thrifty cooking http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/6863/all en-US Menu Planning Backwards and Forwards http://www.wisebread.com/menu-planning-backwards-and-forwards <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/menu-planning-backwards-and-forwards" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/3272033083_6b86e73fb8.jpg" alt="perpetual calendar" title="perpetual calendar" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="333" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We all know it saves time and money to plan a weekly dinner menu. It's easier to resist impulse buys at the market. You can get to the actual cooking sooner when you don't have to spend time figuring out what you're going to make, then see if you have the ingredients, then (if you're like me) figure it out again because you don't have the ingredients. You're also more likely to eat a healthy diet and less likely to cop out and pick up a Big Mac, because you know you're going to pull together a nice chicken Caesar salad when you get home from work.</p> <h2>Tools You Can Use</h2> <p>Fortunately, when it comes to menu planning, there are lots of tools and software to help you get started:</p> <ul type="disc"> <li>You can use menu planning software.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>You can just use <a mce_href="http://www.google.com/calendar" href="http://www.google.com/calendar">Google Calendar</a>, <a mce_href="http://docs.google.com/" href="http://docs.google.com/">Google Docs</a>, Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, or whatever makes it easy for you.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>You can do like I do, and just use a plain old piece of paper and pencil. (I recommend a pencil rather than a pen. You'll probably want to re-arrange your choices more than once.)</li> </ul> <h2>The Best Time to Plan</h2> <p>You can start your plan either before or after you've done the grocery shopping for the week. The advantage to planning before is that it makes it easier to stick to a list and resist expensive impulse buying. If you plan after grocery shopping, however, you can take advantage of specials you didn't know about or maybe some cool new produce that the store (or farmer's market) didn't stock last week, and then build your menu around those items.</p> <h2>Schedule It Out</h2> <p>Personally, after I make my weekday grid, I write down the week's schedule. If I know there's a meeting on Tuesday night, I'll plan a salad or soup or other one-dish meal. If the adult kid is coming to visit on Thursday, she'll get something special to welcome her. (You may also want to think about weather. If, for example, the forecast predicts it to be cool early in the week, we can have a casserole on Monday and sandwiches or a salad later on in the week as it warms up.)</p> <h2>Use Everything Up</h2> <p>I'll use a piece of scrap paper to write down what I already have in the house. This is good even if I'm going to go shopping after I make my menu because it will use up veggies that are getting old, or use up what's currently in the freezer. I consult my local market's sales flyer so I can focus on what's on special that week.</p> <p>I'll also write down a couple meal ideas that I've had requests for from family members. (It could be the spouse is jonesing for some tuna or I've been thinking about a nice creamy mac and cheese all week.) If I'm drawing a blank, I'll look in my cookbooks for ideas. (If you cook with recipes, this is the time to pull them out or do your search and write down a few ideas.)</p> <h2>Putting It All Together</h2> <p>Then I start thinking about putting it all together. I've got a whole chicken in the freezer, some green beans and cabbage in the crisper, and pork chops are on sale at the market. The trick is to think about balance. Unless you really, really love chicken, don't plan chicken two nights in a row. I usually like to plan one night with animal protein, one night without.</p> <p>And don't forget your side dishes! I like to make sure that each dinner has at least two veggies, and if I'm using a recipe, I'll note where to find it &mdash; in a book or the file or the internet.</p> <h2>Plan, Plan, Plan</h2> <p>Another thing to think about is cooking ahead. I've got that whole chicken, and if I roast that for Sunday dinner, I can use the leftovers later in the week for chicken sandwiches. If I make up some extra coleslaw on Monday to go with the mac and cheese, I won't have to make it on Friday to go with chicken sandwiches (which means an easy meal at the end of the week and less temptation to call out for pizza because it's the end of the week and I'm tired).</p> <h2>Stay Flexible</h2> <p>A menu is simply a blueprint or guideline. You don't have to stay wedded to it. If, for example, the weather suddenly heats up, you can make a macaroni salad instead of the mac and cheese. If it has been the day from hell and you're late and tired and just can't bear having to pull out a pan, then it's time to swing by the Chinese place and bring home orange chicken.</p> <p>Having a menu is one less thing I have to think about, so I can relax and enjoy cooking dinner with my husband, knowing that we will have a tasty, healthy dinner that's also saving us money. You can't top that!</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This is a guest post by Anne Louise Bannon, a freelance journalist and blogger.