Career Building http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4814/all en-US 6 Signs You Aren't Making Enough Money http://www.wisebread.com/6-signs-you-arent-making-enough-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-signs-you-arent-making-enough-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_stressed_computer_000044901658.jpg" alt="Woman learning signs she isn&#039;t making enough money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Living paycheck to paycheck can take a toll on your stress levels and emotional wellbeing. It can also greatly impact your financial wellbeing both in the present and in the future. If you aren't confident about your financial future, then it's time to make a change. Here are a few signs that you need to spend less &mdash; or make more.</p> <h2>1. Your Bills Are Overwhelming</h2> <p>If you don't make enough to pay your bills every month, then you need to make more. Even paying the minimum amount on your bills is not enough. You should be working to pay off your debt, without having to worry about making enough to buy food every month.</p> <p>Overdrawing your checking account, paying your bills late every month, or ignoring your financial obligations altogether can make the problem much worse. If you commit any of these bad habits, then you'll have to worry about overdraft fees, bounced check fees, and may even be sent to collections. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-late-payments-affect-your-credit?ref=seealso">How Late Payments Affect Your Credit</a>)</p> <h2>2. Your Budgeting Isn't Enough</h2> <p>The best way to get more out of every paycheck is to simply spend less. Creating a budget can be the right step towards making lasting changes that will pay off big in the end. However, what do you do if you have already created a budget and cut out all the unnecessary spending you can, but still aren't making enough? You'll need to find a way to make more money.</p> <h2>3. You Have No Savings</h2> <p>If you aren't able to pay down your debt and set aside money for your savings and retirement accounts, then you simply need to make more. In the event that there is a large unexpected expense coming your way, you should have some savings to cover it. It is crucial that you set aside money for your future, and if you aren't, then you need to do something to change the present.</p> <p>It's important to keep your money goals and future finances in mind. It's essential that you are saving for your future, in the event that you experience a pay cut or layoff. Saving for retirement is also one of the most important things you can do for your future self. If you aren't reaching your short and long-term financial goals, then you aren't making enough money.</p> <h2>4. You Keep Relying On Credit Cards</h2> <p>If you find that you are relying on your credit cards just to make ends meet, and are only paying the minimum on your credit cards month after month, you're heading towards prolonged debt and a host of other problems. This can result in a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-increase-your-credit-score-quickly" target="_blank">lower credit score</a> and less money available for your savings account. In the long run, you'll also be responsible for higher interest charges and credit card payments.</p> <h2>5. Your Paycheck Disappears in No Time</h2> <p>If you spend the bulk of your paycheck in the first couple of days, then there's a problem. You should have more than just enough to pay your bills. There should be money left to save and invest towards retirement. Everyone has a bad month from time to time, but if you find that your paycheck runs out within the first week of every month, then you may be overspending or simply not making enough.</p> <p>Special occasions occur for most people several times per year. During these times, you'll want to have a little money set aside (for holidays, anniversaries, birthdays, and other occasions that can cut into your pay). The last thing you want to worry about is breaking out the credit cards just because you need to buy gifts for the kids.</p> <h2>6. You Feel Undervalued</h2> <p>If you feel you aren't being paid enough at your current job, then you may get resentful and less productive. Consider speaking with your manager about what you bring to the table and ask for a raise. The worst they can say is &quot;No.&quot;</p> <p>If you decide to ask for a raise, then you need to first determine <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-underpaid-how-to-figure-out-what-salary-you-deserve">what your time is worth</a>. Use a salary calculator or salary comparison site, and find out what the average salary is for your career so that you have that information on your side when you speak with management. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-the-most-out-of-salary-comparison-sites?ref=seealso">Getting the Most Out of Salary Comparison Sites</a>)</p> <h2>Is It Time to Make a Move?</h2> <p>If you realize it's time to make a move, then there are several steps you can take. If you haven't <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-your-first-budget-in-5-easy-steps">worked on a budget</a> yet, then it's time to do so. You can also take steps to reduce your rent, find alternate forms of transportation, or simply spend less. You may also need to consider changing employment or taking on a weekend or side job.</p> <p><em>Do you know of other signs that a person just isn't making enough? Please share your thoughts in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-signs-you-arent-making-enough-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-keep-holiday-spending-from-blowing-debt-repayment">6 Ways to Keep Holiday Spending From Blowing Debt Repayment</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-your-financial-habits-just-bad">Are Your Financial Habits Just Bad?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/prioritize-these-5-bills-when-youre-short-on-cash">Prioritize These 5 Bills When You&#039;re Short on Cash</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-debt-management-questions-youre-too-embarrassed-to-ask">5 Debt Management Questions You&#039;re Too Embarrassed to Ask</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Career Building Debt Management asking for a raise bills paycheck to paycheck salary underpaid wages Mon, 23 May 2016 09:30:20 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1714251 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Job Perks That Can Lead to a Dream Career http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000041367248_Large.jpg" alt="taking advantage of job perks that can lead to a dream career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Work can be a necessary evil. Individuals might dream of being an award winning writer or inventor, but those dreams &mdash; without any pursuit to make them a reality &mdash; do not provide money for nourishment, shelter, and other financial obligations. Short of being independently wealthy or having a family you can lean on, the budding entrepreneur or artist might need to procure a day job as they pursue their professional goals.</p> <p>When applying for jobs, think beyond yearly salary and hourly wage. The right job perks can streamline how fast it might take to achieve your dreams.</p> <h2>1. Free Education</h2> <p>Higher education can be the key to professional success. For some, a degree is a necessity to break into a new field. For others, college can provide face-to-face mentorship time with award winning professionals in their field. Despite these benefits, the cost of college often leads students to either acquiring thousands in <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-easy-ways-to-avoid-student-loan-debt">student loan debt</a> or forgoing a college education altogether.</p> <p>There is another option. You can pursue a job at a company that has a <a href="https://collegeplus.org/blog/33-companies-that-can-save-you-from-college-debt">tuition reimbursement program</a>. Before choosing a potential company to pursue, look at the fine print.</p> <h2>2. Skill Building</h2> <p>Before you start applying for jobs, sit down to determine what skills will help you score your dream job. You can decrease the time it takes you to land that job if your day job will allow you to learn and practice new skills that will be necessary for your chosen path to success.</p> <p>If you don't have the credentials to start in a position that allows you to utilize those desired skills, make it clear to managers what types of opportunities you would be interested in pursuing. Many companies, in a bid to keep good employees happy, will offer professional opportunities to individuals as the need arises.</p> <h2>3. Making Valuable Contacts</h2> <p>One very crucial aspect of achieving success is knowing the right people. An ideal day job would place you in a position to build personal and professional relationships, both inside and outside of the organization.</p> <p>At work, be friendly with individuals from various departments. Don't just talk shop. You want to cultivate relationships, so you can (if necessary) call in a favor down the road. If you cut right to asking them to help you, it can seem a tad selfish.</p> <p>You should also keep an eye out for jobs where cultivating a social media presence is a requirement. A large personal LinkedIn or Twitter following can lead to a larger pool of people that will see posts about your future art, book, product, or company.</p> <h2>4. Telecommuting Allowed</h2> <p>Daily commutes can steal several hours from your life. On average, the daily commute is <a href="http://mbaonline.pepperdine.edu/evolution-of-the-daily-commute/">around 25 minutes</a>. Some spend even more time commuting. My average daily commute is around an hour. That's one less hour every day I can devote to pursuing my personal goals.</p> <p>Telecommuting jobs allow individuals to cut travel time out of their daily lives and dedicate that time to other professional pursuits. As an added bonus, the elimination of the commute will allow you to decrease the amount you spend on gas every month.</p> <h2>5. Flexible Schedule</h2> <p>Some jobs not only allow you to determine where you work, but they also allow you to dictate when you work. The ability to work when you want will allow you more freedom to work towards your ultimate goals.</p> <p>If you know you have a meeting with a potential investor or publisher on a Monday, you won't need to figure out how to convince your boss to give you a few hours off of work. Instead you simply let them know you'll work the hours later in the day on Monday or over the weekend. This can be useful if you don't particularly want the higher-ups at your company to know how close you might be to quitting your day job.</p> <h2>6. Condensed Work Week</h2> <p>The 9-to-5 is the traditional time frame in which corporate America works. While it can be far better than the rotating schedule dished out in many retail and food service jobs, individuals can be more productive if they try to find a job where they work four, 10-hour shifts.</p> <p>The benefit of working 10-hour shifts is the ability to dedicate three full days to your money making side projects. You no longer need to fight with yourself to muster up the motivation to dedicate a few hours to your side-hustle every night after work. That can be hard due to lingering work stress, physical exhaustion (depending on how much physical labor is involved), and the desire to spend time with family. You now have one work-free day to diligently work on completing your other projects.</p> <p><em>What other work perks can make you more money? Share with us! </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-signs-that-youve-been-at-the-same-job-too-long">25 Signs That You&#039;ve Been at the Same Job Too Long</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income career career path job perks perks professional goals side hustle work Mon, 09 May 2016 09:30:29 +0000 Samantha Stauf 1705098 at http://www.wisebread.com Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000020079119_Large.jpg" alt="using guerrilla tactics to land a job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Guerrilla job hunting means: adopting unconventional tactics to land the job of your dreams. This method hits the headlines every now and again. And occasionally, we hear about a stroke of brilliance and a deserving candidate landing the job. But all too often, these stories are about job seekers who go to enormous lengths to catch the eye of a prospective employer, only to have it backfire horribly.</p> <p>Did you hear about the one where the candidate back-flipped into the interview room? Or where she arrived armed with items purchased from the interviewer's Amazon wishlist? Those tales did not have happy endings. But even if your usual approach is a little more low key, you can still use some guerrilla skills without needing to hire a billboard to advertise yourself, or tattoo your resume on your forehead.</p> <p>Here's how to make this job seeking approach actually work for you, without making a total fool of yourself. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked?ref=seealso">6 Extreme Interview Tactics That Worked</a>)</p> <h2>Make Yourself Stand Out</h2> <p>Recruiting managers might receive hundreds of applications for any single position advertised. Even with the most rigorous screening process in place, resume number 357 has to be pretty special to stand out. Some job seekers have gone to great lengths to make sure their applications memorable, including one famous tale of a job hunter sending a note asking for a coffee meeting, inside a coffee cup, using a FedEx tracking number. Monitoring the delivery notes online, she was able to see the exact moment it was received and signed for, and placed a call immediately to follow up. But don't panic. You don't need to do anything so extreme to make sure you get noticed.