Career Building http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4814/all en-US 5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_side_job_000020816287.jpg" alt="Woman using her side hustle to further her career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do you feel stuck in a career rut but not sure what needs to change? Your job likely pays the bills and quitting a steady paycheck just because you're bored or unchallenged doesn't seem like a smart option. You still have to pay the rent, after all.</p> <p>This is where a side hustle can be both financially rewarding and creatively stimulating. But balancing a full time job and a side hustle is not always easy.</p> <p>Here are five ways a side hustle can expand your career and give you more options.</p> <h2>1. Learn New Career Skills</h2> <p>One of the main benefits to starting a side hustle is that you can expand your knowledge by acquiring new skills. This can include learning how to start a website, optimizing social media channels, seeking out new clients, and even taking courses on copywriting, SEO, bookkeeping, and the like.</p> <p>You always have the opportunity to learn something new. Even after four years of having a side-hustle turned full-time gig, I still find new programs, books, and courses that help me learn new skills and increase my knowledge about certain subjects.</p> <h2>2. Manage Multiple Projects</h2> <p>When you work as a traditional employee, you generally only have a certain amount of tasks each day, and you're often doing the same things each month. But when you have a side hustle, things are lot less consistent. You're not only an employee but also the boss, the bookkeeper, the receptionist, the manager &mdash; and everybody else.</p> <p>As a side hustler, you wear a lot more hats and are able to balance many types of projects. Not only are you working for clients, but you're also managing multiple deadlines, and perhaps even outsourcing to other contractors. All of these things will help you learn to balance lots of priorities while still getting things done on time.</p> <h2>3. Streamline Your Workflow</h2> <p>If you don't have a side hustle yet, you may not understand the importance of managing your time wisely. When you have a full time job, family, household chores, errands, and a side hustle, you have to be <em>very efficient </em>with where you spend your time and energy.</p> <p>When I started my side hustle alongside my day job, I began noticing holes in my workday productivity routine. I was able to streamline the processes at my job, in order to get more done in less time.</p> <p>This allowed me to reduce my workload overall, so I could make room for other personal and professional tasks. My employer appreciated this too, as I helped them save money and increase productivity in the office.</p> <h2>4. Diversify Your Income and Career Path</h2> <p>Your career and income are tightly woven together and we all need to make a living to support our families. So what happens when your boss needs to cut costs, or you're handed a pink slip? A side hustle alleviates some of this risk by diversifying the types of income streams you have.</p> <p>Finding another job can take a lot of time and effort, not to mention the additional time it takes to get paid from when you were first hired. This period of stress can be eased by having some money coming in from your side hustle, and a side gig can be a viable second career option, should you need it. It can also take off the pressure while giving you the chance to take your time in pursuing the best opportunity.</p> <h2>5. Broaden Your Network</h2> <p>Working in a traditional office setting means you see the same people day in and day out, which doesn't leave much room for expanding your network. With a side hustle though, specifically one that's online based, you're able to broaden your network everyday.</p> <p>Whether it's meeting up at a local coffee shop, or connecting with new people at an industry conference, a side hustle offers the chance for you to broaden your list of contacts and like-minded individuals. This list of contacts could come in very handy in the future if you get laid off, need to switch jobs, or even take your side hustle full-time.</p> <p><em>Do you have a side hustle? How has it helped expand your career?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-smith">Carrie Smith</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it">6 Times a Higher Salary Isn&#039;t Worth It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bosses-say-these-are-their-6-favorite-qualities-in-employees-do-you-have-them">Bosses Say These Are Their 6 Favorite Qualities in Employees — Do You Have Them?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income career career skills promotion raise side hustle Fri, 24 Apr 2015 13:00:05 +0000 Carrie Smith 1400450 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Ways to Actually Take All Your Vacation Days This Year http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_boat_000034795992.jpg" alt="Man taking the opportunity to use his vacation days this year" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Nearly everyone recognizes the importance of taking a break from work. Time off makes workers happier, helps them rest, allows them to do things that they love, and improves their attitude and focus at work when they return.</p> <p>Why, then, did 41% of American workers plan to <a href="http://www.projecttimeoff.com/research/overwhelmed-america">not use their vacation time</a> in 2014?</p> <p>There are a zillion reasons, and some of them are even good. However, most of these have some easy workarounds, assuming you give it a little thought and put in a little effort. You shouldn't have to compromise on the breaks you've earned &mdash; and deserve.</p> <h2>1. Plan Ahead</h2> <p>Sometimes, people don't take their vacation days because they can't get the weeks off that they want, or because they don't have time to plan the trip that they'd really like to take. This doesn't have to derail your vacationing efforts, though.</p> <p>If the days you really want are days everyone else is going to want off too, make your best effort to accommodate this. As an example, some workplaces have a lottery for these days, so make sure you participate. Avoid the most congested vacation weeks, and opt for nearby time slots. For instance, it's usually easier to get the week before Christmas off than the week of Christmas.</p> <p>When in doubt, get some vacation days on the calendar even if you don't know what you want to do with them. If nothing else, you can play tourist in your own town and sleep in every day!</p> <h2>2. Work Ahead</h2> <p>Many people don't take their vacation days because they're worried about getting behind at work and returning to a mountain of tasks. While you can't completely counteract this, it's possible to complete most work in advance, or to otherwise plan around your absence.</p> <p>It's perfectly acceptable to plan your vacation during a slow time of year at work, in order to avoid a backlog while you're gone. You can also plan your schedule and make budgets, schedule events, meet with clients, etc., before you go so those tasks aren't hanging over your head when you return.</p> <h2>3. Empower People Around You</h2> <p>If the people around you know that you have confidence in them, they will work just as well when you're gone as they do when you're in the office. This will hold true even if you're a manager or own a business.</p> <p>Make sure that the people you work with know that you trust them to make good decisions even if you're not there. Explicitly explain your trust and expectations. Doing this may also mean that they'll have your back while on vacation, taking care of pressing tasks in your absence.</p> <h2>4. Stop Saving</h2> <p>About 38% of the people who don't use their vacation days are saving time off in case they need it. While it's good to be judicious with your vacations, most companies won't let you save your vacation time forever (and increasingly, many companies won't let you save much at all!). This means that you either use your vacation time, or you risk losing it.</p> <h2>5. Be a Great Employee</h2> <p>Employees also worry about being seen as expendable or as not committed to their jobs when they use all of their vacation time (or worse, when other people don't use theirs). The truth is, your employer is not allowed to fire you for using your allotted vacation time. Still, people worry that this will happen to them.</p> <p>Nip this in the bud by being a superb employee. If you're good at your job and clearly focused and committed when you're there, no boss will begrudge your well-deserved time off. Most companies know that employees who use vacation time are <a href="http://www.today.com/money/importance-taking-vacations-1D80097348">happier and more productive</a> on the job, and taking time off doesn't imply disloyalty.</p> <h2>6. Open Communication With Your Supervisor</h2> <p>Some supervisors seem to discourage employees from taking the time off that they've earned. If this is your boss, talk to him or her about it. You don't have to make it into a confrontation. Simply say something like, &quot;Hey, I'd really like to take my kids to go do X, but I've noticed you seem a little stressed. Is there anything I can do to help you out so that my leaving won't make things worse?&quot;</p> <p>You can also offer to coordinate time off with other employees or with your boss, in order to ensure all bases are covered and everyone gets their due vacation. The goal here is to make this a topic you and your boss can talk about, rather than one that everyone tries to avoid.</p> <h2>7. Remember: A Job Is a Job</h2> <p>In the end, your job is not your life. Your job is your job, and a vacation can help you remember that when you're tempted to put all your time and energy into work. Even if you love your job and it's one of the most satisfying parts of your life, it's still a job. Remember this, and it will help you choose to take every single bit of vacation time you're entitled to, without worrying about what might happen later.</p> <p><em>Do you plan to use all of your vacation this year? What do you want to do with your time off?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/earn-more-money-by-demanding-it">Earn More Money by Demanding It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-getting-what-you-want-at-work">What you need to know about getting what you want at work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-survive-and-thrive-in-a-job-you-hate">How to Survive (and Thrive!) in a Job You Hate</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building job time off vacation days work Tue, 14 Apr 2015 21:00:08 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1380880 at http://www.wisebread.com The 9 Types of Horrible Bosses – And How to Manage Them http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-types-of-horrible-bosses-and-how-to-manage-them <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-9-types-of-horrible-bosses-and-how-to-manage-them" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/horrible_bosses_000032969296.jpg" alt="Woman at work dealing with horrible boss" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Unless you happen to be self-employed or independently wealthy, you will have a boss. I have had many different bosses over my 20 years in the ad business, and they have ranged from the sublime to the just plain awful.</p> <p>Here are nine types of frustrating bosses you can expect to encounter, and the strategies you can use to help deal with them. Remember, they're just people. And that means they are both flawed, and have feelings. You just have to find the right way to approach them.</p> <h2>1. The Manipulative Boss</h2> <p>Many people say manipulative bosses are extremely intelligent, but this is not necessarily the case. After all, if they were that good at manipulation, they wouldn't let you realize they're manipulating you. However, they do possess a set of skills that make them very tough to deal with. For starters, they can turn any situation into their advantage. Their failures become your failures, and your successes become theirs. They are usually passive aggressive. And, they always have a hidden agenda; they will do whatever it takes to get a promotion, and they consider you a simple step on their way to the top.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>First, don't try to play them at their own game. Not only are they better at it, they know more than you due to their position. Your best bet here is to appear open and honest with them, whilst making it clear you are not a threat. Keep your distance whenever possible, don't appear weak or easily bullied, and know your rights. If they push it too far, your HR department can help.