USDA http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/5438/all en-US 5 Foods That Are Only Labeled Organic — But Really Aren't http://www.wisebread.com/5-foods-that-are-only-labeled-organic-but-really-arent <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-foods-that-are-only-labeled-organic-but-really-arent" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/organic_veggies_000024751662.jpg" alt="Woman shopping for organic produce that is not just labeled organic" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There's a peculiar practice that breeds corruption in the American food labeling industry: The companies that certify foods as organic are paid by the very farms they certify. And since the certifiers are in competition with one another, the conditions are ripe for what's known as <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/07/23/334073167/can-you-trust-that-organic-label-on-imported-food">organic fraud</a>. As Peter Laufer, author of &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0762790717/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0762790717&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=AFMNTRIQIK7OC2G6">Organic: A Journalist's Quest to Discover the Truth Behind Food Labeling</a>,&quot; explains, &quot;If the inspection is a little harsh, the company or the farm could say, 'Hey, there are other places I can do business with that wouldn't put me through this kind of rigor.'&quot;</p> <p>We've all got to eat. But if it's organic eats that you're looking for, you should know that a certified organic label doesn't necessarily mean the food you're getting is organic. And the type of fraud discussed by Laufer isn't the only culprit. Read on for our roundup of the most common foods that are only labeled organic &mdash; but really aren't. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-health-foods-not-worth-the-money?ref=seealso">11 Health Foods Not Worth the Money</a>)</p> <h2>1. Bananas</h2> <p>Bananas that are certified organic and grown in tropical countries like Ecuador may have been sprayed with rotenone, a toxic pesticide derived from the roots of several tropical and subtropical plants. Classified as &quot;mildly hazardous&quot; by the World Health Organization, rotenone has been linked to <a href="http://civileats.com/2014/08/18/organic-vs-organic-how-much-does-certification-matter/">Parkinson's disease in farm workers</a>. The pesticide was outlawed for use on crops in the U.S. in 2007, but it is still permitted for use on organic produce abroad, and is perhaps most commonly used on bananas.</p> <h2>2. Milk</h2> <p>Organic milk certifiers are not required to test for <a href="http://www.usda.gov/oig/webdocs/01601-0001-Te.pdf">genetically modified organisms</a>, according to a federal audit that questions whether milk marketed as organic is indeed truly organic. Without testing, the report concludes that &quot;...There cannot be reasonable assurance that certifiers are identifying and ensuring that GM material is not contaminating organic feed and forage.&quot; This is not to say that all organic milk is contaminated, but the carton in your refrigerator very well may be.</p> <h2>3. Seafood</h2> <p>If you've ever seen a package of seafood labeled as organic in your local market &mdash; beware. Currently, there is no U.S. government-approved <a href="http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/common-resources/fish/seafood/labeling/organic-seafood-fact-or-fiction/">organic seafood</a>. Organic labels sometimes appear on seafood based on criteria set by a private certification company or in accordance with standards set by foreign governments. But these alternative certification systems typically fall short of U.S. organic standards when it comes to other foods. So there's little reason to believe that seafood labeled as organic is up to par with would-be American organic seafood standards, if we had any.</p> <h2>4. Eggs</h2> <p>Hens must have access to the outdoors in order for their eggs to meet the USDA guidelines for organic egg production. But often they don't. In a recent example, one of <a href="http://www.mlive.com/business/west-michigan/index.ssf/2014/12/dispute_over_organic_label_pit.html">Michigan's largest egg producers</a> did not provide its birds with the freedom to roam outside, yet the farm's eggs still received the organic stamp of approval. &quot;There are hundreds of certified organic egg producers that allow their animals to have access to the outdoors,&quot; says Mark Kastel, co-director of The Cornucopia Institute. &quot;Sadly, the majority of eggs that are sold as organic are coming from facilities (that don't).&quot;</p> <h2>5. Strawberries</h2> <p>When organic strawberries are first planted, their growth is aided by the <a href="http://www.revealnews.org/article-legacy/even-organic-strawberries-are-grown-with-dangerous-pesticides/">use of fumigants</a>, a type of pesticide that has been linked to cancer and developmental problems in the farmhands who plant them. Despite these horrific side effects, farmers rely on fumigants to ward off pests and diseases that might otherwise wipe out an entire crop. But so long as these fumigant-treated strawberry plants mature on an organic farm, they can still be certified as organic.