Job Hunting http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/7800/all en-US These 17 Companies Will Help You Repay Your Student Loan http://www.wisebread.com/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/saving_for_education.jpg" alt="Saving for education" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Student loans can dampen the ability of new grads to get on their feet financially, causing stress at home and at work. According to Student Loan Hero, the graduating class of 2016 had an average student loan balance of $37,172 &mdash; up six percent from the year before.</p> <p>While it's daunting to see that number rise, the good news is that, in an effort to recruit and retain the best hires, a growing number of employers have started programs to help employees pay back those hefty student loans. Here are a few of those companies helping workers get out of debt.</p> <h2>1. Chegg</h2> <p>In April 2015, tutoring and study services company Chegg announced its college loan reduction plan for full-time employees in partnership with Tuition.IO, a company that provides a web-based platform for tracking and managing student loan payments. This benefit has an annual cap of $1,000 (less taxes), but has no cap on the total amount an employee can receive.</p> <h2>2. ChowNow</h2> <p>ChowNow has found this perk so useful in hiring talent that the company decided to double it from when it first started offering it to employees. The Los Angeles-based online food ordering company has an employer-paid student loan assistance program that matches up to $1,000 a year of employee payments.</p> <h2>3. CommonBond</h2> <p>Since December 2016, this lending marketplace platform has been granting $100 per month to its employees to pay down student loans. While CommonBond limits the perk at $1,200 per year, the company continues helping its employees until they fully pay off their student loans. Employees also have the option to refinance their student loans with CommonBond. On average, student borrowers save over $14,000 when refinancing through CommonBond, according to the company.</p> <h2>4. Credit Suisse</h2> <p>The financial services company doesn't offer a lump sum benefit to its employees, but instead provides a 0.25 percent discount on interest rates to workers that refinance their student loans with online lender SoFi.</p> <h2>5. Connelly Partners</h2> <p>Boston-based ad agency Connelly Partners works with Gradifi to offer a student loan repayment plan that improves the longer the employee stays with the company. Like a 401(k) plan, the agency matches up to $100 per month of its employees' debt payments. Employees who stick around for at least six months receive a $1,000 student loan payment bonus. Those who work for the company for five years receive another $1,000 bonus for the sixth year.</p> <h2>6. Fidelity Investments</h2> <p>The financial services firm makes an annual $2,000 direct payment to employees' student loan servicers, up to a total of $10,000. If your career with Fidelity requires you to continue your education, then Fidelity will reimburse you 90 percent of qualifying costs (up to $10,000 per year) of a work-related degree or certification program. You must have worked for the company for at least six months to qualify.</p> <h2>7. Kronos</h2> <p>Based in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, the workforce management software provider has partnered with solutions provider Student Loan Genius to pay up to $500 per year to help employees pay down student debt.</p> <h2>8. LendEDU</h2> <p>Since February 2016, the online marketplace for student loan financing has paid $2,400 per year ($200 per month) to employees with student loan debt.</p> <h2>9. Martin Health System</h2> <p>Employees working in the nursing field at Martin Health System in Florida can receive up to $2,000 per year to help pay down their student loans. In addition to this benefit from Martin Health System, Florida nurses can also work in areas with staff shortages to qualify for the state's Nursing Student Loan Forgiveness Program or the federal Perkins Loan Cancellation for Nurses and Medical Technicians.</p> <h2>10. Moonlite Bunny Ranch</h2> <p>In 2015, Dennis Hof, the owner of the legal brothel Moonlite Bunny Ranch in Nevada, promised to match 100 percent of his employees' student loan payments for two months, up to the full amount that they made during that period.</p> <h2>11. Natixis Global Asset Management</h2> <p>All Natixis employees receive an annual $1,000 student loan repayment benefit, up to $10,000 over a 10-year period. The company used to require that workers reached five years of employment in order to receive a lump sum benefit of $5,000, but did away with the requirement in July 2016.</p> <h2>12. Nvidia</h2> <p>This computing giant offers comprehensive student loan repayment options. First, employees working at least 20 hours per week who graduated within the previous three years can apply for a reimbursement of $6,000 a year for qualifying student loan payments, up to $30,000. Second, employees who successfully refinance their student loans with SoFi receive a bonus ranging from $200 to $500 and pay no loan origination fees. Third, employees who need to go back to college can receive a reimbursement of up to $5,250 each year for qualified job-related educational expenses, including tuition and books, as long as they earn at least a B average.</p> <h2>13. Powertex</h2> <p>The clothing design company was among the first businesses in Wisconsin to partner with Gradifi to offer a student loan repayment assistance program. Powertex gives eligible employees $100 per month for student loan payments for up to six years.</p> <h2>14. PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC)</h2> <p>Associates and senior associates at the consulting firm receive $100 per month ($1,200 a year) toward student loan payments for up to six years.</p> <h2>15. SoFi</h2> <p>Many employers partner with SoFi to offer a student loan repayment assistance program. The online lender also offers its own eligible employees $200 per month to help them fully pay back student loans.</p> <h2>16. Staples</h2> <p>The office supply retailer offers top-performing full-time employees $100 a month for three years, for a total of $3,600 in student loan assistance. To maintain their eligibility, employees must meet set criteria throughout the entire three years.