student loans http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/5885/all en-US 6 Questions to Ask Before Taking Out Student Loans http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-taking-out-student-loans <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-questions-to-ask-before-taking-out-student-loans" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_saving_education_coins.jpg" alt="Woman saving education coins" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Americans are more burdened by student loan debt than ever, with the average graduate in their 20s making $351 a month in student loan payments. Suggested changes to the federal student loan program could have even more college students questioning just how much student loan debt they want or can afford.</p> <p>As part of its overall budget plan, the Trump administration would like to eliminate current provisions in which the government pays the interest on student loans taken out by low-income students while the borrower is still in school and for six months after graduation.</p> <p>The Trump administration is also proposing to end the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program. This program allows borrowers who go on to work for the government or for nonprofits to have the remainder of their federal student loans forgiven after they make 10 years of payments.</p> <p>Even though these potential changes might never be signed into law, just the possibility of such changes makes it even more important for students to ask the right questions before they take out federal or private student loans.</p> <p>Here are six questions you should ask before signing up for any student loan.</p> <h2>1. Have you considered all education options?</h2> <p>Your first-choice school might be the most expensive university on your list. You might be able to reduce the amount of money you borrow each year by choosing a less costly option.</p> <p>Instead of attending a private college, you might investigate a public university. Instead of going to an out-of-state school, you might consider going to school in-state, which comes with lower tuition. You could also attend a community college for two years before transferring to a private or public university for the remainder of your college years. These choices could reduce the amount of student loan debt you'll have to take on.</p> <h2>2. Can you cut out room and board?</h2> <p>The College Board reported that the average yearly cost of room and board at a public four-year university stood at $10,440 during the 2016&ndash;2017 academic year. You can save that expense if you attend a college that allows you to live at home while taking classes.</p> <p>Yes, you will lose out on some of the traditional college experience. But taking on less student loan debt might be an acceptable trade-off.</p> <h2>3. Are you borrowing too much for your potential future income?</h2> <p>Certain careers pay more than others. You need to remember this when applying for student loans. You don't want to take on huge debts if you expect to make $40,000 a year when you graduate. But taking on larger amounts of debt might be a solid financial choice if you are working toward a higher-paying degree.</p> <h2>4. How big of a student loan payment are you willing to make once you're working?</h2> <p>Borrowing money might seem easy when you're still in school. After all, you're probably not making payments on these loans yet. But once you're out in the working world, that student loan debt won't seem so benign.</p> <p>You will have to make payments each month. And these payments will come in addition to rent, car payments and, eventually, mortgage payments. Student loan payments become a huge financial burden to many. Before borrowing today, you need to consider how comfortable you'll be making those payments in the future.</p> <h2>5. Are there other types of financial aid available?</h2> <p>Before applying for a student loan, make sure you explore all financial aid options with your high school counselor, or the university you plan to attend. Many universities offer merit scholarships to incoming students. You usually don't have to apply for these scholarships. Schools automatically provide them, usually based on your academic performance. Even if you've been offered one, you might be able to persuade your university to provide you with a larger merit scholarship, especially if you are worried that you won't be able to afford the yearly tuition without financial help.</p> <p>There are other types of scholarships, too, that you should investigate. The U.S. Department of Education says that there are several ways for college students to search for scholarships and grants. They should first speak with the financial aid office at the college they are attending. These professionals often have tips for hunting down scholarship and grant money.</p> <p>They can also use the free online <a href="http://www.careeronestop.org/toolkit/training/find-scholarships.aspx" target="_blank">scholarship finder</a> offered by the Department of Education. The department also offers an online list of <a href="https://www2.ed.gov/about/contacts/state/index.html" target="_blank">state grant agencies</a> that students can search to find scholarships and grants in their states.</p> <p>Call your school's financial aid office to discuss options such as work-study programs and possible additional financial help.</p> <h2>6. Can you get by without private loans?</h2> <p>Even if you get grants and scholarships, you may still need student loans. There are two types of student loans to consider: Federal loans offered through the federal government or private loans offered by private lenders. Federal loans are preferable because they usually come with lower interest rates and more flexible repayment programs. Federal loans also provide more options if, after graduating, you find yourself struggling to make payments, including deferment and eventual forgiveness programs.</p> <p>It's far better to rely as much as possible on federal subsidized or unsubsidized student loans. The challenge is that these federal loans have limits; you can only borrow so much each school year.</p> <p>Your school might also offer its own lower-interest loans that would be cheaper than private loans. But if these options still aren't enough, you'll have to determine whether taking out less attractive private student loans to attend college is worthwhile. It might be the only option.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-questions-to-ask-before-taking-out-student-loans&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Questions%2520to%2520Ask%2520Before%2520Taking%2520Out%2520Student%2520Loans.jpg&amp;description=6%20Questions%20to%20Ask%20Before%20Taking%20Out%20Student%20Loans"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Questions%20to%20Ask%20Before%20Taking%20Out%20Student%20Loans.jpg" alt="6 Questions to Ask Before Taking Out Student Loans" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-taking-out-student-loans">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt">7 Unique Ways Millennials Are Dealing With Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-financial-aid-might-not-cover">6 Things Financial Aid Might Not Cover</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-make-the-most-of-your-student-loan-grace-period">4 Ways to Make the Most of Your Student Loan Grace Period</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-borrow-student-loan-money-from-amazon-prime">Should You Borrow Student Loan Money From Amazon Prime?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-tax-tricks-to-try-if-youre-stuck-with-student-loans">8 Tax Tricks to Try if You&#039;re Stuck With Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Education & Training college debt repayment federal loans higher education private loans scholarships student debt student loans trump tuition Tue, 18 Jul 2017 08:00:08 +0000 Dan Rafter 1983760 at http://www.wisebread.com These 17 Companies Will Help You Repay Your Student Loan http://www.wisebread.com/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/saving_for_education.jpg" alt="Saving for education" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Student loans can dampen the ability of new grads to get on their feet financially, causing stress at home and at work. According to Student Loan Hero, the graduating class of 2016 had an average student loan balance of $37,172 &mdash; up six percent from the year before.</p> <p>While it's daunting to see that number rise, the good news is that, in an effort to recruit and retain the best hires, a growing number of employers have started programs to help employees pay back those hefty student loans. Here are a few of those companies helping workers get out of debt.</p> <h2>1. Chegg</h2> <p>In April 2015, tutoring and study services company Chegg announced its college loan reduction plan for full-time employees in partnership with Tuition.IO, a company that provides a web-based platform for tracking and managing student loan payments. This benefit has an annual cap of $1,000 (less taxes), but has no cap on the total amount an employee can receive.</p> <h2>2. ChowNow</h2> <p>ChowNow has found this perk so useful in hiring talent that the company decided to double it from when it first started offering it to employees. The Los Angeles-based online food ordering company has an employer-paid student loan assistance program that matches up to $1,000 a year of employee payments.</p> <h2>3. CommonBond</h2> <p>Since December 2016, this lending marketplace platform has been granting $100 per month to its employees to pay down student loans. While CommonBond limits the perk at $1,200 per year, the company continues helping its employees until they fully pay off their student loans. Employees also have the option to refinance their student loans with CommonBond. On average, student borrowers save over $14,000 when refinancing through CommonBond, according to the company.</p> <h2>4. Credit Suisse</h2> <p>The financial services company doesn't offer a lump sum benefit to its employees, but instead provides a 0.25 percent discount on interest rates to workers that refinance their student loans with online lender SoFi.</p> <h2>5. Connelly Partners</h2> <p>Boston-based ad agency Connelly Partners works with Gradifi to offer a student loan repayment plan that improves the longer the employee stays with the company. Like a 401(k) plan, the agency matches up to $100 per month of its employees' debt payments. Employees who stick around for at least six months receive a $1,000 student loan payment bonus. Those who work for the company for five years receive another $1,000 bonus for the sixth year.</p> <h2>6. Fidelity Investments</h2> <p>The financial services firm makes an annual $2,000 direct payment to employees' student loan servicers, up to a total of $10,000. If your career with Fidelity requires you to continue your education, then Fidelity will reimburse you 90 percent of qualifying costs (up to $10,000 per year) of a work-related degree or certification program. You must have worked for the company for at least six months to qualify.</p> <h2>7. Kronos</h2> <p>Based in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, the workforce management software provider has partnered with solutions provider Student Loan Genius to pay up to $500 per year to help employees pay down student debt.</p> <h2>8. LendEDU</h2> <p>Since February 2016, the online marketplace for student loan financing has paid $2,400 per year ($200 per month) to employees with student loan debt.</p> <h2>9. Martin Health System</h2> <p>Employees working in the nursing field at Martin Health System in Florida can receive up to $2,000 per year to help pay down their student loans. In addition to this benefit from Martin Health System, Florida nurses can also work in areas with staff shortages to qualify for the state's Nursing Student Loan Forgiveness Program or the federal Perkins Loan Cancellation for Nurses and Medical Technicians.</p> <h2>10. Moonlite Bunny Ranch</h2> <p>In 2015, Dennis Hof, the owner of the legal brothel Moonlite Bunny Ranch in Nevada, promised to match 100 percent of his employees' student loan payments for two months, up to the full amount that they made during that period.</p> <h2>11. Natixis Global Asset Management</h2> <p>All Natixis employees receive an annual $1,000 student loan repayment benefit, up to $10,000 over a 10-year period. The company used to require that workers reached five years of employment in order to receive a lump sum benefit of $5,000, but did away with the requirement in July 2016.</p> <h2>12. Nvidia</h2> <p>This computing giant offers comprehensive student loan repayment options. First, employees working at least 20 hours per week who graduated within the previous three years can apply for a reimbursement of $6,000 a year for qualifying student loan payments, up to $30,000. Second, employees who successfully refinance their student loans with SoFi receive a bonus ranging from $200 to $500 and pay no loan origination fees. Third, employees who need to go back to college can receive a reimbursement of up to $5,250 each year for qualified job-related educational expenses, including tuition and books, as long as they earn at least a B average.</p> <h2>13. Powertex</h2> <p>The clothing design company was among the first businesses in Wisconsin to partner with Gradifi to offer a student loan repayment assistance program. Powertex gives eligible employees $100 per month for student loan payments for up to six years.</p> <h2>14. PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC)</h2> <p>Associates and senior associates at the consulting firm receive $100 per month ($1,200 a year) toward student loan payments for up to six years.</p> <h2>15. SoFi</h2> <p>Many employers partner with SoFi to offer a student loan repayment assistance program. The online lender also offers its own eligible employees $200 per month to help them fully pay back student loans.</p> <h2>16. Staples</h2> <p>The office supply retailer offers top-performing full-time employees $100 a month for three years, for a total of $3,600 in student loan assistance. To maintain their eligibility, employees must meet set criteria throughout the entire three years.</p> <h2>17. Aetna</h2> <p>As of January 2017, the health care company matches employees' student loan payments of up to $2,000 per year, with a lifetime maximum of $10,000. The program is available to employees who have graduated within the previous three years from an accredited institution.