</p> <p>Make sure all the basics are covered first. Write a tailored resume and cover letter, making your enthusiasm for the role clear. Using a resume template is a great way to create a resume that stands out for the right reasons.</p> <p>Then try this:</p> <ul> <li>Make an effort to find out the name of the individual recruiting, and use it.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If you can start adding value to the business at this early stage, you'll be remembered. Is there a business improvement idea, or some customer insight you can share as part of your application?<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Have an &quot;elevator pitch&quot; summing up your unique abilities, ready to use whenever you get the ear of a potential recruiter.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Gather intelligence. If you send an email application, follow up with a call. Ostensibly this is to check that the email was received, but take the chance while you're on the phone to get any insight into the business that you can.</li> </ul> <h2>Leverage Your Contacts</h2> <p>Once upon a time, &quot;it's not what you know, but who you know&quot; was the embodiment of a system that favored the elite. With the democratization of information resulting from Internet use, this is no longer the case. If don't have contacts who can help you in some way, then it's probably because you're not trying hard enough.</p> <p>First of all, think through your real-life connections. Do you have friends, family, or previous business contacts who might be able to help you? Can they put you in touch with managers at businesses you're interested in applying to, or who you can tap for information and ideas? Even if your direct connections don't work directly at the company in question, they may be partners, suppliers, or contractors, who can still offer valuable insight.</p> <p>Then try this:</p> <ul> <li>If you want to pump connections for ideas, ask to meet for a coffee. An informational interview sounds too formal and demanding.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Follow the right people: businesses, recruiters, industry insiders, and the trade press, on social media. The knowledge you gain can be game-changing. For example, if you learn about an organization's expansion plans, reach out directly even before they start to officially recruit, to get ahead of the game.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>A referral opens doors. If you have an inside contact, ask them to send your resume directly to the recruiter with a recommendation.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If you have the nerve, call the CEO (or another senior manager) directly. Ask them where you should address your application. And when you do send in your resume you can legitimately say, &quot;the CEO recommended I apply to you directly.&quot; It's cheeky, but this implied recommendation has been known to work.</li> </ul> <h2>Follow Up</h2> <p>Recruiting managers are only human. There's research to show that if you've scored an interview, you're more likely to be selected if you are the first or last person seen, as memories are sharper, and the recruiter's mood is perhaps more forgiving. You can't necessarily dictate the order in which your interview falls, but you can increase your chances of being remembered with a polite follow-up note after an interview. Failing to follow up is a common <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">complaint of recruiting managers</a>, so don't miss the chance to do so.</p> <p>Try this:</p> <ul> <li>Handwritten notes, in more traditional businesses, are preferred. In more modern or tech-focused organizations, an email is fine. Include a link to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired">your LinkedIn profile</a>, and you'll be able to see if the reader clicks through to check you out.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Thank the interviewer for their time, and reiterate your interest in the role in authentic terms. If something came up in the conversation that impressed you about the business, then say so.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Refer to a point of connection. If you mentioned an interesting article or book during your conversation, pass over the link in your message.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If you felt you did not get across some skills, or answers as well as you could have, this is a chance to elaborate. The interviewers are likely to be flattered that you're still thinking of them after the meeting.</li> </ul> <p>Traditionally, a job search follows a regular pattern: find a relevant role advertised, apply, interview, and if all goes well, receive an offer. These days, finding a job is a more fluid process. Many roles are not even openly advertised, putting the ball firmly in the job seekers' court. Use your intuition, employ some of these tactics, and you will stand out for the right reasons. No backflips required.</p> <p><em>What tactics have you tried to get a job? Did they work for you? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview">Using Times New Roman on Your Résumé Is Like Wearing Sweatpants to an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers">7 Job Search Stunts to Get You Noticed by Employers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting interview etiquette job application Job Interview job interview questions job search resume unemployed Thu, 05 May 2016 09:30:26 +0000 Claire Millard 1703709 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000064158607_Large.jpg" alt="her company is going under" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you have ever read <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0399144463/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0399144463&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=BESEB2MCRG366GKZ">Who Moved My Cheese?</a> you'll know that there are warning signs everywhere about an impending job loss. But what about the company itself? Is it safe? Or is it in real trouble? If you're having a few doubts about the future of your company, look out for these 10 red flags. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-financial-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-get-fired?ref=seealso">11 Financial Moves to Make the Moment You Get Fired</a>)</p> <h2>1. There's a Hiring Freeze</h2> <p>When a company is doing well, it will be actively looking to expand and add talented new people to the roster. When times are tough, the HR department will initiate a hiring freeze. This is never a good sign. It can be done in a few ways. If the company management does things in a transparent way, they'll be up front about it. You'll be told that there is a hiring freeze until things stabilize. </p> <p>However, most of the time, you'll be given no warning. Positions that should have been filled will be left vacant. When an employee quits, one or two other people will take on their responsibilities. Take a look at the current openings at your company &mdash; they should be listed on an intranet, or publicly on job boards. If you don't see any positions out there, or there are positions that have been open for many months, or years, then your company is probably in the midst of a hiring freeze.</p> <h2>2. Closed Door Meetings Are Everywhere</h2> <p>You walk through the halls of the company and office doors are closed, or sometimes slammed in your face. You peek in to see people clearly upset with raised voices, red faces, and there's a lot of shrugging shoulders and hair pulling. Unless your company has a specific reason to keep a lot of secrets &mdash; perhaps there's a top secret new product in development &mdash; then this can only mean one thing: bad news. Management will not want rumors to start running rampant, and will tell the decision makers to keep everything under wraps. Not only that, but when you ask questions about it, you'll get vague replies. These closed door meetings are not only bad for morale, but a sure sign that there are conversations happening about the future of the company.</p> <h2>3. The Good Employees Start Leaving</h2> <p>Good is a relative term, but in your company you will have employees who are known to be excellent at their jobs. They are good for the business, they are passionate and driven, and they are working on the important projects. When these employees start leaving on their own accord, for jobs that may be seen as a lateral move (or even a downward move), you know something is wrong. The rock stars of any company have a good handle on things, and their gut (plus inside information) will tell them to escape while they can. If upper management starts quitting, that's an even bigger sign of trouble ahead.</p> <h2>4. Layoffs and Reorganizations Are Constant</h2> <p>A company doing well does not need to lay people off, or continually restructure. A company performing poorly will look to cut staffing costs, and shuffle the remaining employees around. It's a Hail Mary approach that rarely works. Layoffs may result in some of the better employees being let go due to salary, or internal politics. The increased pressure on the remaining staff to do more work will take its toll. Mistakes will be made. Problems will escalate. Before you know it, six months have passed and the company is in even worse shape. And then there will be more layoffs, and more reorganization. When this loop occurs, the doors will be closing imminently.</p> <h2>5. Playing It Safe Is Encouraged</h2> <p>Taking risks is part of the business &mdash; any business. After all, starting a company is a risk, and risks are often required in order to grow and succeed. When risk-taking is suddenly frowned upon, you know the company is on shaky ground. What was once considered a bold move will be rebranded as dangerous, or problematic. Your company will slide into patterns of doing only what worked in the past, despite market changes and demographics shifting. Instead of making decisions that will elevate the company, management will pull back, and &quot;play it safe.&quot; Expansion disappears. Innovation crumbles. Everything that made your company a success will be relegated to the back benches, with &quot;tried and tested&quot; solutions taking the lead. When playing it safe is the mantra, it's a big sign of weakness.</p> <h2>6. Everyone Is Unhappy</h2> <p>The conversation in the kitchen is all about how much the culture sucks. At lunch, employees everywhere are complaining about the state of the company, and the future it probably doesn't have. Smiles are in short supply. Everyone is stressed out. The entire staff is walking around with the weight of the world on their shoulders. This is not the kind of culture you'd see at Pixar or Google. Energetic, enthusiastic employees are the sign of a thriving company; the opposite is true of companies that are on the ropes. When everyone is down, the company is going in that very same direction&hellip; and quickly.</p> <h2>7. There's No Money to Do Anything</h2> <p>Cash flow is extremely important to any company. It's the lifeblood of the business, and without it, it's hard to pay salaries, order products, and advertise. In the past, getting the money you needed to get the job done was no problem. Now, it's a struggle. Your requisition for new supplies is denied. Pay raises are eliminated. People are asked to take salary cuts, or even worse, work for free &mdash; furloughs are very real, and very scary. Bills are not being paid. Vendors call you angry about not receiving money they are owed. These are all classic signs of serious money troubles. They are usually followed by closing the doors, for good.</p> <h2>8. The Company Stock Is in Free Fall</h2> <p>If your company is on the stock market, you can track the share price. Every stock has its ups and downs, but if the only way is down, your company has issues. Now, this may be because of a recent press release, or a piece of news that directly impacts your industry. However, if your company is in good shape, it should be a small fluctuation. When the stock starts tanking, and continues on that downward trajectory, things are bad. What's even worse is when major shareholders, including management, start selling off a majority of their shares. If they want out, the end is near. Get out now while you can, and don't let what happened to <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enron#Post-bankruptcy">Enron</a> employees happen to you.</p> <h2>9. Benefits and Freebies Dry Up</h2> <p>Your company was once great at giving employees the benefits they deserved. Not just health care and vacation, but things like free sodas and snacks, parking reimbursements, college tuition, and matching 401K. When times are tough, the perks disappear. If you now have to pay for a lot of the things you used to get for free, your company is in financial trouble. What's worse is that these perks, or lack of them, impact employee morale. Being asked to do more for less is never going to result in a great workforce, which then results in poor performance.</p> <h2>10. You're Not Busy</h2> <p>Your days used to fly by. You were frantic at times, but always had a lot on your plate. Now, you find yourself staring out of the window, or sending emails to people asking for something to do. When it's just you, it could be a clear sign that your position is about to be eliminated. But when there are many people in the company twiddling their thumbs, things are looking bleak. No business can afford to pay a staff to do nothing. If you're not busy for a long period of time, it's time to move on.</p> <p><em>What are some other signs that a company is in trouble? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor">6 Ways That Job You Hate Keeps You Poor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview">Using Times New Roman on Your Résumé Is Like Wearing Sweatpants to an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting company employee morale employee turnover going out of business job loss job search job stress laid off lay offs Fri, 29 Apr 2016 09:30:30 +0000 Paul Michael 1699776 at http://www.wisebread.com 13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000090506469_Large.jpg" alt="looking for a good reason to quit his job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>How many times have you rehearsed that &quot;I quit&quot; speech in your head? How often do you stare out of the window, wishing you were in a different job, or pursuing a more interesting career? So many of us want to be in a job that really fulfills us, but so few of us dare to make that leap. Well, if you are looking for a reason to quit, here are 13 that should fire you up. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-super-cool-ways-people-have-quit-their-jobs?ref=seealso">6 Super-Cool Ways People Have Quit Their Jobs</a>)</p> <h2>1. There's a Better Job Out There</h2> <p>The grass is always greener, right? This is often a justification to stay in your current position, because things could always get worse. But things could also get a whole lot better, and the chances of you currently being in the best job you'll ever have are slim. It's easy to become complacent and accept that this is the job for you, but there are other jobs out there with your name on them. Amazing jobs, and careers, that will make you look back on the one you have now and wonder why it took you years to move on. Of course, you won't know unless you look, so start checking out what's available.</p> <h2>2. You're Doing More Work for Less Money</h2> <p>When a company starts asking you to take on extra responsibilities, for the same money (or even less), then you may want to consider looking into another job. It's always good to take on extra work if it means you grow and learn new skills, but it should be rewarded. If the company is dangling a possible promotion in front of you, do whatever you can to find out it's a real offer. Some people work 60+ hour weeks for years on the promise of a promotion that will never come.</p> <h2>3. Your Job Is Literally Killing You</h2> <p>Stress is considered one of the biggest killers of modern times. It weakens our immune system, leads to higher blood pressure, and can be the cause of a lot of heart problems. It can also lead to substance abuse and marital troubles, and can break up friendships. If the job you are in right now is causing you so much stress that life is becoming hard to take, you need to find another job, or a different career. It's just not worth the risk.</p> <h2>4. You're Starting Your Own Business</h2> <p>What better reason is there to quit your job than to become your own boss? We've all dreamt of that freedom, the flexible hours, the satisfaction of creating something successful. But, so few of us do it because it's a risk. Quitting a corporate job, or one with steady hours and health benefits, in favor of going it alone &mdash; well that's tough.</p> <p>What if you fail? What if no one buys your product or service? What if you quit a good job only to be out of work soon after? That &quot;what if&quot; game can be paralyzing, but think of it the other way. What if you're laid off next week? What if your business could be the next Google, or Pixar? What if you are holding on to something safe for something that could be amazing? Think about it.</p> <h2>5. You're Not Wanted</h2> <p>Your opinion used to be valuable. Now, it's not required, or it's straight-up ignored. You used to be at important meetings. Not so any more. You used to travel to different locations, and meet with clients. Now you're permanently stuck behind your desk. All of these are signs that you are being overlooked. Or worse, the company is getting ready to let you go. If you feel like you are no longer wanted, you should move to a place that really does want you.</p> <h2>6. Your Company Is in Trouble</h2> <p>It could be financial trouble. It could be legal trouble. It could be a corporate takeover, or a merger that will result in massive layoffs. You should have a good feel for this, and if you sense danger, it may be time to pull the plug and move on, before you're caught in the crossfire. You certainly don't want to be in a situation where your 401K or severance package disappears.</p> <h2>7. You're Phoning It In</h2> <p>If you are on autopilot, doing just enough to keep your job, or are giving the minimum amount of effort, you need to move on. First, it's possible that your lack of effort could actually be dangerous, especially if you're working in a field that requires maximum concentration. Your apathy could also put others in danger &mdash; imagine a doctor who doesn't pay attention. But even in an office job, phoning it in is a big sign that you are in the wrong position.</p> <h2>8. Other Locations Are Calling Your Name</h2> <p>It's scary to move to a different city, or state. And another country, well, that's a mighty big leap. But what a leap! There is so much of the world to see, and every country has different opportunities, and new people waiting to meet you. Realistically, is it more likely that the place you're currently in is the pinnacle of existence? Or is it more likely that you're settled, and moving would be a lot of stress and headaches? Start thinking about those places you always wanted to see when you were a kid. Can you do the job you're doing now in one of those places? Can you move there? A completely different, and exciting life is waiting for you in another part of the world.</p> <h2>9. You're Going Nowhere</h2> <p>In any career, whether it's in a corporate office, or under the hood of a car, you want to go places. Not literally &mdash; although travel is a great perk &mdash; but you should be learning, growing, and being promoted. When your job stops giving you those opportunities for growth, you have to assess the situation. How long has it been since you learned something new? Do you think you'll ever get a promotion again? Are you simply treading water? If you are going nowhere, you need to find a job that will give you those opportunities again.</p> <h2>10. You Just Hate It</h2> <p>If you dislike certain aspects of your job, but overall it's still a good position, well, you just have to suck it up. Very few jobs are perfect. However, if you dread going to work every morning, and every waking hour at your company is a living hell for you, then you have to quit. Life is too short to spend 40 hours of every week being miserable. What else can you do? Where can you go? Is a career change possible? You may feel trapped, but there are always options.</p> <h2>11. You're Done With Office Politics</h2> <p>The gossip. The rumors. The back-stabbing. Having to play favorites. If it's all getting too much for you &mdash; and let's face it, it shouldn't even exist &mdash; then you should start looking for a new place to work. However, before you move to another place, do some digging. Ask around. Look at reviews on a website like Glassdoor. The last thing you want to do is make a move only to find the office politics even worse at your new job.</p> <h2>12. You're Ready for a New Challenge</h2> <p>It's not that you dislike the job you're in. It's not even that you're unhappy with the pay, the people, or the work. It's just that what you're doing is no longer challenging you. You can do this job, and do it well, but you feel the need to dive into something that will really push you. Something that will often get your pulse racing, or make you experience that &quot;can I really do this?&quot; feeling. Well, yes, you can. If you push yourself. And think of the satisfaction you'll get from that.</p> <h2>13. You Just Won the Lottery</h2> <p>Hey, weirder things have happened.</p> <p><em>What are some other great reasons to quit your job? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-you-quit-your-job">6 Questions to Ask Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-4-jobs-people-quit-the-most">The 4 Jobs People Quit the Most</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career">6 Job Perks That Can Lead to a Dream Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career path job job search quit quit your job quitting Wed, 27 Apr 2016 10:30:04 +0000 Paul Michael 1698448 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Ways to Spring Clean Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-spring-clean-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-ways-to-spring-clean-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000081453541_Large.jpg" alt="spring cleaning her career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It turns out, <a href="http://www.cleaninginstitute.org/spring_cleaning_survey_reveals_consumers_dirty_little_secrets/">72% of U.S. households</a> spring clean every year. The annual ritual of tidying up your home is a healthy habit that improves your way of life, increases your productivity, and provides you with a serious self-esteem boost.</p> <p>Just like you take care of your home each spring, take this time to spruce up your career to make the very best out of it. Here are the eight moves to spring clean your career.</p> <h2>1. Search Your Name on the Web</h2> <p>According to Google, its users do <a href="http://searchengineland.com/google-1-trillion-searches-per-year-212940">100 billion searches per month</a>, which adds up to about 1.2 trillion searches per year. What's even more surprising is that it has been estimated that <a href="http://www.slideshare.net/jennifermcclure/hiring-onboarding-done-right-nky-chambernkyshrm-7-24-2012/17-CAREERS_SITE_the_hub_30">30% of searches on Google</a> are job-related.</p> <p>What are those people searching for <em>your </em>name finding? Hopefully, it's important websites, publications, or projects that can help you land your next position, or land a promotion. Find out what is currently available under your name so that you can be prepared for questions about those search results, ask not to be mentioned in undesirable places, and build up your online presence. Besides Google, search your name on other search engines, including Yahoo and Bing.</p> <h2>2. Buy Your Name as a Domain</h2> <p>An effective way to establish a hub for your online presence is to purchase your own domain name. Take me as an example. If you look for &quot;Damian Davila&quot; you will find two main individuals: a talented drummer/photographer, and an experienced personal finance writer. While I enjoy the surf photographs of my doppelgänger, I want to make sure that people learn more about my writing when looking up my name. That is why I bought my own domain name, DamianDavila.com and plan to use it to showcase my writing portfolio.</p> <p>Owning your own domain name allows you stand out from the crowd, particularly when you have a very popular name. Keep in mind that it may take some time to be able to buy your domain name &mdash; in my case it took two long years until it became available!</p> <h2>3. Clean Up Your Social Media Accounts</h2> <p>Speaking of search results and websites, you'll notice that social media accounts rank heavily on all search engines. For example, when looking up my name on Google, three out of the nine results from the first page are links to social media accounts.</p> <p>While you may think that your private business is for your eyes only, be aware that <a href="http://thehiringsite.careerbuilder.com/2015/05/14/employers-checking-candidates-social-media/">35% of employers</a> who screen via social networks have requested to become a friend or follow candidates who have private accounts. Depending on the details on the position that you're applying for, your potential employer may have a valid concern for your online activity. Don't let an <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-stop-doing-on-social-media-by-30">inappropriate comment or photo</a> become an obstacle in your path to career success.</p> <h2>4. Invest in a Professional Headshot</h2> <p>While most recruiters recommend that you don't include a photograph when submitting your resume, most social media sites, company directories, and PR organizations do request a headshot. Take the time &mdash; and the expense &mdash; to get a professional headshot. You can hire a professional photographer, ask a favor from your photog friend or relative (do return the favor when they ask!), or request one from the HR department of your company.</p> <p>Be prepared for those times when your boss wants to make an announcement of your promotion in the local newspaper, you want to show yourself in your own domain name, or you submit an article for a website as a guest blogger.</p> <h2>5. Edit Your LinkedIn Profile</h2> <p>Also, <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/careers/articles/2015/02/19/what-recruiters-think-when-they-see-your-linkedin-profile">94% of recruiters use LinkedIn</a> to source and vet candidates, making this professional network a great opportunity to showcase your work skills and career history. What do recruiters find on Linkedin when looking up your name? If your name doesn't show up, you could be making the life of that recruiter a bit more difficult. Beef up your LinkedIn profile by:</p> <ul> <li>Growing your professional network with peers in your company and industry, alumni from your alma mater, or individuals sharing your interests in LinkedIn groups;</li> <li>Including links to any publications, presentations, or projects that are available online;</li> <li>Request recommendations from current or past clients, supervisors, peers, or teachers, and;</li> <li>Demonstrating your analytical and writing skills through articles that you have written.