</p> <p><em>Do you buy any of these &quot;organic&quot; foods?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-foods-that-are-only-labeled-organic-but-really-arent">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-13"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/horizon-organic-milk-is-it-all-just-lies">Horizon Organic Milk: Is it All Just Lies?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-organic-grocery-items-that-arent-worth-it">10 Organic Grocery Items That Aren&#039;t Worth It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-your-apple-dangerous-how-to-eat-fewer-pesticides-and-save-money">Is Your Apple Dangerous? How to Eat Fewer Pesticides (and Save Money)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/less-corn-planted-despite-ethanol">Less corn planted, despite ethanol</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-only-15-foods-that-are-worth-buying-organic">The Only 15 Foods That Are Worth Buying Organic</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Consumer Affairs Food and Drink fraud gmos organic pesticides USDA Mon, 06 Apr 2015 15:24:22 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1368003 at http://www.wisebread.com Less corn planted, despite ethanol http://www.wisebread.com/less-corn-planted-despite-ethanol <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/less-corn-planted-despite-ethanol" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/illinois-barn.jpg" alt="Illinois Barn" title="Illinois Barn" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="186" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Prompted by high prices (driven by demand from ethanol production), farmers planted more acres of corn last year than any year since 1944.  This year, though, planned acres for corn are down 8%, and soybeans are back up to normal.</p> <p>That&#39;s the word from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, in their <a href="http://www.usda.gov/nass/PUBS/TODAYRPT/pspl0308.pdf">Prospective Plantings</a>, released today.</p> <p>Because of where I live--central Illinois--last year&#39;s huge increase in corn planting was something I could see on a daily basis.  Bicycling out in rural areas around Champaign-Urbana, I&#39;m used to seeing soybeans in about a third of the fields.  Last year, it seemed to be barely half that.</p> <p>The usual ratio is a result of the crop rotation that farmers seem to use around here, planting corn two years and then planting soybeans for one year.  Corn requires large amounts of (increasingly expensive) nitrogen fertilizer.  Soybeans, on the other hand, add nitrogen to the soil.  In addition to balancing some of the nutrient demand on the soil, switching to soybeans for a year helps with pest control.  If you plant corn year after year, you can expect corn pests to get worse each year.  A year of soybeans greatly improves the situation.</p> <p>Last year, the agricultural radio reports were full of news (and ads) on how to grow corn for a third straight year on the same plot of land.  Seeing all that corn was worrisome to me--you could point your finger in any direction and point at agricultural practices that were even more unsustainable than usual.</p> <p>It seems, though, to have been a one-off move to take advantage of a record surge in corn prices.  The (entirely predictable) result has been a surge in the prices of other agricultural products, and farmers are moving things back toward normal.  Corn planting will still be higher than usual, but soybean planting (after a huge drop last year) is right back up to recent levels.  Other grains show a mixed bag--sorghum and oats are down, barley (important for beer and scotch drinkers) is up, wheat is way up.</p> <p>With things trending back toward normal, the result will probably be more of what we&#39;ve been seeing lately--higher prices for agricultural commodities, leading to higher food prices.  You can&#39;t figure that the current high prices are an aberration; high prices of agricultural commodities are the new normal.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/less-corn-planted-despite-ethanol">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-foods-that-are-only-labeled-organic-but-really-arent">5 Foods That Are Only Labeled Organic — But Really Aren&#039;t</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-delicious-ways-to-use-canned-corn">15 Delicious Ways to Use Canned Corn</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/concession-stand-treats-a-license-to-print-money">Concession stand treats – a license to print money.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/horizon-organic-milk-is-it-all-just-lies">Horizon Organic Milk: Is it All Just Lies?