milk http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/5584/all en-US The Meaning of Milk Label Colors http://www.wisebread.com/the-meaning-of-milk-label-colors <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-meaning-of-milk-label-colors" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/milk_0.jpg" alt="Milk at the store" title="Milk at the store" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="150" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As Paul Michael pointed out in his post <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/breaking-the-bread-code-how-to-get-the-freshest-loaf">Breaking the Bread Code: How to Get the Freshest Loaf</a>, the plastic tabs on bread have meaning, and the colors are fairly standardized within the bread-making industry.</p> <p>But what about milk?</p> <p>We all know that different types of milk &mdash; from skim milk to whole milk and everything in-between &mdash; have colored caps and labels so you can tell them apart easily while you&rsquo;re shopping. What you might not know, however, is that there is no standardized system among dairies that calls for a certain type of milk to receive a specific color. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paint-a-room-and-wash-your-face-more-uses-for-powdered-milk-than-you-ever-imagined">More Uses for Powdered Milk Than You Ever Imagined</a>)</p> <p>Almost unanimously, the color for whole milk caps and labels is red &mdash; aside from a few rogue dairies that choose shades of orange or brown &mdash; which, light research suggests, is the result of do-as-the-Romans-do-type mentality. I looked up how the red cap started and why it is the preferred color chosen by most dairies, but there&rsquo;s virtually no authoritative evidence.</p> <p>The same thinking is also applied to 2% milk. Many dairies (but not all, by far) choose a variant of blue &mdash; from light to dark &mdash; to signify that the milk contains less fat but that it&rsquo;s not low fat.</p> <p>1% and skim milk is where the non-standardized system gets tricky. <a href="http://www.ehow.com/info_8476921_colors-milk-labels-mean.html">eHow</a> claims that green is the color of choice of most dairies for 1% milk, while skim milk generally receives a purple cap. Except that&rsquo;s not always the case &mdash; not even close. In fact, the 1% milk in my fridge, from Market Pantry (a Target brand), is yellow.</p> <p>All hope is not lost, though. Take a look at this <a href="http://blog.startled.com/milk-label-color-scheme-standardization">milk-label color-scheme standardization chart</a> compiled by amateur milk-color-code investigator Shawn Brenneman, author of the blog <a href="http://blog.startled.com/">startled</a>.</p> <p>He compiled the milk-cap colors for the four most popular milk types &mdash; skim, 1%, 2%, and whole &mdash; from 33 popular dairies. As I mentioned, most of the whole milk caps were red, but lessen the fat content in the milk and a seemingly random rainbow of colors appear. There&rsquo;s 2% with a red cap from Mayfield (which uses brown for whole milk), a purple cap for 1% from Alta Dena, and a green cap for skim from Sunnyside.</p> <p>What&rsquo;s even more interesting is that some brands &mdash; like <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-other-grocery-stores-should-steal-from-trader-joes">Trader Joe&rsquo;s</a> &mdash; don&rsquo;t distinguish their organic and non-organic skim milks &mdash; both receive a light blue cap &mdash; which can be deceiving to shoppers, especially those in a hurry.</p> <p>In addition, Brenneman even offers to help standardize the colors using this system:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Red Cap: </strong>Whole Milk</li> <li><strong>Purple Cap: </strong>Reduced-Fat (2%) Milk</li> <li><strong>Green: </strong>Low-Fat (1%) Milk</li> <li><strong>Light Blue: </strong>Skim Milk</li> <li><strong>Brown Cap: </strong>Chocolate Milk</li> <li><strong>Pink Cap: </strong>Strawberry Milk</li> <li><strong>Yellow Cap: </strong>Buttermilk</li> <li><strong>Orange Cap: </strong>Half and Half</li> <li><strong>Magenta Cap: </strong>Whipping Cream</li> </ul> <p>Seems like a well thought-out solution, considering that many dairies are already on board with these colors choices for the various types of milk.</p> <p>With such a seemingly easy problem to solve, why hasn&rsquo;t it been standardized yet?</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-meaning-of-milk-label-colors">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/horizon-organic-milk-is-it-all-just-lies">Horizon Organic Milk: Is it All Just Lies?