</li> </ul> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired?ref=seealso">30 Minutes to a LinkedIn Profile That Gets You Hired</a></p> <h2>6. Touch Up Your Paper Resume</h2> <p>Despite the popularity of online resumes, some employers and recruiters still stick to paper resumes. Tailor your application to the details laid out on the job post. Insisting on emailing a URL to your domain name or LinkedIn profile instead of mailing out a printout of your resume via regular mail when the recruiter clearly indicated so, is the fastest way to get your application ignored completely. Here are some tips:</p> <ul> <li>Be prepared for requests of paper resumes by formatting yours so it prints nicely on a standard sheet of 8 x 11 paper.</li> <li>Test out the printout before sending a file via email.</li> <li>Keep both Word and PDF versions of your resume because some employers prefer one format over the other.</li> <li>Maintain a text-only version of your resume for those times that you have to copy and paste your resume into an HR online portal.</li> </ul> <h2>7. Work on Your Elevator Pitch</h2> <p>Comedian George Burns said it best, &quot;The secret of a good sermon is to have a good beginning and a good ending; and to have the two as close together as possible.&quot; Brevity in writing and speech is very powerful and makes you look centered and well-prepared. Take a cue of from startup entrepreneurs and develop your own elevator pitch, which is a succinct and persuasive sales pitch that will lead into a deeper dialogue about what you can offer. Test your elevator pitch with people that you trust so they can offer you feedback. And fine tune your elevator pitch until you can deliver it effectively over the phone, in person, or via email.</p> <h2>8. Learn a New Skill That Employers Want</h2> <p>Many organizations have well defined salary payscales with specific requirements, so take the time to investigate what those requirements are. Unless they involve longevity in the company, you can work in attaining them in a shorter amount of time.</p> <p>Some examples are completing a teaching certification, finishing modules towards a professional license, accumulating hours in a list of job-related assignments, or attending a series of industry-required seminars. By completing those skills, you're effectively not only improving your chances of a promotion or salary bump, but also making yourself more desirable to other potential employers.</p> <p><em>What are other ways to spring clean your career?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-spring-clean-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career">6 Job Perks That Can Lead to a Dream Career</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career career aspirations career goals growth potential job growth spring clean spring cleaning Mon, 25 Apr 2016 09:00:05 +0000 Damian Davila 1695996 at http://www.wisebread.com My 2016 Budget Challenge: Am I Ruining My Career? http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-am-i-ruining-my-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/my-2016-budget-challenge-am-i-ruining-my-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_mad_computer_000022967694.jpg" alt="Woman wondering if her work strategy is completely stupid" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>[Editor's Note: This is the another episode in Max Wong's journey to find an extra $31,000 this year. Read the whole series </em><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/max-wongs-budget-0"><em>here</em></a><em>.]</em></p> <p>As a freelancer, I never know when my next job is going to come or how much it's going to pay. Some of my jobs pay me $8,000 for one day's work, or have incredible perks like international travel &mdash; but that kind of gig comes around about once a year. Should I spend more time looking for higher paying work that only comes intermittently, or keep working low paying gigs as they come?</p> <p>I recently had dinner with a business acquaintance who revealed that he is also $30,000 in debt. When I mentioned all the little side jobs I am doing in an effort to make an extra $31,000 this year, he laughed &mdash; and not in a good way. He is actually considering not taking a six-month job that he had been offered because it would only pay him $17 an hour.</p> <p>His argument for not taking the job was this: It would take away his ability to accept <em>better </em>offers for half a year. Did I mention that this person has already been unemployed for four months?</p> <h2>Are My Side Hustles Keeping Me From Better Offers?</h2> <p>The dinner put me in a bad mood. Mainly because when I brought up my $31,000 budget challenge, he was critical of my work strategy. According to him, I spend way too much of my time and brain space working odd jobs, instead of focusing on landing a &quot;primo salaried gig.&quot;</p> <p>When I asked him what a primo salaried gig pays, he responded: $75,000.</p> <h2>I Hated Working 9 to 5</h2> <p>I used to have that primo salaried gig. I hated it. Not the primo aspects of the work, such as flying business class and free office supplies, of course &mdash; just every other single thing about it. I am not cut out for corporate life.</p> <p>Had I stayed a corporate cookie, I would probably be several hundred thousand dollars richer. I would have, no doubt, paid down my house by now.</p> <p>But had I stayed the obvious course, would I be able to leave the U.S., as have done twice in the last five years, and travel abroad for three months at a time? More importantly, would I be as happy as I am now? I don't know one documentary filmmaker or beekeeper who does the job expecting a huge payday.</p> <h2>Am I Wasting Money or Gaining Opportunity?</h2> <p>Aside from the fact that I think his ideal $75,000 primo salaried gig sounds like <em>the worst</em>, I am still trying to parse out whether his argument that I am wasting my time, and by extension my life, on activities that offer a terrible return on investment.</p> <p>I often wonder if crazy side jobs always find me because I am free to take them. For example, would I have been able to spend four days interning for a photographer last month if I had a regular day job? If I had a 9-to-5 job, would I be able to devote as much time to activities like architectural photography that bring me pleasure, that I can potentially grow into a business? Have I exchanged a regular paycheck for more free time?</p> <h2>Is There Such a Thing as Good Personal Debt?</h2> <p>I do feel like, in my current situation, any income is better than no income. The faster I pay down debt, the less my debt will cost me in interest payments.</p> <p>My $31,000 budget shortfall contains $15,000 in debt from a loan with a 4% interest rate (my housing costs and camera fund don't carry interest). My husband and I have been steadily paying down this loan with $800 monthly payments. Using a debt repayment calculator, I know that at our current rate, we will pay off this debt in 20 months, but end up paying an additional $515 in interest. In order to pay down this $15,000 by the end of this year, we are going to have to increase this payment to $1,695 for the next nine months. If we pay off this debt by December 31, 2016, we will pay up to an extra $251 in interest. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-to-do-a-balance-transfer-to-pay-off-credit-card-debt?ref=seealso">How to Stop Paying Interest on Your Credit Card Debt</a>)</p> <p>By comparison, my dinner companion has $30,000 in credit debt over several cards with an average of APR of 11.9%. To pay off this debt in 20 months, he will have to pay $1,740 every month, and he will pay $3,063 in interest.</p> <p>When I pointed out the high cost of using credit cards as a slush fund, my dinner companion did not bat an eyelash. He argued that I am letting my fear of debt overly influence my financial decisions. What if I am so busy putting my nose to the grindstone for small jobs, that I am missing out on bigger job opportunities? For example, although I had wanted to attend this year's Palm Springs Photo Festival, a major educational and networking event, I cannot afford it. Just the cost of the lodging and transportation for the festival would cut into my savings by $1,000. But, by not putting the cost of the festival on my credit card, am I losing out on leads for photography jobs or giving up the opportunity to learn new skills that would immediately improve my work? Am I being pennywise but pound foolish?</p> <h2>Work vs. Unemployment</h2> <p>Since January 1, 2016 I have made $5,190 in extra cash. This averages out to $1,730 per month. For the last four months, my dinner companion has been making $1,800 per month on Unemployment Insurance. (My dinner companion's assessment that I am a financial loser is undoubtedly colored by this fact.) His search for the primo salaried job, as far as I can tell, has also been much more leisurely than my constant hustle to rustle more side work.</p> <h2>Who Am I to Criticize?</h2> <p>Well, I am a financial writer who understands the concept of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-most-valuable-thing-debt-takes-from-you-isnt-money-its-this">compound interest</a>. As unpleasant as it was to get unasked for advice on my debt-killing plan, I made a major effort to listen to my dinner companion, if only so I could passive-aggressively complain about it in this post, and monetize my annoyance.</p> <p>But I still wonder: Is he just really stupid or am I a rube for accepting minimum wage gigs when I'm strapped for cash? Dear reader, what is your opinion on my employment strategy?</p> <h2>Progress Report</h2> <p>Because our business taxes were due on February 29th, my husband and I decided to complete our tax prep for our personal taxes by that due date as well. Why suffer through tax prep twice? Our accountant just filed our personal taxes. We are getting a $2,934 refund from the IRS and a $1,654 refund from the state of California. We paid <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-reasons-why-an-accountant-is-worth-the-money">our accountant</a> $470 for her work.</p> <p><strong>Goal:</strong> $31,000.00</p> <p><strong>Amount Raised:</strong> $13,478.00</p> <p><strong>Amount Spent:</strong> $5,303.72</p> <p><strong>Amount Left to Go:</strong> $22,825.72</p> <p><em>Should Max continue hustling up wacky side jobs she adores or should she buckle down and find a regular job, like everyone else?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/max-wong">Max Wong</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-am-i-ruining-my-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-how-to-turn-your-spouse-into-a-money-saver">My 2016 Budget Challenge: How to Turn Your Spouse Into a Money Saver</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-i-learned-about-money-after-i-went-freelance">7 Things I Learned About Money After I Went Freelance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-life-skills-every-freelancer-needs">8 Life Skills Every Freelancer Needs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-everything-breaks">My 2016 Budget Challenge: Everything Breaks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-finding-food">My 2016 Budget Challenge: Finding Food</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Career Building freelance job hunting max wongs budget odd jobs unemployment Fri, 15 Apr 2016 10:00:06 +0000 Max Wong 1687438 at http://www.wisebread.com The Real World Salaries of 8 Childhood Dream Jobs http://www.wisebread.com/the-real-world-salaries-of-8-childhood-dream-jobs <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-real-world-salaries-of-8-childhood-dream-jobs" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000011643503_Large.jpg" alt="how much do astronauts make?" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When we were kids, we all dreamed of being something special when we grew up. Flying to an international space station as an astronaut; selling out Madison Square Garden as the lead singer of a rock band; or even becoming President. But what do these jobs really pay, and why were we so attracted to them as kids?</p> <h2>1. Astronaut</h2> <p>Salary: $65,140 to $100,701</p> <p>It may be a career filled with danger and poor working conditions, but the compensation doesn't really reflect that. NASA's own website lists the salary information as follows:</p> <p><em>&quot;</em><a href="https://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/about/information/astronaut_faq.html"><em>Salaries for civilian Astronaut</em></a><em> Candidates are based on the Federal Government's General Schedule pay scale for grades GS-12 through GS-13. Each person's grade is determined according to his/her academic achievements and experience. Currently, a GS-12 starts at $65,140 per year and a GS-13 can earn up to $100,701 per year.&quot; </em></p> <p>It takes only two years of training to become a qualified astronaut, and although as children, we think it will be an amazing job, it's actually a little more pedestrian than that. Oh, and the hours are long &mdash; typically from 6 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. We dream of flying into space, looking down on Earth, and doing jobs that will change the world. In reality, the daily tasks of an astronaut in space include exercising at least 2.5 hours per day, making detailed observations about the planet, studying humans in isolation, and doing a host of other small scientific experiments that could be considered boring homework, or infinitely fascinating&nbsp;&mdash; depending on your interests.</p> <h2>2. Rock Star</h2> <p>Salary: $17,667 to $202,903</p> <p>As kids, the rock star lifestyle is one of those dreams that seems to have it all: money, fame, glamour, power, and freedom from the 9-to-5 grind. It's traveling the world, doing a couple of hours of work a day, and partying the rest of the time.