dairy http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/5575/all en-US Buy This — Not That — at the Farmer's Market http://www.wisebread.com/buy-this-not-that-at-the-farmers-market <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/buy-this-not-that-at-the-farmers-market" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_farmers_market_000062350146.jpg" alt="Woman deciding what to buy at the farmer&#039;s market and what to skip" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's summertime and the livin' is easy &mdash; especially if you live near a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-and-worst-things-to-buy-at-farmers-markets">farmer's market</a>. (Not sure if you're near one? Check out this <a href="http://search.ams.usda.gov/farmersmarkets/">market directory</a>). Just don't go in unprepared: check out this list of what to buy and when.</p> <h2>Always Get (When in Season)</h2> <p>These fruits and veggies come really do deliver on the farmer's market promise of fresh and delicious produce, at a good price, as long as they are in season.</p> <h3>1. Root Vegetables</h3> <p>Great choices at the farmer's market are always root veggies like beets, turnips, carrots, heirloom potatoes, yams, and more. These hold up an extremely long time &mdash; up to six weeks depending on your storage method. Also, getting all your bright red and orange root vegetables means tons of vitamin A and beta carotene, leading to healthy skin and hearts.</p> <h3>2. Squash</h3> <p>Vine fruits like squash and melons are also good choices. There are usually varieties you cannot find in the grocery store, and they are usually just a day or two shy of ripeness. No more waiting days for the melon to be just right, then BAM &mdash; mold and squishy bits. In the fall, acorn, butternut, and spaghetti squashes rule the stalls, and they are all the most tasty direct from the farm.</p> <h3>3. Tree and Vine Fruits</h3> <p>Some fruits are really difficult to find in grocery stores: pluots, persimmons, passion fruit, kiwi, blood oranges, and other tasty nutrient-dense fruits. The farmer's market is made for locating new fruits without paying the insane markup of a chain store (who is likely importing the fruit frozen from another country).</p> <h3>4. Lettuces</h3> <p>Greens are excellent buys at the farmer's market, especially varieties of kale, butter lettuce, bok choy, and radicchio. These are usually much cheaper than at the chain grocers and much fresher as well &mdash; straight from the dirt! Speaking of which: Remember to rinse them thoroughly in the salad spinner before using!</p> <h3>5. Breads</h3> <p>Baked goods can sometimes fall into &quot;skip&quot; territory, but fresh bread at the farmer's market is usually really good. Pick up a cracked wheat or a sourdough for that day's brunch, or the week's sandwiches. Much better than store bought sliced bread.</p> <h2>What to Skip</h2> <p>Unfortunately some of the artisanal goods at the farmer's market aren't great buys, even if they are super delish.</p> <h3>6. Honey</h3> <p>Depending on your location and who is selling the honey, there can be a massive markup. Keep a lookout for who made the honey. If the jar lists a different bottler than the stall selling it, you are likely paying an inflated price. You might be better off with raw or manuka honey from Whole Foods.</p> <h3>7. Cheese</h3> <p>The cheese lady is so hard to resist, always offering you rich cubes of fresh cheeses. But keep in mind you are paying a premium for an artisanal product. There is also pressure to buy the specific cheese(s) the farmer's market stall has that day. You are probably better off purchasing fresh cheese from your local specialty foods shop where you have more variety to choose from.</p> <h3>8. Fresh Meat</h3> <p>Meat can be a double-edged sword at the farmer's market. On one hand, it's fresh and usually free of preservatives. On the other, most meat is right on the edge of perishability, so you need to cook it within a day or two. If you intend to cook it later that week, you might find that the meat has already gone brown and gamey before you get to use it.</p> <h3>9. Unpasteurized Dairy</h3> <p>While controversial, there are many out there who extol raw milk's health benefits. It's not worth it. In most states it is illegal to sell unpasteurized foods, and for good reason: you never know what bacteria or parasites are within that bottle of raw goat's milk until it's already in your belly. That's not a risk anyone should be willing to take.</p> <h3>10. Herbs</h3> <p>Fragrant, tempting herbs are plentiful at the farmer's market. But think about it: Herbs are really cheap. You can even grow them yourself. So why not do that? Five dollars for a bunch of mint may not seem like much, but you'd be spending a few cents to keep that mint plant on your kitchen windowsill.</p> <h3>11. Pressed Juice</h3> <p>Pressed juice is not only nutritionally unsound (you're straining out the fiber and many vitamins!), but incredibly pricey &mdash; up to $15 per single-serving bottle. You're basically paying for someone to destroy valuable fruits and vegetables with an extremely expensive machine. Don't fall for it.</p> <h3>12. Prepared Meals</h3> <p>At nearly every farmer's market you'll find a stall selling hot popcorn, or a falafel cart. It's Sunday morning and you haven't eaten yet. It's so tempting! Not only are the prices unreasonably high due to the nature of impulse shopping, there's never anywhere comfortable to eat it. Think of it this way: You just bought a veritable cornucopia of fresh whole foods &mdash; why not rush home and make a meal instead?</p> <p><em>What foods or other products do you skip at the farmer's market?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amanda-meadows">Amanda Meadows</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/buy-this-not-that-at-the-farmers-market">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-off-season-foods-that-are-destroying-your-grocery-budget">5 Off-Season Foods That Are Destroying Your Grocery Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/breaking-the-bread-code-how-to-get-the-freshest-loaf">Breaking the Bread Code: How to Get the Freshest Loaf</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-a-farm-share-a-smart-buy-for-your-household">Is a Farm Share a Smart Buy for Your Household?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-produce-workers-guide-to-choosing-fruits-and-vegetables">The Produce Worker&#039;s Guide to Choosing Fruits and Vegetables</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-5-credit-cards-for-groceries">The 5 Best Credit Cards for Groceries</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink Shopping bread dairy farmer's market fruit groceries vegetables Fri, 24 Jul 2015 13:00:20 +0000 Amanda Meadows 1494595 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Reasons Science Says It's OK to Eat More Cheese http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-science-says-its-ok-to-eat-more-cheese <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-reasons-science-says-its-ok-to-eat-more-cheese" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/cheese_plate_000045135764.jpg" alt="Cheese that science says is okay to eat" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Cheese always seems wrapped up in some sort of controversy. One day it's good for you, the next it's bad for you. So on and so forth.</p> <p>...So let's give cheese a chance and err on the more delicious pro-cheese side.