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthese-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThese%252017%2520Companies%2520Will%2520Help%2520You%2520Repay%2520Your%2520Student%2520Loan_0.jpg&amp;description=These%2017%20Companies%20Will%20Help%20You%20Repay%20Your%20Student%20Loan"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/These%2017%20Companies%20Will%20Help%20You%20Repay%20Your%20Student%20Loan_0.jpg" alt="These 17 Companies Will Help You Repay Your Student Loan" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stop-student-loans-from-ruining-your-life">How to Stop Student Loans From Ruining Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-get-student-loan-debt-forgiveness">8 Ways to Get Student Loan Debt Forgiveness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-didn-t-learn-in-college-but-you-should-have">10 Things You Didn’t Learn in College (but You Should Have)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-taking-out-student-loans">6 Questions to Ask Before Taking Out Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt">7 Unique Ways Millennials Are Dealing With Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Job Hunting college companies contributions education employee benefits jobs loan repayment plans student loans Thu, 22 Jun 2017 09:00:10 +0000 Damian Davila 1968233 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Biggest Ways Millennials Risk Their Retirements http://www.wisebread.com/5-biggest-ways-millennials-risk-their-retirements <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-biggest-ways-millennials-risk-their-retirements" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/sad_man_has_spent_all_his_money.jpg" alt="Sad man has spent all his money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you're stressing out about whether or not you're saving enough for retirement, you're not alone. Millennials are among those struggling the most with this dilemma. According to a 2016 study, 64 percent of working millennials believe they'll never save a $1 million nest egg.</p> <p>Why are millennials so worried? Sadly, this age group is prone to making less-than-ideal money moves that could hurt them later in life. Let's review the five biggest ways in which millennials are risking their retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-things-millennials-should-do-today-to-prepare-for-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Things Millennials Should Do Today to Prepare for Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>1. Delaying the start of retirement savings</h2> <p>Nearly four in 10 millennials haven't started saving for retirement. The same 2016 survey found that 61 percent of females and 50 percent of males belonging to the millennial generation have their finances stretched &quot;too thin&quot; to save for retirement. Even worse, 54 percent of women and 43 percent of men of this generation are living paycheck to paycheck.</p> <p>However, delaying retirement contributions has a serious impact. If a worker were to deposit just $50 per month into a 401(k) with an 8 percent annual rate of return for 10 years, they would end up with around $9,200 at the end of the 10-year period. The IRS sets a cap on how much you can contribute to a retirement account per year, which for 2017, is $18,000 to a 401(k) and $5,500 to an IRA. If you keep delaying your contributions to your retirement accounts, you'll never be able to fully make up that gap.</p> <h2>2. Taking out high student loans</h2> <p>Student Loan Hero estimated the average student loan balance for a member of the Class of 2016 at $37,172, up 6 percent from the year before. With so many Americans still believing in the importance of postsecondary education, it's easy to see how the average student loan continues to climb. Studies have shown that higher education still leads to better earnings potential, after all.</p> <p>Still, loans are rising too fast. Back in 1993, only 45 percent of college graduates had a student loan and their average balance was $15,000 in inflation-adjusted dollars. By having to pay down a high student loan, millennials are foregoing sizable contributions to their retirement accounts.</p> <p>Assuming a $30,000 balance on a federal direct loan with a 4 percent interest rate, you would pay about $304 per month. That's $3,648 in missed retirement contributions every year. By the time that a millennial pays back that standard loan (10 years), they would have missed out on $54,259 in retirement savings, assuming an 8 percent annual return.</p> <h2>3. Putting their kids' college fund before their own retirement fund</h2> <p>Given the tough time that they're having paying back their own student loans, 19 percent of millennial parents say education for their children is their top financial priority, according to TD Ameritrade. Those millennial parents are socking away an average $310 every month for their children's college fund.</p> <p>Every month, these millennial parents are hit with the double whammy of paying down their own student loans and then putting money away for their children's education. No wonder millennial parents ranked saving for retirement third on their list of financial priorities. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-too-much-money-for-a-college-fund-is-a-bad-idea?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Why Saving Too Much Money for a College Fund Is a Bad Idea</a>)</p> <h2>4. Not setting a retirement savings goal</h2> <p>If you don't know where you're going, you'll never know when you get there. According to the Employment Benefit Research Institute, across all generations, workers age 25&ndash;34 are the smallest percentage of individuals who have tried to calculate how much money they'll need to live comfortably in retirement.</p> <p>By not setting a retirement savings goal, millennials may be misjudging how much to contribute from every paycheck toward their retirement accounts. This explains the low average contribution levels per paycheck from millennial men and women &mdash; 7.3 and 5.7 percent, respectively. In 2016, 75 percent of workers age 25&ndash;34 said their total savings and investments were under $25,000.</p> <h2>5. Accepting a first-job salary offer without negotiation</h2> <p>Faced with a countdown to start paying back student loans, many millennials are so eager to start generating income they skip salary negotiations. According to a survey from NerdWallet and Looksharp, of 8,000 recent grads that entered the job market between 2012 and 2015, only 38 percent negotiated their salary offer from a new employer. The same survey revealed that 74.4 percent of employers had room for a 5 to 10 percent salary bump, 8.6 percent of them had room for a 11 to 20 percent salary bump, and 1.3 percent of them were willing or able to go above 20 percent.</p> <p>Do millennials skip negotiations over fear of having their job offer retracted? Not really: Close to nine out of 10 employers in the survey had never done such a thing.</p> <p>Failing to negotiate a starting salary is one of the biggest ways in which millennials are shortchanging their retirement. Let's crunch some numbers to see why. In 2016, The Collegiate Employment Research Institute found that the average starting salary for holders of a bachelor's degree was $41,880. Negotiating a 5 to 10 percent raise on your first-job salary offer would have yielded a starting salary ranging from $43,974 to $46,068. That would have been an extra $2,094 to $4,188 per year, enough to cover six to 13 $304 monthly payments on a $30,000 federal direct loan with a 4 percent interest rate.</p> <p>Saving for retirement may seem like a big hairy monster, but it doesn't need to be that way. By understanding what's keeping you from starting or saving enough for your retirement, you'll have a better chance of meeting your retirement saving goals. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-4-ugly-truths-about-retirement-planning?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Face 4 Ugly Truths About Retirement Planning</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-biggest-ways-millennials-risk-their-retirements&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Biggest%2520Ways%2520Millennials%2520Risk%2520Their%2520Retirements_0.jpg&amp;description=5%20Biggest%20Ways%20Millennials%20Risk%20Their%20Retirements"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Biggest%20Ways%20Millennials%20Risk%20Their%20Retirements_0.jpg" alt="5 Biggest Ways Millennials Risk Their Retirements" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-biggest-ways-millennials-risk-their-retirements">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-retirement-planning-changes-when-youre-single">7 Ways Retirement Planning Changes When You&#039;re Single</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-every-millennial-needs-a-roth-ira">6 Reasons Every Millennial Needs a Roth IRA</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement">10 Signs You Aren&#039;t Saving Enough for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-when-you-should-borrow-from-your-retirement-account">This Is When You Should Borrow From Your Retirement Account</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/half-of-americans-are-wrong-about-their-retirement-savings">Half of Americans Are Wrong About Their Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) college funds IRA millennials not saving enough paycheck to paycheck salary negotiation savings goals student loans young adults Tue, 20 Jun 2017 08:00:11 +0000 Damian Davila 1961116 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Valuable Rights You Might Lose When You Refinance Student Loans http://www.wisebread.com/8-valuable-rights-you-might-lose-when-you-refinance-student-loans <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-valuable-rights-you-might-lose-when-you-refinance-student-loans" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/house_on_money_stack.jpg" alt="House on money stack" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Fannie Mae, the nation's largest buyer and guarantor of mortgage loans, made news recently when it announced it would sweeten the deal for folks who want to refinance their mortgage to pay off student loan debt. Fannie Mae works with 1,800 lenders nationwide, so their rule change affects many homeowners. At the same time, newer financial companies that target millennials have been pushing student loan refinances as a way to save money and simplify life.</p> <p>Fannie Mae's change will make it more affordable for graduates &mdash; or parents &mdash; to use home equity to pay off student loans by waiving the usual extra charge for taking out cash when you refinance a home. With mortgage interest rates still at historic lows, this could indeed be an opportunity for young adults with high-rate student loans to reduce their monthly payments. But proceed with caution.</p> <p>If you have a private student loan, you probably have nothing to lose by converting it into a mortgage, personal loan, or other consolidation loan. But if you have a federal loan, you should be more cautious about making changes. You may not realize you'd be losing these protections and options when you give up your federal student loan.</p> <h2>1. Deferment</h2> <p>If you lose your job or are unable to find a job after graduation, you may qualify for a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-deferring-student-loans" target="_blank">deferment</a>, which halts your loan payments until you're in a better position to pay. With certain federal loans, the government will even pay the interest during deferment.</p> <h2>2. Forbearance</h2> <p>Similar to deferment, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-is-student-loan-forbearance-anyway" target="_blank">forbearance</a> stops your payment obligation during a period of hardship. But unlike deferment, interest continues to accumulate.</p> <h2>3. Income-driven repayment plans</h2> <p>The government has rolled out a whole range of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/which-student-loan-repayment-plan-saves-you-the-most" target="_blank">flexible payment options</a> in recent years to help federal loan borrowers handle payments. These plans cap your monthly payment at a certain percentage of income (10 percent for the program known as Pay As You Earn and 15 percent for the Income-Contingent Repayment Plan). Another benefit of income-driven repayment plans that you would lose if you refinance: an end date. With PAYE, any balance you still owe after 20 years is forgiven; with ICE, loans are forgiven after 25 years. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-definitive-guide-to-pay-as-you-earn-a-great-student-loan-repayment-plan?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Definitive Guide to Pay As You Earn</a>)</p> <h2>4. A second chance if you default</h2> <p>The Federal Loan Rehabilitation Program is a one-time opportunity to get a default removed from your credit report by making a series of on-time payments. This can save you from wrecking your credit and being unable to buy a home later.</p> <h2>5. A central source for tracking loans</h2> <p>If all your student loans are federal, you'll be able to check up on all of them online through the National Student Loan Data System. If you refinance some but not all of your loans, you may end up having to keep track of them using multiple resources.</p> <h2>6. An unsecured loan</h2> <p>If you default on your student loan, you can lose your good credit, but not much else. If you default on your mortgage, you can lose your house. Let that reality sink in before you jump to refinance a home loan to pay off student loan debt.</p> <h2>7. A fixed interest rate</h2> <p>Of course, you could use a fixed-interest mortgage or a fixed-rate personal loan to pay off your federal student loan. But make sure that's what you're getting. If you use a variable rate loan to consolidate your debt, you could get hit with a big payment increase when rates inevitably go up. Federal loans, on the other hand, are guaranteed to be fixed rate.</p> <h2>8. Prepayment penalties</h2> <p>Federal loans don't charge a fee if you pay more than you owe on any given month, but some private lenders do &mdash; check on that before you commit to a refinance.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-valuable-rights-you-might-lose-when-you-refinance-student-loans">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-deferring-student-loans">4 Things You Need to Know About Deferring Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-student-loan-debt-can-affect-your-mortgage-application">3 Ways Student Loan Debt Can Affect Your Mortgage Application</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-is-student-loan-forbearance-anyway">What Is Student Loan Forbearance, Anyway?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-ignore-these-4-things-before-refinancing-your-student-loans">Don&#039;t Ignore These 4 Things Before Refinancing Your Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-make-the-most-of-your-student-loan-grace-period">4 Ways to Make the Most of Your Student Loan Grace Period</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Education & Training Real Estate and Housing debt default deferment fannie mae federal loans forbearance interest rates mortgages refinancing repayment plans student loans Thu, 15 Jun 2017 08:30:16 +0000 Carrie Kirby 1963763 at http://www.wisebread.com The New Grad's Guide to Debt Management http://www.wisebread.com/the-new-grads-guide-to-debt-management <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-new-grads-guide-to-debt-management" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/graduating_student_worrying_about_career_path_and_financial_future.jpg" alt="Graduating Student Worrying About Career Path and Financial Future" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>According to Student Loan Hero, the average 2016 graduate left college with $37,172 in student loan debt. The class of 2017 will graduate owing roughly the same amount, if not more.</p> <p>For many young adults, a student loan is the only option for obtaining a degree. The problem, however, is that it takes years to pay off these balances. Some graduates also have difficulty juggling student debt with their other expenses.