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-and-worst-times-to-go-grocery-shopping">The Best and Worst Times to Go Grocery Shopping</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-81-best-tips-for-saving-big-at-the-grocery-store">Flashback Friday: The 81 Best Tips for Saving Big at the Grocery Store</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-to-shop-for-food-cheaply-without-a-tedious-grocery-list">Grocery Shopping for the Cheap and Lazy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-only-15-foods-that-are-worth-buying-organic">The Only 15 Foods That Are Worth Buying Organic</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink grocery shopping labels milk Thu, 17 Nov 2011 10:48:18 +0000 Mikey Rox 781123 at http://www.wisebread.com Nonfat dry milk--no longer a frugal alternative http://www.wisebread.com/nonfat-dry-milk-no-longer-a-frugal-alternative <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nonfat-dry-milk-no-longer-a-frugal-alternative" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/nonfat-milk-price-graph.png" alt="Graph of nonfat dry milk prices with 100% jump in past year" title="Nonfat Dry Milk Prices 1976-2007" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For more than thirty years, nonfat dry milk was a frugal staple. For things like baking and making yogurt, it was as good as fresh milk. Not many people wanted to drink the stuff, but a whole generation of frugal folks knew you could use it as an extender--make up a quart of nonfat dry milk and mix it with a gallon of fresh milk. (See Myscha&#39;s <a href="/powdered-milk-solutions-for-dairy-lovers">Powdered Milk Solutions for Dairy Lovers</a> for other good ways to use nonfat dry milk.)</p> <p>Since late summer last year, though, nonfat dry milk has been priced more like a gourmet specialty item than as the frugal alternative it used to be.</p> <p>To put it in context, food prices overall are up 4.5%, dairy and &quot;related products&quot; are up 13.1%, but nonfat dry milk is up 104%! At that price, it&#39;s literally as cheap to use fresh milk as it is to use dry. (Data from the <a href="http://www.bls.gov/cpi/">Bureau of Labor Statistics</a> and <a href="http://future.aae.wisc.edu/tab/prices.html">Brian Gould, UW Madison</a>.)</p> <p>What happened? The market for nonfat dry milk is a global one. Just lately we&#39;ve had one of those perfect storms of supply and demand changes that commodities markets see from time to time.</p> <p>The major exporters of nonfat dry milk are the United States, the European Union, and Australia. Here are some of the recent shifts that have impacted the price of nonfat dry milk:</p> <ul> <li>For the past five years, Australia has suffered a severe drought. It has <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2007/s1943065.htm">cut Australian milk production</a> by 20%; this year&#39;s production is down by a billion liters.</li> <li>Over the past two years, the EU has been <a href="http://useu.usmission.gov/agri/dairy2.html">cutting farm subsidies</a> in a way that encourages the production of cheese over nonfat dry milk, and has also ended all dairy export subsidies.</li> <li>A July heat wave in California <a href="http://dairyoutlook.aers.psu.edu/reports/Pub2006/DairyOutlookNov2006.pdf">killed large amounts of dairy cattle</a>--and California produces over half of the US&#39;s nonfat dry milk. Milk production in the US has only in the past couple of months climbed back to year-ago levels.</li> <li>The <a href="/the-sinking-dollar">weak US dollar</a> has made US nonfat dry milk cheaper overseas, leading to higher US exports.</li> <li>There&#39;s been strong US demand for milk proteins and strong world-wide demand for cheese. Meeting this demand has consumed milk that might otherwise have gone to making nonfat dry milk powder.</li> </ul> <p>All that has added up to the recent spike in price for nonfat dry milk.</p> <p>Having given all that attention to the market, I ought to also mention an important non-market force: government dairy subsidies. The change in the EU subsidy for nonfat dry milk is just one example. All these programs have complex effects on prices for dairy products. For example, in the US there&#39;s a support price of $0.80 per pound for nonfat dry milk. At current prices, that&#39;s not going to affect supplies, but in any market that has the kind of pervasive price support structures that the dairy market has, one has to be careful when analyzing sources of price shifts. </p> <p>With US production returning to normal, I think we&#39;ll see nonfat dry milk prices begin to moderate, but as long as the US dollar remains weak and the drought in Australia continues, export demand will keep the price higher than its historical average.</p> <p>(Thanks to Professor Bob Cropp at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for the lowdown on recent nonfat dry milk price shifts.)</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nonfat-dry-milk-no-longer-a-frugal-alternative">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/horizon-organic-milk-is-it-all-just-lies">Horizon Organic Milk: Is it All Just Lies?