</p> <p>In addition to being loaded with calcium and vitamin D, cheese contains lots of great vitamins that benefit your body in some surprising ways. New research comes out on a nearly daily basis, and more and more point to the healthful qualities of cheese. Just keep a few things in mind while you nibble on that block of cheddar: eat good quality cheese (<a href="http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0082429">organic is best</a>), watch your portion sizes, and eat other healthy foods to round out your diet and keep calorie intake at recommended levels.</p> <p>We also suggest <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/milking-it-5-easy-homemade-cheeses">eating a cheesy snack</a> while reading the following facts.</p> <h2>1. Cheese Can Boost Your Metabolism</h2> <p>Because it's high in protein, cheese can <a href="http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/cheese-snack-stabilize-blood-sugar-increase-metabolism-12404.html">increase your metabolism</a> for a short period of time after eating. A 2013 study also found that dairy contains a fatty acid that's been shown to have <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23407305">health-promoting effects</a> on metabolic health. A Canadian study in 2014 found that dairy intake is associated with a reduced risk of developing <a href="http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/apnm-2014-0154#.VVqnDxdcai5">type 2 diabetes</a>, showing a positive metabolic impact. All great news for cheese lovers.</p> <h2>2. Cheese is Good for Your Teeth</h2> <p>As weird as it sounds, cheese is good for your dental health. In addition to containing calcium, which is great for bone health, consuming cheese and other dairy products may help <a href="http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2013/06/dairy-does-the-mouth-good-new-dental-research-shows-cheese-may-p.html">protect against cavities</a>. A study in 2013 compared the pH level in subjects' mouths before and after consuming dairy &mdash; a low pH puts a person at risk for tooth erosion. The group that ate cheese showed a rapid increase in pH levels, suggesting that cheese <em>could </em>have anti-cavity properties. Cheese was already a better snack choice for dental health than carb-filled or sugary snacks, and now it's even better. Not only will cheese make your tastebuds really happy, it'll keep your teeth smile-worthy, too.</p> <h2>3. Cheese May Help Lower Your Risk of Coronary Heart Disease</h2> <p>French people eat a lot more cheese than Americans on average, and yet they typically have low rates of coronary heart disease. This &quot;French paradox&quot; has long confused scientists, since current logic tells us that all of that saturated fat can lead to real heart problems. Clearly there is something else going on, and new studies are beginning to shed light on the subject. A recent Danish study showed that a diet including cheese may have a <a href="http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf505878a">positive effect on gut bacteria</a>, which in turn affects lipids in the blood. Further research could lead to a new understanding about what affects cheese has on the body and how the body processes it, changing how we view cheese products.</p> <h2>4. Cheese Helps Build Strong Bones</h2> <p>As you are most likely aware, dairy is a good way to get the majority of your calcium intake. Calcium is essential to bone health, as is vitamin D. Cheese is an especially good source of both of these vitamins &mdash; two slices of Swiss cheese contain a whopping 44% of your recommended daily calcium intake. Cheese also contains vitamins K2 and D3, and when consumed along with calcium, they are especially powerful for protecting your <a href="http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/06/17/heart-healthy-cheese.aspx">brain, heart, and bones</a>. Vitamin K2 helps transport calcium into the proper areas of the body like your bones and teeth, and helps keep it from being deposited where it shouldn't, like arteries.</p> <h2>5. Cheese Is Part of a Healthy Diet</h2> <p>This may seem obvious by now, but it's worth pointing out that cheese can and should be part of a healthy diet. It's a great source of protein, which helps fill you up and gives you energy. Cheese is high in calcium, phosphorus, vitamin A, and zinc, all of which are necessary for a healthy lifestyle. Most cheese products are gluten-free and low in lactose, making them safe to eat for most lactose-intolerant people. While some are higher in sodium than others, none contain nearly as much sodium as many processed foods, making them a healthier snack. So sprinkle a little cheese on your salad or pasta, or enjoy a small plate of cheese and whole wheat crackers &mdash; it's good for you.</p> <p><em>What's your favorite healthful cheese?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/laurel-randolph">Laurel Randolph</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-science-says-its-ok-to-eat-more-cheese">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/milking-it-5-easy-homemade-cheeses">Milking It: 5 Easy Homemade Cheeses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-foods-scientifically-proven-to-help-you-sleep">6 Foods Scientifically Proven to Help You Sleep</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-nutrients-you-need-more-of">7 Nutrients You Need More Of</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-too-high-to-pay">The Cost of Meat—Too High To Pay</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/great-ways-to-get-calcium">Great Ways to Get Calcium</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink Health and Beauty calcium cheese dairy snacking vitamin D Mon, 08 Jun 2015 15:00:12 +0000 Laurel Randolph 1445023 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Healthy Homemade Yogurt Recipes http://www.wisebread.com/6-healthy-homemade-yogurt-recipes <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-healthy-homemade-yogurt-recipes" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/yogurt_parfait_000016879134.jpg" alt="Delicious impromptu yogurt parfait recipe that will change your life" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>One of my more indulgent grocery expenses is yogurt, and those tubs really add up. It doesn't matter what kind &mdash; plain, Greek, Icelandic, vegan, etc. &mdash; I'm hooked on all those healthy bacteria and tasty flavors.</p> <p>But did you know that you can make yogurt in the comfort and convenience of your own kitchen? It's true. Even better: It costs far less than the cartons at the store. So, go get your apron, 'cause it's yogurt-making time!</p> <h2>1. Crock-Pot Yogurt</h2> <p>What could be easier than simmering DIY <a href="http://moneysavingmom.com/2012/06/homemade-yogurt-in-the-crock-pot.html">yogurt in your slow cooker</a>? Start by pouring half a gallon of milk into your crock pot and setting it on low for just under three hours. Let it sit for three hours more. Then take a few spoonfuls of the warmed milk and mix with a half cup of your favorite yogurt as a starter (it should contain &quot;active cultures&quot; listed on the label). Combine with the rest of the pot, cover with a towel, and let rest for another eight to 12 hours before spooning into airtight containers and transferring to your refrigerator.