</p> <p>In reality, most rock performers are either scraping by on a small salary made from gigging, or are supporting their musical career with another job. Payscale places the median <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Musician_or_Singer/Salary">annual salary of a rock singer</a>, or musician, at just $37,899. And that's not taking into account those years of living in a van, eating ramen, and touring small clubs.</p> <p>Now, obviously some performers make millions of dollars every year. But make no mistake, they are the exception to the rule. Rock star status is almost impossible to achieve, and even before it happens, there will be years spent earning low wages on grueling schedules. It's a long hike to even mediocre success, requiring a lot of practicing, weekend and evening work, and years spent sleeping in low-end motels.</p> <h2>3. Pilot</h2> <p>Salary: $31,022 to $173,627</p> <p>Payscale confirms quite a wide range for the <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Commercial_Pilot/Salary">salary of a commercial airline pilot</a>. The median salary comes in at $63,738, which definitely seems low for the kind of esteem this job has always held. As a kid, hearing someone say they were a pilot, well that was like saying they were an astronaut. They fly huge planes across the world &mdash; how cool is that?!</p> <p>Well, it's cool, but it is not all wine and roses. Commercial pilots never have a straight 9-to-5 job, and often work weeks at a time without a day off, keeping bizarre hours. After years of training, they must be able to respond under great pressure. But, on a long-haul flight, things can get pretty dull and tedious.</p> <p>On the other hand, there's the other kind of pilot: the fighter pilot &mdash; like the ones we saw in movies like <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0094D462M/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B0094D462M&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=7SYOKZ5N4S3YI6O6">Top Gun</a> and <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00WLCQ0G8/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B00WLCQ0G8&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=NEYCPO3A32E6NI32">Iron Eagle</a>. That comes with more training, more pressure, and yet, even less money. After 11 years as a fighter pilot, you can only expect to earn $90,000. However, AOL recently reported that <a href="http://jobs.aol.com/articles/2013/07/23/air-force-fighter-pilots-signing-bonus/">fighter pilots are getting a $225,000 signing bonus</a> due to a shortage of talent.</p> <h2>4. Doctor</h2> <p>Salary: $60,016 to $220,873</p> <p>There are many kinds of doctors out there, and some kids will often say, &quot;brain surgeon&quot; or &quot;plastic surgeon&quot; when asked which they'd prefer to become. Kids are drawn to this position for the &quot;superhero&quot; persona it has. Doctors save lives. They can change the world for the better.</p> <p>That's an attractive proposition for any kid.</p> <p>Using Payscale's results for a general practitioner, you can see a large array of salaries. The <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Physician_%2f_Doctor%2c_General_Practice/Salary">median is around $141,000</a>, but what so few kids ever take into account is the cost &mdash; in time and money &mdash; of getting to that position.</p> <p>A few years ago, CBS news reported on the extreme debt that <a href="http://www.cbsnews.com/news/1-million-mistake-becoming-a-doctor/">graduating doctors find themselves</a> in. An average of almost $177,000 in student loans will cost over $419,000 to repay over 30 years. It takes many years of school and college to get the required qualifications, and that is followed by a residency. Most doctors are in their 30s before that can become independent physicians.</p> <h2>5. Firefighter</h2> <p>Salary: $25,913 to $73,125</p> <p>As everyday heroes go, firefighter is up there at the top of the list. Firefighters are brave, heroic, strong, selfless, and they save lives. To this day, it's still one of the most popular costumes for young children at Halloween. And let's not gloss over the attraction people feel when the mere mention of firefighter comes up. They have their own calendars, and sex appeal is a serious plus to this career.</p> <p>Of course, there is more to life as a firefighter than the heroics. When not answering the call, firefighters will spend a lot of time checking and cleaning equipment, and the station itself. School visits are common, plus firefighters are continually training. Working out in the gym is also essential, as firefighters need to be strong for those rescues. And let's not forget, this is a dangerous job. In fact, <a href="http://www.nfpa.org/research/reports-and-statistics/the-fire-service/fatalities-and-injuries/firefighter-fatalities-in-the-united-states">64 firefighters died</a> in the line of duty in 2014. For a <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Fire_Fighter/Salary">median salary of only $44,078</a>, this is one job people do not do for the money.</p> <h2>6. Veterinarian</h2> <p>Salary: $50,476 to $109,252</p> <p>Kids love animals, so it's no surprise that many children want to help them out when they're sick. Being a vet is a chance for kids to spend more time with animals, coming to their rescue, and being the hero. But what does it really entail, to earn that <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Veterinarian/Salary">median salary of $72,709</a>?</p> <p>Well, it's a challenging job to say the least. Sometimes vets have to deal with horrendous injuries caused by neglect and that can be emotionally difficult. It's a job that can often go beyond the usual office hours, because animals don't always need help at convenient times. Plus, there is the need to constantly keep up with the latest techniques and medicines. But, for all of those challenges, it is said to be a very rewarding career.</p> <h2>7. Actor/Actress</h2> <p>Salary: $20,040 to $209,525</p> <p>The fame. The fortune. The parties. The luxurious lifestyle. And all for doing what you love &mdash; which is essentially being paid to play pretend. It sounds too good to be true. And sadly, for most people who go into the acting profession, it is. The <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Actor_%2f_Actress/Salary">median income for an actor</a> working in the US today is just $48,237. Not only that, but it's a career filled with rejection and disappointment. </p> <p>Actors are constantly auditioning for roles, often competing with 20 or 30 other people for just one part. In the UK, only one in 50 actors <a href="http://www.independent.co.uk/incoming/just-one-actor-in-50-makes-more-than-20000-per-year-survey-shows-9448922.html">makes more than &pound;20,000</a> per year. Most are living below the poverty line. It's estimated that at any one time, 95% of actors are actively looking for work, with most getting side jobs in order to make ends meet. However, for those with luck on their side, as well as talent, there is a path to fortune and glory.</p> <h2>8. Police Officer</h2> <p>Salary: $30,897 to $81,653</p> <p>Another heroic symbol for children of all ages, the police officer represents truth, justice, and the American way. Kids love dressing up as police officers, dealing with the bad guys, and chasing criminals who will never get away with it.</p> <p>In reality, it's a tough, dangerous job; and as Payscale reports, it does not compensate well for that perilous lifestyle. The median <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Police_Officer/Salary">income of a U.S. police officer is only $48,815</a>. When not chasing criminals, police officers also have to deal with the other side of law enforcement: the mundane side. From speeding tickets and domestic calls, to hours of paperwork, it is not the glamorous job depicted in so many movies. Thankfully, there are enough kids fulfilling their childhood dream of becoming a cop, and thereby, are keeping the peace for us all.</p> <p><em>What was your dream career when you were a kid? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-real-world-salaries-of-8-childhood-dream-jobs">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-surprising-sources-of-celeb-income">6 Surprising Sources of Celeb Income</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-truths-from-a-mystery-shopper-you-must-read-before-you-get-started">8 Truths From a Mystery Shopper You Must Read Before You Get Started</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career">6 Job Perks That Can Lead to a Dream Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-great-side-jobs-for-introverts">10 Great Side Jobs for Introverts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-i-learned-about-money-after-i-went-freelance">7 Things I Learned About Money After I Went Freelance</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income astronaut childhood dream job dream job income making money rockstar income salaries Mon, 28 Mar 2016 10:30:05 +0000 Paul Michael 1679590 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Things I Learned About Money After I Went Freelance http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-i-learned-about-money-after-i-went-freelance <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-things-i-learned-about-money-after-i-went-freelance" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000085246475_Large.jpg" alt="things she&#039;s learned about money after going freelance" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Accurately or inaccurately, I've always considered myself a financially savvy guy. I avoid consumer debt like a pro, keep my wants in check, get all OCD about saving for retirement, and hunt for bargains like a steely-eyed warrior. But when I decided to chuck my 9-5 job eight years ago and commit to building a freelance business, I realized that I still had some serious learning to do. My new venture taught me a few brand-new money lessons and served as a refresher course on others. Here are seven things I learned about money once I went freelance.</p> <h2>1. There's Power in Profit</h2> <p>In a traditional work arrangement, a company produces a good or service and the management team determines how much employees can be paid in order to safeguard or maximize profits. Once you become your own employer, the distinction between payment and profit blurs &mdash; to your benefit. If you control costs and price your labor correctly, the profit can be a powerful force to fund expansion, pursue additional training, or enjoy more free time.</p> <h2>2. Budget or Go Bust</h2> <p>Especially in the early days of any freelance business, income can be unpredictable. That's why knowing how to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-your-first-budget-in-5-easy-steps">build a budget</a> and live within it takes on a whole new level of importance. A well-structured monthly budget should leave a financial cushion to help you ride out late payments, adjust to unforeseen expenses, and squirrel away money for taxes.</p> <h2>3. Stay Lean</h2> <p>No matter how dogged your determination, lean months are inevitable in any one-person enterprise. Planning ahead, keeping overhead in check, and staying financially disciplined are make-or-break strategies. I apply the same principles to freelancing as I do to traditional employment &mdash; in today's economy, it's smart to be prepared for a layoff at any time and have six months' worth of income set aside for cash flow interruptions.</p> <h2>4. The Taxman Cometh</h2> <p>When I became a one-man enterprise, the level of importance I placed on income tax awareness went from about a two to a solid 10. As part of the freelancing set, your tax obligations can change significantly. Learn all you can and retain a trusted tax advisor who caters to the self-employed. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/freelancing-a-beginner-s-guide-to-doing-it-right?ref=seealso">Freelancing: A Beginner's Guide to Doing It Right</a>).</p> <h2>5. Income Is Fluid and Largely Controllable</h2> <p>Money is just labor in physical form, right? As much as I knew this before, going solo helped me understand it far more profoundly. Once my freelance career gained traction, I realized that I had control over my income in a new and direct way, and I could exercise that control to increase my billings and, in turn, grow my savings.</p> <h2>6. Negotiating Skills Are Non-Negotiable</h2> <p>Whether you're buying or selling, negotiating helps you get the best deal possible and it's one of the essential <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-life-skills-every-freelancer-needs">life skills every freelancer needs</a>. Freelancing full-time has challenged my negotiation skills and forced me to take my skill level from &quot;proficient&quot; to &quot;expert.&quot; Negotiating tactical discounts to forge new client relationships, working out the details of retainer agreements, and establishing realistic project timelines require flexibility and fortitude.</p> <h2>7. The Devil's in the Details</h2> <p>As with all things financial, the details matter. Keeping track of contracts, hours, rates, outstanding invoices, and expenses means the difference between success and failure. Likewise, knowing how to project income from month-to-month based on accurate record-keeping helps me plan for major expenditures, invest in my business, and pay estimated taxes each quarter. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/16-time-and-money-saving-apps-for-freelancers?ref=seealso">16 Time and Money Saving Apps for Freelancers</a>).</p> <p>Remember, we keep learning (and relearning) money lessons as our lives and careers evolve. And when it comes to freelancing, experience is a quick and able teacher. The goal is be open to the lessons and broadly apply what we learn to build more financially independent lives.