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-meaning-of-milk-label-colors">The Meaning of Milk Label Colors</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/menu-planning-backwards-and-forwards">Menu Planning Backwards and Forwards</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-sinking-dollar-as-viewed-from-overseas">The sinking dollar, as viewed from overseas</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-is-bread-so-expensive">Why is bread so expensive?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink exchange rates global trade globalization milk milk savings thrifty cooking Mon, 05 Nov 2007 21:07:56 +0000 Philip Brewer 1355 at http://www.wisebread.com The Cost of Meat—The Personal Health Argument http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-the-personal-health-argument <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-cost-of-meat-the-personal-health-argument" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/health.jpg" alt="health forms" title="health forms" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p class="MsoNormal"><em>This continues from &quot;<a href="/the-cost-of-meat-too-high-to-pay">The Cost of Meat—Too High To Pay</a>.&quot; The Personal Health Argument attempts to show that there is few, if any, benefit from eating meat. This will cover heart disease, cancer, and calcium intake.<span> </span></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal">While the meat/dairy industry would have us believe we need both in every meal to have a balanced diet, many studies have shown a high correlation between meat/dairy consumption and major health problems, including heart disease and cancer.<span> </span>Significant decrease in health problems have been associated with moving to a plant-based diet.<span> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">The following information is taken from John Robbins&#39; <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1573247022?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1573247022"><em>The Food Revolution</em></a>.<span> </span>The references I list here are not as detailed as his endnotes (page numbers, dates, etc.), but should be sufficient information to find through a quick search on the web.<span> </span>If any information does not have a source listed, it did not have a source cited in <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1573247022?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1573247022"><em>The Food Revolution</em></a>.<span> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong><u>Heart Disease</u></strong></p> <ul> <li>A high blood cholesterol level is the single greatest risk factor for heart disease. —&quot;Atherosclerotic Risk Factors: Are There Ten or Is There Only One?&quot; <em>American Journal of Cardiology</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>The single most important factor in raising blood cholesterol levels is the consumption of saturated fat.<span> </span></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Meat contributes an extraordinarily significant percentage of the saturated fat in the American diet. —&quot;Where&#39;s the Ground Beef Labeling?&quot; <em>Nutrition Action</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>The primary dietary sources of cholesterol are eggs, shellfish, chicken, beef, fish, pork, cheese, butter, and milk.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Chicken has about as much cholesterol as beef.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Eating the standard American diet that&#39;s based on meat and dairy products, with plenty of white flour and white sugar, one-third of the women and one-half of the men in the U.S. population die of heart disease.<span> </span>Meanwhile, vegetarians and vegans not only have far less heart disease, but also have lower rates of cancer, hypertension, diabetes, gallstones, kidney disease, obesity, and colon disease. —<em><a href="%3ca%20href=%22http:/www.amazon.com/gp/product/0763732419?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0763732419%22%3eThe%20Dietitian&#39;s%20Guide%20to%20Vegetarian%20Diets:%20Issues%20and%20Applications%3c/a%3e%3cimg%20src=%22http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=w">The Dietitian&#39;s Guide to Vegetarian Diets: Issues and Applications</a></em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Vegetarians have the lowest rates of coronary heart disease of any group in the country. —William Castelli, M.D., Framingham Health Study</li> </ul> <ul> <li>In regions where meat is scarce, cardiovascular disease is unknown. —&quot;The Irradiation Controversy&quot; <em>Time </em>Magazine</li> </ul> <ul> <li>No plant food contains any cholesterol.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>People with high blood pressure are seven times more likely to suffer a stroke, four times more likely to have a heart attack, and five times more likely to die of congestive heart failure than people with normal blood pressure.