</p> <h2>2. Countertop Yogurt</h2> <p>This <a href="http://holisticsquid.com/the-easiest-homemade-yogurt-ever/">raw yogurt</a> can be made right atop your kitchen counter. You'll need raw milk, packaged cultures, jars, a nonreactive saucepan, and some clean cloths. Heat your milk in the saucepan until it starts to rise, then let cool to room temperature before stirring in the cultures to create your starter. From there, take one tablespoon of starter and place in a glass jar. Fill the rest up with raw milk (leaving one inch for headspace). Let sit on your countertop overnight, then place in the fridge to set.</p> <h2>3. Coconut Yogurt</h2> <p>This delicious <a href="http://tasty-yummies.com/2014/06/03/how-to-make-coconut-milk-yogurt/">coconut milk yogurt</a> requires just four ingredients. Coconut milk (full fat, canned works best), sweetener, starter (like probiotic powder), and optional thickener. Once you gather these items, the process is simple. Heat the coconut milk and sweetener until just boiling, then allow to cool to 115 degrees Fahrenheit. Stir in the thickener. Once cooled, add the probiotics as well. Then let culture for eight hours to a full day.</p> <h2>4. Almond Milk Yogurt</h2> <p>Another great vegan alternative is this <a href="http://www.lexieskitchen.com/lexies_kitchen/2011/9/14/almond-milk-yogurt-dairy-free.html">almond milk yogurt</a> &mdash; starting with pure almonds. You'll need some additional thickening agents for this mix, including agar agar and arrowroot powder. From there, soak almonds in filtered water overnight. Blend everything in a high-powered blender and strain out solid pieces. You'll heat this milk and combine with the thickeners before adding to a <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000EX16RY/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000EX16RY&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=MXHMNAJTHAEEL5AS">yogurt maker</a> and letting sit another good eight to 10 hours before chilling.</p> <h2>5. Greek Yogurt</h2> <p>Making thick <a href="http://tastykitchen.com/recipes/homemade-ingredients/homemade-greek-yogurt/">Greek yogurt</a> is very much like the processes in the other recipes. The difference is in the straining. So, after you've mixed and heated and set your yogurt, you'll line a colander with cheesecloth. Pour the yogurt inside and gather the corners to let it drain for five hours (or until you reach your desired consistency). That's the secret step.</p> <h2>6. Kefir</h2> <p>I only recently started enjoying <a href="http://www.diynatural.com/how-to-make-kefir/">homemade kefir</a> &mdash; a drinkable yogurt &mdash; as part of my everyday routine. And like most things, you can make it at home using whole ingredients. The key here is fermentation, which occurs when you allow milk to sit with kefir grains for 12 to 48 hours. After this critical part of the process, just pour through a strainer, store, and retain grains for future kefir-making sessions.</p> <p><em>Have you made yogurt at home? What's your favorite method?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-marcin">Ashley Marcin</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-healthy-homemade-yogurt-recipes">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-creative-delicious-things-you-can-make-in-a-blender">15 Creative, Delicious Things You Can Make in a Blender</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-cool-uses-for-a-blender">14 Cool Uses for a Blender</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-popular-snacks-you-can-make-at-home">14 Popular Snacks You Can Make at Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/food-hacks-recipes">Food Hacks: Recipes</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-indulgent-desserts-that-are-actually-good-for-you">10 Indulgent Desserts That Are Actually Good for You</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink crock pot dairy health foods Homemade recipes vegan yogurt Fri, 24 Apr 2015 09:00:09 +0000 Ashley Marcin 1396577 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Ways to Get Stronger Bones Without Eating Dairy http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-get-stronger-bones-without-eating-dairy <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-ways-to-get-stronger-bones-without-eating-dairy" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/running-176984567.jpg" alt="running" title="running" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Bone health is something we all must consider long before we become seniors. Most people reach their <a href="http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00127">maximum bone mass between ages 25 and 30</a>. By age 40, we begin to lose bone mass. The loss of bone mass leads to osteoporosis &mdash; a condition that makes bones more brittle and susceptible to breaks. The good news is we can stave off bone loss with healthy lifestyle choices including nutrition and exercise. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/great-ways-to-get-calcium?ref=seealso">Great Ways to Get Calcium</a>)</p> <p>One of the key minerals for healthy bones is calcium. Healthy bones also need vitamin D, magnesium, vitamin C, and vitamin K. While dairy is a wonderful way to make sure we get the calcium and vitamin D we need, there are also many other ways to protect our bone health.</p> <h2>1. Eat Your Fruits and Veggies</h2> <p>Many fruits and vegetables are rich in calcium and the other <a href="http://nof.org/foods">minerals that comprise healthy bones</a>. Calcium is abundant in dark leafy greens (especially kale, collard, dandelion, mustard, and turnip greens) okra, Chinese cabbage, and broccoli. Spinach, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and raisins have healthy doses of magnesium and potassium.</p> <h2>2. Go Fish</h2> <p>Fish are also a great source of calcium and vitamin D, <a href="http://www.dietandfitnesstoday.com/fish-high-in-calcium.php">though only certain species</a>. The best bets are the fatty fish varieties: sardines, salmon, mackerel, and tuna. These are even better if they are wild as opposed to farm raised. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-buy-and-prepare-fresh-fish?ref=seealso">How to Buy and Prep Fresh Fish</a>)</p> <h2>3. Find Fortified Foods</h2> <p>Many foods are now fortified with calcium and vitamin D. Check your grocery store for fortified juices, cereals, and bread.</p> <h2>4. Try Weight-Bearing Exercise</h2> <p>Exercise is good for our overall health. For exercise to be of maximum benefit to our bones, <a href="http://nof.org/articles/238">it must be weight-bearing</a>. Walking, jogging, and yoga are weight-bearing exercises, meaning we use our own weight to strengthen the body. Swimming is not a weight-bearing exercise, so it's less helpful for bone health than other options.</p> <h2>5. Cut the Salt</h2> <p>Too much <a href="http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120724131604.htm">sodium leeches calcium from the bones</a>, so limit your intake to less than 2,400 mg or less of sodium per day. As a general rule, avoid foods that have 20% or more of the recommended daily sodium intake. Salt is one of those ingredients that is hidden in a lot of packaged foods, so whole foods you prepare at home can go a long way toward cutting excess sodium from your diet. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-eat-less-salt-without-losing-flavor?ref=seealso">4 Ways to Eat Less Salt</a>)</p> <h2>6. Supplements</h2> <p>While our bodies most effectively process nutrients in their natural form in food, <a href="http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART02862/supplements-for-bone-and-joint-health.html">supplements can help</a>, too. Vitamin D and calcium supplements are readily available at most drug stores. Always consult your doctor before beginning a supplement routine.