</p> <h2>2. The Desperate-to-Be-Popular Boss</h2> <p>If you've ever seen BBC's excellent The Office, which was remade for the U.S. and many other countries, you will know the name David Brent. Played superbly by Ricky Gervais, he portrayed this kind of boss perfectly; the boss who only wants to be loved will always fail in that regard, because they are never doing their job well. They'll go out of their way to try and make you laugh, or get praise, but they won't have their eyes on the prize. They will want to leave early with you to go to the bar, or have long meetings talking about movies and football. At the end of the day, you will have a harder time doing your job well because of this boss, and will even find yourself making excuses for them.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>The key here is setting boundaries. It's fine to go out occasionally with this kind of boss, or indulge in a little extra chitchat. But, you are at a place of business, and you have a job to do. Keep focused on that, and avoid getting too buddy-buddy with him or her. When they eventually go down, you do not want to be there taking the fall with them.</p> <h2>3. The &quot;Me, Me, Me&quot; Boss</h2> <p>This boss has an ego the size of a planet, and yet will often try to downplay it. Somehow the conversation always comes back to them, their achievements, their weekend plans, their family, their awards, their office, and anything else involving their number one subject. Meetings will invariably be steered in the direction of this boss, and they will be more than happy to steal the spotlight. You'll hear things like &quot;Well, I don't like to brag, but&hellip;&quot; and &quot;Oh, I always know how to&hellip;&quot; and you'll have to grin and bear another 10 minute diatribe on their awesome life and career.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>You basically have to take everything with a grain of salt. Sure, they will always want to talk about themselves, but if they are good in other ways, let it slide. Maybe they were the middle child and didn't get a lot of attention, or have other inadequacies that they're making up for. As long as it doesn't affect you, your position, or your career, just let them have their many moments in the sun.</p> <h2>4. The Martyr Boss</h2> <p>If there's a sword around, expect them to tell you how often they have fallen on it. Seriously, these bosses should have &quot;Take One for the Team&quot; emblazoned on a t-shirt. They will work weekends and late nights without extra pay. They will volunteer for the worst projects or assignments. They will come into the office with a severe bout of Ebola and won't even take a lunch break. The problem is, they work unnecessarily hard and expect you to do the same; &quot;I was here at 4:00 a.m. even though I had a broken leg and my dog passed away&hellip;where were you!?&quot;</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>You will never, ever be able to compete with a martyr boss, and if you try, you'll only make them work even harder (if that's possible). You can't play their game, so instead play up how much you think they rock. The martyr loves being recognized for his or her actions, and if you do so often, they'll appreciate you for it. They also know more about the company than the CEO and the board put together, so listen when they talk, and you may pick up some very useful info.</p> <h2>5. The MIA Boss</h2> <p>You know you have a boss. You have seen their office, you receive their emails, and occasionally, you talk with them on the phone. But you can never, ever find them. It's like they went into the Witness Protection Program and are now living under an assumed identity. When you pass by their office, no one's home. When you call, you usually get voicemail. They will send you an email demanding you work the weekend, and yet you can't remember the last time they stepped foot through the front door. These bosses are experts in sucking the marrow out of life, and will do as little work as possible whilst making it seem like they are too busy to eat or sleep.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>It's tough to have a &quot;Missing in Action&quot; boss. You can't really talk to them about issues face to face, because they're never around. Getting approvals can be hard work, and nailing them down on an issue is like nailing Jello to a wall. With a boss like this, get an action plan in writing. If they're not around, who is in charge? Who can sign off on invoices, or projects? Can you go directly to their superior, if they have one? On the plus side, you won't have a boss constantly looking over your shoulder.</p> <h2>6. The Micromanaging Boss</h2> <p>Of all the bosses named on this list, this is one of the toughest you'll encounter. A micromanaging boss does not trust you to do anything correctly. In fact, they are absolutely convinced that if it wasn't for them, the entire company would grind to a halt. The irony is, they become a bottleneck and will slow everything down, precisely because they have their hand in every pie. Micromanagers will assign you tasks, and then proceed to check in on your progress constantly. They will redo things you have already done (even if done well). They will put their stamp on everything, and of course, take credit because they believe they have done it all themselves. This kind of boss is toxic to any work environment.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>You need tact and diplomacy on this one. First, play up to the fact that you recognize their many strengths. Then, give them the impression that the ideas you want to go forward with are actually their ideas. From a stockroom clerk to the highest levels of corporate power, if they believe they thought of it, they'll go with it. You should also ask for specific direction on every project, in writing. Finally, keep records of everything; emails, voicemails, and the rounds of adjustments or revisions. If it looks like you're incompetent because of their lack of trust, you need evidence to back up your side of the story.</p> <h2>7. The &quot;Fear Me&quot; Boss</h2> <p>If asked, &quot;Would you rather be feared or liked?&quot; most bosses would say, &quot;Neither, I'd rather be respected.&quot; But this boss chooses the first option every time. They rule with an iron fist in a flaming, spiked gauntlet, and they love their scary reputation. They will shout and scream on occasion, just to get their own way. They will show up late to meetings to impose their authority. They will use name-calling, sarcasm, and threats to control everyone around them (watch <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Swimming-With-Sharks-Special-Edition/dp/B0009A40EI">Swimming With Sharks</a> for a better idea of this kind of boss). Sadly, they temper all of this behavior around the people who matter, so that only the workers beneath them feel like they are being abused.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>I'm sorry to say these bosses cannot be dealt with by you alone. Sadly, most of the time the people underneath them either request a transfer, lose it and get fired, or quit. The turnover in their department will be a big indicator that something is wrong, and they will eventually have to answer for their actions. Until then, you just have to smile, be polite, and avoid them whenever you can.</p> <h2>8. The Stuck-in-the-Past Boss</h2> <p>Bob Dylan famously wrote &quot;The times, they are a-changin.'&quot; This boss does not like it, and is in no hurry to play catch up. He or she will always be the last to figure out the new copier or email system, and refuses to keep up with modern trends. &quot;Twitter? Facebook? In my day, a letter in the mail worked wonders.&quot; If these opinions were kept personal, it would be okay. Sadly, their opinions influence your business decisions, and that is often why you will be working on things in a way that would seem archaic to your grandma.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>Usually, these bosses mean no harm, they are just set in their ways. The best way to deal with a boss like this is to demonstrate the advantages of new systems and equipment. They may be old school, but they're not dumb. Demonstrate that a new methodology will save time and money, and they'll ask for it to be implemented in no time. Just have a little patience.</p> <h2>8. The Debbie Downer Boss</h2> <p>This boss, and it can be a man or a woman, never looks on the bright side. If you do an excellent job on something, you could have done it a little sooner. If you fix a problem, you were partly responsible for creating it. If you improve company morale, you're guilty of not working hard enough. If you work too hard, you're trying to embarrass him or her. The company will always be on the verge of folding, or people are always about to get fired. This boss is about as fun to be around as a funeral home.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>Don't try and change who they are as a person. That's not your job, and it is a mission doomed to fail. If you want to stay on their good side, sympathize when they have problems. Don't try to be too &quot;up&quot; or enthusiastic, but don't let their awful mood swings and poor outlook on life get you down. They are happy in their misery; don't get pulled into that sinkhole.</p> <h2>9. The &quot;I'm Not Sure&quot; Boss</h2> <p>Many of the bosses listed here are flawed, but they at least know how to make a decision. This boss spends most of their day sitting on the fence. The basic premise here is &quot;If I don't make a specific decision, I can't be held accountable for it.&quot; They will worm out of decisions day and night, and will always find ways to answer questions in a non-committed kind of way. Ultimately, everyone suffers, because they are leaving everyone hanging. But in many businesses in corporate America, these people can have very lucrative careers.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>You have to force their hand. If they say &quot;I'll trust your judgment,&quot; make sure you get confirmation that they agree with your decision. Nailing them down is tough, but make it impossible for them to avoid. The way you phrase your questions must give no room for error, and at every stage of the project, insist on a sign-off. If they won't say yes to one option, then ask them to say no to the others. You can get blood out of a stone if you apply a little pressure.</p> <p>Now&hellip;the one type of boss who will actually improve your career.</p> <h2>The Great Boss</h2> <p>In my experience, and those of my friends and colleagues, great bosses are few and far between. These are the bosses who encourage independent thinking, foster an atmosphere of mutual respect, and always have an open door. They don't scream or shout, they don't belittle people, and they don't manipulate or play politics. They're not perfect; they make mistakes, occasionally lose their cool, or make you work extra hours when required. But, they're good eggs.</p> <h3>How to Deal</h3> <p>When you are fortunate enough to work for a great boss, make the extra effort to remember his or her birthday as a department. Let them know their feedback means a lot. And never be afraid to let the people above them know what a great job they're doing. Their behavior should be nurtured, and hopefully it will spread to other people in the company.</p> <p><em>So, do you have a specific type of boss who isn't on this list? What do you do to deal with them? Let us know in the comments.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-types-of-horrible-bosses-and-how-to-manage-them">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tips-to-acing-an-interview">5 Tips to Acing An Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/finding-the-right-job-there-s-plenty-of-phish-in-the-sea">Finding the Right Job: There’s Plenty of Phish in the Sea</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building bad bosses employment work strategies Tue, 31 Mar 2015 09:00:02 +0000 Paul Michael 1359565 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Ways to Act Like a Leader -- And Get Ahead at Work http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/teamwork_000020741550.jpg" alt="Two people working as a team at the office" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I have worked for organizations with as few as four employees, and others with as many as a couple of thousand. In each of those companies, employees who were good &quot;team players&quot; were valued and rose quickly into leadership roles. If you want to move ahead in your workplace, here are 10 ways to become a better team player.