</p> <p><em>Do you work freelance? What has it taught you about making and managing money? </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-i-learned-about-money-after-i-went-freelance">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-biggest-mistakes-freelancers-make">The 5 Biggest Mistakes Freelancers Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-freelance-jobs-that-pay-surprisingly-well">11 Freelance Jobs That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-unexpected-side-benefits-of-your-side-hustle">5 Unexpected Side Benefits of Your Side Hustle</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-part-time-jobs-to-do-while-your-kids-are-at-school">17 Part-Time Jobs to Do While Your Kids Are at School</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-smart-way-to-budget-on-a-freelance-income">The Smart Way to Budget on a Freelance Income</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Entrepreneurship Extra Income freelance freelancer hustle independent contractor money lessons side gig side job Mon, 21 Mar 2016 09:30:25 +0000 Kentin Waits 1675899 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Career Moves You'll Never Regret http://www.wisebread.com/6-career-moves-youll-never-regret <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-career-moves-youll-never-regret" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000056893798_Large.jpg" alt="making career moves she&#039;ll never regret" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You are in control of your career, and the decisions you make can either help you or hold you back. That's why it's important to make moves that set you in the right direction to increase your chances of career satisfaction.</p> <p>Getting to the top takes confidence, hard work, determination, and you might even have to make a few sacrifices. Sometimes, the path to success isn't as straight as we'd like, and most people have at least one regrettable career decision under their belt. (You're not alone.) But even if you've made some mistakes, there are at least a few moves you'll never regret.</p> <h2>1. Take the Focus Off the Money</h2> <p>We all need to make a living. The more we earn, the better quality of life we enjoy. This by no means suggests staying in a career just because you're pulling in the big bucks. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-depressing-jobs-that-arent-worth-the-money?ref=seealso">10 Depressing Jobs That Aren't Worth the Money</a>)</p> <p>Understandably, you have to be reasonable and seek a position that lets you care for your financial responsibilities. But when you make a career decision based solely on the potential size of your paycheck, you could end up in a job you hate, and sacrifice more than you bargained for.</p> <p>A company doesn't pay a generous salary without getting something in return. You have to count the cost and decide whether a promotion or a job offer is worth the money. I can't tell you the number of people I know who have voluntarily stepped down from positions because the money wasn't worth the hassle. Burnout is a real possibility when you give up time with your family and friends and work around the clock. Some people might say you're crazy for giving up a lucrative position, but you shouldn't put a career over your sanity.</p> <h2>2. Step Outside Your Comfort Zone</h2> <p>Don't be afraid to say yes. This doesn't mean you should take every opportunity that comes your way. You have to know your limitations so that you don't overwhelm yourself. But at the same time, you should step outside your comfort zone and take on new responsibilities. It can be frightening and intimidating, and you might fear failure.</p> <p>However, saying yes is an opportunity to build self-confidence and you might surprise yourself. Fear keeps us stuck. Branching out and challenging yourself helps you realize your true potential and can open the door to better opportunities.</p> <h2>3. Follow Your Instincts</h2> <p>If the climate at work isn't great and you're questioning the security of your job due to recent <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-financial-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-get-fired">layoffs and cutbacks</a>, one of the worst things you can do is sit back, ignore the situation, and think you're somehow immune. You may feel a sense of loyalty to your employer, but loyalty doesn't pay your bills. The situation around your workplace might improve, or it might not. Listen to your gut and follow your instincts. If you have compelling reasons to believe the company won't bounce back, or if you think you're on the chopping block, there's no harm in plotting your next move and beating your employer to the punch.</p> <h2>4. Never Burn Bridges</h2> <p>It doesn't matter if you hate your job and you're beyond ready to move on, never burn bridges or slack off as you prepare to move into a position with a new company. You don't know what the future will hold. You may get to your next job and quickly realize the grass isn't greener on the other side. Make sure you give your current employer 110% until the very end. If you leave on a good note, the door may be open for you to return.</p> <h2>5. Keep Your Skills Up-to-Date</h2> <p>As far as your career goes, you may be your sharpest the first few years after graduation. Realize, however, that your skills can quickly become stale as your industry evolves and changes. Allowing your skills to become dated is career suicide. New grads are entering the workforce every year with the freshest knowledge and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/learn-something-new-with-these-9-cheap-apps">the latest information</a> about the industry. If you can't keep up, you could lose your job to someone with less experience.</p> <p>Staying up-to-date can mean taking a class or workshop on your own dime, or finding time to learn new software programs and technology. This is how you do your job well and stay ahead of changes in your industry. Not only can this move open doors, it helps you keep your job in a tough economy. You become a more valuable employee.</p> <h2>6. Pursue Your Dream Career</h2> <p>It takes courage to pursue your dream &mdash; especially if you're leaving behind a cushy position and moving into a completely new field. Some people stay in careers they hate because they spent money getting a degree in this area. But after working in a particular field for years, you may discover that your passion is elsewhere.</p> <p>Moving up the ladder in a career that doesn't excite you can lead to a comfortable life &mdash; but you may later regret this decision. Carving your own way and taking a different path, however, is one move you'll never regret. If you can start your own business or find a job doing what you love &mdash; and you're still able to pay your bills &mdash; going to work won't feel like a job. You can join the ranks of a select few who actually love getting up in the morning and starting their day.</p> <p><em>Have you recently change careers? Would you say these tips are helpful in hindsight? Share with us in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-career-moves-youll-never-regret">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-in-the-wrong-career-heres-how-to-tell">Are You in the Wrong Career? Here&#039;s How to Tell</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-guide-to-getting-a-job-right-out-of-college">Your Guide to Getting a Job Right Out of College</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-solid-online-resources-to-help-you-find-a-job">6 Solid Online Resources to Help You Find a Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career career moves job search job tips life decisions no regrets wisdom Wed, 16 Mar 2016 11:00:12 +0000 Mikey Rox 1673865 at http://www.wisebread.com Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We've Ever Shared http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_glasses_work_000075592811.jpg" alt="Woman learning best career tips ever shared" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your first job will probably not be your dream job. In fact, you might not land your ideal professional role until your fourth, fifth, or sixth job. Crafting a fulfilling career takes time, and hopefully your peers and mentors are sharing their wisdom with you along the way.</p> <p>But just in case that wisdom is hard to come by, and you need some additional assistance in your path to success, we've got some brilliant job search tips right here.</p> <p>Here are the 65 best career tips we've ever shared.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/000050916338.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a> &mdash; Answering any question during a job interview can be stressful experience. There's so much pressure to nail every answer that's it's easy to flub a response. Well, not anymore. This will help you nail all interview questions, and hopefully, get the job.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a> &mdash; Sometimes the path to the stop requires standing out in a crowd. These unique interview tactics may seem extreme, but amazingly, they worked!</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/iStock_000071991467_Large.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-career-tips-you-wish-you-could-give-your-younger-self">7 Career Tips You Wish You Could Give Your Younger Self</a> &mdash; Hindsight is always 20/20, right? Well, what would you tell your younger self about how to be professionally fulfilled? There might be some handy advice in there for you now, too.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-transition-to-a-new-career-after-30">6 Ways to Transition to a New Career After 30</a> &mdash; Starting over in a new field is not easy, especially once you're past your 20s &mdash; when life is generally more flexible and suited to career changes. These tips will help you transition at any age.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/guy_fired_000052937386.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career">Fired? Here's How to Keep It From Hurting Your Career</a> &mdash; It happens to the best of us. Don't worry, losing your job doesn't mean your entire professional world has imploded. Pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and read this.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview">10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview</a> &mdash; There are certain topics that should not be discussed and certain things you should never ever do during an interview. Know the rules before you go.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/iStock_000068043419_Large.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-signs-the-job-is-too-good-to-be-true">11 Signs the Job Is Too Good to Be True</a> &mdash; Don't fall for the job scam. There are plenty of jobs out there that are too good to be true, and here are all the telltale signs.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a> &mdash; Certain seasons are just better for job hunting. If you've got a job now, but would like to make a change in the near future, try to search when the time is right.</p> <p><em>What other career tips have you learned along the way? Share your wisdom with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/chrissa-hardy">Chrissa Hardy</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-10"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-68-best-ways-to-make-money-that-are-actually-fun">Flashback Friday: 68 Best Ways to Make Money That Are Actually Fun</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting career fbf flashback friday Job Interview job search jobs resume Fri, 11 Mar 2016 11:00:15 +0000 Chrissa Hardy 1670661 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000066992053_Large.jpg" alt="she needs to make these money moves after getting a promotion" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Congratulations on your promotion! You've just made another step toward a successful future.</p> <p>Still, this isn't the time to become complacent. A promotion comes along with new challenges and tasks. To help you make the very best out of your new job, here are the 10 money moves to make after a promotion.</p> <h2>1. Revisit Your Tax Withholding</h2> <p>Most promotions don't come with just a title upgrade, they come with a well-deserved raise. If that's your case, calculate whether or not you need to adjust your W-4 form and submit it to your HR department.</p> <p>Let's assume that you file a joint return with your spouse and your combined taxable income was $90,000. Your tax due would be $18,293.75 ($5,156.25 + 25% of the amount over $37,450). After your promotion, your new combined taxable income is now $100,000. Your new tax bill is $21,071.25 ($18,481.25 + 28% of the amount over $90,750). Assuming no offsets to your salary bump and no changes to your W-4, you would be $2,777.50 short of your tax bill! (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/top-three-tax-facts-to-know-for-2016?ref=seealso">Top Three Tax Facts to Know for 2016</a>)</p> <p>Use the <a href="https://www.irs.gov/Individuals/IRS-Withholding-Calculator">IRS Withholding Calculator</a> and determine if you need to update your W-4.</p> <h2>2. Calculate Vesting of Company Shares</h2> <p>Vested company shares are another way that your employer could reward you. Very often, these restricted stock units vest over time, meaning that you gain ownership of those shares the longer you stay. The idea is that your employer wants you to perform well and remain with the company. Contact your HR department to find out the vesting schedule of your company shares so that you know how much you would actually take with you if you were to part ways with your employer.