</p> <h2>7. Strengthen Muscles</h2> <p>Our skeletons support our muscles. The <a href="http://nof.org/articles/238">stronger we keep our muscles</a>, the less stress they place on our bones. Weight-bearing exercise and adding strength building with weights to our workouts can help us keep our entire body strong. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-great-body-weight-exercises-and-why-you-should-do-them?ref=seealso">Body Weight Exercises</a>)</p> <h2>8. Improve Flexibility</h2> <p>In addition to strength building, <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/specialtopic/physical-activity/exercise's-effects-on-bones-and-muscles.html">flexibility also helps maintain bone health</a> by improving our balance and reducing our risk of falls. While many people assume they are either flexible or not, flexibility can be improved over time with practice. Stretching after a workout and yoga are great ways to increase flexibility.</p> <h2>9. Here Comes the Sun</h2> <p>The best way to increase our vitamin D level is to get some sun. In as <a href="http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/how-do-i-get-the-vitamin-d-my-body-needs/">little as 15 minutes</a> a day of sun exposure, your body can produce all the vitamin D it needs.</p> <h2>10. Limit Alcohol, Caffeine, and Cola</h2> <p>Alcohol, caffeine, and cola <a href="http://guide2bonehealth.com/beverages-sap-your-bones">interfere with calcium absorption</a>, so even if we're eating right for bone health, consuming large amounts of these three beverages could negate the nutritional benefits. Limit alcohol intake to no more than two to three drinks per day, drink no more than three cups of coffee or tea per day, and drink cola only in moderation.</p> <p>While our bone density and health has a genetic component, our choices in diet and exercise also have a strong impact on bone strength. By making these changes above, we can stop, and in some cases even reverse, bone loss.</p> <p><em>What are you doing to promote healthy bones? Please share in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/christa-avampato">Christa Avampato</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-get-stronger-bones-without-eating-dairy">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-fitness-gadgets-actually-worth-the-money">5 Fitness Gadgets Actually Worth the Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-resistance-bands">The 5 Best Resistance Bands</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-most-affordable-gym-memberships">5 Most Affordable Gym Memberships</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-exercise-videos">The 5 Best Exercise Videos</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-online-workout-videos-for-free-or-cheap">7 Online Workout Videos for Free or Cheap</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Health and Beauty bones dairy exercise fitness Fri, 21 Mar 2014 10:36:16 +0000 Christa Avampato 1131913 at http://www.wisebread.com Milking It: 5 Easy Homemade Cheeses http://www.wisebread.com/milking-it-5-easy-homemade-cheeses <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/milking-it-5-easy-homemade-cheeses" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/cheese_shop2.jpg" alt="Cheese shop" title="Cheese shop" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="205" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>One of the things that always amazes me about cooking is how, if you have a little bit of patience and a willingness to follow directions, certain totally intimidating foods turn out to be relatively easy to make. Like bagels. OK, your homemade bagels might not taste exactly like the ones at your favorite NYC nosheri. But if you can make a yeast bread, you can make tasty bagels &mdash; all you really have to do is add a step where you boil them.</p> <p>In this way, cooking is like a drug to me. Quick breads are a gateway to yeast breads. Yeast breads are a gateway to bagels. Bagels are a gateway to making homemade puff pastry dough. And cheese...well!</p> <p>Cheese was one of those foods that I always assumed I couldn't make. Since some cheeses are complex, I assumed they all were, requiring months of aging, crazy bacterial cultures, and area-specific milks.</p> <p>The truth is that many fresh cheeses are startlingly easy to make, requiring few or none of these things (although the better the milk you get is, the better your cheese will taste). Here are five kinds of cheese you can easily make yourself. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/homebrewed-beer-make-your-own-and-save-money">Homebrewed Beer: Make Your Own and Save Money?</a>)</p> <h2>1. Cottage Cheese</h2> <p>Remember Little Miss Muffet eating her curds and whey? If she had spent a little more time in the kitchen, she could have ended up with some cottage cheese. The process is simple &mdash; after heating milk, add an acid (usually vinegar or lemon juice), and the milk will separate into curds and whey. Then, simply drain the whey from the curds, and what you have left is cottage cheese.</p> <p>Homemade cottage cheese doesn't taste like the salt-laden store-bought stuff &mdash; it's much closer to the &quot;farmer's cheese&quot; you can sometimes find. To get your homemade cottage cheese going, try this <a href="http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/quick-cottage-cheese-recipe/index.html">cottage cheese recipe</a> from Alton Brown. Or, if you are interested in trying an easy cheese that uses rennet, a cheesemaking enzyme traditionally found in animal stomachs (there's vegetarian rennet as well), make this <a href="http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2006/03/la-presure-home-1/">recipe from chef David Lebovitz</a>.</p> <p>When they're made professionally, ricotta and cottage cheese are different &mdash; cottage cheese uses the curds, and ricotta uses the whey. However, if you want to make a homemade ricotta, the two cheeses are somewhat interchangeable (just look at this <a href="http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Fresh-Homemade-Ricotta-234282">ricotta recipe</a> from&nbsp;Epicurious).</p> <h2>2. Paneer</h2> <p>A staple of Indian cooking, Paneer is a type of cottage cheese that is typically cut in blocks and served in dishes such as <a href="http://www.epicurious.com/articlesguides/cuisines/aroundtheworldin80dishes/indiasaagpaneerrecipe/recipes/food/views/Indian-Cheese-and-Red-Peppers-in-Fragrant-Spinach-Sauce-230902">Saag Paneer</a>. The process to create it is very similar to cottage cheese. This <a href="http://www.manjulaskitchen.com/2008/05/24/how-to-make-paneer/">paneer recipe</a> from Indian cooking site Manjula's Kitchen has both a video and written instructions.</p> <h2>3. Fresh Mozzarella</h2> <p>A staple of Caprese salads, sliced-baguette sandwiches, and pizza, fresh mozzarella follows a similar process to cottage cheese, with a bit more complexity. After you curdle your milk and allow the cheese to drain, you then knead it until it reaches that elastic fresh-mozzarella consistency.