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/explaining-away-the-green-m-m">Explaining Away the Green M&amp;M</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Consumer Affairs Food and Drink agriculture barley bicycling corn ethanol grain soybeans USDA Tue, 01 Apr 2008 00:26:51 +0000 Philip Brewer 1963 at http://www.wisebread.com Healthy recipes--with cost data http://www.wisebread.com/healthy-recipes-with-cost-data <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy-recipes-with-cost-data" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/farmers-market-tomatoes.jpg" alt="Farmers market tomatoes" title="Farmers Market Tomatoes" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="158" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Want to eat a cheap, healthy diet? Want some recipes that use real food instead of packaged food products? Want to argue about how much it costs to feed a family a healthy diet? Here's a free tool, created by the USDA, that will help you with any of those.</p> <p>Can you eat for $21 a week? If you had to feed yourself using just food stamps, that's about how much you'd be able to spend. To help people trying to do that--and probably to help policy-makers arguing about the food stamp program--the USDA created a database of recipes and then used cost data from stores (gathered by AC Nielson in 2001, and adjusted based on the CPI) to calculate the cost of each dish. Even if you're neither on food stamps nor a policy maker, the USDA's <a href="http://recipefinder.nal.usda.gov/">Food Stamp Nutrition Connection Recipes Finder</a> is available for free.</p> <p><img width="183" align="right" height="350" title="Nutrition Facts for Bluet Corn Pan Bread" alt="Nutrition facts for blue corn pan bread" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u203/blue_corn_pan_bread_nutrition_facts.gif" />It's kind of a cool tool. You can search by recipe name or by ingredient--that latter being very handy if you bought a bunch of something because it was cheap and are now trying to find a new way to use it. It provides not only cost per recipe and per serving, but also nutrition facts--a nice chart exactly like the one you find on any packaged food. It also lets you print the recipe in several different formats.</p> <p>Another cool feature is that it will maintain a shopping list for you--click &quot;add to shopping list&quot; for the recipes that you plan to make and it will keep track and give you a list of everything you need. (Sadly, it doesn't total up the amounts when the same ingredient is used in several different recipes, but it does list them all together, making it easy enough to figure out yourself.)</p> <p>As we've discussed in several recent posts, adjusting 2001 prices with the CPI is likely to underestimate actual costs. Since the data is based on national averages, though, regional and seasonal variations will probably be a greater source of inaccuracy than the inflation adjustment. (I couldn't immediately find a way to get at the price data used--it just presents aggregate prices for the recipes--so it wouldn't be easy to spot-check the prices for accuracy.)</p> <p>Still, despite its limitations, it seems like a cool free resource for anyone who wants to make cheap, healthy meals out of real food.</p> <p>The <a href="http://recipefinder.nal.usda.gov/index.php?mode=display&amp;rec_id=323">Blue Corn Pan Bread recipe</a> looked good. They say you can make the recipe for $1.43, which comes to just $0.12 per serving:</p> <h2><strong>Ingredients:</strong></h2> <ul> <li>3 cups water</li> <li>2 cups blue cornmeal (yellow may be used)</li> <li>1 cup yellow cornmeal</li> <li>3/4 cup raisins</li> <li>1/2 cup sprouted wheat*</li> <li>1/3 cup brown sugar</li> </ul> <p>*To sprout wheat: Wash untreated wheat grains; drain but do not dry. Spread in a single layer in shallow pans and cover with damp cloths. Keep damp in a warm, dark place.</p> <h2><strong>Instructions:</strong></h2> <ol> <li>Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Line 8x8 inch cake pan with foil.</li> <li>Bring water to boil in a large pot. Add each ingredient, one at a time.</li> <li>Stir well until mixture is smooth and pour into foil-lined cake pan. Cover with a piece of foil.</li> <li>Bake for 2 hours. Bread is done when toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.</li> </ol> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/healthy-recipes-with-cost-data">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-new-face-of-poverty-is-fat">The new face of poverty is fat</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/healthy-frugal-eating">Healthy, frugal eating</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-foods-with-the-most-bang-for-your-buck">10 Foods With the Most Bang for Your Buck</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-foods-nutritionists-say-you-should-splurge-on">12 Foods Nutritionists Say You Should Splurge On</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-foods-scientifically-proven-to-increase-your-lifespan">6 Foods Scientifically Proven to Increase Your Lifespan</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink Shopping cost government Health healthy foods healthy living nutrition recipes USDA web site Sat, 17 Nov 2007 16:34:46 +0000 Philip Brewer 1401 at http://www.wisebread.com Horizon Organic Milk: Is it All Just Lies? http://www.wisebread.com/horizon-organic-milk-is-it-all-just-lies <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/horizon-organic-milk-is-it-all-just-lies" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/3179384002_ca75b4522c_o.jpg" alt="Horizon Organic" title="Horizon Organic" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Under the advice of several colleagues