</p> <h2>3. Time Profit Sharing and Bonus Checks</h2> <p>When your promotion includes a large bonus or profit sharing check, pay attention to the date that the payment will be issued on. An elective deferral contribution to your retirement accounts must be deposited by the tax filing due date (April 19, 2016 for Maine and Massachusetts residents and April 18, 2016 for everybody else). For 2015 and 2016, the contribution limit to 401K, 403B, and most 457 plans is $18,000, and to regular and Roth IRA plans it's $5,500. If you're age 50 or over, you can make an additional $6,000 in catch-up contributions. When you haven't met the applicable contribution limit, take advantage of that windfall to fatten up your retirement accounts.</p> <h2>4. Identify Additional Costs</h2> <p>With great power comes great responsibility, Peter Parker! Take stock of the responsibilities of your new position and determine how much additional time you may need to perform those tasks successfully. Having to stay a bit longer at work may increase several costs, including paying higher fees for babysitters or preschools, and dining out more often than before the promotion. Your first weeks in your new position will provide you an idea of how much your budget will need to adjust.</p> <h2>5. Determine New Tax Deductions</h2> <p>The good news is that some of those new-job-related costs may also be tax deductible.</p> <ul> <li>Keep track of mileage that you have to drive to off-site locations for job-related activities. You can deduct <a href="https://www.irs.gov/uac/Newsroom/2016-Standard-Mileage-Rates-for-Business-Medical-and-Moving-Announced">54 cents per mile</a> for business miles driven in 2016, down from 57.5 cents in 2015. Also, you may use that mileage to allocate a portion of your car expenses, such as insurance and maintenance.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Being able to telecommute from home allows you to designate a portion of your home as a business office. Use the percentage from your total home space used used for business purposes to allocate allowable deductions using <a href="http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f8829.pdf">Form 8829</a>.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Having to dine and wine prospective clients may also be tax deductible.</li> </ul> <p>Consult your accountant for more details on allowable deductions.</p> <h2>6. Prevent Burnout</h2> <p>Several human resources experts claim that the <a href="http://fortune.com/2011/04/01/just-got-promoted-how-not-to-blow-it/">first 100 days on the job</a> are critical, particularly after a promotion. To thrive in your new role &mdash; and to maximize your number of fully vested shares if applicable &mdash; take steps to mitigate additional stress related to your new job. Whether it's hitting the gym more often, signing up for a new class, or having &quot;pizza day&quot; with the kids once a week, you may have new costs to cope with stress. Make sure to include them in your new monthly budget.</p> <h2>7. Request a Credit Limit Increase</h2> <p>Now that you have a higher annual income, you may be eligible for a higher limit on your credit cards. If you've have been current in all of your payments for the last year, have an account in good standing, and haven't requested a limit increase in several months, contact the issuers of your credit cards to submit your request. Most financial institutions allow you to do this over an online portal, but some may request to contact them via phone.</p> <p>With a higher credit limit, you can effectively improve your credit utilization ratio, which accounts for 30% of your FICO credit score.</p> <h2>8. Ask for Education and Licensing Subsidies</h2> <p>Most promotions are the result of hard work, and some of them are the result of an important investment that requires a recurrent annual expense.</p> <p>For example, an architect needs to complete a series of hour requirements and exams to become licensed. Upon becoming licensed, an architect can choose to become a member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), which has an initial cost of $442 per year and costs $600 each year thereafter to renew. Having the AIA in the title of a lead architect in a project bid makes a company more desirable to clients, so an architect could successfully argue that it's in the company's best interest to subsidize the annual cost of $600.</p> <p>Similar scenarios take place in other industries, including accounting, engineering, and finance.</p> <h2>9. Inquire About Additional Company Benefits</h2> <p>Your promotion could unlock new or improved perks, including:</p> <ul> <li>Health plans;</li> <li>Flexible spending accounts (FSA);</li> <li>Telecommuting devices (laptops, smartphones);</li> <li>Fund options in retirement accounts;</li> <li>Industry conferences; and</li> <li>Parking options.</li> </ul> <p>Find out what discretionary items are covered by your updated employment package.</p> <h2>10. Hire an Assistant</h2> <p>One <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-time-saving-hacks-from-the-worlds-busiest-people">time saving hack</a> from the world's busiest people is to outsource non-critical tasks, such as researching travel options, transcribing audio, and scheduling meetings, to an assistant. If your new job doesn't include a personal assistant, then hire a virtual one for about $10 per hour through Upwork, Fancy Hands, or Zirtual.</p> <p>You'll free up time to be able to focus on higher level priorities.</p> <p><em>What are some other things that people should do after a promotion? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-11"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career">6 Job Perks That Can Lead to a Dream Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-spring-clean-your-career">8 Ways to Spring Clean Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income career growth potential job job promotion more money raise Thu, 03 Mar 2016 10:00:11 +0000 Damian Davila 1666773 at http://www.wisebread.com The 5 Biggest Mistakes People Make When Working From Home http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-biggest-mistakes-people-make-when-working-from-home <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-5-biggest-mistakes-people-make-when-working-from-home" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000081290559_Large.jpg" alt="avoiding mistakes while working at home" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You've finally done it: You've landed a work-from-home job. No more daily commute to the office. No more being distracted by the office gossip. And no more interruptions in the middle of your workday to celebrate the fifth office birthday of the month.</p> <p>Yes, working from home can alleviate much of the stress that comes with holding down an office job. But this doesn't mean that working from your own home office doesn't pose its own risks. For first-time work-from-homers, especially, the many temptations of the home could pull you away from your work, lower your productivity, and get you in trouble with the boss. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-stay-productive-while-working-from-home?ref=seealso">5 Ways to Stay Productive While Working From Home</a>)</p> <p>Here are five big mistakes that, if you don't avoid them, could cause you to lose that work-from-home gig and return you to that daily morning commute.</p> <h2>1. You Don't Work in a Home Office</h2> <p>It's easy to say that you'll treat your entire home as an office when you work from it, but that's unrealistic. Saying that you can tote your laptop to the kitchen, the living room, or your bedroom depending on your mood means one thing: You don't have a real home office. And that can lead to problems. It's harder to resist the pull of your favorite TV shows when you're working just feet from the flat-screen in the living room.</p> <p>The better move is to set up a dedicated home-office space as soon as you land your work-from-home gig. This office space can be anywhere, as long it's permanent, large and comfortable enough to allow you to get your work done. Setting up a permanent home-office space &mdash; that you only use for work &mdash; is also important when you want to claim work-from-home deductions on your income taxes.</p> <h2>2. You Take Far Too Many Breaks</h2> <p>One of the benefits of working from home is that you can avoid the distractions caused by chatty coworkers, but working from home brings with it plenty of other distractions &mdash; especially from your computer or your TV. It's easy to give yourself a 15-minute break to watch a few YouTube videos or check your Facebook page. Most workers do this in a traditional office, too. But when there's no supervisor looming over your shoulder? Those breaks get far easier to take, and they can then easily increase in frequency.</p> <p>To fend off this temptation, make a list each morning of what work you absolutely need to complete before the day ends. This should keep you focused on the tasks you are getting paid to complete. And don't work anywhere near your TV. If you get too distracted by the entertainment options in your home, your productivity will plummet. Once your bosses notice, they might yank you right back to the office.</p> <h2>3. Your Health Takes a Backseat</h2> <p>You might think that working from home would be a boon to your diet. After all, it's tempting to go on those fast-food lunch runs with your coworkers. It's easy to snag one of the doughnuts in the conference room. But working from home brings with it some extremely tricky dietary landmines.</p> <p>You might be alone in your home for hours every day. Even if you start each day with good intentions &mdash; you're ready to fix a healthy lunch during your break time &mdash; it's awfully tempting to visit your refrigerator and cupboards several times a day, just for a break from your work. All those extra crackers, candies, and pretzels can add up, and you might discover that your clothes are getting a bit snugger.</p> <p>When you do need a brief break, why not do a few jumping jacks or take a walk around the block instead of opening that refrigerator for the sixth time?</p> <h2>4. You Forget to End the Work Day</h2> <p>A big benefit of working from home is that you can set your own work schedule, but that can also be a significant negative. Some work-from-homers don't reduce their production when they leave the office. They go the opposite route: They never end the work day.</p> <p>It's a tough temptation for many. Your laptop is right on the kitchen counter, so why not check your emails before getting ready for bed? Why not write a few more paragraphs of that report long after the workday ends?</p> <p>If you're not careful, it's all too easy to fall into the trap of working from the moment you wake up to the moment you go to bed. To avoid this, vow not to work after a certain hour. Your entire life shouldn't be devoted solely to work, even if you work from home.</p> <h2>5. You Disappear Too Much From Office Life</h2> <p>Just because you work from home doesn't mean that you should never make an appearance at your former office. Too many work-from-homers simply disappear from office life. They rarely attend important meetings. They don't participate in conference calls.</p> <p>This can lead to missed opportunities. Supervisors might pass over work-from-homers for key promotions simply because these employees have become all but invisible.</p> <p>To avoid this, make sure to visit the office on a regular basis, whether it's once every two weeks or once a month. Also, check in by phone or video conferencing on a regular basis with your coworkers and bosses. Remind your supervisors that even though you're not in the office each day, that you are still completing important work.</p> <p><em>Do you work from home? How do you balance it all? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-biggest-mistakes-people-make-when-working-from-home">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-12"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-stay-productive-while-working-from-home">5 Ways to Stay Productive While Working From Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs">6 Gadgets Every Work at Home Professional Needs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-life-skills-every-freelancer-needs">8 Life Skills Every Freelancer Needs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-tools-for-telecommuting">5 Essential Tools for Telecommuting</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-tips-to-make-working-from-home-a-success">10 Tips to Make Working From Home a Success</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building common mistakes home office wfh work from home working remotely Mon, 29 Feb 2016 10:00:04 +0000 Dan Rafter 1663952 at http://www.wisebread.com 30 Minutes to a LinkedIn Profile That Gets You Hired http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000052304036_Large.jpg" alt="making a great linkedin profile in just 30 minutes" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>LinkedIn is the world's largest global professional network &mdash; with 400+ million corporate and individual members in more than 200 nations.</p> <p>LinkedIn is more than a professional network and job board. Corporate headhunters use it as a recruitment tool in their quest to retain viable talent. And it's the first place potential employers and business associates look when deciding to hire and do business with you. In today's business community, it's imperative that you have a professionally designed LinkedIn profile.</p> <p>Here are six major components to creating a successful career-building LinkedIn profile that will get you the job opportunities you've been seeking.