</p> <p>Most recipes for fresh <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ten-things-to-do-with-bulk-block-mozzarella">mozzarella</a> do call for rennet, which you can find in the baking section of some grocery stores. Another great resource is <a href="http://www.leeners.com/cheese.html">Leeners</a>, a company that sells supplies for cheesemaking, homebrewing, and similar endeavors. As for a recipe, Chow has one that instructs you how to <a href="http://www.chow.com/food-news/54705/make-your-own-mozzarella/">make mozzarella</a> from scratch or from cheese curds.</p> <h2>4. Goat Cheese</h2> <p>Obviously, if you want to tackle goat cheese, you'll need to find goat's milk. Once you've done that, creating a cottage-cheese style goat cheese is simple. The blog Jules Food has instructions for making an easy, <a href="http://julesfood.blogspot.com/2011/02/homemade-goat-cheese.html">herbed goat cheese</a>.</p> <h2>5. Chevre</h2> <p>If you're feeling ready to tackle another level in cheesemaking, chevre is a great place to start since it doesn't require any aging. What this fresh, creamy goat's milk cheese does require is a starter bacterial culture (you can purchase it from <a href="http://www.leeners.com/cheese-ingredients-primary-cultures.html">Leeners</a> or elsewhere online if you don't have a local cheesemaking supply shop). Then, simply follow these <a href="http://www.tartedujour.com/journal/2011/4/11/homemade-chevre-fresh-from-the-farm.html">chevre instructions</a> from Tarte du Jour. The page also features a recipe for a tart that incorporates said chevre.</p> <p><em>Have you tried cheesemaking?&nbsp;What did you make? Share your thoughts in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/meg-favreau">Meg Favreau</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/milking-it-5-easy-homemade-cheeses">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-science-says-its-ok-to-eat-more-cheese">5 Reasons Science Says It&#039;s OK to Eat More Cheese</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kitchen-hacks-i-can-make-this-in-that">Kitchen Hacks: I Can Make This in That?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-moonshine">How to Make Moonshine</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-quick-cheap-lunch-ideas">25 Quick, Cheap Lunch Ideas</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fresh-fruits-and-vegetables-by-the-month">Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, By the Month</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> DIY Food and Drink cheese dairy easy recipes Fri, 05 Aug 2011 10:24:08 +0000 Meg Favreau 641477 at http://www.wisebread.com Low-Carb: Less Carbon in Your Meals? http://www.wisebread.com/low-carb-less-carbon-in-your-meals <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/low-carb-less-carbon-in-your-meals" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/semitruck.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>These days, it’s pretty much accepted practice to have a high carbon diet — the tomatoes in your salad may have ridden on a truck for days to get to you and the fish you’re grilling tonight may have caught a trans-Pacific flight to get to your table. We’re talking some pretty high carbon emissions just to make a meal.</p> <p>Environmentally-speaking, some low-carb — carbon, that is — is good for your diet and, considering the cost of food that has to be trucked into your area is rising, it might do your wallet some good as well. </p> <p>Most grocery stores don’t label locally-produced foods very clearly, but there are a couple of clear starting points for removing some carbon from your diet. Beef and dairy are ranked as the foods with the highest associated carbon emissions — although the fault doesn’t entirely lie with the transport. Cows, the source of both, are notorious sources of carbon emissions. As any farm kid can tell you, they produce methane — and lots of it! A reduction in the numbers of cows would go a long way towards reducing carbon emissions. Consider reducing the amount of beef and cheese you consume — consider poultry as an alternative, even if you can’t get it locally. </p> <p>Locally-grown produce is often suggested as a way to cut grocery bills and a local farmer’s market does offer a lot of good options. But, for most of us, they aren’t really a year round option. If you’ve got the time to spare, you might consider canning some local fruits and veggies — but honestly, most of us probably won’t. In that case, it’s worthwhile considering those canned varieties available at the grocery store. The occasional piece of fresh fruit isn’t going to ruin the environment, but out-of-season produce requires plenty of energy (and the associated emissions) to either grow or ship in from warmer climates. Long lasting canned goods are a better deal.</p> <p>One kind of food makes for the absolutely worst carbon emissions, though: the kind that gets thrown away. Not only is the energy used to get food to the consumer wasted, but then the food decomposes as well. Planning out meals ahead of time and reducing waste as much as possible is one of the clearest techniques most of us can use to lower our carbon footprint. And, we get the added benefit of saving money when we don’t buy food we won’t use.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/thursday-bram">Thursday Bram</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/low-carb-less-carbon-in-your-meals">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-too-high-to-pay">The Cost of Meat—Too High To Pay</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fresh-fruits-and-vegetables-by-the-month">Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, By the Month</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-on-budget-while-eating-paleo">How to Stay on Budget While Eating Paleo</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-easy-ways-to-make-cheap-cuts-of-meat-taste-expensive">25 Easy Ways to Make Cheap Cuts of Meat Taste Expensive</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-produce-workers-guide-to-choosing-fruits-and-vegetables">The Produce Worker&#039;s Guide to Choosing Fruits and Vegetables</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink carbon emission dairy meat produce Thu, 22 May 2008 18:44:01 +0000 Thursday Bram 2118 at http://www.wisebread.com The Cost of Meat—Too High To Pay http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-too-high-to-pay <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-cost-of-meat-too-high-to-pay" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/groundbeef.jpg" alt="US ground beef" title="US ground beef" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p class="MsoNormal">Let me start by making one thing clear: I do not think it is wrong to eat meat.<span> </span>It&#39;s not because I believe God gave us &quot;dominion&quot; over everything on Earth either.<span> </span>It&#39;s because I&#39;ve watched shows on Discovery; I&#39;ve seen <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000MR9D5E?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B000MR9D5E">Planet Earth</a>.<span> </span>Nature doesn&#39;t blink an eye when it comes to one species eating another.<span> </span>So I&#39;m not a newly converted vegan animal rights activist condemning all meat eaters. I just think there is a lot of information about the real and true cost of meat that most people aren&#39;t aware of. It might make you think twice before buying that $0.99 whopper. And that&#39;s all I could hope for. We should want to be able to make informed decisions that affect our personal health, public health, the environment, the animals we use for food, and legislation in our country. </p> <!--break--><!