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Incidence of high blood pressure in meat eaters compared to vegetarians: Nearly triple —&quot;Low Blood Pressure in Vegetarians…&quot; <em>American Journal of Clinical Nutrition</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Patients with high blood pressure who achieve substantial improvement by switching to a vegetarian diet: 30-75 percent —&quot;A Vegan Regimen with Reduced Medication in the Treatment of Hypertension&quot; <em>British Medical Journal</em></li> </ul> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong><u>Cancer</u></strong></p> <ul> <li>In 1996 the American Cancer Society released guidelines calling for a reduction in meat intake to lower the risk of cancer.<span> </span></li> </ul> <ul> <li>The primary route through which many environmental carcinogens enter the human body is through food, and specifically through animal products.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Dioxin is a carcinogen.<span> </span></li> </ul> <ul> <li>The EPA says that up to 95% of human dioxin exposure comes from red meat, fish, and dairy products. —&quot;FDA Launches Study on Dioxin…&quot; <em>Food Chemical News</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>A low-fat plant-based diet would not only lower the heart attack rate about 85%, but would lower the cancer rate 60 percent. —William Castelli, M.D., Director, Framingham Health Study</li> </ul> <p><em>Prostate Cancer</em> <ul> <li>Just as data indicate a strong connection between consumption of animal fat, high blood pressure, and stroke, so too does the evidence suggest stunning correlations between dairy consumption and prostate cancer.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Total fat consumption was directly related to risk of advanced prostate cancer. This association was due primarily to animal fat, but not vegetable fat. Red meat represented the food group with the strongest positive association with advanced cancer. —<a href="http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/85/19/1571">&quot;A Prospective Study of Dietary Fat and Risk of Prostate Cancer&quot; <em>Journal of the National Cancer Institute</em></a></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Most common cancer among American men: Prostate cancer</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Rick of prostate cancer for men who consume high amounts of dairy products: 70% increase. —&quot;Dairy Products Linked to Prostate Cancer&quot; Associated Press</li> </ul> <p class="MsoNormal"><em>Colon Cancer</em> </p> <ul> <li>Of all forms of cancer, colon cancer may be the most strongly linked to diet.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Risk of colon cancer for women who eat red meat daily compared to those who eat it less than once a month: 250 percent greater. —Caldwell Esselstyn, Beyond Surgery </li> </ul> <ul> <li>Risk of colon cancer or people who eat red meat once a week compared to those who abstain: 38 percent greater —&quot;Dietary Risk Factors for Colon Cancer in a Low-Risk Population&quot; <em>American Journal of Epidemiology</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Risk of colon cancer for people who eat poultry once a week compared to those who abstain: 55 percent greater —&quot;Dietary Risk Factors for Colon Cancer in a Low-Risk Population&quot; <em>American Journal of Epidemiology</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Risk of colon cancer for people who eat poultry four times a week compared to those who abstain: 200-300 percent greater —&quot;Dietary Risk Factors for Colon Cancer in a Low-Risk Population&quot; <em>American Journal of Epidemiology</em></li> </ul> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong><u>Calcium and Bones</u></strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal">The ubiquitous &quot;milk moustache&quot; ads have made us believe we need milk to get enough calcium.<span> </span>The milk industry is trying to imply that calcium intake from milk will lower the risk of osteoporosis and high blood pressure, that it helps women have stronger bones and help bone growth in among growing children.<span> </span>These are misleading claims, because many studies have linked the intake of animal protein to bone loss (animal protein is present in dairy), and showing a worse calcium balance with increased dairy consumption. These studies have shown that the more animal protein we eat, the more calcium we lose. </p> <ul> <li>In an effort to prove their claims that milk helps prevent bone loss, the National Dairy Council funded a study where post-menopausal women drank three additional 8-ounce glasses of skim milk compared to the control group of post-menopausal women.