and readers, I decided to pick up a copy of The Omnivore's Dilemma. Fascinating read to say the least, and one thing that cropped up was the term 'organic' and how the word has become perverted and practically raped by the agricultural industry. Not surprising when you consider it's now a $15 billion a year business. That's a lot of money&hellip;which means power&hellip;which means corruption. (See also: <a title="Deciding Which Produce to Buy Organic - The Dirty Dozen" href="http://www.wisebread.com/deciding-which-produce-to-buy-organic-the-dirty-dozen">Deciding Which Produce to Buy Organic - The Dirty Dozen</a>)</p> <p>So, I decided to do some digging around, putting a product in my own fridge under the microscope. Horizon Organic Milk. The packaging and verbiage promise a lot, a beautiful world of cows grazing in green pastures with big smiles, happily producing only he tastiest, unsullied milk. I reproduce it here word for word, you can judge for yourself if it's entirely truthful as we continue.</p> <blockquote><p><strong><em>HORIZON ORGANIC &mdash; A Choice You Can Feel Good About</em></strong></p> <p><em><strong>Horizon Organic products are as good for you as they are delicious because they are produced without the use of antibiotics, added growth hormones or dangerous pesticides.</strong></em></p> <p><em><strong>That's why choosing Horizon Organic is a wholesome and nutritious way to help reduce your exposure to added chemical. And drinking our milk is also a great way to nourish your body. It provides an excellent source of calcium and vitamin D.</strong></em></p> <p><em><strong>When you choose Horizon Organic you also contribute to the health and well being of the planet and animals. We allow our cows to make milk according to their natural cycle and keep them in good health by giving them certified organic feed, fresh air and access to pasture. In return, our cows give us great-tasting organic milk.</strong></em></p> <p><em><strong>Best put, all of our products proudly carry the USDA Organic seal and that says it all. Thank you for choosing Horizon Organic. We hope it's a choice that leaves you feeling good inside and out.</strong></em></p></blockquote> <p>Now, as far as I can see there are some misleading and downright deceptive statements in that copy. Let's deal with them one at a time.</p> <blockquote><p><em><strong>&quot;&hellip;they are produced without the use of antibiotics, added growth hormones or dangerous pesticides.&quot;</strong></em></p></blockquote> <p>As it turns out, antibiotics were never added to milk or were ever present in milk. According to the USDA, all milk must be tested to ensure any antibiotics used to treat milk cows are not present in the end product. So, this cannot be a claim as it fundamentally untrue anyway. In fact, the terms 'antibiotic free' and 'no-antibiotic' are false claims that the USDA is trying to crack down on.</p> <p>Similarly, the same can be said of the other claims, regarding pesticides and hormones. First, hormones will always be present in milk; it's part of the biology of a cow. To call milk 'hormone-free' is like making the claim that 90% <a title="6 Questions to Ask Before You Buy Ground Beef" href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-you-buy-ground-beef">ground beef</a> is fat-free. But growth hormones, again according to the USDA, are only ever approved for beef cattle, plus lamb and veal. So, again another inflated claim. And by the way, Vitamin D3 is added to all milk&hellip;it is also a hormone.</p> <p>Finally, pesticides. The FTC has ruled that a manufacturer cannot make a &quot;no pesticide&quot; claim as it is untruthful, because pesticides are never added to milk or milk products. It's like claiming that the new car you buy comes without chlorine gas inside the cabin. It's just not a claim.</p> <blockquote><p><em><strong>&quot;We allow our cows to make milk according to their natural cycle and keep them in good health by giving them certified organic feed, fresh air and access to pasture.&quot;</strong></em></p> </blockquote> <p>The key word here is 'access.' Right now at work I have access to the executive squash courts, but I am rarely allowed to use them, if at all. I'm too busy and I'm not an exec. Well, the cows at Horizon may have access to pasture but it's a known industry fact that milk cows don't spend their days grazing on green grass. They just get to look at it, cooped up in the usual factory-farming warehouses. Occasionally, when the press drops in, the cows may be allowed out for 20 minutes to make a good showing, but this is a rarity. For Horizon Milk to remain productive and profitable, they must keep their cows hooked up to the milking machines.</p> <p>Horizon cows are hard workers. The average Horizon organic cow produces almost double the amount of milk of the national average. Which makes it even more difficult for these poor cows to step outside.</p> <p>Then there are the slaughter rates. They're higher than the national average because, as no antibiotics are involved, they simply ship the cow off to slaughter if it gets sick. And as the factory-farming conditions are rife with disease and infection, this happens a lot.