</p> <h2>1. Get to Know Your Team</h2> <p>You may not think this is job #1, but it's really important. In order to accomplish your company's directives, it is helpful to better know and understand your coworkers. For example, employee &quot;A&quot; may love all things data-driven, but &quot;B&quot; might excel in social media and marketing, and hate crunching numbers. Meanwhile, &quot;C&quot; might be the organizer of the group, who will keep everyone on track. If you don't already know your team, you might ask them to take an <a href="http://www.tracomcorp.com/solutions/by-element/social-style/model/">interpersonal self-assessment</a> such as Social Style. If you are out to accomplish a common goal, understanding personalities is very helpful.</p> <h2>2. Share a Vision</h2> <p>What is it that you are all trying to accomplish? Has management shared its mission? A good team leader will map out and share goals and a timeline. Communicate! Weekly huddles, monthly meetings, emails, and texts keep the flow of information going. Be patient and do your best to be friendly. Keeping a positive outlook and sharing your enthusiasm will keep your team moving in the same direction.</p> <h2>3. Be Ready to Pitch In</h2> <p>This is one of my favorite &quot;teamwork&quot; quotes: &quot;Sympathizers are spectators; empathizers wear game shoes.&quot; &mdash; John Eyberg</p> <p>If you aren't pitching in on a project, this is going to be noted by your team, and it will result in gossip, resentment, and a &quot;Why should I?&quot; attitude. You will lose respect. So what if you're the big cheese? Get your hands dirty. File, copy, crunch numbers, make phone calls &mdash; whatever it takes.</p> <h2>4. Motivate the Team</h2> <p>If you are the team's leader, or eventually want to be that person, you need to motivate the team. What you need to do is to <em>figure out what motivates your team members.</em> Don't you have your own &quot;carrots?&quot; To motivate, you need to get to know them. Personally, I would rather have a bonus than a pizza party. Some team members will love being recognized at a meeting, but shy ones will be embarrassed. The point is, one size does not fit all. A strong team player knows their team, and knows what motivates them.</p> <h2>5. Take the Initiative</h2> <p>Somebody has to do it: Whether the project is cleaning out the office refrigerator, auditing the I-9's, changing the toner, or working on Saturday, there are going to be those take-one-for-the-team projects. Once in a while, that person needs to be you. Put your hand up. Everyone will be grateful.</p> <h2>6. Say Thanks</h2> <p>Don't just say it during reviews, or when something gets done. Unexpected thank-yous are a great morale-booster. Writing someone a heartfelt note is very meaningful. Pick up Starbucks coffees, grab McBreakfast for everyone, or thank your team publicly in a staff meeting. Say it, write it, or find creative ways to show that gratitude.</p> <h2>7. Make it FUN</h2> <p>By fun, I don't mean &quot;Let's go outside for team-building and build a team pyramid!&quot; I personally abhor team-building exercises, both physical and mental (remember the stranded plane exercise of the '80s?). Most people like potlucks, office &quot;pools,&quot; or silly games in the breakroom. You might join together on a food drive, or a fundraising walk to better the community. Several departments in my workplace have special t-shirts they wear on casual Fridays. Mix it up &mdash; while some will love Zumba in the conference room, others would rather do a craft.</p> <h2>8. Help Each Other</h2> <p>Isn't helping each other a huge part of teamwork? I really like knowing I can go to certain team members for IT assistance, navigating new software, or ordering a particular office supply. Everyone has their area of expertise and your work life is greatly simplified by knowing who can help you. Be the person that people can go to. Are you approachable and helpful? If not, then get to it.</p> <h2>9. Brainstorm</h2> <p>Stuck on a problem? Get together with the team, a lot of paper, and start throwing out possible solutions. The trick with this is to make sure everyone's voice is heard. A good leader will ask the quiet staff members, if they have not contributed, for their input. Be respectful of everyone's ideas. Type them up, prioritize, and move ahead.</p> <h2>10. Reward!</h2> <p>Most companies, no matter their size, have some sort of recognition. Some offer bonuses; many larger ones throw ceremonies. If your team member, or entire team, has done great work, make sure that information gets in front of management. Successes need to be celebrated. Everyone wants their efforts to be recognized and praised.</p> <p><em>How does your company promote and inspire teamwork?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-survive-and-thrive-in-a-job-you-hate">How to Survive (and Thrive!) in a Job You Hate</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year">7 Ways to Actually Take All Your Vacation Days This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building coworkers job office morale team building teamwork Thu, 26 Mar 2015 09:00:03 +0000 Marla Walters 1354183 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Times a Higher Salary Isn't Worth It http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_stressed_office_000043549226.jpg" alt="Man stressed out at the office" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Money isn't everything. Having the extra funds for foreign travel and designer shopping splurges can be nice &mdash; to say the least &mdash; but not when the tradeoffs include scientifically backed side effects such as insomnia, death, and divorce. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-times-youre-better-off-without-a-promotion?ref=seealso">12 Times You're Better Off Without a Promotion</a>)</p> <p>So if you're facing a job offer that comes with an attractive salary bump, be sure the new gig won't catapult you into any of the following problems.</p> <h2>1. The Commute Would Kill You</h2> <p>Americans spend more time commuting (100+ hours per year) than they do vacationing (80 hours). According to reserach out of Sweden, long commutes also cause a wealth of <a href="http://www.slate.com/articles/business/moneybox/2011/05/your_commute_is_killing_you.html">horrible side effects</a>, including&nbsp;neck pain, obesity, loneliness, divorce, stress, and insomnia. So if the twice daily traffic jam you'd have to endure to get to your higher paying gig seems likely to drive you mad, then it's probably best to stick with the job you've already got. Sure, the extra money would be nice. But research shows you very well may end up spending a good portion of that salary increase on your newfound needs for physical therapy, sleep doctors, and a divorce attorney.</p> <h2>2. The Office Culture is Toxic</h2> <p>If you've ever said, &quot;My job is killing me!&quot; &mdash; you could be right. Research shows that people in&nbsp;<a href="http://healthland.time.com/2011/08/10/study-your-hostile-workplace-may-be-killing-you/">hostile work environments</a> are more likely to die sooner than those who work in atmospheres that are more favorable. Death aside, toxic work environments are also known to provoke aches, stress, and signs of depression. So before accepting a new job offer with a dazzling salary, do your homework.</p> <h2>3. Your Work-Life Balance Would Be Out of Whack</h2> <p>Work has a way of getting in the way of what matters most: family time. These numbers offer a glimpse at the epidemic: 55% of all employees say they don't have enough time for themselves, 67% of employed parents say they don't have enough time with their kids, and 63% of married employees say they don't have enough time with their spouse, according to Families and Work Institute's <a href="http://www.familiesandwork.org/context-matters-insights-about-older-workers-from-the-national-study-of-the-changing-workforce/"><em>National Study of the Changing Workforce</em></a>. If a higher paying gig would mean severely under-serving yourself or your loved ones, it may be best to stick with a lower paying job that offers more flexibility.</p> <h2>4. You Don't Believe in the Work</h2> <p>All the money in the world can't make you feel pride in the job you're doing unless you truly believe in the work. And if you're being offered a better-paying gig at a company whose ideals are in conflict with your beliefs, be they religious, social, or otherwise, your time would be well spent to figure out how to reconcile that &mdash; which could mean declining the job. You'll never reach your potential if you're doing something you don't stand behind 100%.</p> <h2>5. You Don't See Eye to Eye With Your Boss</h2> <p>If the person who's supposed to be raising you up seems set on bringing you down, it might be time to skedaddle. Studies show that <a href="http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10869-011-9253-2">unsupportive bosses</a> affect how your whole family relates to one another, your physical health, and your morale while in the office. They also raise your risk for heart disease. No job is worth putting up with woes like that &mdash; no matter how many zeros are included in the salary.</p> <h2>6. The Company is on the Fritz</h2> <p>There's no need to go down with a sinking ship. If the company trying to pad your pockets is on its way out, it may be wise to stay in control and decline the job offer rather than suffer a layoff in the future.</p> <p><em>Have you ever taken the higher salaried job only to regret it later? Tell us about it in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back">5 Career Tactics That Are Actually Holding You Back</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise">These 10 Words and Phrases Are Keeping You From Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building promotion raise salary Fri, 13 Mar 2015 08:00:09 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1334919 at http://www.wisebread.com The 5 Worst Career Mistakes — and How to Avoid Them http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-worst-career-mistakes-and-how-to-avoid-them <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-5-worst-career-mistakes-and-how-to-avoid-them" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/work_mistake_000029945840.jpg" alt="Business man upset over mistake" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Figuring out how to get ahead in modern corporate environments can sometimes feel like an entirely separate (and full-time) career. Politics change, mergers reset the playing field, and bosses come and go. It's enough to make you want to pull out your hair. But stay on-track and get ahead by avoiding these five career-killing moves. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year?ref=seealso">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a>)</p> <h2>1. Wearing Club Couture</h2> <p>Ever notice how business attire is gradually getting confused with clubwear? It's a strange phenomenon that new college graduates are especially susceptible to. In our hyper-casual culture, it's as if folks mistakenly conclude that anything better than jeans and a T-shirt <em>must be</em> formal wear. It's hard to succeed professionally when your clothing says, &quot;Let's go to the VIP room, order a couple dirty martinis, and show each other our piercings.&quot; College administrators take note: There needs to be an entire semester-long course on proper business attire with a few hours of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/reclaiming-etiquette-dining-basics-for-young-professionals">basic dining etiquette</a> thrown in for good measure. Your students will thank you.</p> <p>Dress to succeed by building an <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-a-work-wardrobe-for-any-job-on-a-budget">appropriate work wardrobe</a> and avoiding anything too tight, too dramatic, too embellished, or too branded. Oh, and invest in a good iron and learn how to use it.</p> <h2>2. Over-Celebrating</h2> <p>Office parties can be a great way to get to know coworkers on a more casual level &mdash; just don't let things get too casual. Today, a temporary embarrassment can echo on social media forever. Avoid those drunken lampshade-wearing moments by being acutely aware of your personal thresholds with alcohol and embracing nearly puritanical limits during work celebrations.</p> <h2>3. Being Complacent</h2> <p>Even for those who do their jobs well, getting too comfortable in a role can be a career killer. While dependability matters, employers don't promote bookends. To get ahead, it helps to stay just a little bit hungry. Avoid complacency by going a few steps beyond what's required, anticipating and responding to needs that may technically be outside the scope of your role, and distinguishing yourself from the crowd subtly but consistently.</p> <h2>4. Getting Angry</h2> <p>Passion is good. Anger is bad. And while the two may overlap from time-to-time, an angry employee can quickly be dubbed a &quot;loose cannon&quot; and passed over for any role that involves managing people, clients, or complex projects. Learn how to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-manage-powerful-emotions">manage powerful emotions</a> and re-channel negative energy to create solutions that help improve communication and resolve conflict. Remember, effective and diplomatic peacemakers are rare animals. Their skills get noticed.