</p> <p>Luckily, student loan debt doesn't have to cripple a new grad's finances. Here are a few strategies to help graduates manage their debt and stay on track.</p> <h2>1. Get organized and prepared for that first bill</h2> <p>Student loan repayment typically begins six to nine months after graduating college. You'll likely receive information regarding your first payment in advance. If you haven't received this information yet, it doesn't hurt to contact your student loan lender to ask about your due date and minimum payment. Having this information early helps you prepare your budget ahead of time.</p> <p>To stay organized and avoid late payments, set up automatic reminders a few days before your student loan payments are due. If you have multiple lenders, look into consolidating all your loans into a single loan. This way, you don't have to juggle multiple payments and due dates. If consolidation isn't an option, contact your lenders to see if you're allowed to change your due dates. It might be easier to manage student debt when due dates are within a few days of each other. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-s-the-difference-between-student-loan-refinancing-and-consolidation?ref=seealso" target="_blank">What's the Difference Between Student Loan Refinancing and Consolidation?</a>)</p> <h2>2. Sign up for autopay to stay on schedule</h2> <p>Signing up for autopay is one way to avoid missing a due date on your student loans, which can trigger a late fee or a negative mark on your credit report. With autopay, your student loan lender automatically drafts monthly payments from your checking or savings account on a specific day of the month. As a bonus, your lender may reduce your interest rate when you agree to automated payments. This results in paying less interest over the life of the loan.</p> <p>Of course, the key to making this a successful solution is ensuring that there's always enough money in your checking account to cover the deductions &mdash; something you'll really need to stay on top of.</p> <h2>3. Request forbearance if you need more time</h2> <p>If you're scheduled to begin repaying your student loan, but you don't have enough income, don't ignore the bills. Student loan lenders &mdash; especially federal lenders &mdash; are flexible and offer assistance to students requiring financial help.</p> <p>One provision is forbearance, which allows you to temporarily suspend student loan payments for a certain number of months. For example, request a one-month forbearance if you have a temporary hardship, or request a one-year forbearance if you experience longer financial troubles. Keep in mind that interest continues to accrue with forbearance, which can put you deeper in the hole. Only use this option as a last resort.</p> <p>Deferment, on the other hand, is an income-based hardship provision. This option works the same as forbearance in that it suspends monthly payments without penalty. With a deferment, however, the federal government pays the interest that accrues during this period. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-deferring-student-loans?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Things You Need to Know About Deferring Student Loans</a>)</p> <h2>4. Deduct student loan interest</h2> <p>Student loan interest is a deductible expense, so remember to include this item when filing your income taxes. This is critical in cutting your tax liability, especially when you're already on a tight budget. Since it's an &quot;above-the-line deduction,&quot; you don't have to itemize your tax return to take advantage of this write-off. You're allowed to write off up to $2,500 of student loan interest paid annually. This will reduce how much you owe in federal and state taxes. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-student-loans-impact-your-taxes?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Ways Student Loans Impact Your Taxes</a>)</p> <h2>5. Hold off on other types of financing</h2> <p>After finishing college, you're likely ready to get your &quot;adult&quot; life started. This might include buying a new car and furnishing an apartment. But since you're fresh out of school with student loan debt, try to hold off on other types of financing &mdash; at least for now.</p> <p>The more debt you acquire, the harder it might be to juggle student loan and other credit payments. If you can avoid a car loan and unnecessary credit card debt, the money you would have spent on these expenses can go toward paying down student loan debt.</p> <h2>6. Live at home</h2> <p>The financial decisions you make as a young adult can affect your life later on. Although your friends might move into their own apartments, buy new cars, and spend most of their money on fun stuff, consider the benefits of living at home after graduation. By doing so, there's an opportunity to put a major dent in your debt. I did it for two years immediately following college, and I wasn't even a little bit embarrassed about it; I've paid off two student loans as a result.</p> <p>Whether you have credit card debt or student loan debt, minimizing your expenses now and prioritizing debt elimination sets the foundation for a strong financial future. Not only should you pay off debt, you should use this time to build a solid emergency fund. It'll be easier to save money and get ahead financially when you commit to living as cheaply as possible. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-to-pay-off-your-student-loans?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Surprising Ways to Pay Off Your Student Loans</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthe-new-grads-guide-to-debt-management&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThe%2520New%2520Grad%2527s%2520Guide%2520to%2520Debt%2520Management_0.jpg&amp;description=The%20New%20Grad's%20Guide%20to%20Debt%20Management"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/The%20New%20Grad%27s%20Guide%20to%20Debt%20Management_0.jpg" alt="The New Grad's Guide to Debt Management" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-new-grads-guide-to-debt-management">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-deferring-student-loans">4 Things You Need to Know About Deferring Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-is-student-loan-forbearance-anyway">What Is Student Loan Forbearance, Anyway?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-student-loans-impact-your-taxes">4 Ways Student Loans Impact Your Taxes</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-times-student-loan-refinancing-can-save-you-big">4 Times Student Loan Refinancing Can Save You Big</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-most-common-tax-mistakes-made-by-college-grads">5 Most Common Tax Mistakes Made by College Grads</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Debt Management Education & Training college grads deductions forbearance interest new graduates student loans taxes Wed, 14 Jun 2017 08:31:16 +0000 Mikey Rox 1963760 at http://www.wisebread.com Don't Let Outdated Money Advice Endanger Your Money http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-outdated-money-advice-endanger-your-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dont-let-outdated-money-advice-endanger-your-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-503170570.jpg" alt="Woman ignoring outdated money advice" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We've all received unsolicited financial advice, often from well-meaning relatives and friends. In many cases, this advice is useful. But a lot of &quot;classic&quot; personal finance advice simply hasn't aged well, and is now viewed as flawed. It's just not applicable anymore in today's world.</p> <p>Before you blindly accept any money advice you receive, be sure to do some additional research to find out if the advice is outdated. Here are nine examples of financial tips that may no longer apply.</p> <h2>&quot;Find a good employer and stay forever&quot;</h2> <p>Many of us know an older relative that began working at a company as a teenager and then retired from that same firm four decades later. Often, they walked away with a sizable pension and even health benefits for life. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/if-youre-lucky-enough-to-receive-a-pension-here-are-6-things-you-need-to-do?ref=seealso" target="_blank">If You're Lucky Enough to Receive a Pension, Here Are 6 Things You Need to Do</a>)</p> <p>This doesn't happen much anymore. Job security is not what it once was. A decline in labor unions means that guaranteed annual pay increases are a thing of the past. And a pension? Forget it.</p> <p>There's a lot of evidence now that switching jobs periodically will result in higher pay increases. And with the introduction of 401(k) plans, retirement savings are portable when your employer changes.</p> <h2>&quot;Pay off all of your debt as soon as you can&quot;</h2> <p>This is not so much &quot;bad&quot; advice, it's just less than ideal. Yes, it's a fine goal to remain as close to debt-free as possible, but in the current environment, carrying <em>some </em>kinds of low-interest debt may be more beneficial for you in the long run.</p> <p>Let's say you have a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage and were fortunate enough to lock in a low 3.5 percent interest rate. Let's also say stock market returns are averaging 7 percent per year. Over time, you're going to be better off using any extra money you have to invest in stocks rather than pay off your loan early. Generally speaking, if your investment returns outpace current interest rates, there's not much incentive to pay off debt early.</p> <h2>&quot;Technology is a fad&quot;</h2> <p>There was a time when some of the most savvy investors dismissed many tech stocks because they didn't understand them. The bubble collapse of advertising-dependent dot-com companies in the late 1990s didn't help the image of this sector. But there's no denying the fact that investing in technology companies with solid business models has been a clear path to wealth in recent years.</p> <p>All you need to do is look at the incredible returns for companies like Amazon, Apple, Netflix, Facebook, and others. A full 15 percent of companies in the S&amp;P 500 are technology companies, and they comprise most of the companies traded on the NASDAQ.</p> <p>Tech stocks are still notoriously volatile, but if you ignore the sector completely, you're ignoring some big potential returns.</p> <h2>&quot;Max out your 401(k)&quot;</h2> <p>While there's still little question that you should take advantage of your employer's 401(k) plan, people aren't quite as eager anymore to recommend that you contribute the maximum amount allowed. That's because over time, we've learned that the investment options and fees in many plans are rather lousy.</p> <p>Now, the best advice is to contribute to your 401(k) up to the amount that is matched by your employer. After that, begin contributing as much as you can into a Roth IRA, which offers tax-free growth and a wide array of investment choices.</p> <h2>&quot;Education debt is good debt&quot;</h2> <p>Attending college isn't a bad thing, but don't be cavalier about the impact that student loan debt will have on your financial wellbeing. College costs are increasing, along with stories of students and new grads being weighed down by tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-ways-to-pay-back-student-loans-faster?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Ways to Pay Back Student Loans Faster</a>)</p> <p>Carrying this debt can create a ripple effect that impacts your ability to save, purchase a home, or invest. And student loan debt can't be discharged in bankruptcy. Nowadays, any thought of borrowing for school should not be taken lightly.</p> <h2>&quot;Diversify your portfolio with a mix of stocks and bonds&quot;</h2> <p>Financial advisers have always emphasized diversification, but over time there's evidence that younger investors don't need to devote as much of their portfolio to fixed-income investments. Investing in bonds is useful for people who are nearing retirement age. But if you've got a long way to go before you stop working, you'll be best off with mostly stocks, which will offer much better returns and greater potential to meet your retirement goals.</p> <p>There is more risk and volatility associated with buying stocks, but a long time horizon will give you plenty of time to recoup any losses and then some (especially since people are living longer than ever). If you're not sure what stocks to invest in, pick a simple, low-cost index fund that mirrors the performance of the overall stock market.</p> <h2>&quot;Try to become a millionaire&quot;</h2> <p>There is an enormous amount of mystique surrounding the $1 million mark, and there's no question that saving that amount is something to be proud of. But a million dollars won't carry you as far as it once did. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-being-a-millionaire-is-overrated?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Reasons Being a Millionaire Is Overrated</a>)</p> <p>If you plan to retire at age 60, keep in mind that you need your nest egg to last for 30 years or more. Will $1 million allow you to maintain your lifestyle and pay for things like long-term care? It's certainly possible to retire with $1 million, but you may still have to live conservatively to make the money last.</p> <h2>&quot;Always buy instead of rent&quot;</h2> <p>Homeownership is a powerful thing. It allows you to build equity and get some possible tax breaks while also offering you a place to live. But we've learned in recent years that it's not for everyone.</p> <p>Home prices are sky high in many areas of the country, and having a mortgage payment that's too expensive can make it hard to save for the future or even live comfortably. Remember that just because you qualify for a loan of a certain size doesn't mean that's a sensible loan size for you.</p> <p>The best advice now is to purchase a home if you believe you can make a large down payment and then comfortably make monthly payments while still saving for other future needs. If you're not quite there yet, don't fret. Renting is OK as long as you're still saving, investing, and building your net worth in other ways.</p> <h2>&quot;Buy Coca-Cola stock&quot;</h2> <p>For decades, you'd often hear investors gloat about the consistent, predictably great returns from Coke. Heck, the great <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-pieces-of-financial-wisdom-from-warren-buffett" target="_blank">Warren Buffett</a> owns a ton of shares and drinks several Cokes a day.</p> <p>It's still a good company, but anyone who bought Coca-Cola shares in recent years will have seen below-average market returns. Shares have risen just 18 percent in the last five years compared to nearly 70 percent for the S&amp;P 500. Quite simply, the company has had to work very hard to maintain profits in an age when people are increasingly concerned about the health impact of sugary drinks and snacks.