<span> </span>The results, published in the <em>American Journal of Clinical Nutrition</em>, found that women who drank the extra milk actually lost more calcium from their bones than the control group of women who did not drink it. —&quot;The Effect of Milk Supplements on Calcium Metabolism…&quot; <em>American Journal of Clinical Nutrition</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>January 2001, the <em>American Journal of Clinical Nutrition</em> published a study that reported a dramatic correlation between the ratio of animal to vegetable protein in the diets of elderly women and their rate of bone loss.<span> </span>Even after adjusting for age, weight, estrogen use, tobacco use, exercise, calcium intake, and total protein intake, the women who had high ratio of animal to vegetable protein had 3x the rate of bone loss as the women with low ratio of animal to vegetable protein.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Studies have also shown elderly people with the highest dairy product consumption actually had double the risk of hip fracture compared to those with the lowest consumption. —&quot;Case-Control Study of Risk Factors for Hip Fractures in the Elderly&quot; <em>American Dietetic Association </em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Countries with the highest consumption of dairy products: Finland, Sweden, United States, England —McDougall, John <em>McDougall&#39;s Medicine</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Countries with the highest rates of osteoporosis: Finland, Sweden, U.S., England —McDougall, John <em>McDougall&#39;s Medicine</em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Amount of calcium loss in women after eating a hamburger: 28 milligrams —Connie Weaver, Ph.D., of Purdue University, at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine&#39;s Summit on the Dietary Guidelines 2000</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Amount of calcium loss in woman after drinking a cup of coffee: 2 milligrams —Connie Weaver, Ph.D., of Purdue University, at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine&#39;s Summit on the Dietary Guidelines 2000</li> </ul> <ul> <li>The milk industry argue that milk is the best way to get calcium, because of its bio-availability (how much calcium is absorbed by our digestive system), and that it would be difficult to meet our daily calcium needs without milk.<span> </span></li> </ul> <ul> <li>Studies have shown vegans get an average of 627mg/day (amount in one glass of milk is 300mg).<span> </span>—&quot;A Comparative Evaluation of Vegan, Vegetarian, and Omnivore Diets&quot; <em>Journal of Plant Foods; </em>&quot;Nutrient Intakes and Eating Behavior Scores of Vegetarian and Nonvegetarian Women&quot;<em> Journal of the American Dietetic Association </em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>The level of calcium that the federal government has set as the daily requirement has been set controversially high, primarily due to the political pressure of the dairy industry.<span> </span>90% of all Americans don&#39;t reach it.</li> </ul> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lynn-truong">Lynn Truong</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-the-personal-health-argument">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-too-high-to-pay">The Cost of Meat—Too High To Pay</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/exercise-and-alcohol-good-for-your-brain">Exercise (and alcohol) good for your brain</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-science-says-its-ok-to-eat-more-cheese">5 Reasons Science Says It&#039;s OK to Eat More Cheese</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/so-you-think-youre-a-carnivore">So, You Think You&#039;re a Carnivore?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-the-environment-argument">The Cost of Meat—The Environment Argument</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Extra Commentary blood pressure calcium cancer dairy Health heart disease meat milk saturated fat Mon, 21 May 2007 20:55:39 +0000 Lynn Truong 665 at http://www.wisebread.com Horizon Organic Milk: Is it All Just Lies? http://www.wisebread.com/horizon-organic-milk-is-it-all-just-lies <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/horizon-organic-milk-is-it-all-just-lies" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/3179384002_ca75b4522c_o.jpg" alt="Horizon Organic" title="Horizon Organic" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Under the advice of several colleagues and readers, I decided to pick up a copy of The Omnivore's Dilemma. Fascinating read to say the least, and one thing that cropped up was the term 'organic' and how the word has become perverted and practically raped by the agricultural industry. Not surprising when you consider it's now a $15 billion a year business. That's a lot of money&hellip;which means power&hellip;which means corruption. (See also: <a title="Deciding Which Produce to Buy Organic - The Dirty Dozen" href="http://www.wisebread.com/deciding-which-produce-to-buy-organic-the-dirty-dozen">Deciding Which Produce to Buy Organic - The Dirty Dozen</a>)</p> <p>So, I decided to do some digging around, putting a product in my own fridge under the microscope. Horizon Organic Milk. The packaging and verbiage promise a lot, a beautiful world of cows grazing in green pastures with big smiles, happily producing only he tastiest, unsullied milk. I reproduce it here word for word, you can judge for yourself if it's entirely truthful as we continue.