</p> <h2>5. Going Solo</h2> <p>There's a fine line between distinguishing yourself (a must for career advancement) and being ruthlessly independent (a no-no in most situations). Employers reward effective team players who can &quot;lead and lift.&quot; That means positively taking control of team dynamics and motivating others. Instead of tooting your own horn, demonstrate the effectiveness of your team. Share strategies that helped win a new account or meet an impossible deadline. The simple act of communicating this information will set you apart and show that you're tuned in to the power of positive group psychology.</p> <p>No matter what field you're in, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-office-politics-goofs-that-can-set-your-career-back-years">office politics goofs</a> can set your career back years, and in tough economic times, that makes you an easy lay-off target. Remember, you invested a lot of effort and money in your degree and took the time to find the right &mdash; or at least okay for right now &mdash; job. Don't sabotage your success by falling prey to a single career-killer.</p> <p><em>Have you ever made a career-killing move? How did you recover? What missteps have you seen in the workplace that sealed someone's fate?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-worst-career-mistakes-and-how-to-avoid-them">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-laid-off-a-step-by-step-guide">How to Get Laid Off: A Step-By-Step Guide</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-improve-your-performance-at-work">12 Ways to Improve Your Performance at Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career mistakes job killers Tue, 10 Mar 2015 09:00:10 +0000 Kentin Waits 1329652 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/frustrated_paper_000026250736.jpg" alt="Woman frustrated trying to write the perfect resume" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2015/01/04/the-job-outlook-for-2015/21208321/">U.S. job outlook</a> is looking much improved for 2015, and most economic indicators suggest a continued, healthy pace of hiring in the year ahead.</p> <p>If you're still job hunting, it's time to polish your resume and ensure it stands out from the competition. While it can be tempting to pull outlandish stunts to convince employers to hire you, we don't recommend them as a prudent job search strategy. Instead, stick to what works &mdash; like having a crisp, error-free CV. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-6-craziest-things-people-have-done-to-land-a-job?ref=seealso">The 6 Craziest Things People Have Done to Land a Job</a>).</p> <p>To make your resume really stand out from the competition, here are ten mistakes that will hurt your job search.</p> <h2>1. It Starts With a Career Objective Statement</h2> <p>Sometime back in high school, one of your instructors forced you to write a resume that included a career objective statement. Since habits die hard, you probably still include a career objective statement on your resume today.</p> <p>Career objective statements are dated and don't belong in the modern business world. Hiring managers recommend leaving objective statements off your resume because they're irrelevant for the initial screening process. It's all about what the company wants, not the other way around. If you make it past the screening process, then you will have a chance to talk about your objective(s).</p> <h2>2. It Features Quirky Job Titles</h2> <p>While TeaEO may have worked for the founder and CEO of Honest Tea, quirky job titles are often a bad idea.</p> <p>There are three reasons why quirky job titles do more harm than good on your resume.</p> <h3>Quirky Job Titles Lack Context</h3> <p>If you're a &quot;Marketing Ninja,&quot; what happens when you request or get a promotion? Do you become a &quot;Marketing Jōnin?&quot; Also, are you above a samurai? Did you report to a shogun?</p> <h3>Applicant Tracking Systems Search for Specific Keywords</h3> <p>Your &quot;Word Guru&quot; title will leave you out from an &quot;associate editor&quot; query.</p> <h3>Great Performances Trump Job Titles</h3> <p>Any customer would still prefer to be taken care of by an effective, yet boringly named &quot;customer service representative&quot; than by a happy but hopeless &quot;happiness advocate.&quot;</p> <h2>3. It Includes Too Much Work History</h2> <p>A recent study found that recruiters spend only six seconds reviewing a resume. This means that most of the time your resume should be no longer than a single page, especially if you're just starting your career. If you include pages and pages of work history, then you're more likely to go over the one-page limit.</p> <p>Unless it is 100% relevant, nobody wants to hear about your first job selling lemonade on your street or being a &quot;sandwich artist&quot; in college. Keep your job history relevant to the position that you're applying to.</p> <h2>4. It Has Big, Unexplained Gaps in Employment</h2> <p>If you experienced a layoff, decided to take a long leave to raise your children, or took a year off to travel around Latin America, you will have a big gap in employment. Life happens and recruiters are fine with that. What they're not okay with is that you leave them wondering about those gaps.</p> <p>Include a single line description, such as &quot;Family Care&quot; or &quot;Volunteer for Red Cross&quot; that helps your potential employer to review your job history, and then move on.</p> <h2>5. It Lacks Specifics</h2> <p>Focus on accomplishment, not job duties. Recruiters don't want to hear about menial tasks and duties. Anybody in that job would have done those. Instead, recruiters would like to read about what you got done.</p> <p>Here are three tips on how to provide specifics in your job history.</p> <h3>Avoid iPhrases</h3> <p>Resumes are never written in the first person. Use dynamic verbs instead.</p> <h3>Leverage Numbers to Provide Context</h3> <p>For example, &quot;Redesigned a trading platform used by 2,500 investment managers,&quot; or &quot;Launched a grassroots email marketing campaign that grew sales 25% to $500,000 the next quarter.&quot;</p> <h3>Provide Specific Dates</h3> <p>&quot;White lies&quot; about length of employment are still lies.</p> <h2>6. It Contains Misspellings and Grammar Mistakes</h2> <p>Misspellings and grammar mistakes are the easiest ways to get your resume ignored. Use your word processor's spell check, take advantage of online grammar checkers, and have at least two people proofread your resume before you deliver it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-grammar-mistakes-that-are-making-you-look-stupid?ref=seealso">12 Grammar Mistakes That Are Making You Look Stupid</a> and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-more-grammar-mistakes-that-are-making-you-look-stupid?ref=seealso">12 More Grammar Mistakes That Are Making You Look Stupid</a>)</p> <p>By taking the time to proofread your resume, you will stand apart from the <a href="http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?sd=9%2F11%2F2013&amp;id=pr780&amp;ed=12%2F31%2F2013">58% of resumes</a> that have typos.</p> <h2>7. It's in the Wrong Format</h2> <p>As many as 75% of qualified applicants are <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2014/03/18/how-to-get-your-resume-read-by-an-employer/">rejected by ATS programs</a> because they submitted resumes can't be read correctly, or at all. Avoid rejection with some simple steps.</p> <ul> <li>Use .doc or .txt format instead of .pdf or image formats.</li> <li>Avoid graphics and tables that may confuse an ATS.</li> <li>List the name of your employer, then the dates of employment.</li> <li>Upload your resume, instead of typing it out, because ATS prefers the first.</li> <li>Include relevant keywords from the job posting contextually throughout your resume.</li> </ul> <h2>8. It Shares Confidential Information</h2> <p>This is a big no-no and is never okay By disclosing confidential details to a potential employer, you're telling them that they should never hire you, unless they want their own trade secrets revealed to their competitors.</p> <p>When in doubt about whether or not to include something in your resume, use the <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20140917045901-24454816-the-5-biggest-mistakes-i-see-on-resumes-and-how-to-correct-them">New York Times test</a>: if you wouldn't want to see it on the cover on the New York Times with your name attached, leave it off your resume.</p> <h2>9. It Promises &quot;References Upon Request&quot;</h2> <p>Don't waste space on your resume to state the obvious. Remember that you only have about a page worth of resume real estate to impress your potential employer.</p> <h2>10. It Ignores Specific Requests From the Posting</h2> <p>Consider these surprising statistics about recruitment:</p> <ul> <li>First applications are received 200 seconds after a job goes online; and</li> <li>An average of 250 resumes are received for each job position.</li> </ul> <p>To avoid drowning in a sea of resumes, on top of leveraging an ATS, recruiters include special requests on job postings. For example, an employer may ask you to <a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052748704684604575381010512997300">include a specific phrase </a>on your email subject line or cover letter.</p> <p>If you ignore specific requests from a job posting, you're never giving your resume a fighting chance.</p> <p><em>What are other resume mistakes that hurt any job searcher?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers">7 Job Search Stunts to Get You Noticed by Employers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview">What You Should Do If You&#039;re Stumped During an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-case-for-not-tweaking-your-resume">The Case for Not Tweaking Your Resume</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-reasons-why-veterans-make-great-emloyees">10 Reasons Why Veterans Make Great Employees</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building employment hiring job search resume Mon, 09 Mar 2015 09:00:10 +0000 Damian Davila 1325191 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Career Tactics That Are Actually Holding You Back http://www.wisebread.com/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/career_000026674434.jpg" alt="Coworkers using career tactics that are holding them back" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>What if all your efforts to become the shining star of your organization were having the opposite effect? Sometimes even our best-intentioned ploys to climb the ladder higher and faster can result in an unfortuitous fall down to the lower rungs. Just like over-exercising can harm your body rather than help it, there are repercussions to trying too hard to get ahead at work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today?ref=seealso">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a>)</p> <p>Sometimes our career advancement tactics may be causing you more harm than good.</p> <h2>1. Volunteering for Every Assignment</h2> <p>If you're volunteering for every assignment in hopes of projecting yourself as the tireless, tenacious worker you think your boss wants you to be, you're at risk of stretching yourself too thin. You're right, your boss probably <em>does</em> want a go-getter. But not a burnt out one.</p> <p>Research shows that we actually need rest to not only perform at our peak, but to perform well, period. A 2010 LexisNexis survey of 1,700 white collar workers from the U.S., China, South Africa, the U.K., and Australia revealed that employees spend more than half their workdays receiving and managing information. What's more, half of those surveyed workers confessed that they were <a href="http://www.lexisnexis.com/en-us/about-us/media/press-release.page?id=128751276114739">reaching a breaking point</a> after which they would not be able to accommodate the deluge of data. The takeaway is this: Man is not machine, and if you keep pushing yourself to act like the Energizer Bunny, it's only a matter of time before you crash and burn.</p> <h2>2. Personal Websites That Highlight Your Lack of Experience</h2> <p>If you've got it, flaunt it, as the saying goes. But when it comes to all things ranging from your physique to your personal website, it's best not to accentuate what you're lacking.</p> <p>Yes, a resume site can help advance your career by showcasing your skills and accomplishments. But it can also ward off potential job and networking opportunities if it merely serves as a cyber billboard promoting the fact that you haven't got much experience under your belt. So if you're having trouble compiling a list of your work-related talents, it's probably best to hold off on building that website and instead bide your time trying to gain more experience. Then, once you've got something to boast about, get back to creating that website and shout it from the virtual mountaintops.