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-outdated-money-advice-endanger-your-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/millennial-millionaires-how-the-brokest-generation-can-also-become-the-richest">Millennial Millionaires: How the Brokest Generation Can Also Become the Richest</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-financial-basics-every-new-grad-should-know">The Financial Basics Every New Grad Should Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-increase-your-net-worth-this-year">10 Ways to Increase Your Net Worth This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-financial-moves-you-will-always-regret">9 Financial Moves You Will Always Regret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-personal-finance-calculators-everyone-should-use">15 Personal Finance Calculators Everyone Should Use</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance 401(k) bad advice debt education investing pensions retirement saving money stocks student loans Fri, 19 May 2017 09:00:09 +0000 Tim Lemke 1948480 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Ways Student Loan Debt Can Affect Your Mortgage Application http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-student-loan-debt-can-affect-your-mortgage-application <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-ways-student-loan-debt-can-affect-your-mortgage-application" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-164113230_0.jpg" alt="Learning how student loan debt affects your mortgage loan application" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You're ready to buy a home, but you're also paying back federal or private student loans. Will this make it more difficult to qualify for a mortgage?</p> <p>Yes. But that doesn't mean qualifying for a mortgage while paying off student loans is impossible. Here's what you need to understand before starting the home buying process.</p> <h2>Debt-to-income ratio</h2> <p>When determining whether to approve you for a mortgage, lenders look at something called your debt-to-income ratio. This ratio shows how much of your gross monthly income &mdash; your income before taxes are taken out &mdash; your monthly debts eat up. If your debt-to-income ratio is too high, lenders won't approve you for a mortgage because they worry that you won't have enough money each month to handle this significant payment.</p> <p>It's important to remember that mortgage lenders aren't as concerned about your total student loan debt as they are about the size of your monthly student loan payments. Lenders typically want all of your monthly debts, including your new mortgage payment, to equal no more than 43 percent of your gross monthly income. So, if your total debts &mdash; again, including that new mortgage payment &mdash; are at or under that percentage, your odds of qualifying for a mortgage loan are higher.</p> <p>Your student loan payments are considered part of your monthly debt by lenders. For example, if you are paying $300 a month on your student loans, your lender will count that amount when calculating your debt-to-income ratio. If that $300 payment pushes your debt-to-income ratio past 43 percent, you might not be able to qualify for a mortgage.</p> <h2>A deferment won't help</h2> <p>Your student loan might be in deferment while you are applying for a mortgage, meaning you won't have to start making payments on it for six to 12 months. You might think this will help your debt-to-income ratio. After all, when you're applying for your mortgage, you aren't making those student loan payments.</p> <p>But this isn't the case. Lenders will still count your student loan debt against you. That's because lenders know that long before you pay off your mortgage, you'll have to eventually start making those monthly student loan payments. Lenders don't want your mortgage payment to be affordable for 12 months but then suddenly turn into a burden once your student loan payments kick in. When your monthly debts suddenly rise, you might no longer be able to afford those mortgage payments that you were once able to handle.</p> <p>Loans insured by the Federal Housing Administration, better known as FHA loans, were once an exception to this rule. In the past, student loan debt that was deferred for more than 12 months before a mortgage's closing was not counted in applicants' debt-to-income ratios. That changed last year, when the FHA amended its rules. Now, if the lender doesn't know what the monthly student loan payment amount will be when the deferment ends, it must count 2 percent of applicants' total student loan debt as part of their monthly debt.</p> <p>So if you have $30,000 worth of student loan debt, under the new FHA rules, $600 will be added to your monthly debt levels, a figure that could push you over that 43 percent threshold.</p> <p>Borrowers might actually help themselves by getting their student loans out of deferment. That's because their actual monthly payments could be far lower than 2 percent of their total student loan debt. If loans aren't in deferment, lenders will use the actual amount borrowers are paying each month on their student loans. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-deferring-student-loans?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Things You Need to Know About Deferring Student Loans</a>)</p> <h2>Missed student loan payments can hurt, too</h2> <p>Student loan debt doesn't just make reducing your debt-to-income ratio harder. It can also hurt your credit score, if you're not careful about making your payments on time.</p> <p>In addition to debt-to-income ratios, lenders also rely on borrowers' FICO credit scores when determining who qualifies for a mortgage. Most lenders consider FICO scores of 740 or higher to be exceptionally strong. If your score is under 640, you'll struggle to qualify for a mortgage without paying high interest rates. If your score is under 620, you'll have a hard time qualifying for a mortgage at all.</p> <p>Paying your bills late is one of the biggest reasons for a low credit score. Your student loan payment is officially considered late when it is 30 days or more past due. A single late payment can sink your credit score by 100 points or more. On the other hand, making your student loan payments on time every month will help your score, making you a more attractive borrower.</p> <h2>What you can do about student loan debt</h2> <p>What can you do if your student loan debt is hurting your debt-to-income ratio? You can always improve your ratio by earning more income each month, perhaps by taking on a second job. The more income you make without increasing your monthly debt, the lower your debt-to-income ratio will be. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-ways-to-pay-back-student-loans-faster?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Ways to Pay Back Student Loans Faster</a>)</p> <p>You might also try to consolidate your student loan payments into one loan with a lower monthly payment. That will reduce your overall monthly debt obligation, again improving your debt-to-income ratio.</p> <p>Reducing other monthly debts &mdash; anything from trading in a car with a high monthly payment to paying off your credit cards &mdash; can help, too.</p> <p>Then there's your choice of home. Buying a lower-priced home will result in a lower monthly mortgage payment. That will also reduce your future monthly debt and lower your debt-to-income ratio.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-student-loan-debt-can-affect-your-mortgage-application">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-valuable-rights-you-might-lose-when-you-refinance-student-loans">8 Valuable Rights You Might Lose When You Refinance Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-these-5-money-moves-before-applying-for-a-mortgage">Make These 5 Money Moves Before Applying for a Mortgage</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-ends-meet-when-youre-house-poor">How to Make Ends Meet When You&#039;re House Poor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-you-shouldnt-buy-a-house-yet">5 Reasons You Shouldn&#039;t Buy a House (Yet)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/youve-defaulted-on-your-loan-now-what">You&#039;ve Defaulted on Your Loan. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Real Estate and Housing credit score debt to income ratio deferment home loans missed payments mortgages student loans Mon, 01 May 2017 08:30:13 +0000 Dan Rafter 1935490 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Things You Need to Know About Deferring Student Loans http://www.wisebread.com/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-deferring-student-loans <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-deferring-student-loans" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-528499384.jpg" alt="Man learning about deferring student loans" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="142" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Finding a way to pause your student loan payment can be a lifesaver when your financial life goes sideways. And trust me, this can happen to anyone at any time.</p> <p>For me, the financial roller coaster ride started in June 2010. I was expecting our first child when my husband accepted a job in another state. I'd had to quit my teaching job when we moved, and I knew I was not going to be bringing in a paycheck for at least a year.</p> <p>On top of this reduction in income, we bought a house in our new city, but it took nearly a year to sell our old house. We were stuck paying two mortgages for 11 months.</p> <p>Between the two of us, my husband and I also had about $35,000 in outstanding federal student loan debt. To help get a better handle on our monthly budget, we decided to explore the option of deferment until our financial situation became more stable.</p> <h2>What is deferment?</h2> <p>Deferment allows you to pause the monthly payments on your federal student loans for a set period of time. For subsidized loans (these include Federal Perkins loans, Direct Subsidized loans, and Subsidized Federal Stafford loans), interest will not accrue on your loans while they are deferred. Unsubsidized loans, on the other hand, do accrue interest during the deferment period. If you have an unsubsidized loan that you plan to defer, you are allowed to pay the interest to keep it from being capitalized and added to your principal, but it is not a requirement for your deferment.</p> <p>Deferment can make a huge difference in your bottom line, but it is not necessarily a cure-all to your financial problems. Here is what you need to know about deferring your student loans.</p> <h2>1. You might not be eligible for deferment</h2> <p>When we applied for a deferment of our student loan payments, our first big surprise was the discovery that we were not eligible. Borrowers are eligible for, and have the right to take, deferment in the following circumstances:</p> <ul> <li>During at least half-time enrollment in postsecondary school;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During full-time enrollment in an approved graduate program;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During enrollment in an approved rehabilitation training program if you are disabled;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During a period of unemployment (limited to three years);<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During active duty with the military, or within 13 months of when your active duty occurred;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During periods of economic hardship, as defined by federal regulations (also limited to three years).</li> </ul> <p>My husband and I had assumed that going from two family members to three, from two paychecks to one, and from one mortgage to two, was sufficient enough to meet the economic hardship requirements. But federal regulations only allow for <a href="http://www.studentloanborrowerassistance.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/self-help-EconomicHardshipDeferment.pdf" target="_blank">economic hardship deferment</a> if you are either on public assistance, or the salary from your full-time employment is no more than 150 percent of the federal poverty guideline for your family size and state. His salary was too high to qualify.</p> <p>Instead of deferment, we had to apply for a discretionary forbearance, which is the option available to borrowers who aren't eligible for a deferment.</p> <h3>What's the difference between deferment and forbearance?</h3> <p>The biggest difference between the two processes is that interest will accrue on your loans if they go into forbearance, even if your loans are subsidized. This means that unless you pay the interest during the forbearance period, the accrued interest will be capitalized (added to your principal).</p> <p>In addition, deferments are granted in six-month increments, and you may keep applying for the next six-month increment of deferment as long as you qualify for it. Forbearance, on the other hand, is granted in 12-month increments, and you may only apply for it three times over the life of your loan.</p> <p>In some situations, forbearance is mandatory, which means your loan servicer must offer forbearance to you. You can receive mandatory forbearance in any of the following situations:</p> <ul> <li>During a medical or dental internship or residency program;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During economic hardship wherein your total monthly student loan payment is 20 percent or more of your total monthly gross income;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During service in a national service program, such as AmeriCorps;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>You are a teacher who is eligible for teacher loan forgiveness;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>You meet the eligibility requirements for the U.S. Department of Defense Student Loan Repayment Program;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>You are a National Guard member who has been activated by a governor, but who is not eligible for a military deferment.</li> </ul> <p>For student loan borrowers who do not meet any of the eligibility requirements for a mandatory forbearance, the only other option is applying for a discretionary forbearance. As the name implies, these are granted to borrowers at their lender's discretion, and generally borrowers apply for them because of financial hardship or illness.</p> <p>In 2010, my husband and I were granted a discretionary financial hardship forbearance. My unemployment was nominally my choice &mdash; although I was actually unemployed because of my baby's insistence on a Virgo birthday that coincided with the beginning of the school year. If I had been unable to find full-time work, that would have potentially made us eligible for a deferment, rather than a discretionary forbearance.</p> <h2>2. Accrued interest can pack a mean punch</h2> <p>Unless you are lucky enough to be eligible to defer a subsidized loan, you are likely going to deal with accrued interest. The problem with accrued interest is that it's like the inverse of compound interest: The interest that you accrue on your student loan is capitalized, which generates even more interest.</p> <p>For instance, between the two of us, my husband and I paid about 4.5 percent interest on our outstanding $35,000 student loan debt. By putting our loans into forbearance and not paying the accrued interest, we added over $1,600 to the $35,000 principal over 12 months.</p> <p>Not only does capitalized interest increase the total amount you owe, but it can also potentially increase either your monthly payment or your repayment term.</p> <h2>3. Be prepared for paperwork</h2> <p>Neither deferment nor forbearance is an automatic process, even when they are &quot;mandatory.