those companies.</p> <p>Why?</p> <p>For starters, these companies may have a higher amount due when you pay past a certain date. For example, most mortgage lenders make payments due by the first of the month, allow a grace period until the 15th of the month, and start charging a higher amount on the 16th of the month and on. Once your payment becomes 30 days past due, your creditor will report it to the credit bureaus.</p> <p>When there's potential for a 30-day late payment, inform your creditor in writing and request that your potential late payment not be reported due to a situation outside of your control. Send a letter explaining your situation via certified mail, keep a copy for your &quot;Bad Check&quot; folder, and expect a response within 30 days (also for your folder).</p> <h2>7. Notify your state's Department of Labor</h2> <p>Still waiting? Contact your employer again and inform them that you require payment or you will be forced to contact the U.S. Department of Labor. In case of no response, then report your employer to your state's <a href="https://www.dol.gov/dol/location.htm" target="_blank">Department of Labor office</a> backing up your statements with your &quot;Bad Check&quot; folder.</p> <p>Once your complaint has been filed, you're highly likely to get your paycheck &hellip; and possibly a bit extra. In Hawaii, for example, employers who fail to pay wages have to pay back a sum equal to the amount of unpaid wages and annual <a href="http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol07_Ch0346-0398/HRS0388/HRS_0388-0010.htm" target="_blank">interest rate of 6 percent</a> from the date that the wages were due. In addition, nonpaying Hawaii employers who can't provide a reasonable explanation are also subject to a fine ranging from $100 to $10,000 and imprisonment up to one year.</p> <p>The employer may also have to provide remedies to cover additional costs, such as late fees and reasonable attorney's fees. Labor laws and filing fees vary by state, but one thing is certain: You'll get paid.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fwhat-to-do-if-your-paycheck-bounces&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FWhat%2520to%2520Do%2520If%2520Your%2520Paycheck%2520Bounces.jpg&amp;description=What%20to%20Do%20If%20Your%20Paycheck%20Bounces"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/What%20to%20Do%20If%20Your%20Paycheck%20Bounces.jpg" alt="What to Do If Your Paycheck Bounces" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-your-paycheck-bounces">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-a-sudden-loss-of-income">How to Handle a Sudden Loss of Income</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-every-new-college-student-should-make">7 Money Moves Every New College Student Should Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-late-payments-affect-your-credit">How Late Payments Affect Your Credit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-a-secure-future-starting-with-your-next-paycheck">Build a Secure Future Starting With Your Next Paycheck</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Career Building bills bounced check department of labor employer insufficient funds overdraft fees paycheck work Wed, 05 Jul 2017 08:30:18 +0000 Damian Davila 1974322 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Unexpected First Jobs of the Wealthy and Famous http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-first-jobs-of-the-wealthy-and-famous <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-unexpected-first-jobs-of-the-wealthy-and-famous" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_serving_ice_cream.jpg" alt="Woman serving ice cream" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Singer, actor, author, business tycoon &mdash; everyone still starts somewhere. And while some people have the luxury of starting with wealth and fame behind them, others have had to scrape their way to the top. If you think millionaires and billionaires have always had it easy, think again. Many of them have worked jobs that may surprise you.</p> <h2>1. Orlando Bloom: Clay pigeon trapper</h2> <p>You probably know him as Legolas from <em>The Lord of the Rings</em>, or Will Turner from <em>Pirates of the Caribbean</em>. And although he's considered one of the sexiest men in the world, Orlando's first job was not exactly &quot;sexy.&quot;</p> <p>He was just 13-years-old when he took this job at the shooting range, and by all accounts, he loved it. &quot;I was a clay trapper,&quot; he said in a 2006 interview. &quot;People would go clay-pigeon shooting on the weekends, and when they said 'pull,' I was the one who released the pigeon. It was wild.&quot;</p> <p>Today, Orlando Bloom has a net worth estimated at $35 million.</p> <h2>2. Oprah Winfrey: Grocery store clerk</h2> <p>One of the most successful women in the world started her working life as many of us do &mdash; at the local grocery store. Oprah recounted her time working at the corner store for Oprah.com, part of the vast empire this billionaire businesswoman has created.</p> <p>&quot;I wasn't allowed to talk to the customers, and can you imagine for me? &hellip; That was very, very, very hard.&quot;</p> <p>She was in her early teens when she took the job in Nashville, but by the time she hit 16-years-old, she already had her sights set on broadcasting. She then landed a job reading the news at Nashville radio station, WVOL. The rest, as they say, is history.</p> <h2>3. Michael Dell: Dishwasher</h2> <p>In 1992, eight years after his computer company Dell was founded, Michael Dell became the youngest CEO ever to run a Fortune 500 company. He attributes his success to hard work, dedication, and doing whatever it takes to make your dreams happen.