</p> <h2>3. Unabashedly Trying to Be the Best</h2> <p>In professional team sports like soccer and football, <a href="http://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/cbs-directory/sites/cbs-directory/files/publications/Too%20much%20talent%20PS.pdf">too many elite players</a> can hinder a&nbsp;team's overall performance, according to a recent study by researchers at Columbia University. The same is true in the workplace. When teams of any sort need to come together, the study authors concluded, a deluge of talent can tear them apart. Infighting over dominance is just one of many negative outcomes of what researchers dubbed the &quot;too-much-talent-effect.&quot; So if you're currently on a mission to assert yourself at the head of the office talent pool, it might be beneficial to take a step back, gain some perspective, and consider whether you'd be better off branding yourself instead as the all-star team player.</p> <h2>4. Branding Yourself as Someone You're Not</h2> <p>If you're lying, or even just slightly embellishing, to qualify yourself for a raise, promotion, or new gig, you're running the risk of setting yourself back five steps rather than one ahead. Whether it's saying you're an expert at using a computer program you're actually unfamiliar with or asserting that you speak fluent Spanish when you really don't, you're probably going to suffer some serious repercussions when it comes time to perform on those skills and you fall short. Half of all employers said they would automatically <a href="http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?sd=8%2F7%2F2014&amp;id=pr837&amp;ed=12%2F31%2F2014">dismiss a job candidate</a> if they caught a lie on his or her resume, according to a nationwide survey by CareerBuilder.</p> <h2>5. Over-Extending Yourself Financially</h2> <p>Maybe you broke your budget by self-funding a flight to Colorado for a meet-and-greet with company executives that very well may not hire you. Or you joined the ritzy golf club you can't really afford because your boss belongs there and you're hoping to get some more face time. Perhaps it was a new business suit you splurged on in hopes that it might improve the outcome of your annual performance evaluation meeting. If you're spending money you don't have on things that very well may do nothing to advance your career, stop. Long shots aimed at making gains in the office aren't worth the risk of financial ruin.</p> <p><em>What career tactics have you tried &mdash; only to have them backfire? Please warn others in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it">6 Times a Higher Salary Isn&#039;t Worth It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise">These 10 Words and Phrases Are Keeping You From Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career growth promotion raise Tue, 03 Mar 2015 10:00:06 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1316589 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Ways to Improve Your Work Reputation http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-improve-your-work-reputation <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-ways-to-improve-your-work-reputation" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/young-businesspeople-team-office-Dollarphotoclub_78278791.jpg" alt="businesspeople office" title="businesspeople office" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Developing a strong work reputation is a bit like tending a garden: Your commitment to maintaining it over time is what yields the best results. If your work rep needs some fine-tuning, however, it's not too late to make a few improvements. Here's how. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-ways-to-suck-up-at-work-that-wont-make-you-feel-slimy?ref=seealso">15 Ways to Suck Up at Work That Won't Make You Feel Slimy</a>)</p> <h2>1. Prove Your Intent to Be Taken Seriously</h2> <p>If you've earned a not-so-flattering reputation around the office, it's time to do damage control. In other words, take Missy Elliot's advice: Flip it and reverse it.</p> <p>&quot;The best way to improve your work reputation is to prove your desired reputation with actions,&quot; advises Michelle Burke, marketing supervisor for WyckWyre Food Industry HR Systems. &quot;Are you looking to be reputable in project management or leadership? Take a project and over-deliver on all expectations to prove yourself. Have you been late a lot and want to change that view? Show up extra early continually to prove you are working on past mistakes.&quot;</p> <p>It's not easy to undo some of the more unsavory work blunders in your past, but it's also not impossible. Dedicate yourself to changing your actions and attitude, and others will start to see and respect your efforts.</p> <h2>2. Consistently Meet Your Deadlines</h2> <p>Just like Rodney Dangerfield, you'll get &quot;no respect&quot; if you're always missing deadlines &mdash; especially if it's because you tend to manage your time poorly. Get back on track and start turning things in on or before the due date, without exception.</p> <p>The quickest way to improve your reputation with your peers and supervisors alike is to execute successfully on the timeline you have laid out &mdash; and if you can't, to openly and proactively communicate the cause behind the delayed execution,&quot; says Kathryn Prusinski, VP of integration and development at Vision Alignment. &quot;Reputation in large part is based upon two things: One, your style &mdash; the way you approach your job, and two, whether or not you do what you say you will. Failing on the second half instantaneously impacts your credibility, regardless of how charming you may be in your approach.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Under Promise and Over Deliver</h2> <p>&quot;Man, when he say he be there; he be there.&quot; That's a quote from an old episode of Spencer for Hire, which means, in essence, keep your promises &mdash; no excuses.</p> <p>Words to live by according to Boston-based photographer Matt McKee.</p> <p>&quot;Under promise and over deliver by delivering the goods the day before you promised them, under budget, and better than they expected &mdash; because you set the expectations,&quot; he says. &quot;And always say thank you. It doesn't cost anything and makes everyone feel appreciated.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Keep Your Criticism to Yourself</h2> <p>It's easy to be a Negative Nancy (or Ned) when things don't go your way at work, but the office is the last place you want to let your salty attitude show.</p> <p>Money Crashers' David Bakke agrees.</p> <p>&quot;Save your complaints for when you get home &mdash; no one at work wants to hear them and you come off as a whiner,&quot; he says. &quot;Get all of your assignments completed without mistakes and on time. On that note, don't take on a new responsibility unless you're confident that you can deliver. Don't always be the first one to take credit on a job well done, even if it mostly came about because of your individual work. Be humble and mention anyone else who might have helped.&quot;</p> <h2>5. Invite Your Coworkers to Activities Outside of Work</h2> <p>This is one of my favorite suggestions on how to improve your reputation at work because it's totally how I roll.</p> <p>&quot;Someone can improve their reputation by being involved in activities outside of work and by letting your coworkers know about it,&quot; says Brian Vanderlip, director of compliance analysis at Zenith Education Group. &quot;Being part of a non-profit, starting a side business, or even having interesting hobbies can increase someone's work reputation by saying 'Here is something I'm passionate about, talk to me if you want to know more.' Not everyone can be an expert at something within their company; generally those individuals are already identified, but you can establish yourself as an expert on something outside of work.&quot;</p> <p>Yes, yes, and yes. I'm definitely that guy who will invite you to after-work activities so we can form a better work bond. Besides, if I'm spending most of my waking hours with my coworkers, shouldn't we know a little more about each other than what flavor coffee we like?</p> <h2>6. Engage in Active Listening</h2> <p>Guilty, party of one.</p> <p>I have quite a bad reputation about never remembering anyone's name the first time I meet them &mdash; usually because I just don't listen. It's in one in ear and out the other, and then I have to embarrass myself by asking a second time. Thus, active listening is as much a lesson for me as it may be for you. And Timothy J. Trudeau, active listening enthusiast and CEO of Syntax Creative, is about to school us.</p> <p>&quot;The most important thing someone can do for me is to make it clear to me that they understand (not necessarily agree) what I am saying,&quot; he says. &quot;Active listening &mdash; which is simply repeating back to the person what they said and how you understand it, as part of your answer &mdash; will either help the person you're talking with feel listened to (which is one of the best ways to build a relationship) or it will allow the person to try again, and differently, to help you understand what they're saying. This is important. Things don't get done, and people are not motivated when they don't feel heard or understood. When someone has a history of making you feel heard or listened to, that's the person you go to when you have a choice.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Be Firm But Kind</h2> <p>You want your coworkers or employees to respect you if you're in a position of responsibility, but that doesn't give you authority to be a jerk. Try to be firm but flexible, and always come from a positive and genuine place.</p> <p>&quot;Disciplined kindness requires a broad approach,&quot; says writer and editor Susan Froetschel. &quot;For example, don't brag about vacations or gifts or possessions when colleagues might be struggling or worried about losing their jobs. Listen to others and offer your best professional advice to keep them calm while supporting the overall organization. Do not gossip, and try to tamp down gossip by other employees by gently pointing out how observations might be unsubstantiated. Work hard, look for solutions, and be positive &mdash; because colleagues, competitors, or any of their acquaintances can someday be in a position to hire or extend special recognition.&quot;</p> <p>Words to live by.</p> <p><em>How do you brighten up your reputation at work?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-improve-your-work-reputation">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year">7 Ways to Actually Take All Your Vacation Days This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-three-f-rule-can-lead-you-to-happiness">The Three F Rule Can Lead You to Happiness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/need-a-job-try-searching-in-china">Need a Job? Try Searching in China</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/earn-more-money-by-demanding-it">Earn More Money by Demanding It</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building image reputation status work Mon, 02 Mar 2015 10:00:07 +0000 Mikey Rox 1315215 at http://www.wisebread.com Brian Williams' $5 Million Fib: 4 Little Lies that Can Cost You Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/brian-williams-5-million-fib-4-little-lies-that-can-cost-you-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-williams-5-million-fib-4-little-lies-that-can-cost-you-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessman-contemplating-Dollarphotoclub_50735780.jpg" alt="businessman contemplating" title="businessman contemplating" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It was a $5 million fib. Maybe even more expensive than that. <em>NBC Nightly News</em> anchor Brian Williams' war story tall tale cost him six months pay, and considering his freshly signed five-year, $50 million contract, that's an expensive white lie. The fact is, he's likely never to return to the anchor desk at NBC, so his out-of-pocket penalty could be much larger.</p> <p>He fell into a surprisingly easy trap: stretching the truth so far as to finally reach the breaking point. It's something celebrities tend to do often &mdash; start believing their own press hype. But we're all prone to tell a &quot;harmless&quot; little falsehood now and then. <em>Your baby is so cute! No, those pants don't make your butt look big. The check is in the mail.</em> We all know the routine.