</p> <p>We should also address the claim of certified organic feed. In the past, Horizon has and used and supported local area farmers. But the growth of the organic industry could not let the limitations of these small farms get in the way of making a profit. Now most of the feed that Horizon buys is shipped in on massive railroad cars, processed by a giant corporate agribusiness and then given to the cows. And much of this feed is irrigated by dams that have been condemned for destroying ecosystems. So, while it may technically fit the terms of the organic feed set out by the USDA, it does not support local farmers&hellip;and that was originally a backbone of the organic industry.</p> <blockquote><p><em><strong>&quot;&hellip;all of our products proudly carry the USDA Organic seal and that says it all.&quot;</strong></em></p> </blockquote> <p>The USDA Organic Seal can only be given to products that are made with 95% organic ingredients. But what does 'organic' mean? The most commonly accepted definition of &quot;organically grown&quot; food comes from Robert Rodale, editor of Organic Gardening &amp; Farming magazine. This from 1972&hellip;</p> <blockquote><p>&quot;Food grown without pesticides; grown without artificial fertilizers; grown in soil whose humus content is increased by the additions of organic matter, grown in soil whose mineral content is increased by the application of natural mineral fertilizers; has not been treated with preservatives, hormones, antibiotics, etc.&quot;</p> </blockquote> <p>But in 1980 a team of USDA scientists concluded there was in fact no universally accepted definition for organic farming.</p> <blockquote><p>&quot;The organic movement represents a spectrum of practices, attitudes, and philosophies. On the one hand are those organic practitioners who would not use chemical fertilizers or pesticides under any circumstances. These producers hold rigidly to their purist philosophy. At the other end of the spectrum, organic farmers espouse a more flexible approach. While striving to avoid the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, these practitioners do not rule them out entirely. Instead, when absolutely necessary, some fertilizers and also herbicides are very selectively and sparingly used as a second line of defense. Nevertheless, these farmers, too, consider themselves to be organic farmers.&quot;</p> </blockquote> <p>So, in 1997 Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman stated the following:</p> <blockquote><p>&quot;What is organic? Generally, it is agriculture produced through a natural as opposed to synthetic process. The natural portion of the definition is fairly obvious, but process is an equally critical distinction. When we certify organic, we are certifying not just a product but the farming and handling practices that yield it. When you buy a certified organic tomato, for instance, you are buying the product of an organic farm. And, consumers are willing to fork over a little more for that tomato. They've shown that they will pay a premium for organic food. National standards are our way of ensuring that consumers get what they pay for.&quot;</p> </blockquote> <p>Get it? It's just another way of saying that the production of the food differed slightly than the production of regular food. Organic is not a term meaning that the content of the food is any different, just the way in which the manufacturer arrived at the end product.</p> <p>And here's the punch line, taken directly from the USDA:</p> <blockquote><p>&quot;No distinctions should be made between organically and non-organically produced products in terms of quality, appearance, or safety.&quot;</p> </blockquote> <p>Basically, even with the USDA Organic Seal, the food can really make no claims that it is more nutritious, better quality or safer to eat. In short, organic food may in fact be almost no different at all than regular food. Until you notice the price tag&hellip;often double, or even triple the price of the same product without the USDA seal.</p> <p>So, continue buying Horizon Milk if the copy makes you feel like you're doing something good. But now that you know it's not quite a truthful picture, maybe you can pass by the Horizon milk aisle and stop contributing to an enormous agribusiness that feeds us more lies than good products...and charges you extra cash for the privilege.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/horizon-organic-milk-is-it-all-just-lies">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-foods-that-are-only-labeled-organic-but-really-arent">5 Foods That Are Only Labeled Organic — But Really Aren&#039;t</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-meaning-of-milk-label-colors">The Meaning of Milk Label Colors</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-organic-grocery-items-that-arent-worth-it">10 Organic Grocery Items That Aren&#039;t Worth It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-only-15-foods-that-are-worth-buying-organic">The Only 15 Foods That Are Worth Buying Organic</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-new-face-of-poverty-is-fat">The new face of poverty is fat</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink antibiotics milk organic USDA Tue, 15 May 2007 21:43:34 +0000 Paul Michael 646 at http://www.wisebread.com