</p> <p>For the 12-year-old Michael Dell, that dream was to own a stamp collection. So, he took a job washing the dishes at the local Chinese restaurant &mdash; a job that, as you can imagine, was long hours for little pay, even for a boy not yet a teenager.</p> <p>But great oaks from little acorns grow, and just a few years later, he took apart an Apple computer to see exactly how it worked. His next dream was much more ambitious. And he achieved it.</p> <h2>4. Rod Stewart: Wallpaper screen printer</h2> <p>Known for his signature raspy crooning voice, Rod Stewart is an international singing superstar.</p> <p>Before he rose to fame, Rod held a couple of odd jobs, including newspaper deliverer and grave plot measurer. But before that, he had another unusual job that was short-lived &mdash; wallpaper screen printer.</p> <p>After dropping out of school at age 15, Rod worked printing the patterns on wallpapers. For some, a job like this could be a creative outlet. For Rod, it was never meant to be. Rod Stewart is colorblind, and that adversely affected his take on his job.</p> <p>&quot;If you are colorblind, one of the things you can't be is an aircraft pilot,&quot; he said in an interview. &quot;One of the other things you can't be is a wallpaper designer.&quot;</p> <p>He was laid off shortly after getting the job, but didn't let that dissuade him from pursuing the road to success. Today, Rod is worth about $235 million.</p> <h2>5. Sir Sean Connery: Milkman</h2> <p>He's considered by many to be the best James Bond ever to grace the screen. He is also still considered a sex-symbol, despite being 86-years-old. Back in 1944, when he was just 14, he earned his living pushing a barrow at the local Corstorphine Dairy, in a small village west of Edinburgh. The salary back then was 21 shillings per week &mdash; that's roughly &pound;1.05, which today would be the equivalent of around &pound;42, or $54.</p> <p>For most 14-year-olds, over $200 per month is a nice chunk of change. Still, he went on to become a legend in the acting business, but those early days pushing barrels of milk gave him quite the foundation.</p> <h2>6. Sir Richard Branson: Parakeet breeder</h2> <p>There are some people destined to become a huge success, and you can tell from an early age. Richard Branson clearly had the entrepreneurial spirit from the get-go, and at the age of just 11, he started a small business with his best friend breeding parakeets (known as &quot;budgies&quot; in the UK).</p> <p>&quot;With my best friend Nik Powell as my partner, we set about breeding budgerigars,&quot; Branson wrote in a 2013 LinkedIn article. &quot;We saw a gap in the market to sell budgies as they were very popular with kids in school at the time.&quot;</p> <p>Branson says that when he went off to boarding school, rats got to some of the birds. The remaining ones were set free, and he went on to sell Christmas trees, and a student magazine that became the foundation for Virgin Records.</p> <h2>7. Stephen King: Laundry worker</h2> <p>Stephen King is the master of horror, and one of the most famous authors who has ever lived. As a publisher of over 54 novels, inspiring countless movies and TV series, he's sold over 350 million copies of his books. But his beginnings were humble to say the least.</p> <p>After graduating from college in 1970, he tried to find work as a teacher, but there were no positions available. After marrying his wife Tabby in 1971, he was desperate for any kind of income to help support her and his children. So, he took a job as a laborer at an industrial laundry, and also moonlighted as a janitor.</p> <p>It was here that he set up a makeshift desk in the laundry room, between a huge washing machine and dryer, and on his wife's Olivetti typewriter, wrote stories for Playboy, Cavalier, and Penthouse. And from those small successes, and his wife's encouragement, he wrote a book &mdash; <em>Carrie</em>.</p> <h2>8. Barack Obama: Ice cream scooper</h2> <p>The 44th President of the United States of America honed his charming social skills at an early age. As a teenager, he took a job at the Baskin-Robbins on Honolulu, scooping the 31 flavors daily to lines of hungry patrons.</p> <p>Sue Thirlwall, brand operating officer for Baskin-Robbins, says that this job builds essential skills for use in later life. &quot;Scooping for America's favorite neighborhood ice cream shop can result in obtaining basic lifelong job skills, like handling consumer care in real time and keeping calm under pressure,&quot; she told the L.A. Times in 2009</p> <p>And if you look back on his presidency, even if you did not support him or his party, how often did you see Barack Obama become unhinged, or lose his cool? Maybe we should all take a stint in an ice cream parlor.</p> <h2>9. Amy Adams: Hooters waitress</h2> <p>Some of the most notable movies of the last decade feature Amy Adams, including <em>The Muppets</em>, <em>Doubt</em>, <em>Man of Steel</em>, <em>American Hustle</em>, and <em>Arrival</em>. But when she graduated high school, she only had one thing on her mind &mdash; a car. She was &quot;sick of taking the bus&quot; and found herself in the famous white and orange outfit at Hooters.</p> <p>&quot;I wasn't cut out to be a waitress, and I certainly wasn't cut out to be a Hooters waitress. That was a short-lived ambition,&quot; said Amy of her brief career. She lasted just long enough to raise the money, $900, for her new set of wheels &mdash; a Chevrolet. And thankfully for us all, she then pursued a career in acting.