</p> <h2>1. Use Appropriate Profile Images</h2> <p>Use a professional looking photo as your profile picture. Use a headshot or three-quarter photo that shows you from the waist up. Ideally, it should capture you in your business environment. Real estate agents, who understand the importance of branding themselves, do this exceptionally well. They often embed a forward facing photo in property listings to convey their professionalism and sense of style.</p> <p>LinkedIn also offers the option of adding a background image. This is a second opportunity to brand yourself that adds visual context to your profile. Use it and upload a high-quality image. Also, you may want to add text to the image using a photo editor. For example, &quot;Raymond Miller, Java Developer.&quot; Make use of the space, as it's an opportunity to stand out in the crowd.</p> <h2>2. Customize Your Public LinkedIn Profile URL</h2> <p>Create a unique URL on LinkedIn from which your public profile will appear. You should use your given name if possible, but those with highly common names will encounter limitations. In this case, you should get creative and try <em>lastname-firstname</em> or use professional titles in your vanity URL, such as Dr., MBA, PhD, DDS, CFA, CPA, etc. Professional designations will also work. If, in the future, you acquire a professional title or designation, or you simply don't like the vanity URL you've created and wish to change it, you can always do so by clicking the gear icon to manage your &quot;public profile URL&quot; settings. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-easy-ways-to-improve-your-online-reputation?ref=seealso">6 Easy Ways to Improve Your Online Reputation</a>)</p> <h2>3. Tag Yourself With Keywords</h2> <p>LinkedIn's search tool functions are based on keyword relevance, just like Google's. Therefore, you should tag yourself with keywords you want to be found under. It's very important that you use them in your headline, or current job title. Do this by giving it a &quot;present&quot; value in the date field. For example, if you're looking for work as a freelance journalist, make sure your title as a freelance journalist remains present in order to stay relevant to search queries.</p> <p>And secondly, tag any companies you worked for in the job description area. In addition, list work experience separately (see below). This will improve your chances of appearing in &quot;current search queries,&quot; which is a feature of the Advanced Search options. To better understand how LinkedIn's search algorithm works, read <a href="http://blog.linkedin.com/2007/07/15/5-tips-on-how-t/">5 Tips on How to Search LinkedIn Like a Pro</a>.</p> <h2>4. Detail Your Experience</h2> <p>Describe your professional background in a brief summary that highlights your accomplishments over your career. Add degrees, awards, TEDx Talks, brands that you've worked with, and project achievements. Most sources recommend including 10 years of work experience, or more, but only if it's relevant to the present. The multimedia feature that LinkedIn introduced in 2013 let's you embed video and web content to sections of your profile. This is an obvious one for artists, authors, and speakers, but every professional can find use for this feature. Add letters of recommendation, presentations, case studies, press feeds, and anything that you contributed to that will give your profile a boost.</p> <h2>5. Build a Network</h2> <p>Start to build your network by granting access to your email contacts. Here you may find former colleagues and alumni. You should have added the names of schools you attended and companies you worked for to your profile. If so, LinkedIn will automatically begin to suggest connections. Another way to build your network is to join groups and connect with its members. Search for groups based on your interests and ask to join. You can also use the &quot;People you may know&quot; tab beneath &quot;My network&quot; in the top navigation, surf member profiles, and connect. From there, watch your network grow. Then, periodically rinse and repeat.</p> <h2>6. Promote Yourself</h2> <p>Connect your social media accounts and start sharing. Promote insightful content to your network. If you like an article or blog post you've just read, share it as an update on LinkedIn. Use the rich media feature to add photos to your updates and make them more eye-catching.</p> <p>And with <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/">LinkedIn Pulse</a>, you can publish posts by contributing original content you feel may be valuable to your network. Pulse posts are visible to all of LinkedIn's 400 million members and adds a follow button to each title you publish, which is another great way to build your network and promote your brand: You!</p> <p><em>Any tips we missed for creating a LinkedIn profile? Let us know in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/qiana-chavaia">Qiana Chavaia</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-13"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-pro-resume-editor-reveals-the-5-dumbest-things-you-have-on-your-resume">A Pro Resume Editor Reveals the 5 Dumbest Things You Have on Your Resume</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-not-to-answer-10-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How NOT TO Answer 10 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building job hunt linked in LinkedIn professional network resume Thu, 18 Feb 2016 10:00:05 +0000 Qiana Chavaia 1658150 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Great Side Jobs for Introverts http://www.wisebread.com/10-great-side-jobs-for-introverts <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-great-side-jobs-for-introverts" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000075438099_Large.jpg" alt="introvert working her side job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A second source of income is not only a nice financial safety net; it's also a way to broaden your work experience. In fact, many side jobs are often very different to the full-time careers people have. And, speaking as an introvert with a side job, this topic is near and dear to my heart. So if you're a little on the quiet side, and would like to spend some of your spare time earning money, here are 12 great jobs for you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-introverts-make-the-best-employees?ref=seealso">6 Reasons Introverts Make the Best Employees</a>)</p> <h2>1. Thrifting for Cash</h2> <p>Thrift and charity stores are home to so many hidden treasures, and if you know what to look for, you can make some great money selling them on eBay, Craigslist, and various Facebook groups. It helps to start with a subject you have some interest and enthusiasm for. So, if you're a fan of vintage clothing, start browsing the aisles at your local thrift stores. For a few bucks, you can pick up sweaters and coats that can go for 10 times what you paid for them, and often a lot more. It's a job you can do in your spare time, and requires little-to-no contact with any of those social situations that can raise your anxiety levels to Defcon 1.</p> <h2>2. Drive for Lyft or Uber</h2> <p>Taxis are quickly being replaced by the very convenient Lyft and Uber services. If you have a car in excellent condition, and don't mind putting extra miles on it, you can make a good bit of extra cash being a driver. Most of the time, you're driving just one or two people around, and with the aid of smartphone GPS services, you never have to worry about getting lost or asking your fare for directions.</p> <p>I have had drivers who were very chatty and social, and others who clearly liked to just do the driving with as little conversation as possible. As long as you're okay with strangers getting into your car (and both Lyft and Uber have a lot of safety measurements in place) you will do great. Plus, you'll get to see more of your city than you ever thought you would.</p> <h2>3. Writing</h2> <p>Be it blogging, journalism, copywriting, or even writing jokes for comedians, writing is perfectly suited to introverts. You can do it at home, or if you have a laptop, you can write wherever and whenever you want. For instance, if you have a long commute on public transportation, you can fill that time earning extra money. Writing, in its many forms, can be fit into a regular full-time schedule, using evenings and weekends, holidays, and personal days. And it's something that can be done without having any real contact with anyone, if you desire.</p> <h2>4. Medical Transcription</h2> <p>Make no mistake, you cannot just decide to become a medical transcriptionist one day, apply for a job, and get it. Although you don't need a degree, you will need some training in this arena. Vocational schools, community colleges, and even online schools can give you the skills you need. In particular, a strong knowledge of medical terminology must be acquired, but once you have this, you can make a very good side living transcribing written reports (which can be very tough to read), or more often, recorded memos from doctors and nurses. It can be done in the comfort of your own home, and the pay can be close to <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-transcriptionists.htm">$20 per hour</a>.</p> <h2>5. Janitorial Work</h2> <p>I actually made some good money doing this to put myself through college. The hours were very flexible, and I rarely had to interact with people on a regular basis. Jobs ranged from cleaning windows and mopping floors, to small DIY jobs, changing light bulbs, and unpacking boxes and crates. Most of the time, I would wear headphones and listen to music while I did my duties. Reach out to local places that have janitorial services &mdash; including schools and community centers &mdash; and see if they need help.</p> <h2>6. Pet Sitting/Dog Walking</h2> <p>If you're more at home with animals than you are with people (and let's face it, animals rarely give us the social anxiety problems that people do), then a part-time job with animals may be just your thing. Advertise your services as either a pet sitter, or dog walker on a site like Craigslist. How much you charge is completely up to you, but obviously you don't want to charge so much that you never get any work. Also keep in mind that with pet sitting comes additional expenses, like food and supplies. You may want to have the owner provide those, or include the additional costs in your hourly rate.</p> <h2>7. Answering Service</h2> <p>All you need is a phone, a pleasant phone manner, and the willingness to work some unfavorable hours. As an answering service, you will be taking calls and relaying messages to a variety of professionals, including doctors, insurance agents, and hospitals. Obviously, the major drawback is that you will be required to work outside of normal work hours, and that can mean answering the phone at 3:30 a.m., and doing so with alertness and amiability. However, if that's no problem for you, this can be a great way to earn extra income.</p> <h2>8. Tutoring</h2> <p>One-on-one tutoring with someone eager to learn is a great side job for any introvert. You may have some excellent skills in any number of school and college subjects, include math, chemistry, biology, or music, and you should share that knowledge.</p> <p>Personally, I have taken guitar lessons from a guy who did it evenings and weekends to pay for his own equipment. When I asked where he was next playing a gig, he looked like I had smacked him with a wet kipper. &quot;Oh, I'm way too shy to gig, I just love playing at home.&quot; But, he had absolutely no problem with the tutor/student dynamic. If that sounds like you, give tutoring a try. You can travel to other people's homes, or have them come to you.</p> <h2>9. Deliver Pizzas, or Newspapers</h2> <p>These are not just jobs for college kids looking to make a bit of extra cash. Anyone can become a pizza delivery driver, or deliver newspapers. All you need is your own car, and the available time to get it done. Most pizza deliveries happen after the workday ends, and most newspapers are delivered long before the workday begins. So, if you are willing to sacrifice some of that time, you can earn some good income.</p> <h2>10. Data Entry</h2> <p>If you have a computer, and have good typing skills (accuracy <em>and</em> speed are essential) then data entry could be ideal for you. As the world goes digital, there are literally millions of pages of documents that need to be typed up and stored. The money varies, from as little as minimum wage, to around $20 per hour.</p> <p>However, it can be done from home, with some music in the background and your feet in slippers. And you will never have to talk to anyone, as it can all be done via snail mail and email.</p> <p><em>Are you an introvert? What's your ideal side gig? Let us know in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-great-side-jobs-for-introverts">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-14"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-side-jobs-for-stay-at-home-moms-and-dads">12 Side Jobs for Stay-at-Home Moms and Dads</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-must-know-about-money-before-you-take-a-side-job">10 Money Moves You Need to Make Before You Take a Side Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-side-jobs-for-people-who-are-good-with-money">6 Side Jobs for People Who Are Good With Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-great-jobs-for-college-students">10 Great Jobs for College Students</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-kids-and-adults-can-earn-extra-income-by-doing-voice-overs">How Kids and Adults Can Earn Extra Income by Doing Voice-Overs</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income gig economy introvert jobs for introverts part-time job side jobs Wed, 17 Feb 2016 10:00:08 +0000 Paul Michael 1658141 at http://www.wisebread.com