</p> <blockquote><p><strong><em>HORIZON ORGANIC &mdash; A Choice You Can Feel Good About</em></strong></p> <p><em><strong>Horizon Organic products are as good for you as they are delicious because they are produced without the use of antibiotics, added growth hormones or dangerous pesticides.</strong></em></p> <p><em><strong>That's why choosing Horizon Organic is a wholesome and nutritious way to help reduce your exposure to added chemical. And drinking our milk is also a great way to nourish your body. It provides an excellent source of calcium and vitamin D.</strong></em></p> <p><em><strong>When you choose Horizon Organic you also contribute to the health and well being of the planet and animals. We allow our cows to make milk according to their natural cycle and keep them in good health by giving them certified organic feed, fresh air and access to pasture. In return, our cows give us great-tasting organic milk.</strong></em></p> <p><em><strong>Best put, all of our products proudly carry the USDA Organic seal and that says it all. Thank you for choosing Horizon Organic. We hope it's a choice that leaves you feeling good inside and out.</strong></em></p></blockquote> <p>Now, as far as I can see there are some misleading and downright deceptive statements in that copy. Let's deal with them one at a time.</p> <blockquote><p><em><strong>&quot;&hellip;they are produced without the use of antibiotics, added growth hormones or dangerous pesticides.&quot;</strong></em></p></blockquote> <p>As it turns out, antibiotics were never added to milk or were ever present in milk. According to the USDA, all milk must be tested to ensure any antibiotics used to treat milk cows are not present in the end product. So, this cannot be a claim as it fundamentally untrue anyway. In fact, the terms 'antibiotic free' and 'no-antibiotic' are false claims that the USDA is trying to crack down on.</p> <p>Similarly, the same can be said of the other claims, regarding pesticides and hormones. First, hormones will always be present in milk; it's part of the biology of a cow. To call milk 'hormone-free' is like making the claim that 90% <a title="6 Questions to Ask Before You Buy Ground Beef" href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-you-buy-ground-beef">ground beef</a> is fat-free. But growth hormones, again according to the USDA, are only ever approved for beef cattle, plus lamb and veal. So, again another inflated claim. And by the way, Vitamin D3 is added to all milk&hellip;it is also a hormone.</p> <p>Finally, pesticides. The FTC has ruled that a manufacturer cannot make a &quot;no pesticide&quot; claim as it is untruthful, because pesticides are never added to milk or milk products. It's like claiming that the new car you buy comes without chlorine gas inside the cabin. It's just not a claim.</p> <blockquote><p><em><strong>&quot;We allow our cows to make milk according to their natural cycle and keep them in good health by giving them certified organic feed, fresh air and access to pasture.&quot;</strong></em></p> </blockquote> <p>The key word here is 'access.' Right now at work I have access to the executive squash courts, but I am rarely allowed to use them, if at all. I'm too busy and I'm not an exec. Well, the cows at Horizon may have access to pasture but it's a known industry fact that milk cows don't spend their days grazing on green grass. They just get to look at it, cooped up in the usual factory-farming warehouses. Occasionally, when the press drops in, the cows may be allowed out for 20 minutes to make a good showing, but this is a rarity. For Horizon Milk to remain productive and profitable, they must keep their cows hooked up to the milking machines.</p> <p>Horizon cows are hard workers. The average Horizon organic cow produces almost double the amount of milk of the national average. Which makes it even more difficult for these poor cows to step outside.</p> <p>Then there are the slaughter rates. They're higher than the national average because, as no antibiotics are involved, they simply ship the cow off to slaughter if it gets sick. And as the factory-farming conditions are rife with disease and infection, this happens a lot.</p> <p>We should also address the claim of certified organic feed. In the past, Horizon has and used and supported local area farmers. But the growth of the organic industry could not let the limitations of these small farms get in the way of making a profit. Now most of the feed that Horizon buys is shipped in on massive railroad cars, processed by a giant corporate agribusiness and then given to the cows. And much of this feed is irrigated by dams that have been condemned for destroying ecosystems. So, while it may technically fit the terms of the organic feed set out by the USDA, it does not support local farmers&hellip;and that was originally a backbone of the organic industry.