--break--><p class="MsoNormal">We are a very uninformed group of people, Americans that is.<span> </span>Much truth has been hidden in the name of profit margins.<span> </span>And the blame does not fall solely on the shoulders of the few big companies that control the majority of certain commodities.<span> </span>The blame also falls on us as consumers to allow ourselves to be lied to because we actually like it better that way.<span> </span>We want to eat our veal with no guilt in our stomach.<span> </span>We want to see our diamond engagement rings shining brightly, untainted with conflict.<span> </span>We want to fill up our SUVs without the burden of a war far away on our shoulders.<span> </span>We want to pay for our comforts in low dollar amounts, and feel debt free when we leave the store.<span> </span>We are generally a responsible group of people.<span> </span>But we feel we can&#39;t be held responsible for what we don&#39;t know, and especially what we&#39;re told we can&#39;t understand.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">This article does not demand that anyone stop eating meat.<span> </span>But in this day and age, being uninformed is simply no excuse to continue being ignorant.<span> </span>This article intends to give a little information regarding the choices we make everyday, at every meal.<span> </span>After reading this, my intention is that some will seek out more information, some will search for local sustainable farms in their area, some will resolve to eat <em>less</em> meat, some will join organizations to petition our state and federal officials to make changes in the system, and some will simply spread the word.<span> </span>For those who decide to continue consuming meat and dairy made from factory farms, at least your decision will be an informed one.<span> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Most of the information in this article is taken from John Robbins&#39; <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1573247022?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1573247022"><em>The Food Revolution</em></a>. <span> </span>I&#39;m not saying he is the ultimate authority, nor to take everything at face value.<span> </span>You can believe him, you can easily look up the information yourself, or you can believe this is all crap, overblown sensational fear inducing propaganda.<span> </span>But I haven&#39;t had a good night&#39;s rest since picking up the book, and I&#39;ve read many others on this topic.<span> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">The truth is you can take anything out of context.<span> </span>You can have different results show up in different studies. But many people have already done the work of gathering data to provide well researched information.<span> </span>Short of doing years of research like <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1594200823?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1594200823">Michael Pollan</a>, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1573247022?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1573247022">John Robbins</a> , <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1932100660?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1932100660">T. Colin &amp; Thomas M. Campbell</a>, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0060838582?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0060838582">Eric Schlosser</a>, and many others, we will have to decide who is credible and objective in their conclusions.<span> </span>I&#39;ll choose the people who have nothing to gain by changing our lifestyles.<span> </span>Yes, he&#39;s selling books (which I borrowed from the library).<span> </span>But whether we are persuaded by him doesn&#39;t give him any additional profit.<span> </span>He doesn&#39;t have any John Robbins power bars for sale.<span> </span>And I believe that his aim is to inform us, candidly and urgently, of the grave consequences of our food choices. The meat/dairy industry on the other hand, have every reason to confuse and misinform.<span> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">By the way, I&#39;m not an expert myself, in case you were wondering.<span> </span>My opinion doesn&#39;t matter.<span> </span>So please don&#39;t leave nasty comments about why you choose to eat meat, point to specific words or numbers to say they&#39;re wrong or outdated (<em>The Food Revolution </em>was published in 2001), how the studies I&#39;ve quoted or the books I&#39;ve read are full of misinformation, or how my article is poorly written and poorly researched.<span> </span>I am not trying to write a well researched paper for publication consideration in a medical journal.<span> </span>This is an opinion piece, a commentary, a plea for us to fight for facts, not marketing slogans.<span> </span>You do not need to validate your choices to anyone but yourself.<span> </span>But anyone would be naïve to believe that the choices we make as part of the most powerful nation in the world has no global effects.<span> </span>I&#39;m simply asking you to consider the effects of your choices on the living beings, big and small, that we share the world with.<span> </span>Consider, then choose.<span> </span>At least you can&#39;t ever say &quot;no one told you.&quot;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span class="me">I&#39;m breaking up the remainder of this article into five parts, in the interest of page length and easy access. <span> </span>Each part will have its own argument. These are completed, located in <a href="/topic/extra-commentary">Extra Commentary</a> and also directly through its own link: <span> </span></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span class="me"><strong><a href="/the-cost-of-meat-the-personal-health-argument">The Personal Health Argument</a> </strong>addresses the implications of dairy and meat consumption on our health, specifically heart disease, cancer, and calcium intake.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span class="me"><a href="/the-cost-of-meat-the-public-health-argument"><strong>The Public Health Argument</strong></a> addresses the cost effective measures factory farms use to yield higher production and profits at the cost of public health. This will include food-borne illness, irradiation, the use of antibiotics, growth hormones, and what we feed the animals we eat.<span> </span></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span class="me"><a href="/the-cost-of-meat-the-cruelty-argument"><strong>The Cruelty Argument</strong></a> addresses the horrible conditions and treatment the animals in factory farms are subjected to.<span> </span>I know people might choose to skip over this argument, thinking, &quot;yeah, yeah, I know it&#39;s bad, but we need to eat.&quot;<span> </span>This argument isn&#39;t designed to compel people to stop eating meat.<span> </span>This argument attempts to show how <em>unnecessarily</em> cruel and horrible the conditions are.<span> </span>We can still eat meat and treat the animals well.<span> </span>Small family farms have always done this.<span> </span>At the very least, we can demand that compassion be shown to these living, breathing, <em>feeling</em>, beings before they end up on our plate.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span class="me"><a href="/the-cost-of-meat-the-environment-argument"><strong>The Environment Argument</strong></a> addresses the harm factory farming does to our environment, including water usage, waste contamination, and rainforest destruction.