</p> <h2>17. Aetna</h2> <p>As of January 2017, the health care company matches employees' student loan payments of up to $2,000 per year, with a lifetime maximum of $10,000. The program is available to employees who have graduated within the previous three years from an accredited institution.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-get-student-loan-debt-forgiveness">8 Ways to Get Student Loan Debt Forgiveness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-didn-t-learn-in-college-but-you-should-have">10 Things You Didn’t Learn in College (but You Should Have)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stop-student-loans-from-ruining-your-life">How to Stop Student Loans From Ruining Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/college/college-resources">40+ College Resources for Parents and Students</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-places-to-find-cheap-or-free-education">6 Places to Find Cheap (or Free!) Education</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Job Hunting college companies contributions education employee benefits jobs loan repayment plans student loans Thu, 22 Jun 2017 09:00:10 +0000 Damian Davila 1968233 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/leading_a_great_team_to_success.jpg" alt="Leading a great team to success" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Some people have a dream job; others have a dream company. If your dream gig is more of a &quot;who&quot; than a &quot;what,&quot; you'll need to switch up your job-hunting technique. Use these tips, and hiring managers will be eager to extend you an offer at your dream company.</p> <h2>1. Do your homework</h2> <p>You'll give yourself a better fighting chance if you've done your homework before any face-to-face meeting. Find out who the C-level executives are and what the company's mission statement is. This ground-floor research will help you decide if the company's views are in line with your long-term objectives. It'll also demonstrate your dedication when interview day arrives.</p> <p>&quot;This means reading about the company in a variety of places &mdash; their own PR and website, articles about the company in industry publications, and the press,&quot; says human resources expert Laura MacLeod, founder of From the Inside Out Project. &quot;Try to find someone who works or has worked at the company and pick their brain. Try your connections and '2nd degree connections' on LinkedIn.&quot;</p> <p>Once you've done your research, use what you find to focus your pitch. Think about how you'll contribute to the company culture and its bottom line. Make your best case on why you're the best choice for the position.</p> <h2>2. Approach your search actively</h2> <p>If you're limiting your job search to passive online applications, you may be waiting a while for a call. Instead, take a more active approach to getting what you want by letting the decision-makers within the company's &quot;<em>hire-archy</em>&quot; know who you are and what you want.</p> <p>&quot;Your dream company is almost certainly looking for assertiveness, and this means attacking the process from the beginning,&quot; explains Ryan Naylor, CEO and founder of LocalWork.com. &quot;When you hear about the job, whether it's through online job boards or an acquaintance, find a way to make contact with someone. Reach out through your network, locate someone within the ranks, and send them an email or call them on the phone. Use networking tools such as LinkedIn and even Facebook. If you make contact, you have a much better shot at getting that prized interview.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Take advantage of social media</h2> <p>Of course, the best people to network with are those on the inside &mdash; but don't discount those on the outside, either. Creating a rapport with your dream company's clients and associates could turn into a good word on your behalf. It may be a slow build toward the end goal (you'll want to establish a relationship before asking for references or favors), but if patience is your virtue, you can succeed in this endeavor.</p> <p>Social media is a great way to make these connections. Check out the various platforms used by your dream company, and engage. Social media managers will then see that you're a constant presence and interested in the company. Leave comments and start conversations. This could be a great transition into reaching out directly via the platforms' messaging systems to inquire about how you can become part of the narrative permanently.</p> <p>Some larger companies, like Google and Huffington Post, also have separate social media accounts just for job openings. If your dream company has a Twitter, Facebook, or other social media platform just for recruiting talent, be sure to give it a follow and check the feed regularly.</p> <h2>3. Set daily progress goals</h2> <p>Looking for a new job is a marathon, not a sprint. You can't expect to land an interview because you sent over one email attachment detailing your accomplishments. Sometimes it happens like that, but companies that have their pick of the litter usual require a bit more involvement in the hiring process. You need to remind them you're in it to win it, regularly.</p> <p>&quot;Do something every day that gets you one step closer to achieving the interview and the job,&quot; advises corporate trainer Chavaz Kingman. &quot;The more often you submerge yourself in your dream company's ideals and goals, the more easily you'll be able to discuss these goals and ideals in your interview, and in turn on the job.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Adopt a &quot;whatever it takes&quot; attitude</h2> <p>Maybe you get a job offer from your dream company, but it's not exactly the position you wanted. Should you take it anyway? If your goal is getting your foot in the door by any means necessary, then yes. There are other factors to consider, such as taking a potential pay cut &mdash; you may be OK with it, or you may need to negotiate a salary you're more comfortable with. Either way, if you can make it work to accept this position, you should take it. The opportunity to work for your dream company may not come again.