</p> <blockquote><p><em><strong>&quot;&hellip;all of our products proudly carry the USDA Organic seal and that says it all.&quot;</strong></em></p> </blockquote> <p>The USDA Organic Seal can only be given to products that are made with 95% organic ingredients. But what does 'organic' mean? The most commonly accepted definition of &quot;organically grown&quot; food comes from Robert Rodale, editor of Organic Gardening &amp; Farming magazine. This from 1972&hellip;</p> <blockquote><p>&quot;Food grown without pesticides; grown without artificial fertilizers; grown in soil whose humus content is increased by the additions of organic matter, grown in soil whose mineral content is increased by the application of natural mineral fertilizers; has not been treated with preservatives, hormones, antibiotics, etc.&quot;</p> </blockquote> <p>But in 1980 a team of USDA scientists concluded there was in fact no universally accepted definition for organic farming.</p> <blockquote><p>&quot;The organic movement represents a spectrum of practices, attitudes, and philosophies. On the one hand are those organic practitioners who would not use chemical fertilizers or pesticides under any circumstances. These producers hold rigidly to their purist philosophy. At the other end of the spectrum, organic farmers espouse a more flexible approach. While striving to avoid the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, these practitioners do not rule them out entirely. Instead, when absolutely necessary, some fertilizers and also herbicides are very selectively and sparingly used as a second line of defense. Nevertheless, these farmers, too, consider themselves to be organic farmers.&quot;</p> </blockquote> <p>So, in 1997 Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman stated the following:</p> <blockquote><p>&quot;What is organic? Generally, it is agriculture produced through a natural as opposed to synthetic process. The natural portion of the definition is fairly obvious, but process is an equally critical distinction. When we certify organic, we are certifying not just a product but the farming and handling practices that yield it. When you buy a certified organic tomato, for instance, you are buying the product of an organic farm. And, consumers are willing to fork over a little more for that tomato. They've shown that they will pay a premium for organic food. National standards are our way of ensuring that consumers get what they pay for.&quot;</p> </blockquote> <p>Get it? It's just another way of saying that the production of the food differed slightly than the production of regular food. Organic is not a term meaning that the content of the food is any different, just the way in which the manufacturer arrived at the end product.</p> <p>And here's the punch line, taken directly from the USDA:</p> <blockquote><p>&quot;No distinctions should be made between organically and non-organically produced products in terms of quality, appearance, or safety.&quot;</p> </blockquote> <p>Basically, even with the USDA Organic Seal, the food can really make no claims that it is more nutritious, better quality or safer to eat. In short, organic food may in fact be almost no different at all than regular food. Until you notice the price tag&hellip;often double, or even triple the price of the same product without the USDA seal.</p> <p>So, continue buying Horizon Milk if the copy makes you feel like you're doing something good. But now that you know it's not quite a truthful picture, maybe you can pass by the Horizon milk aisle and stop contributing to an enormous agribusiness that feeds us more lies than good products...and charges you extra cash for the privilege.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/horizon-organic-milk-is-it-all-just-lies">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-foods-that-are-only-labeled-organic-but-really-arent">5 Foods That Are Only Labeled Organic — But Really Aren&#039;t</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-meaning-of-milk-label-colors">The Meaning of Milk Label Colors</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-to-shop-for-food-cheaply-without-a-tedious-grocery-list">Grocery Shopping for the Cheap and Lazy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-only-15-foods-that-are-worth-buying-organic">The Only 15 Foods That Are Worth Buying Organic</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/baby-carrots-the-frugal-idea-that-isnt">Baby Carrots: The Frugal Idea That Isn&#039;t</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink antibiotics milk organic USDA Tue, 15 May 2007 21:43:34 +0000 Paul Michael 646 at http://www.wisebread.com