&quot; You will always have to apply for either deferment or forbearance.</p> <p>If you are applying for deferment, you will need to submit a request to your loan servicer. For deferments while you are enrolled in school at least half-time, you will need to contact your school's financial aid office as well as your loan servicer. This process is relatively simple, but you will need to go through it every six months to maintain your deferment.</p> <p>For forbearance requests, the paperwork can be a little more onerous. Like deferment, you will need to submit your request to your loan servicer. In some cases, you will need to submit documentation to support your request, especially if you are requesting a discretionary forbearance. For instance, my husband and I were required to prove we were paying two mortgages at once to be granted our forbearance.</p> <h2>4. You must continue paying until your request is granted</h2> <p>After you have made your request for deferment or forbearance, you are required to continue making your monthly payments until your lender informs you that the request has been granted. Generally, this process takes about 10 business days, but it can take as many as 30.</p> <p>Not making payments during this time can be serious. If you skip a month after submitting your request, and your request is denied, then your lender will consider you delinquent and you risk defaulting.</p> <p>Both the paperwork and the necessity of continuing payments means that deferment and forbearance are options you have to plan ahead for. If you have a sudden financial downturn with no emergency fund, then you might be scrambling to request a deferment or forbearance, which may not be immediately granted.</p> <h2>Postponing your student loan payments doesn't erase them</h2> <p>Anyone can fall into an untenable financial situation. Your student loan servicer wants to work with you to help you stay afloat, but deferment and forbearance are not instantaneous processes nor are they a given. Putting your student loan payments on hold can help you get back on your feet financially, but you need to be prepared to handle the costs and be ready to get back to paying off your loans as soon as you can.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-deferring-student-loans">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-is-student-loan-forbearance-anyway">What Is Student Loan Forbearance, Anyway?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-valuable-rights-you-might-lose-when-you-refinance-student-loans">8 Valuable Rights You Might Lose When You Refinance Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-pay-off-your-student-debt-faster">5 Ways to Pay Off Your Student Debt Faster</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-new-grads-guide-to-debt-management">The New Grad&#039;s Guide to Debt Management</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/css-is-one-source-of-college-financial-aid-you-cant-afford-to-overlook">CSS Is One Source of College Financial Aid You Can&#039;t Afford to Overlook</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Education & Training capitalized deferment financial aid forbearance interest monthly payments student loans subsidized loans Mon, 24 Apr 2017 08:30:13 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1932491 at http://www.wisebread.com What to Do When You Can't Afford Your Child's College Education http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-when-you-cant-afford-your-childs-college-education <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-to-do-when-you-cant-afford-your-childs-college-education" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-168249072.jpg" alt="Learning what to do when you can&#039;t afford college education" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>First comes the joy: Your child receives the thick packet from a dream university, the sure sign of an acceptance.</p> <p>But then comes the reality: that sky-high price tag.</p> <p>The college your child has just been accepted to might be asking for $30,000, $40,000, $50,000 or more in tuition each year. And if your child doesn't receive much, or anything, in merit-based scholarships from that school, you and your child will be responsible for covering those costs &mdash; often in the form of student loans that can haunt your child's finances for decades after graduation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-sobering-facts-about-student-loan-debt?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Sobering Facts About Student Loan Debt</a>)</p> <p>What if you haven't saved nearly enough to help cover these costs? What if you haven't managed to save anything at all? What can parents do when they can't afford their child's college education?</p> <p>The choice usually comes down to taking on tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt or attending a less expensive alternative school. And if you can't afford the tuition at any school, there are still options in the form of scholarships, grants, and community college. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/college/college-resources?ref=internal" target="_blank">40+ College Resources for Parents and Students</a>)</p> <h2>Rising costs</h2> <p>Tuition rates continue to rise every year. Especially at private universities, this means that tuition that is already intimidating becomes a bit more of a financial burden with each passing year.</p> <p>In its 2016 report, the College Board said that the average annual sticker price &mdash; including tuition, fees, and room and board &mdash; stood at $20,090 for in-state students at public colleges, and $35,370 for out-of-state students. The average for private colleges was $45,370 in 2016.</p> <p>There is a glimmer of good news here: Many students don't pay this full price. That's because many students receive scholarships (many offered automatically by the schools that accept them) and grants. According to the College Board's 2016 report, the net price of college &mdash; the price showing what students <em>actually </em>pay after they receive financial assistance &mdash; was $14,210 a year for tuition, fees, and room and board for in-state students at public colleges, and $26,080 for students at private colleges.</p> <p>The fact still remains that after financial assistance, paying for college is no easy task, even at more affordable public universities.</p> <h2>Student loan burden</h2> <p>Student loan debt is a financial burden for many college graduates. According to Student Loan Hero, the average college graduate from the class of 2016 has $37,172 in student loan debt, a record high. But for many students, there is no other way to pay for college.</p> <p>If you can't afford to help pay for your child's college education, student loans are an alternative. The loans, though, are far from a perfect solution. First, students can only borrow from $5,500 to $12,500 in federal subsidized and unsubsidized loans. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/college/federal-student-loans?ref=internal" target="_blank">Federal student loans</a> are the best option because they come with the lowest interest rates and most favorable repayment terms.</p> <p>Students who must borrow more each year will have to take out private loans. Their parents can also take out private student loans for their children. Those often come with higher interest rates and less favorable terms.</p> <p>Relying completely on student loans could also set you or your children up for a tough financial future after they graduate, especially if they struggle to land a decent paying job. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-to-pay-off-your-student-loans?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Surprising Ways to Pay Off Your Student Loans</a>)</p> <h2>A more affordable school</h2> <p>Your child might dream of attending that elite private school, but an in-state public university might be a more affordable choice that can provide your child with an equally strong education.</p> <p>Explain to your children that an out-of-state private school might be a dream destination, but might also negatively affect their financial health for decades after graduation.</p> <p>Students might also attend an in-state public school for two years, taking the general education classes that they are required to complete. They can then apply again to their dream university for the final two years of their undergraduate career. This can make their entire college career more affordable.</p> <p>There's also community college. Community colleges are a far more affordable alternative to both private and public four-year colleges. Attending a community college for at least two years could leave graduates with far less student loan debt after graduation.</p> <h2>Sources of additional help</h2> <p>Many colleges automatically provide merit scholarships to incoming students, which students never have to repay. Colleges will automatically provide this financial assistance to the students they accept; students don't have to do anything to apply.</p> <p>Merit scholarships can make private universities far more affordable. Private schools generally pass out more of this aid to attract students who otherwise wouldn't be able to afford tuition at these schools.</p> <p>If your child is accepted at a school but doesn't receive any or enough merit aid directly from the university, you can always contact the institution's office of admissions or financial aid. Often, schools will allow you to fill out a hardship form as a way to request additional financial support. Colleges aren't required, of course, to provide more aid, but some might. A phone call could make a difference.</p> <p>Also search for scholarships. Your child might qualify for hundreds of scholarships, some offering significant financial help. Winning these scholarships isn't always easy, with many attracting thousands of applicants. But even earning one or two scholarships can help cut down the expense of a college education. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/college-without-loans-where-to-find-scholarships?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Where to Find Scholarships</a>)</p> <p>Your children can also work on a part-time basis to help afford tuition. Colleges usually offer their own work-study programs that can help defray expenses. Students who volunteer to serve as residential advisers at campus dorms might receive free or discounted room and board.</p> <p>You might even be able to significantly reduce your child's yearly college costs by convincing your child to attend a school close enough to home so that your student can continue living with you. Room and board generally costs about $10,000 a year; if your child lives at home, he or she can eliminate this cost.</p> <p>College education remains an expensive proposition. But you and your child do have options, if you look for them.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-when-you-cant-afford-your-childs-college-education">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-great-sources-of-financial-aid-for-switching-careers">7 Great Sources of Financial Aid for Switching Careers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-taking-out-student-loans">6 Questions to Ask Before Taking Out Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-deferring-student-loans">4 Things You Need to Know About Deferring Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moves-students-should-make-during-a-gap-year">8 Money Moves Students Should Make During a Gap Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-sobering-facts-about-student-loan-debt">5 Sobering Facts About Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training college costs community colleges financial aid grants private schools public schools scholarships student loans Wed, 12 Apr 2017 09:00:10 +0000 Dan Rafter 1922478 at http://www.wisebread.com It's Never Too Late to Fix These 5 Money Mistakes From Your Past http://www.wisebread.com/its-never-too-late-to-fix-these-5-money-mistakes-from-your-past <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/its-never-too-late-to-fix-these-5-money-mistakes-from-your-past" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-637362030.jpg" alt="Fixing money mistakes from his past" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Making mistakes is part of life, and this is particularly true when it comes to finance. Since money is such a taboo topic in our culture, we often have to learn good money behavior through trial and error.</p> <p>The problem is that our culture also considers errors as something to regret, rather than opportunities to learn. This can land us in a shame-filled cycle of inaction.</p> <p>Forgiving yourself for financial mistakes is not the same as condoning or ignoring them. It's simply giving yourself the opportunity to move on from the past. Stop beating yourself up over these common youthful money mistakes and take action to fix them instead.</p> <h2>1. Taking on too much student debt</h2> <p>Taking out a student loan has become the default method for the majority of college students to pay for their education. According to a 2016 Market Watch report, &quot;about <a href="http://www.marketwatch.com/story/americas-growing-student-loan-debt-crisis-2016-01-15" target="_blank">40 million Americans</a> hold student loans and about 70 percent of bachelor's degree recipients graduate with debt.&quot;</p> <p>With the near ubiquity of student loans, however, comes the problem of students taking on more debt than they need or can comfortably pay off once they graduate. Student loans can feel like an easy way to pay for more school than you can afford, or even a way to fund things you don't <em>really </em>need, like your own apartment or spring break vacations.</p> <p>This can be exacerbated by the fact that college students and their parents don't always completely understand the differences between types of student loans, which can leave them all the more susceptible to overwhelming debt.</p> <h3>How to fix it</h3> <p>If you are kicking yourself for running up a student loan tab that you can't afford, start your journey to self-forgiveness by investigating your repayment options. The first step is to call your lender and explain the situation. If you have federal student loans, you may be eligible for a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/which-student-loan-repayment-plan-saves-you-the-most?ref=internal" target="_blank">modification of your repayment plan</a> based on your income. Even if you have private loans, talking with your lender can let you know what <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-things-you-must-know-about-repaying-your-private-student-loans?ref=internal" target="_blank">options are available</a> that will give you more breathing room.</p> <p>Once you have made whatever changes you can to your repayment plan, then take the time to write down everything you got for the money you borrowed. For instance, in addition to your education, you might list the friends and connections you made at college, the experiences you had, the insights you gained about yourself and your area of study, and the way the loans allowed you to focus on college instead of tuition.