</p> <p>And it's something we do at work, too. Well, we can't be brutally honest at all costs and there is a certain amount of gamesmanship in being gainfully employed, right? We're not really going to tell our boss she's gained a few pounds, are we? But little lies can compound over time &mdash; as Brian Williams well knows &mdash; and can take on a life of their own, if we're not careful. Here are six workplace white lies to avoid.</p> <h2>Taking Credit for Something You Didn't Do</h2> <p>You think people won't find out but they will. One survey noted the <a href="http://www.natcom.org/CommCurrentsArticle.aspx?id=1022">most frequent workplace lie</a> involves using deception to discredit other employees while attempting to make themselves look better to the organization. Brian Williams was &quot;taking credit&quot; for <a href="http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/nbcs-brian-williams-apologizes-false-iraq-war-story/">risking life and limb</a> on a helicopter in a war zone. Certainly without meaning to he may have, to some small degree, <a href="http://www.stripes.com/news/us/nbc-s-brian-williams-recants-iraq-story-after-soldiers-protest-1.327792#.VNKWQdl3NjQ.twitter">discredited members of the military</a> &mdash; often in harm's way &mdash; who took offense with his &quot;faulty memory.&quot;</p> <h2>Lying on a Resume</h2> <p>In a survey conducted last year by Career Builder, 58% of hiring managers said they've <a href="http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?sd=8%2F7%2F2014&amp;id=pr837&amp;ed=12%2F31%2F2014">caught a lie</a> on a resume. And in an increasingly competitive job market, the problem is getting worse. One-third (33%) of those same employers said they've seen an increase in resume embellishments since the recession.</p> <p>It's not just about lying about the length of employment or education, either. One applicant claimed to have 25 years of experience &mdash; at the age of 32! Whoops. Half of employers surveyed (51%) said that they would automatically dismiss a candidate if they caught a lie on their resume.</p> <h2>Professing Competence in Something You Know Little About</h2> <p>It might start out with, &quot;Sure, I know how to use QuickBooks,&quot; and end up being &quot;...Well, I thought I could figure it out.&quot; That same Career Builder survey said it was one of the most common resume lies &mdash; &quot;embellished skill set&quot; &mdash; committed by 57% of those seeking to stretch the truth on their applications. And again, over half of employers surveyed saw resume fibs as grounds for dismissal.</p> <h2>Make Promises You Can't &mdash; Or Don't Intend &mdash; To Keep</h2> <p>As customers, we've often been on the receiving end of this white lie. &quot;Your table will be ready in five minutes.&quot; Thirty minutes later, we're still waiting &mdash; hungry and irritable. Sales training professionals often preach a mantra of &quot;under promise and over deliver&quot; to trainees, looking to build a culture of surprising customers, in a good way.</p> <p>And one final thought about lying &mdash; non-work related. A recent survey said that seven million Americans lie to their spouse or significant other about matters of money. In fact, one-quarter of adults under 30 admitted to being less than honest with the one they love about debt, spending, hidden accounts, or other financial falsehoods. Being open and honest about money is important in a relationship.</p> <p>Losing a love is much worse than losing a job.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/hal-m-bundrick-cfp">Hal M. Bundrick CFP</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brian-williams-5-million-fib-4-little-lies-that-can-cost-you-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-10"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/women-and-wall-street-is-the-romance-gone">Women and Wall Street: Is the Romance Gone?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-laid-off-a-step-by-step-guide">How to Get Laid Off: A Step-By-Step Guide</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Financial News brian williams Sun, 22 Feb 2015 07:42:00 +0000 Hal M. Bundrick CFP 1304298 at http://www.wisebread.com What You Should Do If You're Stumped During an Interview http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman-job-interview-Dollarphotoclub_54828193_1.jpg" alt="woman job interview" title="woman job interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you don't know how to answer a question during an interview, the silence can seem excruciating. You might even wish the floor would open up and swallow you whole. Not to worry, though &mdash; keep these tips in mind the next time you're strapped for an answer.</p> <p>RELATED: <a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Dos-Donts-Job-Interviews-34040192">16 Major Dos and Don'ts at a Job Interview</a></p> <h2>1. Calm Down</h2> <p>First of all, the most important thing to do is stay calm. If you start freaking out, your body will begin reacting physiologically. For example, your blood pressure will start rising, and your heart may race. Once you start a stress response, you won't be thinking clearly, and you may throw out answers without thinking. Take deep breaths, and tell yourself that it's OK to not know the answer to the question. You'll just have to work through it; there's nothing you can do to change things, but you need to stay calm to find the right answer.</p> <h2>2. Don't Say &quot;I Don't Know&quot; Off the Bat, and Don't Make Stuff Up</h2> <p>You should not tell the interviewer you don't know the answer without mulling it over. Then again, be careful not to<a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Can-I-Lie-Interviewer-22943027"> make stuff up</a>, because your interviewer can see right through that.</p> <h2>3. Ask Questions</h2> <p>Maybe it's the question you don't understand. Ask your interviewer to clarify what she said. Go deeper into the question to see if you can get more details that will help you figure it out.</p> <h2>4. Tell Your Interviewer What You Do Know</h2> <p>If you do have some knowledge of the question, then take the time to tell your interviewer what you do know of the situation. Saying everything out loud can start you on the process of figuring out the problem.</p> <h2>5. Tell Them How You Would Find the Answer</h2> <p>Even if you don't know what the answer is, you can tell the interviewer the steps you would take to figure out the problem. Interviewers ask you hard questions because they want to see what your thought process is. Sometimes, the thought process may be more important than the actual answer. They want to see that you can take initiative and have the resources to come up with a solution on your own, instead of needing someone to hold your hand through problems. While you're trying to find the solution, you can admit to not knowing certain parts; this way, you come off as being honest, and the hiring manager will know you are not trying to fake it. For example, if you need to calculate something and you're not good at math, you can respond with &quot;I can't do the calculations off the top of my head, but I think these calculations will give me the answer. And what I can do is use a calculator to find that answer.&quot; Showing a little honesty shows vulnerability and transparency. It also makes you more likable.</p> <h2>6. Know the Right Time to Come Clean</h2> <p>Although we mentioned not admitting to the interviewer that you don't know the answer, there is an exception to this rule. If the answer is something that you will only know through memorization, such as a definition of the word, then it's probably best to admit that you don't know the answer, as it may be impossible to figure it out independently. Here's what you can tell the interviewer: &quot;It's a good question, but I'm sorry, I don't have the answer off the top of my head. I will be sure to follow up with the answer after the interview.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Send a Follow-Up Email</h2> <p>The <a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Interview-Follow-Up-Email-Template-19179139">follow-up email for an interview</a> could become your second chance. Try to talk about the answer you were stumped on, but be smooth when you're talking about it. And make sure you're only naming the mistakes your interviewer caught and not drawing attention to the ones she did not catch. Don't say something like &quot;I'm sorry I did not know the answer to that question.&quot; Instead, tell her that after more time and thought, you managed to come up with a couple of solutions that could work for the problem.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-blog-teaser"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Your resume worked and you landed an interview! Don&#039;t blow it now with a bad answer to a tough question. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p style="text-align:center;"><a style="border:none;" href="http://www.savvysugar.com"><img style="height:95px; width:300px" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u921/POPSUGARrgb.jpg" alt="" /></a></p> <p><em>This is a guest contribution from our friends at </em><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/"><em>POPSUGAR Smart Living</em></a><em>. Check out more useful articles from this partner:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Typical-Job-Interview-Questions-Answers-20280663#photo-20280663">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Good-Questions-Ask-During-Interview-33652741">7 Questions That Will Knock the Socks Off Your Interviewer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Save-Money-Trader-Joe-35589009">9 Ways to Save Major Money at Trader Joe's</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/popsugar-smart-living">POPSUGAR Smart Living</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-11"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers">7 Job Search Stunts to Get You Noticed by Employers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/16-major-dos-and-donts-at-a-job-interview">16 Major Dos and Don&#039;ts at a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building General Tips Job Hunting hiring interview new job resume Fri, 30 Jan 2015 10:00:18 +0000 POPSUGAR Smart Living 1282663 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Reasons You Deserve to Get Fired http://www.wisebread.com/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/fired-businesswoman-78749363-small.jpg" alt="fired businesswoman" title="fired businesswoman" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The recession might be over, but that doesn't mean any of us can afford to be passive about holding onto our jobs. If you think you may soon be having an uncomfortable conversation with HR, it's time to find out why. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-tips-for-the-recently-fired-and-some-for-the-rest-of-us-too?ref=seealso">Job Hunting Tips for the Recently Fired</a>)</p> <p>Here are 12 reasons you're getting fired.</p> <h2>1. Social Media SNAFU</h2> <p>Venting about your employer, boss, or co-workers on Twitter, Facebook, or any other social media site can get you fired. Avoid other career-killing <a href="http://www.pcworld.com/article/206359/6_Facebook_Twitter_Mistakes_That_Can_Get_You_Fired.html">social media mistakes</a> and remember &mdash; six degrees of separation is about one and a half degrees online.</p> <h2>2. Refusing to Play the Game</h2> <p>I don't know what the game is where you work, but I know there is one &mdash; and I bet there are a lot of folks playing their hearts out. The game usually involves demonstrating your passion for the work, coming in early and staying late, and working to impress the right people without falling all over yourself. Call me cynical and old-fashioned, but if you haven't learned how to play the game, you haven't really learned how to stay employed.</p> <h2>3. Not Giving Your All</h2> <p>Those cheesy motivational posters are wrong; it's impossible to give 110%. But consistently settling for 70% is a bad strategy if want to duck and weave past a pink slip. Doing a bit more than required, volunteering for a committee or two, and diplomatically making recommendations for process improvements adds value to what you do and can help secure your employment long-term</p> <h2>4. Clicking on Caps Lock</h2> <p>TYPING IN ALL CAPS READS LIKE YOU'RE SHOUTING and shows a fundamental lack of professional etiquette and insight. It may be trivial, but people get fired for trivial things every day. Cut it out.</p> <h2>5. Skipping the Finer Points of Good Etiquette</h2> <p>Good business etiquette is both valuable and rare, especially if your job involves direct work with clients or partners. Not grasping the finer points of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/reclaiming-etiquette-dining-basics-for-young-professionals">dining</a>, interview, or meeting etiquette can jeopardize business relationships, flag you as inexperienced, and kill a career.