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="/the-cost-of-meat-the-market-demand-argument"><strong>The Market Demand Argument</strong></a> illustrates how a little pressure from the market can go a long way. Already, consumer awareness of the gross treatment of animals in factory farms and slaughterhouses, as well as the health implications with consuming antibiotics and hormones given to the animals has given rise to &quot;Organic&quot; and &quot;Natural&quot; products found in most supermarkets. But these labels are purposely deceptive. The topics here will include deciphering common food labels and describes what happened when PETA launched its &quot;McCruelty to go&quot; campaign against McDonald&#39;s, and the changes the corporation implemented as a result. </p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lynn-truong">Lynn Truong</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-too-high-to-pay">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ultimate-green-workout">The Ultimate &quot;Green&quot; Workout</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/so-you-think-youre-a-carnivore">So, You Think You&#039;re a Carnivore?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-in-defense-of-food">Book review: In Defense of Food</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-on-budget-while-eating-paleo">How to Stay on Budget While Eating Paleo</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-new-face-of-poverty-is-fat">The new face of poverty is fat</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink Green Living Health and Beauty animal cruelty dairy food revolution Health john robbins meat plant-based diet preventing cancer Mon, 21 May 2007 20:56:10 +0000 Lynn Truong 664 at http://www.wisebread.com The Cost of Meat—The Personal Health Argument http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-the-personal-health-argument <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-cost-of-meat-the-personal-health-argument" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/health.jpg" alt="health forms" title="health forms" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p class="MsoNormal"><em>This continues from &quot;<a href="/the-cost-of-meat-too-high-to-pay">The Cost of Meat—Too High To Pay</a>.&quot; The Personal Health Argument attempts to show that there is few, if any, benefit from eating meat. This will cover heart disease, cancer, and calcium intake.<span> </span></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal">While the meat/dairy industry would have us believe we need both in every meal to have a balanced diet, many studies have shown a high correlation between meat/dairy consumption and major health problems, including heart disease and cancer.<span> </span>Significant decrease in health problems have been associated with moving to a plant-based diet.<span> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">The following information is taken from John Robbins&#39; <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1573247022?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1573247022"><em>The Food Revolution</em></a>.<span> </span>The references I list here are not as detailed as his endnotes (page numbers, dates, etc.), but should be sufficient information to find through a quick search on the web.<span> </span>If any information does not have a source listed, it did not have a source cited in <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1573247022?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1573247022"><em>The Food Revolution</em></a>.<span> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong><u>Heart Disease</u></strong></p> <ul> <li>A high blood cholesterol level is the single greatest risk factor for heart disease. —&quot;Atherosclerotic Risk Factors: Are There Ten or Is There Only One?&quot; <em>American Journal of Cardiology</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>The single most important factor in raising blood cholesterol levels is the consumption of saturated fat.<span> </span></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Meat contributes an extraordinarily significant percentage of the saturated fat in the American diet. —&quot;Where&#39;s the Ground Beef Labeling?&quot; <em>Nutrition Action</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>The primary dietary sources of cholesterol are eggs, shellfish, chicken, beef, fish, pork, cheese, butter, and milk.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Chicken has about as much cholesterol as beef.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Eating the standard American diet that&#39;s based on meat and dairy products, with plenty of white flour and white sugar, one-third of the women and one-half of the men in the U.S. population die of heart disease.<span> </span>Meanwhile, vegetarians and vegans not only have far less heart disease, but also have lower rates of cancer, hypertension, diabetes, gallstones, kidney disease, obesity, and colon disease. —<em><a href="%3ca%20href=%22http:/www.amazon.com/gp/product/0763732419?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0763732419%22%3eThe%20Dietitian&#39;s%20Guide%20to%20Vegetarian%20Diets:%20Issues%20and%20Applications%3c/a%3e%3cimg%20src=%22http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=w">The Dietitian&#39;s Guide to Vegetarian Diets: Issues and Applications</a></em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Vegetarians have the lowest rates of coronary heart disease of any group in the country. —William Castelli, M.D., Framingham Health Study</li> </ul> <ul> <li>In regions where meat is scarce, cardiovascular disease is unknown. —&quot;The Irradiation Controversy&quot; <em>Time </em>Magazine</li> </ul> <ul> <li>No plant food contains any cholesterol.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>People with high blood pressure are seven times more likely to suffer a stroke, four times more likely to have a heart attack, and five times more likely to die of congestive heart failure than people with normal blood pressure.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Incidence of high blood pressure in meat eaters compared to vegetarians: Nearly triple —&quot;Low Blood Pressure in Vegetarians…&quot; <em>American Journal of Clinical Nutrition</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Patients with high blood pressure who achieve substantial improvement by switching to a vegetarian diet: 30-75 percent —&quot;A Vegan Regimen with Reduced Medication in the Treatment of Hypertension&quot; <em>British Medical Journal</em></li> </ul> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong><u>Cancer</u></strong></p> <ul> <li>In 1996 the American Cancer Society released guidelines calling for a reduction in meat intake to lower the risk of cancer.<span> </span></li> </ul> <ul> <li>The primary route through which many environmental carcinogens enter the human body is through food, and specifically through animal products.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Dioxin is a carcinogen.<span> </span></li> </ul> <ul> <li>The EPA says that up to 95% of human dioxin exposure comes from red meat, fish, and dairy products. —&quot;FDA Launches Study on Dioxin…&quot; <em>Food Chemical News</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>A low-fat plant-based diet would not only lower the heart attack rate about 85%, but would lower the cancer rate 60 percent. —William Castelli, M.D., Director, Framingham Health Study</li> </ul> <p><em>Prostate Cancer</em> <ul> <li>Just as data indicate a strong connection between consumption of animal fat, high blood pressure, and stroke, so too does the evidence suggest stunning correlations between dairy consumption and prostate cancer.