</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.yourfamilyviewer.com/">Your Family Viewer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.oddballgrape.com/">Odd Ball Grape</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.whitehouserhapsody.com/">White House Rhapsody</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/anne-louise-bannon">Anne Louise Bannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/menu-planning-backwards-and-forwards">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-cut-your-grocery-bill">5 Ways to Cut Your Grocery Bill</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-and-worst-times-to-go-grocery-shopping">The Best and Worst Times to Go Grocery Shopping</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-grocery-shop-for-five-on-100-a-week">How to Grocery Shop for Five on $100 a Week</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-frugal-rules-you-must-follow-when-shopping-at-costco">5 Frugal Rules You Must Follow When Shopping at Costco</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-reasons-why-buying-groceries-online-is-great">3 Reasons Why Buying Groceries Online Is Great</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Food and Drink Shopping frugal menu planning grocery shopping thrifty cooking Thu, 01 Oct 2009 14:00:02 +0000 Anne Louise Bannon 3659 at http://www.wisebread.com Nonfat dry milk--no longer a frugal alternative http://www.wisebread.com/nonfat-dry-milk-no-longer-a-frugal-alternative <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nonfat-dry-milk-no-longer-a-frugal-alternative" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/nonfat-milk-price-graph.png" alt="Graph of nonfat dry milk prices with 100% jump in past year" title="Nonfat Dry Milk Prices 1976-2007" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For more than thirty years, nonfat dry milk was a frugal staple. For things like baking and making yogurt, it was as good as fresh milk. Not many people wanted to drink the stuff, but a whole generation of frugal folks knew you could use it as an extender--make up a quart of nonfat dry milk and mix it with a gallon of fresh milk. (See Myscha&#39;s <a href="/powdered-milk-solutions-for-dairy-lovers">Powdered Milk Solutions for Dairy Lovers</a> for other good ways to use nonfat dry milk.)</p> <p>Since late summer last year, though, nonfat dry milk has been priced more like a gourmet specialty item than as the frugal alternative it used to be.</p> <p>To put it in context, food prices overall are up 4.5%, dairy and &quot;related products&quot; are up 13.1%, but nonfat dry milk is up 104%! At that price, it&#39;s literally as cheap to use fresh milk as it is to use dry. (Data from the <a href="http://www.bls.gov/cpi/">Bureau of Labor Statistics</a> and <a href="http://future.aae.wisc.edu/tab/prices.html">Brian Gould, UW Madison</a>.)</p> <p>What happened? The market for nonfat dry milk is a global one. Just lately we&#39;ve had one of those perfect storms of supply and demand changes that commodities markets see from time to time.</p> <p>The major exporters of nonfat dry milk are the United States, the European Union, and Australia. Here are some of the recent shifts that have impacted the price of nonfat dry milk:</p> <ul> <li>For the past five years, Australia has suffered a severe drought. It has <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2007/s1943065.htm">cut Australian milk production</a> by 20%; this year&#39;s production is down by a billion liters.</li> <li>Over the past two years, the EU has been <a href="http://useu.usmission.gov/agri/dairy2.html">cutting farm subsidies</a> in a way that encourages the production of cheese over nonfat dry milk, and has also ended all dairy export subsidies.</li> <li>A July heat wave in California <a href="http://dairyoutlook.aers.psu.edu/reports/Pub2006/DairyOutlookNov2006.pdf">killed large amounts of dairy cattle</a>--and California produces over half of the US&#39;s nonfat dry milk. Milk production in the US has only in the past couple of months climbed back to year-ago levels.</li> <li>The <a href="/the-sinking-dollar">weak US dollar</a> has made US nonfat dry milk cheaper overseas, leading to higher US exports.</li> <li>There&#39;s been strong US demand for milk proteins and strong world-wide demand for cheese. Meeting this demand has consumed milk that might otherwise have gone to making nonfat dry milk powder.</li> </ul> <p>All that has added up to the recent spike in price for nonfat dry milk.</p> <p>Having given all that attention to the market, I ought to also mention an important non-market force: government dairy subsidies. The change in the EU subsidy for nonfat dry milk is just one example. All these programs have complex effects on prices for dairy products. For example, in the US there&#39;s a support price of $0.80 per pound for nonfat dry milk. At current prices, that&#39;s not going to affect supplies, but in any market that has the kind of pervasive price support structures that the dairy market has, one has to be careful when analyzing sources of price shifts. </p> <p>With US production returning to normal, I think we&#39;ll see nonfat dry milk prices begin to moderate, but as long as the US dollar remains weak and the drought in Australia continues, export demand will keep the price higher than its historical average.</p> <p>(Thanks to Professor Bob Cropp at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for the lowdown on recent nonfat dry milk price shifts.)</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nonfat-dry-milk-no-longer-a-frugal-alternative">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/horizon-organic-milk-is-it-all-just-lies">Horizon Organic Milk: Is it All Just Lies?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-meaning-of-milk-label-colors">The Meaning of Milk Label Colors</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-is-bread-so-expensive">Why is bread so expensive?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-sinking-dollar-as-viewed-from-overseas">The sinking dollar, as viewed from overseas</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/menu-planning-backwards-and-forwards">Menu Planning Backwards and Forwards</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink exchange rates global trade globalization milk milk savings thrifty cooking Mon, 05 Nov 2007 21:07:56 +0000 Philip Brewer 1355 at http://www.wisebread.com