</p> <h2>6. Making Yourself Non-Essential</h2> <p>If you're not actively looking for new ways to add value to the company you work for, you may be inadvertently planting the seeds for your own dismissal when there's a hiccup in the market. Besides being first-rate at your job, look for those tasks that no one else wants to do and position yourself as the go-to person for each.</p> <h2>7. Mixing Your Personal and Professional Life</h2> <p>When it comes to job security, it's good policy to save the drama for your mama. Allowing personal issues to consistently affect your work erodes your professional image and can make letting you go as easy as switching off a bad reality show.</p> <h2>8. Getting Embroiled in Office Politics</h2> <p>Some work environments can be as political as a swing state in late October. Diving in headfirst and picking sides gives you a 50% of being right and a 100% chance of showing how easily distracted you are. Learn how to <a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Ways-Beat-Office-Politics-1108688">beat office politics</a> and still get ahead.</p> <h2>9. Snoozing or Boozing</h2> <p>No surprises here. Sneaking a nap or a nip at work is usually an epically bad idea. And with office holiday parties coming up, sticking to a moderate personal drink limit will help you avoid those regretful lampshade-on-the-head moments that leave you red-faced Monday morning.</p> <h2>10. Stealing</h2> <p>Hey, Sticky Fingers, it may feel like a fringe benefit, but few companies see it that way. If you're tempted to pocket random goodies from your employer, it may be a sign that you feel stuck or that you're not being fairly compensated. Be proactive about both issues or move on.</p> <h2>11. Sleeping In</h2> <p>Who hasn't woken up feeling like a sack of wet concrete? These are the moments when we suddenly tap deep reserves of creativity to craft the most elaborate excuses for being late or taking a half-day. But as our inner storytellers dream, our careers can get creamed. Wake up, slam a double espresso, and defend your professional turf.</p> <h2>12. Playing Hooky</h2> <p>It might not have been a big deal in sixth grade, but playing hooky in your professional life can have lasting consequences. Don't assume (cough, cough) taking sick days when you're feeling great, ducking out early, or adding 15 minutes to your lunch hour is going unnoticed.</p> <p>If you're guilty of multiple axe-worthy offenses, it might be time to hope for the best and prepare for the worst by keeping an eye out for <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">signs you're about to get fired</a>. If you make the cut, wipe the sweat from your brow and let 2015 be the year you turn over a new leaf. Like much of life, our professional lives can be reinvented with focus, discipline, and the right motivation.</p> <p><em>Have you ever been fired? Did the experience change how you approached your next job? Share your favorite stories below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-12"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-laid-off-a-step-by-step-guide">How to Get Laid Off: A Step-By-Step Guide</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/starting-a-new-job-3-rules-to-live-by">Starting a New Job: 3 Rules to Live By</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-first-5-things-you-must-do-after-getting-laid-off">The First 5 Things You Must Do After Getting Laid Off</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-not-to-answer-10-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How NOT TO Answer 10 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building fired job hunt job loss new job pink slip Wed, 03 Dec 2014 11:00:09 +0000 Kentin Waits 1262734 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways to Discover Your Dream Career http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-discover-your-dream-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-to-discover-your-dream-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/office-worker-thinking-516681649-small.jpg" alt="office worker thinking" title="office worker thinking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you're flailing, facing layoffs, or otherwise feeling unfulfilled at work, it might be time to reconsider your calling. Job researchers report that <a href="http://online.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052748704206804575468162805877990">the average American changes jobs seven times</a> in his or her lifetime, most often in pursuit of better job satisfaction or financial stability. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today?ref=seealso">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a>)</p> <p>But it's not always easy to know what direction to take. That's because we're prone to define who we are by what we do to make a living. So when there's opportunity to trade our profession for something completely new, it often feels like we're faced with the unsettling task of altering the basic building blocks of who we are as human beings. But it can be done, and <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2011/03/03/how-loving-your-job-helps-you-succeed">the payoff can be spectacular</a>.</p> <p>Read on for our roundup of the best ways to go about recreating your career and finding your true calling. (You can thank us when you're blissfully employed in your brand new niche).</p> <h2>1. Be a Skill-Shifter</h2> <p>Reflect on all of your skills &mdash; not just the ones you acquired in the workforce &mdash; and think about all the creative ways you can apply them to new careers or business ventures. What skills have you picked up from volunteering, coaching soccer, raising your children, paying off your credit card debt, or gardening in the backyard? How might those techniques serve you in the working world?</p> <p>&quot;<a href="http://blog.ctnews.com/connecticutpostings/2010/10/16/recreate-your-career-take-or-leave-a-tip/">Don't limit your job search or career possibilities</a> to the exact field you have been in or with the same field on your educational degree,&quot; advises Dr. Stuart Sidle, an industrial organizational psychologist. The idea is to identify your most outside-the-box strengths and passions, and then play to them.</p> <h2>2. Unearth a Childhood Dream</h2> <p>Many people think childhood dreams are just dreams. Yet one in four working Americans are employed in the job or career field they dreamed about as kids, according to a survey by LinkedIn. People who work in a field they once dreamed about tend to be successful because <a href="http://press.linkedin.com/News-Releases/150/Cool-Careers-LinkedIn-Research-Reveals-Data-About-the-Top-Childhood-Dream-Jobs">their job is on the same playing field as their passions</a>. When you do something you're passionate about, you're bound to do it well.</p> <p>&quot;The dream jobs we aspire to as children are a window into our passions and talents,&quot; says Nicole Williams, LinkedIn's career expert. &quot;Identifying and understanding those passions are key to improving our performance and enjoyment&hellip;&quot;</p> <h2>3. Try It Out</h2> <p>A restaurant chef might seem like the ultimate occupation, but how often does the average chef have the opportunity to experiment with flavors and create new dishes for the dinner menu? There's only one way to find out: Network with people in your desired field, find opportunities to shadow people working in your desired role, and ask a lot of questions. When possible, try out the work for yourself on a limited, exploratory basis to see if it's really for you.</p> <p>&quot;Making a major career change is not simply about picking up new technical skills and repackaging one's image and resume,&quot; writes Herminia Ibarra in her book, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1591394139/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=1591394139&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=MUC7F2E4CCXNBERS">Working Identity: Unconventional Strategies for Reinventing Your Career</a>. &quot;It is also about finding people we want to emulate and places where we want to belong.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Future-Proof Yourself</h2> <p>It's not a bad idea to <a href="http://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_table_103.htm">go where the growth is</a>. So you might want to jot down these fastest-growing occupations:</p> <ul> <li>industrial-organizational psychologist</li> <li>personal care aide</li> <li>home health aide</li> <li>mechanical insulation worker</li> <li>interpreters and translators</li> <li>diagnostic medical sonographers</li> <li>brickmasons</li> </ul> <p>These fields of the future are less likely to be affected by a shrinking economy or other setbacks. And they're more likely to provide workers with opportunities for growth and promotion. They may not be the sexiest of jobs, but there's certainly something to be said for stability.</p> <h2>5. Be Honest &mdash; Are You Up to the Challenge?</h2> <p>&quot;Much more than transferring to a similar job in a new company or industry, or moving laterally into a different work function within a field we already know well, a true change of direction is always terrifying,&quot; writes Ibarra in her book.</p> <p>That's why Dr. Stuart Sidle, an industrial organizational psychologist, recommends asking yourself these questions before <a href="http://blog.ctnews.com/connecticutpostings/2010/10/16/recreate-your-career-take-or-leave-a-tip/">embarking on any major career shift</a>:</p> <ul> <li>Do you have the passion to do the hard work that goes along with succeeding in the field?<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Is your choice practical?<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Are you taking a path because you believe it is a great option for you, or are you simply avoiding something, such as discomfort or fear?</li> </ul> <p>If your honest answer to any of these key considerations is &quot;No,&quot; you might want to consider making a trip back to the drawing board.</p> <p><em>Have you relaunched a career? How'd you do? Please share in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-discover-your-dream-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-13"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/starting-a-new-job-3-rules-to-live-by">Starting a New Job: 3 Rules to Live By</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired">12 Reasons You Deserve to Get Fired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview">What You Should Do If You&#039;re Stumped During an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career choice new career new job Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:00:07 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1245696 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Job Search Stunts to Get You Noticed by Employers http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/job-seeker-480474317-small.jpg" alt="job seeker" title="job seeker" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Did you ever think your dream job would be snatched away by a desperate grad with a viral gimmick? No. No you didn't.</p> <p>In today's society, we're more interested social media hacks than work experience. We'd rather follow a good speaker than a good leader. And we'd rather have an out-of-the-box thinker than someone who knows what he/she wants. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-outdated-job-search-techniques-to-avoid?ref=seealso">10 Outdated Job Hunt Techniques to Avoid</a>)</p> <p>But don't worry, the same rules apply to you. If your previous job hunting strategies have failed, we've compiled an inspiring list of crazy stunts that landed real jobs for real people.</p> <h2>1. Billboard Lands Media Grad 60 Job Offers</h2> <p>By far the most publicized job stunt in recent memory is that of <a href="http://www.adampacitti.com/employadam.html">Adam Pacitti</a>, a college grad with a media production degree who found himself working as a coin exchanger at a video game arcade.</p> <p>After job applications failed, Adam decided enough was enough and of course, as any of us would have done, spent his last 500 pounds on a billboard. After being featured in literally every news source imaginable, Adam received over 60 solid job offers and went to work for award-winning production company KEO.</p> <p>What few people realize is that Adam put a whole lot more work in than simply buying a billboard. His spot in news media was only the result of a successful multi-platform social media campaign that went viral. Viral media always finds its way into the news these days, so his success shouldn't be a surprise.</p> <p>If that sounds like too much work, you'll love our next stunt.</p> <h2>2. Grad Student Suits Up, Hits the Metro, and Lands a Job</h2> <p>If you aren't one for all that social media nonsense, you'll love the story of <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2014/09/10/graduate-handed-cvs-waterloo-station-dream-job_n_5795724.html">Alfred Ajani</a>. Alfred's marketing degree wasn't enough to land one of 300 positions he applied for, so he decided to go on the offensive.