</p> <p>This exercise will give you a chance to feel gratitude for the loans. You are now the beneficiary of your younger self's choices &mdash; both the good and the bad. Recognizing all of the benefits you got from your student loans will help you move from being angry at yourself, to looking at your current loan payments as a gift to your younger self.</p> <h2>2. Not budgeting or building an emergency fund</h2> <p>I don't know a single person who did not immediately begin spending money hand over fist after landing their first well-paid job. That means anything from immediately purchasing an expensive car to relying on restaurants for meals rather than cooking. Even people who carefully budget their money when working for low salaries have a tendency to start making it rain as soon as their paychecks get bigger.</p> <p>This can cause problems in two ways. Sometimes, the good salary doesn't last forever because of a layoff or other change in your financial circumstances. And sometimes, you keep making good money, but your lifestyle continues to inflate &mdash; which means you can never seem to get ahead.</p> <p>In either case, the lack of a budget and an <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-step-by-step-guide-to-creating-your-emergency-fund?ref=internal" target="_blank">emergency fund</a> means that a financial blow can turn into a crisis, leaving you cursing yourself for every unnecessary purchase you made when the money was good.</p> <h3>How to fix it</h3> <p>Budgeting may be the last thing on your mind when the lack of money hits the fan, but <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-your-first-budget-in-5-easy-steps?ref=internal" target="_blank">creating a budget</a> is exactly what you need to do in an emergency. Don't waste your time beating yourself up for the spending choices you made before the financial crisis &mdash; just sit down with your bank statements, credit card accounts, and bills, and figure out your income and outflow. Learning to budget in the middle of a crisis might be painful, but it will ultimately help you feel in control of your money.</p> <p>Once you have a budget system in place, it's time to start looking back on your spending habits. What did you buy that you now regret? Why do you regret it? Do you feel regret now only because an emergency came up and you didn't have the funds, or do you actually feel the purchase itself added nothing to your life? If you truly regret the purchase, why did you make it?</p> <p>It can hurt to ask yourself these questions, which is why it is important to regard your past purchases with curiosity and compassion, rather than guilt or anger at yourself. But once you have answered these questions, you will have a better understanding of why you made those unnecessary purchases &mdash; which will help you avoid the same spending traps in the future. Understanding the reasons behind your bad money habits can help you develop financial mindfulness to make better choices going forward.</p> <h2>3. Not saving for retirement</h2> <p>Most people don't think to start <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement?ref=internal" target="_blank">putting money aside for retirement</a> when they are young. In your 20s and 30s, not only does retirement seem too far away to worry about, but you've got plenty of competing needs that seem more important.</p> <p>Of course, if you read <em>any </em>advice on retirement, it's clear that saving as much money as you can when you are young is the best route to a secure retirement. Unfortunately, this advice can feel like it's meant to shame anyone who didn't start funding their 401(k) on the day they started their first job. That's not helpful to late funders.</p> <h3>How to fix it</h3> <p>When it comes to retirement, we should all save early and save often. Unfortunately, financial advice tends to beat the &quot;save early&quot; drum so much that it's easy to believe that there is such a thing as &quot;too old to start saving for retirement.&quot; But as long as you are bringing in an income, you can save for your retirement. Write down your future goals and your vision of retirement, so you can get excited about saving. Then you can let go of the anger at your younger self, and start putting money in your retirement accounts today, tomorrow, and beyond. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a>)</p> <h2>4. Racking up credit card debt</h2> <p>I got my first credit card in college. Though I tried to pay off the bill every month, it got away from me pretty quickly. Sometime in my senior year of college, when I realized that there was no way I could pay off my bill, I made the decision to just let the debt rack up, since I'd have a good-paying job after graduation and could take care of it then.</p> <p>Of course, after I graduated, I was unable to find a job for about three months, and the first job I did land was working retail for $8.25 an hour. My credit card debt crept up even more.</p> <p>My youthful problems with credit card debt are incredibly common. When you get your first sweet taste of credit, it's pretty hard to stop using the plastic even when your budget can't handle your charges. The fact that you're not required to pay off the cringe-inducing full amount allows you to assume the problem will take care of itself, as I did.</p> <p>Then, one day, you realize that you are in debt up to your eyeballs with nothing to show for it, and you are kicking yourself for your youthful credit card spending.</p> <h3>How to fix it</h3> <p>Start by recognizing the fact that humans are not wired to be able to handle the combination of instant gratification plus delayed payment. Young adults are particularly susceptible to this, which is the very reason why credit card companies have been banned from college campuses.</p> <p>Once you recognize this, it becomes much easier to start digging yourself out of the hole. You can much more easily leave your credit cards at home and remove them from your favorite e-tailer sites when you realize the cost of their convenience. Sending extra money to your credit card each month also starts feeling like steps toward freedom. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-pay-off-high-interest-credit-card-debt?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Ways to Pay Off High Interest Credit Card Debt</a>)</p> <h2>5. Buying too much car</h2> <p>Buying a new car for yourself can be one of the most satisfying moments in young adulthood. You can finally choose the car <em>you</em> want to drive, rather than making do with a beater or your parents' minivan. So it's very easy to go hog-wild when you're in a position to buy a new car. You can get the horsepower, or the luxury, or the bells-and-whistles you've always dreamed of having.</p> <p>But the monthly payments end up being a bigger deal than they seemed when you were in the showroom, and your high-end car keeps needing expensive maintenance and insurance. When you realize how much you could have saved if you opted for that reliable low-key sedan instead, you want to kick your younger, flashy self.</p> <h3>How to fix it</h3> <p>Once you have forgiven yourself for putting too much emphasis (and money) on your car, you can start thinking more rationally about your transportation needs. If your vehicle is just a means to get from point A to point B, then what do you really need from it? What's the minimum that would be acceptable for your transportation?</p> <p>Going through this thought exercise allows you to think about what you really need, and will help you do the research necessary to find the right car for your life. Then you can trade in your too-much car for something more appropriate, or drive something that meets your barest of needs until you have paid off the mistake of buying too much car.</p> <p>And don't forget &mdash; you can always put some racing stripes on &ldquo;Old Reliable&rdquo; if you want it to represent you. Loving your car doesn't have to be expensive.</p> <h2>Let it go</h2> <p>Feeling shame over things you did in the past is a way of letting your mistakes continue to hurt you. Yes, you may have screwed up when you were younger and it might be hurting your bottom line right now. But you give that old mistake far more power over your future if you continue to beat yourself up for it instead of simply accepting it and doing what you can to bounce back from it. Step out of regret and into action today.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/its-never-too-late-to-fix-these-5-money-mistakes-from-your-past">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-moves-to-make-before-moving-out-on-your-own">5 Money Moves to Make Before Moving Out on Your Own</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-personal-finance-resolutions-anyone-can-master">8 Personal Finance Resolutions Anyone Can Master</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-new-year-budget-resolutions-you-should-make-now">4 New Year Budget Resolutions You Should Make Now</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-tell-youve-become-a-financial-grownup">How to Tell You&#039;ve Become a Financial Grownup</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-critical-money-mistakes-people-make-in-their-40s">7 Critical Money Mistakes People Make in Their 40s</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance budgeting debt emergency funds forgiveness missteps money mistakes retirement savings student loans young youth Fri, 31 Mar 2017 09:00:15 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1918286 at http://www.wisebread.com Pay These 6 Bills First When Money Is Tight http://www.wisebread.com/pay-these-6-bills-first-when-money-is-tight <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/pay-these-6-bills-first-when-money-is-tight" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-503389404.jpg" alt="Man paying certain bills when money is tight" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Is your money situation a little tight this month? It happens to the best of us. What if you don't have enough money this month to pay every bill by its due date? For the time being, you might need to prioritize your payments.</p> <p>This isn't the ideal solution. Far from it &mdash; paying any bill late could result in a late fee. But thanks to a bit of leeway when it comes to credit reporting, paying bills <em>just a bit late </em>might not hurt your all-important FICO credit score.</p> <p>This makes it a bit easier to determine which bills you absolutely <em>must</em> pay on time, and which bills you can more easily tackle after their due dates pass.</p> <h2>1. Mortgage</h2> <p>It's important to keep the roof over your head. And not paying your mortgage payment on time can send your credit score plummeting by 100 points or more. Credit scores are important: Lenders rely on them to determine if you qualify for a loan and at what interest rate.</p> <p>There is some leeway, though, with mortgage payments. First, lenders can't report your payment as late to the credit bureaus until you're at least 30 days past due. This means that paying your bill one, two, or three weeks late won't hurt your credit score.</p> <p>Second, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, lenders usually won't start the foreclosure process until three to six months after your first missed mortgage payment.</p> <p>Even though these safeguards are built in, you don't ever want to take the chance of losing your home. Make sure to pay your mortgage as soon as you can.</p> <h2>2. Rent</h2> <p>If you're renting an apartment, do everything you can to pay this bill on time. Your landlord can send you an eviction notice if you're just one day late with your rent payment. Now, actually evicting you will take time, and most landlords probably won't file a notice that quickly. But you don't want to give your landlord any excuse to start this process in motion.</p> <h2>3. Car payment</h2> <p>As with your mortgage, there is a grace period before your late car payment starts to affect your credit score. Your auto lender can't officially report your payment as late to the credit bureaus until that payment is more than 30 days past due.</p> <p>However, you need to be aware that if you stop making car payments, your vehicle can be repossessed. If this happens, your credit <em>will </em>suffer the consequences &mdash; by up to 100 points. Auto lenders can repossess your vehicle quickly, too. In fact, in most states they have the legal right to repossess your car as soon as you miss a single payment. It's unlikely that your lender will move to take your car that quickly, but why take that risk? If you're prioritizing your bills, this is definitely one to move to the top of your list.</p> <h2>4. Utility bills</h2> <p>Typically, you'll receive plenty of advance warning before your utility providers shut off your services. But you will have to pay these bills eventually to keep them on. Put these bills at the top of your priorities list.</p> <p>If you are struggling to pay these bills, don't ignore them; call the utility company. Utilities will often work with homeowners who are struggling financially. They might lower your bill for a period of time or defer your payments for a few months to allow you to rebuild your finances.</p> <h2>5. Student loans</h2> <p>Student loan debt is a financial burden for many, but you might be able to work out a new repayment plan with your lender if you are struggling. This is usually easier to do with federal student loans. You might qualify for a deferment, depending on your financial situation. But even if you are struggling to pay private student loans, call your lender. The company issuing your loans might be willing to work with you to keep you from falling into default. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-to-pay-off-your-student-loans?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Surprising Ways to Pay Off Your Student Loans</a>)</p> <h2>6. Credit cards</h2> <p>Yes, your credit card issuer can hit you with a late fee if you miss a payment. And yes, your card's interest rate might then soar. But credit cards don't need to be at the very top of your priorities list if you are struggling with critical bills like your mortgage.</p> <p>Your credit card provider can't throw you in jail if you miss payments, and it can't take your house or car. So paying this provider <em>after</em> making your mortgage and car payments is OK in a financial pinch.</p> <p>It typically isn't a smart move to pay only the monthly minimum on a credit card, because it's often such a small amount. However, if you're really struggling with money, this is another temporary option you can take. This will keep you current on your bill, and you can always boost your payments back up again once you've regained financial footing. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-simple-ways-to-never-make-a-late-credit-card-payment?