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-unexpected-first-jobs-of-the-wealthy-and-famous&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520Unexpected%2520First%2520Jobs%2520of%2520the%2520Wealthy%2520and%2520Famous.jpg&amp;description=9%20Unexpected%20First%20Jobs%20of%20the%20Wealthy%20and%20Famous"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20Unexpected%20First%20Jobs%20of%20the%20Wealthy%20and%20Famous.jpg" alt="9 Unexpected First Jobs of the Wealthy and Famous" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-first-jobs-of-the-wealthy-and-famous">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-sure-you-get-paid-and-4-other-great-tips-from-famous-commencement-speakers">Make Sure You Get Paid and 4 Other Great Tips From Famous Commencement Speakers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-crazy-investments-of-the-rich-and-famous">9 Crazy Investments of the Rich and Famous</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-jobs-that-robots-cant-do-yet">10 Jobs That Robots Can&#039;t Do, Yet</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Entertainment Barack Obama celebrities employment famous people first jobs odd jobs Oprah stephen king Tue, 04 Jul 2017 09:00:09 +0000 Paul Michael 1974218 at http://www.wisebread.com Don't Let These 6 Common Job Traps Derail Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i_need_a_break.jpg" alt="I need a break" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Have you run out of novel reasons to call in late to work? Do you keep close tabs on the number of vacation and sick days you have left? Have you fantasized about pulling a Thelma and Louise-style getaway on your Monday morning commute? If so, you may feel trapped by that job you used to love.</p> <p>It's no fun. Feeling trapped in a job you hate can sap your motivation, keep you poor, and lead to all kinds of other stress. Get yourself unstuck by learning why so many people get stuck in the first place. Here a six of the most common career traps.</p> <h2>1. Convincing yourself you're too invested to leave</h2> <p>Being invested in your job is admirable, but at a certain point, the law of diminishing returns kicks in. Ask yourself, &quot;Is my investment paying off? Is the payoff purely financial? Are there hidden costs to my health and relationships that I'm not factoring into the equation?&quot; Consider how moving on might revitalize your career and offer greater rewards. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-its-never-too-late-for-a-career-change?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Reasons It's Never Too Late for a Career Change</a>)</p> <h2>2. Believing that big promotion is just around the corner</h2> <p>I get it; we're all taught that quitting is bad and that patience is rewarded. But if you're continually passed over for promotions despite working harder and working smarter, something's gotta give. Have a chat with your supervisor to clarify your career path and outline exactly what's needed to progress professionally. If things don't change in a reasonable amount of time, move on. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a>)</p> <h2>3. Confusing your employer with your family</h2> <p>We've all heard the familiar refrain, &quot;We're just one big happy family here!&quot; While the metaphor is lovely, it usually doesn't survive an economic downturn. Without taking anything away from companies that work hard to foster a close and collaborative atmosphere, the employer/employee relationship is an economic one. Your coworkers aren't your siblings and your boss isn't your parent. Pursue your career goals free of these false family obligations.</p> <h2>4. Not realizing you can interview casually</h2> <p>An interview is like a first date; even if things go well, you don't have to get married. There's a big difference between exploring your professional options and turning in a letter of resignation. Chill out. It's perfectly OK to interview casually, learn more about companies that are hiring, and take your time considering new roles. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a>)</p> <h2>5. Waiting to cash in when the company goes public</h2> <p>Sure, sometimes companies go public and faithful employees get a big payday by exercising company stock options. But just as often, companies spend years preparing for an IPO that either never happens or falls flat. Unless you're fully prepared to play the long game &mdash; potentially sacrificing career advancement and happiness in the process &mdash; don't stick around for an iffy IPO.</p> <h2>6. Believing your employer is special</h2> <p>I once had a friend who spent more than 25 years working for the same company. The first five or 10 years were terrific. The firm was small and privately held, provided employees with free lunch every day, and offered a host of convenient services on-site. But when the company went public and had to answer to shareholders, the culture changed dramatically and most of those little perks were cut.</p> <p>Still, my friend endured. She had a difficult time admitting the place was no longer special &mdash; that other employers might actually offer her more valuable benefits and far more progressive work environments. For the next decade, she toiled as new staff came and went, her workload grew, and her stress level skyrocketed. Though she dreamed of moving on, she's likely still there &mdash; holed up in a dark corner remembering the good ol' days.</p> <p>That doesn't have to be you. Let go of what used to be special and move on to something that is.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fdont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FDon%2527t%2520Let%2520These%25206%2520Common%2520Job%2520Traps%2520Derail%2520Your%2520Career.jpg&amp;description=Don't%20Let%20These%206%20Common%20Job%20Traps%20Derail%20Your%20Career"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Don%27t%20Let%20These%206%20Common%20Job%20Traps%20Derail%20Your%20Career.jpg" alt="Don't Let These 6 Common Job Traps Derail Your Career" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career traps dead end job employers interviews job hunting quitting stuck Mon, 26 Jun 2017 09:00:12 +0000 Kentin Waits 1966171 at http://www.wisebread.com