</p> <p>Armed with a suit and a stack of CVs, Alfred posted up at Waterloo station, collecting a few emails and business cards in the process.</p> <p>Oh but wait, that's actually not what landed him his job. Twitter took his post viral, where it caught the attention of recruitment company Asoria Group, who offered him a job via&hellip; LinkedIn.</p> <p>Looks like you're going to need those social media accounts after all.</p> <h2>3. Grad Lands Dream Job After Walking London Streets In a Sandwich Board</h2> <p>At this point, you're probably frantically following people on Twitter, preparing for your next job stunt. But just take a breather. It might be easier than you think.</p> <p>After making the unfortunate decision to get a history degree, <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/6221701/Graduate-uses-sandwich-board-to-find-job.html">David Rowe</a> found himself predictably jobless. Emboldened by a father-son debate, David strapped a sandwich board around his shoulders and advertised that he would work the first month free.</p> <p>He was then interviewed by recruiting firm Parkhouse Bell and ended up landing his dream job, which I'm assuming was in recruiting. We're guessing the firm saw his photo on Facebook, but it hasn't been confirmed, so you know... there might just be room for something more old fashioned.</p> <h2>4. Send QR Code Cupcakes to Editorial Teams</h2> <p>If public infamy isn't your cup of tea, what about something more direct and personable?</p> <p>Like cupcakes. Everybody loves cupcakes.</p> <p>Blogger and fashionista <a href="http://www.scarphelia.com/2013/06/act-six-scene-one-turning-great-ideas.html">Katie Oldham</a> decided to take her summer internship into her own hands with the help of a local bakery. Katie researched the editorial teams at her favorite publishing companies and delivered special batches of cupcakes with her website's QR code to their London offices.</p> <p>And it worked! She interned for Cosmopolitan, and her website is currently part of the Vice blogging network.</p> <h2>5. Home Brewed Beer Resumes</h2> <p>Nothing says work hard and party harder like a home-brewed batch of beer. What makes that beer even better? Resume covers of course.</p> <p>Brennan Gleason takes a distinguished spot on our list as being the only to pull off a successful job hunt stunt outside of the UK. Then again, he did it in Canada, so potato-patata.</p> <p>Brennan wanted to nab a sexy graphic design job, so what did he do? He designed custom resume covers for six-packs of beer he brewed himself.</p> <p>Let's see...</p> <ul> <li>Creativity&hellip; check.</li> <li>Graphic design skills&hellip; check.</li> <li>Free specialty beer for the office&hellip; CHECK!</li> </ul> <p>Surprise, surprise &mdash; <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/26/resume-on-beer-brennan-gleason_n_5534535.html">Brennan</a> was hired.</p> <h2>6. Wacky Website Campaign Turns Bakery Manager Into VP</h2> <p>Many of you are under the false impression that working successfully at your company will translate into a promotion.</p> <p>Not true!</p> <p>That VP spot just went to this guy. Despite seven tries, his CV tells us he hasn't been able to hold down a job for even one calendar year. But guess what!? He acted super wacky on video and a lot of people laughed, so he's qualified to be your boss!</p> <p>His name is <a href="http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-news/dad-dan-conways-wacky-job-hunting-2477515">Dan Conway</a>, but you can call him &quot;Yes, Sir.&quot; Dan launched a wacky website campaign consisting of him doing wacky things in order to find work and was eventually made a VP of marketing for a company I won't advertise.</p> <p>Apparently, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWffOEVI7IY#t=38">THIS</a> is what British marketing employers look for in their executives.</p> <h2>7. Grad Lands Social Media Manager Position by PMing a Stranger</h2> <p>What's the quickest way to land an interview? Find the owner's profile and hit them up with a private message.</p> <p>&hellip;Said no one ever. Unless you're <a href="http://mashable.com/2010/03/08/job-seeker-results/">David Cohen</a>. David knew a guy who knew a guy, and he randomly messaged that guy, who then interviewed him with another guy, and now David's their top social media guy.</p> <p>Sounds quaint. Perhaps you should try it. Just don't blame us if you get slapped with a restraining order.</p> <p><em>Have you ever tried to land a job with an outlandish stunt? What did you do &mdash; and did you get the job?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jacob-mcmillen">Jacob McMillen</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-14"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-effective-ways-to-make-yourself-more-employable">6 Effective Ways to Make Yourself More Employable</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-words-you-need-to-delete-from-your-resume-right-now">12 Words You Need to Delete From Your Resume Right Now</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/great-ways-to-improve-your-resume-today">Great Ways to Improve Your Resume Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview">What You Should Do If You&#039;re Stumped During an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting job search promotion resume self promotion Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:00:03 +0000 Jacob McMillen 1238130 at http://www.wisebread.com Bosses Say These Are Their 6 Favorite Qualities in Employees — Do You Have Them? http://www.wisebread.com/bosses-say-these-are-their-6-favorite-qualities-in-employees-do-you-have-them <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/bosses-say-these-are-their-6-favorite-qualities-in-employees-do-you-have-them" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/boss-employee-working-162277415-small.jpg" alt="boss employee working" title="boss employee working" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you can't get ahead at work, there's probably a reason why. You might not have the experience or educational background for a specific position &mdash; or worse, your boss may feel that you lack important qualities. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise?ref=seealso">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a>)</p> <p>Since your boss holds the key to your future with the company, it is imperative that you understand qualities employers look for in employees. This can be the difference between advancing up the corporate ladder and staying stuck in the same position.</p> <h2>1. Good Communication Skills</h2> <p>Bosses look for employees with strong communication skills &mdash; written and spoken. Being able to clearly express yourself is a major asset and can take your career to the next level.</p> <p>&quot;If you have a gift for the spoken and written word, you will always put your best foot forward. Being articulate is highly prized in today's workplace, when time is at a premium and technology requires constant communication,&quot; Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and author of <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0470457643/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=0470457643&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=FSOK7MOUNS3ZLT5N">Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job</a>, <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/jacquelynsmith/2013/11/15/the-20-people-skills-you-need-to-succeed-at-work/">told Forbes.com.</a></p> <p>Master good communication skills and you might become the official or unofficial spokesperson for the company. You don't have to become a walking dictionary. But if your communication style needs improvement, it doesn't hurt to brush up on your English and writing skills, or take a public speaking course or workshop on your own dime.</p> <h2>2. Adaptability</h2> <p>Companies must adapt or evolve to keep pace with the times, and it's important for employees to evolve as well.</p> <p>&quot;I have found that people who are comfortable with change in general tend to be more successful,&quot; <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20130924104438-407452-how-i-hire-adaptability-and-5-other-must-haves">says Jennifer Dulski</a>, President and COO at <a href="http://change.org">Change.org</a>.</p> <p>Even if you do not understand the changes taking place in the organization, go with the flow and trust that your boss knows what she's doing. The end goal is simple &mdash; grow the company. And if the company grows, so can your income. So, don't buck the system or make it difficult for your boss. Being adaptable goes hand-in-hand with being a team player. Team players put aside their personal feelings and work for the common good of the company.</p> <h2>3. Honesty</h2> <p>Bosses have enough on their plates, and they don't have time to supervise each employee. Therefore, employers need workers who are honest and willing to follow rules and policies, even when no one's watching. An honest employee is committed from start to finish, honest in everything, and takes responsibility for his actions.</p> <p>&quot;If they can't be honest with themselves and honest with me, then we are likely going to be wasting time and not operating at our full potential. I expect all team members to express any concern that comes up so we can keep improving not only our processes, but also our morale,&quot; <a href="http://www.monster.com/about/b/16-values-startup-employees-share#.VBdnPkvPZuY">says Patrick Curtis</a>, founder at <a href="http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/">WallStreetOasis.com</a>.</p> <h2>4. Hard-Working Mentality</h2> <p>Bosses need employees who go beyond the call of duty. Technically, you shouldn't be expected to do anything outside your job description, especially if you're not getting paid for your time. But at the same time, taking the initiative and going the extra mile speaks volumes.</p> <p>Karen Rehn, owner of HH Staffing Services, brings attention to a recent employee trait survey that says &quot;57% of <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20140729173700-45510292-employee-traits-what-are-employers-really-looking-for">managers are looking for hard working employees</a>, those who embody work ethic and good ole hard work.&quot;</p> <p>It takes hard work for a company to succeed, and most employers can't get to the top without help from diligent employees. So, your commitment to the job won't go unnoticed and it can open doors to a brighter future with the company.</p> <h2>5. Punctuality and Conscientiousness</h2> <p>From clocking in on time to meeting deadlines, it only takes one tardy or unreliable employee to get everyone off schedule. Do a self-evaluation to determine whether your punctuality needs improvement. A manager may not say anything to you, but arriving even five minutes late or turning in an assignment 15 minutes late doesn't go unnoticed. If you can't be counted on to handle seemingly insignificant tasks, how can your boss trust you with bigger responsibilities?</p> <p>&quot;If the resume has typos or the candidate is late or sloppy, you can be sure those typos will translate into frustrating quality issues on the job,&quot; <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20130924094909-131079-how-i-hire-trust-your-gut-and-take-your-time">says Josh Bersin</a>, Principal and Founder, Bersin by Deloitte.</p> <h2>6. Leadership</h2> <p>Your boss might be the top dog, but he needs a few leaders on his team. No good comes from being a follower. And when bosses look to promote, they prefer applicants who aren't too impressionable. As a leader, you can motivate your co-workers or be a voice of reason during difficult situations.</p> <p>&quot;Anyone can get others to show up for work. Leaders, on the other hand, genuinely inspire people to choose to follow them &mdash; on a mission, toward a goal, or perhaps even to transform an industry,&quot; <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20130924101600-128201973-how-i-hire-let-s-do-lunch">says Walt Bettinger</a>, President and CEO of The Charles Schwab Corporation.</p> <p><em>Are you a boss? Are there other qualities you'd like to add? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bosses-say-these-are-their-6-favorite-qualities-in-employees-do-you-have-them">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-15"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-generosity-is-key-to-everything-including-your-career">Why Generosity Is Key to Everything — Including Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Personal Development career getting hired good employee job promotion Thu, 02 Oct 2014 09:00:05 +0000 Mikey Rox 1225625 at http://www.wisebread.com