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Simple Ways to Never Make a Late Credit Card Payment</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fpay-these-6-bills-first-when-money-is-tight&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FPay%2520These%25206%2520Bills%2520First%2520When%2520Money%2520Is%2520Tight.jpg&amp;description=Pay%20These%206%20Bills%20First%20When%20Money%20Is%20Tight"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Pay%20These%206%20Bills%20First%20When%20Money%20Is%20Tight.jpg" alt="Pay These 6 Bills First When Money Is Tight" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/pay-these-6-bills-first-when-money-is-tight">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-financial-mistakes-that-wont-hurt-your-credit-score">5 Financial Mistakes That Won&#039;t Hurt Your Credit Score</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-you-need-to-know-the-difference-between-secured-and-unsecured-debts">Why You Need to Know the Difference Between Secured and Unsecured Debts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-late-payments-affect-your-credit">How Late Payments Affect Your Credit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/prioritize-these-5-bills-when-youre-short-on-cash">Prioritize These 5 Bills When You&#039;re Short on Cash</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-why-you-shouldnt-freak-out-if-you-miss-a-payment-due-date">Here&#039;s Why You Shouldn&#039;t Freak Out If You Miss a Payment Due Date</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Debt Management bills car loan credit score late fees late payments mortgage rent repossession student loans utilities Fri, 31 Mar 2017 08:00:16 +0000 Dan Rafter 1915858 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Things Financial Aid Might Not Cover http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-financial-aid-might-not-cover <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-things-financial-aid-might-not-cover" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/kid_books_piggybank_626639020.jpg" alt="Guy learning things financial aid might not cover" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most students and parents realize that it's crucial to apply for financial aid, regardless of what your financial status may be. However, many families don't realize how expensive college can be, even if you receive a great financial aid package. It's important to recognize what items financial aid may not cover so that you can be better prepared for the school year ahead.</p> <h2>What Is Covered</h2> <p>Every student's financial aid package is different, so there are no exact expectations on how much you will receive and what will be covered. The package is based on the full cost of college, which includes tuition and fees, room and board, and sometimes, things like books and school supplies. Financial aid may also cover a summer session, but again, it all depends on how much is included in your particular package.</p> <p>If you live at home or off-campus, your package may include an allowance for things like transportation, housing, and food. If you live on campus, the dorm room and required meal plans may be covered.</p> <h2>What Isn't Covered</h2> <p>Students should be prepared for unexpected charges, which can quickly become overwhelming. Some of the most common college costs not covered by financial aid include:</p> <h3>1. Transportation</h3> <p>Some schools offer aid for transportation, but it's rare and something you should budget for. You'll need to find money for gas or public transportation. There may also be parking fees, campus shuttle fees, and transportation costs to travel back home during the summer and winter breaks.</p> <h3>2. School Supplies</h3> <p>Books may or may not be covered by a financial aid package, but you will still need to find money for pens, pencils, notebooks, and any other school supplies you may need for the semester. You may also be charged extra for art supply fees or other course necessities. You may also need to purchase things like a new laptop or printer for your dorm room.</p> <h3>3. Dorm Supplies</h3> <p>If you'll be living on campus, you'll need to buy items for your dorm. This can include everything from a mini fridge and television to new sheets and beanbag chairs.</p> <h3>4. Lab Fees</h3> <p>There are frequently lab fees, equipment charges, and other fees associated with certain courses.</p> <h3>5. Activity Fees</h3> <p>If you're planning on participating in sports, clubs, sororities or fraternities, or other on-campus activities, there will be additional fees.</p> <h3>6. The College Experience</h3> <p>Part of the fun of college is going out and meeting new friends, which will result in costs for eating out, going shopping, going to concerts or sporting events, and paying for other forms of entertainment.</p> <h2>How to Fill in the Gap</h2> <p>According to Damian Rothermel, a CFP who specializes in college funding, it's possible to <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/learnvest/2014/03/24/9-things-you-probably-didnt-know-about-financial-aid-for-college/2/#7c72a39223a1" target="_blank">negotiate your financial aid package</a>. He says that once you receive your financial aid package, you can contact the school to appeal for more money.</p> <p>For instance, if the Expected Family Contribution is too high, you can appeal the offer. You can also provide documentation to support your request for increased funding.</p> <p>If a student needs more funding for the school year, then there are a number of options available.</p> <ul> <li>Grants and scholarships. There is no limit on how many scholarships you can apply for, so it's best to get into the routine of searching for and applying for scholarships whenever possible.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Work-study jobs. Students can earn money through work-study jobs either on or off campus.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Part-time jobs. There are endless part-time jobs available to students, which can help them earn the extra money needed for items that aren't covered by financial aid.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Payment plans. The school may have payment plans available, allowing you to spread the remaining costs you owe throughout a semester.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Student loans. Student loans should be your last resort, as the last thing a student wants after graduation is to be saddled with debt. Your best bet is to first apply for a federal loan, which offers flexible payments if you don't find employment after college. There are also private or alternative loans available to students. Many banks also offer special student loan rates that you may not have to begin paying off until graduation.</li> </ul> <p>If you still have questions about how to fill in the gap, the school's financial aid office is available to help however they can. You may want to call and speak with them about how you can receive more funding. They may be able to help you find scholarships, part-time work, and good private student loans.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-financial-aid-might-not-cover">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-taking-out-student-loans">6 Questions to Ask Before Taking Out Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-sobering-facts-about-student-loan-debt">5 Sobering Facts About Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/css-is-one-source-of-college-financial-aid-you-cant-afford-to-overlook">CSS Is One Source of College Financial Aid You Can&#039;t Afford to Overlook</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-better-way-to-rank-americas-colleges">A Better Way to Rank America&#039;s Colleges</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-for-college-students-to-save-loads-of-money">10 Ways for College Students to Save Loads of Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training college financial aid higher education not covered room and board student loans students transportation tuition Tue, 24 Jan 2017 10:30:36 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1876850 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Unique Ways Millennials Are Dealing With Student Loan Debt http://www.wisebread.com/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_graduate_debt-450067439.jpg" alt="Millennials dealing with student loan debt" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Many Millennials are wracked with student loan debt and don't see a way out anytime soon. Fortunately, there are some unique opportunities available to you &mdash; both while you are in school and after you graduate &mdash; that can help you deal with this obligation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-you-shouldnt-panic-about-your-federal-student-loans?ref=seealso">Why You Shouldn't Panic About Your Federal Student Loans</a>)</p> <p>According to Debt.org, student loans account for <a href="https://www.debt.org/students/" target="_blank">over $1 trillion in debt</a> in America, and among those who borrow, the average debt load is about $30,000. However, with the right plan of action, you can tackle this debt in less time and with a smaller overall effect on your life and financial well-being.</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/which-student-loan-repayment-plan-saves-you-the-most?ref=seealso2">Which Student Loan Repayment Plan Saves You the Most?</a></p> <h2>1. Take Advantage of Income Share Agreements</h2> <p>Purdue University was the first to offer such a program (theirs is called &quot;<a href="http://purdue.edu/backaboiler/" target="_blank">Back a Boiler</a>&quot;), which provides funding to students who are willing to repay the foundation a portion of their salaries for up to10 years following graduation. These are often referred to as Income Share Agreements or ISAs.</p> <p>With an Income Share Agreement, there is less risk for the student because payments are based on a percentage of your income. (If you earn less, you pay less; when your income increases, you pay more, up to a defined maximum.) Conversely, with a traditional loan, there is a set loan repayment amount that you must find a way to pay every month, even if you don't have a job (although you may be eligible for a variety of deferments or other payment plans; check with your lender).</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-definitive-guide-to-pay-as-you-earn-a-great-student-loan-repayment-plan?ref=seealso2">The Definitive Guide to Pay As You Earn</a></p> <h2>2. Find an Investor</h2> <p>Some schools offer programs where an &quot;investor&quot; buys &quot;shares&quot; in a student's future. This is similar to an ISA, but can also be agreed upon privately. If the student does well financially after graduation, then the investor profits, but the student may end up paying even more than they would have on a private loan. On the other hand, if the student doesn't make much money during the repayment period, then the investor loses. As an added bonus, by selling stock in themselves, students may have even more motivation to do well after graduation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-to-pay-off-your-student-loans?ref=seealso">Surprising Ways to Pay Off Your Student Loans</a>)</p> <h2>3. Plug Your Venmo Account</h2> <p>Once you've opened a Venmo account, you can begin accepting payments from friends, family members, and concerned strangers who want to help you pay off your student loan. Ask for money to be deposited into your Venmo account for your birthday, graduation present, and during the holidays. Loved ones may be willing to contribute even more if they know the money is going toward your student loan.</p> <p>You can share your Venmo account via email or social media. Better yet, you can even make signs with your Venmo account on them, which you can hold in front of the camera at large events or in the background of your favorite news shows. There have been two successful instances where someone <a href="http://www.abc-7.com/story/33099003/what-the-tech-money-app-and-student-make-money-after-stunt" target="_blank">holding a sign</a> with their Venmo account received more than $20,000 in payments from amused viewers. While these feats pulled in 2013 and 2016 weren't for noble purposes, it just goes to show that this quick stunt can really pay off.</p> <h2>4. Volunteer More</h2> <p>With organizations like <a href="http://www.sponsorchange.org/" target="_blank">SponsorChange</a> and <a href="http://www.zerobound.com/" target="_blank">Zerobound</a>, you can volunteer your time and skills to meaningful organizations and your student loans will also reap the benefits. While you accumulate good karma from volunteering your time, the organizations will contribute toward your student loan debt as repayment. Organizations like <a href="http://www.nationalservice.gov/programs/americorps" target="_blank">AmeriCorps</a> and <a href="https://www.peacecorps.gov/" target="_blank">Peace Corps</a> also offer partial loan cancellation incentives to volunteers.&nbsp;</p> <h2>5. Find the Right Employer</h2> <p>More companies are now offering student loan payoff programs as a perk to new employees. This is becoming especially common with new startups. When you are meeting with a potential employer, you may want to ask if their benefits program offers student loan repayment options.</p> <h2>6. Consider Student Loan Forgiveness Programs</h2> <p>There are various <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-get-student-loan-debt-forgiveness?ref=internal" target="_blank">student loan forgiveness programs</a> available, but only to select people. While most borrowers won't qualify for these programs, it is worth looking into.</p> <p>For instance, with the <a href="https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/public-service" target="_blank">Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program</a>, people working in public service can have their loans forgiven after 10 years of payment. There are also income-driven repayment plans, which can forgive your loans after 20&mdash;25 years of repayment. You may also qualify for special federal student loan forgiveness programs if you work in low-income schools or in public service jobs, such as for a nonprofit or the government.</p> <h2>7. Explore Traditional Methods</h2> <p>Traditional means of student loan repayment are always a great option. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-times-student-loan-refinancing-can-save-you-big?ref=internal">Debt refinancing</a> or debt consolidation can help lower the interest you pay in the long-run. You can also take advantage of automatic debt payments, make payments twice per month, or trim your budget so there's more left over for repayment. These methods will all help you to pay off your student loan faster and can save you a great deal of money in the long-run. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-ways-to-pay-back-student-loans-faster?ref=seealso">15 Ways to Pay Back Student Loans Faster</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Unique%2520Ways%2520Millennials%2520Are%2520Dealing%2520With%2520Student%2520Loan%2520Debt.jpg&amp;description=7%20Unique%20Ways%20Millennials%20Are%20Dealing%20With%20Student%20Loan%20Debt"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Unique%20Ways%20Millennials%20Are%20Dealing%20With%20Student%20Loan%20Debt.jpg" alt="7 Unique Ways Millennials Are Dealing With Student Loan Debt" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-taking-out-student-loans">6 Questions to Ask Before Taking Out Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-get-student-loan-debt-forgiveness">8 Ways to Get Student Loan Debt Forgiveness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-sobering-facts-about-student-loan-debt">5 Sobering Facts About Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-to-pay-off-your-student-loans">8 Surprising Ways to Pay Off Your Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stop-student-loans-from-ruining-your-life">How to Stop Student Loans From Ruining Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Debt Management Education & Training college income share agreements investors loan forgiveness millennials repayment student debt student loans tuition volunteering Thu, 15 Dec 2016 10:30:31 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1853983 at http://www.wisebread.com How Trump's Presidency Might Change Student Loans http://www.wisebread.com/how-trumps-presidency-might-change-student-loans <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-trumps-presidency-might-change-student-loans" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/saving_college_fund_544603158.jpg" alt="Learning how Trump&#039;s presidency might change student loans" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Whether you were a Trump supporter or not, the $1.3 billion student debt issue is one that needs to be tackled. Trump called student debt an 'albatross' around the necks of borrowers. While he didn&rsquo;t spend a lot of his election talking about student loans, he did offer several plans to solve the debt problem.