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Total fat consumption was directly related to risk of advanced prostate cancer. This association was due primarily to animal fat, but not vegetable fat. Red meat represented the food group with the strongest positive association with advanced cancer. —<a href="http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/85/19/1571">&quot;A Prospective Study of Dietary Fat and Risk of Prostate Cancer&quot; <em>Journal of the National Cancer Institute</em></a></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Most common cancer among American men: Prostate cancer</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Rick of prostate cancer for men who consume high amounts of dairy products: 70% increase. —&quot;Dairy Products Linked to Prostate Cancer&quot; Associated Press</li> </ul> <p class="MsoNormal"><em>Colon Cancer</em> </p> <ul> <li>Of all forms of cancer, colon cancer may be the most strongly linked to diet.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Risk of colon cancer for women who eat red meat daily compared to those who eat it less than once a month: 250 percent greater. —Caldwell Esselstyn, Beyond Surgery </li> </ul> <ul> <li>Risk of colon cancer or people who eat red meat once a week compared to those who abstain: 38 percent greater —&quot;Dietary Risk Factors for Colon Cancer in a Low-Risk Population&quot; <em>American Journal of Epidemiology</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Risk of colon cancer for people who eat poultry once a week compared to those who abstain: 55 percent greater —&quot;Dietary Risk Factors for Colon Cancer in a Low-Risk Population&quot; <em>American Journal of Epidemiology</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Risk of colon cancer for people who eat poultry four times a week compared to those who abstain: 200-300 percent greater —&quot;Dietary Risk Factors for Colon Cancer in a Low-Risk Population&quot; <em>American Journal of Epidemiology</em></li> </ul> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong><u>Calcium and Bones</u></strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal">The ubiquitous &quot;milk moustache&quot; ads have made us believe we need milk to get enough calcium.<span> </span>The milk industry is trying to imply that calcium intake from milk will lower the risk of osteoporosis and high blood pressure, that it helps women have stronger bones and help bone growth in among growing children.<span> </span>These are misleading claims, because many studies have linked the intake of animal protein to bone loss (animal protein is present in dairy), and showing a worse calcium balance with increased dairy consumption. These studies have shown that the more animal protein we eat, the more calcium we lose. </p> <ul> <li>In an effort to prove their claims that milk helps prevent bone loss, the National Dairy Council funded a study where post-menopausal women drank three additional 8-ounce glasses of skim milk compared to the control group of post-menopausal women.<span> </span>The results, published in the <em>American Journal of Clinical Nutrition</em>, found that women who drank the extra milk actually lost more calcium from their bones than the control group of women who did not drink it. —&quot;The Effect of Milk Supplements on Calcium Metabolism…&quot; <em>American Journal of Clinical Nutrition</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>January 2001, the <em>American Journal of Clinical Nutrition</em> published a study that reported a dramatic correlation between the ratio of animal to vegetable protein in the diets of elderly women and their rate of bone loss.<span> </span>Even after adjusting for age, weight, estrogen use, tobacco use, exercise, calcium intake, and total protein intake, the women who had high ratio of animal to vegetable protein had 3x the rate of bone loss as the women with low ratio of animal to vegetable protein.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Studies have also shown elderly people with the highest dairy product consumption actually had double the risk of hip fracture compared to those with the lowest consumption. —&quot;Case-Control Study of Risk Factors for Hip Fractures in the Elderly&quot; <em>American Dietetic Association </em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Countries with the highest consumption of dairy products: Finland, Sweden, United States, England —McDougall, John <em>McDougall&#39;s Medicine</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Countries with the highest rates of osteoporosis: Finland, Sweden, U.S., England —McDougall, John <em>McDougall&#39;s Medicine</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Amount of calcium loss in women after eating a hamburger: 28 milligrams —Connie Weaver, Ph.D., of Purdue University, at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine&#39;s Summit on the Dietary Guidelines 2000</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Amount of calcium loss in woman after drinking a cup of coffee: 2 milligrams —Connie Weaver, Ph.D., of Purdue University, at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine&#39;s Summit on the Dietary Guidelines 2000</li> </ul> <ul> <li>The milk industry argue that milk is the best way to get calcium, because of its bio-availability (how much calcium is absorbed by our digestive system), and that it would be difficult to meet our daily calcium needs without milk.<span> </span></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Studies have shown vegans get an average of 627mg/day (amount in one glass of milk is 300mg).<span> </span>—&quot;A Comparative Evaluation of Vegan, Vegetarian, and Omnivore Diets&quot; <em>Journal of Plant Foods; </em>&quot;Nutrient Intakes and Eating Behavior Scores of Vegetarian and Nonvegetarian Women&quot;<em> Journal of the American Dietetic Association </em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>The level of calcium that the federal government has set as the daily requirement has been set controversially high, primarily due to the political pressure of the dairy industry.<span> </span>90% of all Americans don&#39;t reach it.</li> </ul> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lynn-truong">Lynn Truong</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-the-personal-health-argument">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-too-high-to-pay">The Cost of Meat—Too High To Pay</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/exercise-and-alcohol-good-for-your-brain">Exercise (and alcohol) good for your brain</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-the-public-health-argument">The Cost of Meat—The Public Health Argument</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-science-says-its-ok-to-eat-more-cheese">5 Reasons Science Says It&#039;s OK to Eat More Cheese</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/low-carb-less-carbon-in-your-meals">Low-Carb: Less Carbon in Your Meals?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Extra Commentary blood pressure calcium cancer dairy Health heart disease meat milk saturated fat Mon, 21 May 2007 20:55:39 +0000 Lynn Truong 665 at http://www.wisebread.com