</p> <p>All of the President-Elect&rsquo;s student loan plans are still just that &mdash; plans. However, here is how Trump&rsquo;s presidency might affect your current or future student loan (or your children&rsquo;s loans).</p> <h2>Cap on Maximum Repayment Amount</h2> <p>Trump addressed the ever-growing student loan debt dilemma in his rally in Columbus, Ohio, on October 13. One of his proposed solutions was to cap how much a borrower would have to repay. He said, &quot;We would cap repayment for an affordable portion of the borrower&rsquo;s income, 12.5%, we&rsquo;d cap it. That gives you a lot to play with and a lot to do.&quot;</p> <p>Currently, the Revised Pay As You Earn, or REPAYE, plan allows borrower&rsquo;s to cap their monthly payments at 10% of their discretionary income. However, this is only applicable for federal loans, and the plan requires borrowers to extend the length of their loan, meaning they will pay for their debt longer.</p> <p>Trump&rsquo;s plan to cap loan repayment at 12.5% might look higher initially, but depending on how he enforces the plan, it could save a lot of money for borrowers. If Trump allows the monthly cap to be applied to private loans, then this plan will benefit many borrowers.</p> <h2>Student Loan Forgiveness After 15 Years</h2> <p>Trump added to his speech in Columbus, Ohio, &quot;And if borrowers work hard and make their full payments for 15 years, we&rsquo;ll let them get on with their lives. They just go ahead and they get on with their lives.&quot;</p> <p>Currently loan forgiveness is available through special forgiveness programs, such as the public service loan forgiveness plan and the teacher loan forgiveness plan. The income-driven repayment plan will also forgive student loan debt after 20 or 25 years of payments, depending on which plan you qualify for.</p> <p>Trump&rsquo;s 15-year forgiveness plan would drastically cut the length of loan repayment and finally offer solutions for individuals weighed down with private loan debt. Trump did not give exact numbers to how much this plan would cost or save Americans, but it was said that it would be paid for through reduced federal spending overall. Also, it is believed that this plan would save the government money through fewer defaulted loans. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stop-student-loans-from-ruining-your-life?ref=seealso">How to Stop Student Loans From Ruining Your Life</a>)</p> <h2>Cut College Costs</h2> <p>Trump also addresses the root of the student loan dilemma &mdash; costs set by colleges. On his site, Trump wrote that he plans to, &quot;work with Congress on reforms to ensure universities are making a good-faith effort to reduce the cost of college and student debt in exchange for the federal tax breaks and tax dollars.&quot;</p> <p>Colleges have no incentives to lower costs, so why should they? If Trump were to offer significant tax breaks, then students might see lower tuition bills, too.</p> <h2>Aid for Non-Traditional Schools</h2> <p>Right now, federal aid is for students attending schools that are accredited through the Department of Education. This means that if a vocational school or nontraditional school program is not accredited, students cannot receive federal aid to help them attend. Trump said on his campaign website that he would help make it possible for any student to attend and complete whatever school or program they wanted.</p> <p>According to his website, he wants to &quot;ensure that the opportunity to attend a two- or four-year college, or to pursue a trade or a skill set through vocational and technical education, will be easier to access, pay for, and finish.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-is-student-loan-forbearance-anyway?ref=seealso">What Is Student Loan Forbearance, Anyway?</a>)</p> <h2>So What Does Trump&rsquo;s Plans Mean for You?</h2> <p>If you are already paying student loan debt, then there is a possibility that the plans will not fully be developed and implemented for another year or two. Taking on something as big as student debt and bloated college costs is not an overnight job.</p> <p>However, if you are currently in college or are a parent with a child attending college in the next three years, then there is a possibility that Trump&rsquo;s plan will benefit you. For the rest of America, it is hard to determine just how much Trump&rsquo;s plans will cost.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-trumps-presidency-might-change-student-loans">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt">7 Unique Ways Millennials Are Dealing With Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stop-student-loans-from-ruining-your-life">How to Stop Student Loans From Ruining Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-get-student-loan-debt-forgiveness">8 Ways to Get Student Loan Debt Forgiveness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-get-trapped-by-these-higher-education-scams">Don&#039;t Get Trapped by These Higher Education Scams</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-every-parent-should-know-about-the-new-college-financial-aid-rules">What Every Parent Should Know About the New College Financial Aid Rules</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training college debt donald trump federal aid loan forgiveness president trump REPAYE school student loans vocational school Fri, 02 Dec 2016 12:30:07 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 1844379 at http://www.wisebread.com Be Careful Who You Owe: Here's Who Can Garnish Your Wages http://www.wisebread.com/be-careful-who-you-owe-heres-who-can-garnish-your-wages <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/be-careful-who-you-owe-heres-who-can-garnish-your-wages" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/handling_cash_money_64609483.jpg" alt="Learning who can garnish your wages" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Benjamin Franklin once said, &quot;In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.&quot; Nowadays, some people would want to update that famous quote to include &quot;debt.&quot;</p> <p>From student loans to alimony, there are several instances in which your employer must withhold a certain amount from your wages and send it to your creditor. Let's review which creditors can do this, and when they are legally allowed to claim part of your hard-earned dollars.</p> <h2>1. Issuers of Student Loans</h2> <p>With the average student loan for Class of 2016 graduates at $37,172 (up 12.64% from two years earlier), many Americans entering the workforce may feel like the main character in &quot;Game of Loans&quot; (Interest is coming!). Since one estimate claims that 76% of Americans are <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2013/06/24/pf/emergency-savings/">living paycheck to paycheck</a>, you could assume that it's just a matter of time until some of them start missing some monthly payments on their student loans.</p> <p>After failing to make payments for <a href="https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/default">270 days</a>, your federal student loan is considered to be in default. The period is 330 days for Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program loans. The consequences of student loan default are very severe, including:</p> <ul> <li>Losing eligibility for additional federal student aid;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Damaging your credit history;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Having the federal government request your employer to withhold up to 10% from your paycheck to pay back a federal student loan;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Having up to 100% of your federal tax refunds seized through the Treasury Offset Program; and<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Having <a href="http://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/Programs/EROD/org_list.cfm?category_ID=SGA">authorized state guarantee agencies</a> take up a portion of your state income tax refund.</li> </ul> <p>Uncle Sam is legally allowed to withhold not only your paycheck, but also your tax refund! To prevent your student loan from being considered in default, stay in constant communication with your student loan issuer. If you are planning to miss any payments, read the fine print of your loan agreement to minimize consequences. If you're going into default, talk with your student loan officer in advance to discuss alternatives to wage garnishment, including consolidating your federal education student loans.</p> <h2>2. Internal Revenue Service (IRS)</h2> <p>When the taxman cometh and you don't answer his call, he'll seize part of your wages each pay period and send it to the IRS to cover your unpaid back taxes. Unlike other creditors, the federal government doesn't require a court order to levy your wages.</p> <p>Once your employer receives a notice for wage garnishment (usually Form 668&ndash;W (ICS) or <a href="http://www.americanpayroll.org/pdfs/fpi/08j09668-w.pdf">668-W (C) DO</a>) from the IRS, your employer must return a Statement of Exemptions and Filing Status to complete and return within three days. It's critical that your employer submits this form on time because it may help you to exempt part of your wages from garnishment according to the schedule of its <a href="https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p1494.pdf">Publication 1494</a>.</p> <p>For example, if you file your return as married and joint, and are able to claim four exemptions, you can exempt $951.92 from garnishment. If were to not return the statement in three days, your exempt amount is figured as if you were married filing separately with one exemption ($640.38).</p> <p>Keep in mind that other income sources, including one-time bonuses, wages from additional employers, and commissions, may be <a href="https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/information-about-wage-levies">levied at 100%</a>. Besides when you pay back the remaining balance in full, the IRS will stop withholding part of your wages when you make other arrangements to pay your overdue taxes, including setting up an installment agreement, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/filed-an-extension-heres-what-you-need-to-know">payment extension</a>, or offer in compromise.</p> <h2>3. Spouse Demanding Child Support or Alimony</h2> <p>Love and marriage go together like a horse and carriage, until your spouse calls its quits and obtains a court order to automatically withhold child support or alimony moneys from your paycheck.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs30.pdf">Federal Wage Garnishment Law</a> sets the following limits on wage garnishment on your paycheck for child support and alimony:</p> <ul> <li>Up to 50% of your disposable earnings if you're supporting another spouse or child;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Up to 60% of your disposable earnings if you're not supporting another spouse or child; and<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>An additional 5% for support payments more than 12 weeks in arrears.</li> </ul> <h2>4. Other Creditors With Court Orders Against You</h2> <p>Last but not least, private creditors, including credit card companies and health care institutions, and federal agencies other than the IRS, can obtain a court order to start garnishing your wages. Without a court order, &quot;take it all&quot; threats from pushy reps from creditors are absolutely empty. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-annoying-things-bill-collectors-cant-do-and-how-to-stop-them?ref=seealso">4 Annoying Things Bill Collectors Can't Do &mdash; And How to Stop Them</a>)</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.dol.gov/ocfo/media/regs/DCIA.pdf">Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996</a> authorizes federal agencies and collection agencies under contract to garnish up to 15% of disposable earnings to repay defaulted debts to the U.S. government. For private creditors, the Act sets a limit on wage garnishment of up to 25% of disposable earnings or up to the amount that your earnings are greater than 30 times the federal minimum hourly wage, whichever is lower. In case of economic hardship, you may be subject to lower limits for potential wage garnishment.</p> <p>Besides garnishing your wages, some creditors with a court order may want to go after your personal assets. Depending on your state of residence, you may be eligible for protection exemptions on vehicles and real estate property. For example, states New Mexico and Hawaii have collection exemptions on motor vehicles of $4,000 and $2,575, respectively. Contact your State Labor Office for more details.</p> <h2>The Bottom Line: Inform Yourself!</h2> <p>Wage garnishment is scary. Fortunately, there are several steps you can take to minimize how much can be seized from your paycheck. For additional information, visit the <a href="https://www.dol.gov/whd/">Wage and Hour Division</a> website from the U.S. Department of Labor or call its toll-free helpline 1-866-4-USWAGE (1-866-487-9243), available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in your time zone. Also, you can find the contact information of your <a href="http://www.dol.gov/whd/contacts/state_of.htm">State Labor Office</a>for specifics on the rules in your state.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/be-careful-who-you-owe-heres-who-can-garnish-your-wages">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-protect-yourself-financially-during-a-divorce-or-separation">How to Protect Yourself Financially During a Divorce or Separation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-valuable-rights-you-might-lose-when-you-refinance-student-loans">8 Valuable Rights You Might Lose When You Refinance Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/youve-defaulted-on-your-loan-now-what">You&#039;ve Defaulted on Your Loan. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-taking-out-student-loans">6 Questions to Ask Before Taking Out Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-myths-about-divorce-and-money-debunked">4 Myths About Divorce and Money, Debunked</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance alimony back taxes child support court orders default paychecks student loans wage garnishment Tue, 25 Oct 2016 09:00:08 +0000 Damian Davila 1819782 at http://www.wisebread.com