</p> <p>Once you're hired, you can really make an effort to shine. Keep up the good work, and it will eventually show management you'd be better suited for the position you really want. Don't go stepping on anybody's toes to get there &mdash; you won't make any friends that way &mdash; but go above and beyond whatever your current job is so your boss will see that you're a dedicated worker.</p> <h2>5. Brush up on basic job-hunting techniques</h2> <p>Getting hired by your dream company takes a little extra legwork, but that doesn't mean you can skip the basics. First, polish up your resume to make sure it's current, spell-checked, and tailored to align with the company's needs. Focus on your successes and achievements, especially any that might be relevant to the job you want. (<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a>)</p> <p>Then, prepare for interviews. Yeah, this might be old hat to you by now, but you'll only increase your chances of nailing it if you go in confident and ready to slay. Ask other professionals you know if they'd be willing to give you a practice run and an honest critique. Have them test your knowledge of the subject matter and familiarity with the company background. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-not-to-answer-10-of-the-most-common-interview-questions?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How NOT TO Answer 10 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a>)</p> <p>Kingman suggests using the S.T.A.R. method when asked to discuss previous work accomplishments. Describe the Situation you were in; the Task you were assigned; the Action you took; and the positive Result of your contribution.</p> <p>Last but not least, do a thorough <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-clean-up-your-image-on-social-media" target="_blank">social media cleanup</a>. Get rid of unflattering photos, questionable text posts, and anything else inappropriate. Double check your privacy settings, and then view your profiles as an outsider to see what's still visible. Social media searches are a fast way for a company to get an instant feel for your moral character and &quot;real&quot; personality &mdash; don't let a few drunk selfies derail your chance at your dream gig.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/video-resumes-and-5-other-cool-tricks-to-land-the-job">Video Resumes and 5 Other Cool Tricks to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview">10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-employers-care-about-more-than-your-degree">7 Things Employers Care About More Than Your Degree</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting dream company dream job getting hired interviewing new job research social media strategies techniques Mon, 05 Jun 2017 08:30:13 +0000 Mikey Rox 1955702 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/interview_panel.jpg" alt="Interview panel" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Looking for a job can be tricky when you already have one. You want to take your career to the next level, but you don't want to risk the job you currently have &mdash; which can happen if your employer finds out you're trying to jump ship.</p> <p>Use these tips to keep your search a secret until you're ready to put in your two weeks' notice:</p> <h2>Keep your job search to yourself</h2> <p>There's no need to tell anyone else about your job search, least of all your coworkers. It doesn't matter how close you are, it's still none of their business. Loyalty is a fickle beast when positions are up for grabs, and if your coworkers see a chance to get a leg up, you may find yourself thrown under a proverbial bus. Rumors can spread like wildfire, and they'll eventually hit the boss. You could compromise your current employment if you don't have control of the narrative. Best to say nothing at all.</p> <h2>Stay away from company equipment</h2> <p>Using company equipment to conduct a job search seems like an obvious no-no, but you'd be surprised how many people don't recognize the risk until they get caught. Your activities may be monitored, and it'll be hard to explain yourself when IT has proof that you're wasting company time and resources to further your career elsewhere.</p> <p>Always use your personal computer and mobile devices to look for jobs and respond to emails, and only provide your personal phone numbers for calls. Don't use the office copier or fax for resume or other job-search materials, either; you could accidentally leave your resume on the machines, thereby ratting on yourself.</p> <h2>Continue giving 100 percent at your current job</h2> <p>Remember when you were a senior in high school? It was so hard to put forth the effort during that last week of class. It's common to adopt a similar attitude when you're planning to leave a job. You might tell yourself that you'll be gone soon anyway, so why bother trying to impress anyone? But this is a dangerous mentality. It's important to remain professional until the day your tenure ends at your current position.</p> <p>&quot;Don't ease off the gas just because you are thinking about leaving,&quot; says Ryan Naylor, CEO and founder of LocalWork.com. &quot;Maybe that new job won't come, or maybe you want a good referral later. If you do leave, you want to leave behind a continued path of goodwill, not burned bridges.&quot;</p> <h2>Don't announce your intentions on social media</h2> <p>Even though you think your social media accounts are &quot;private,&quot; remain cautious. People are nosy, and it's common practice these days for employers to check in on their employees' social media presence. If you don't say anything, you don't have to explain anything. This is especially true on LinkedIn; use the service to search for open positions and network with contacts, but don't outwardly declare that you're looking for a new job. It's almost guaranteed to get back to your employer.</p> <p>Nancy Schuman, chief marketing officer at recruitment firm Lloyd Staffing, adds, &quot;Make your activity stream on LinkedIn private and turn off broadcasts. Don't list your current employer by name on your resume. Instead, describe it as a 'large financial institution,' 'a well- known consumer products company,' etc.&quot;</p> <p>Same goes for Facebook, Twitter, and any other platforms you use. You may not be directly connected to your boss, but chances are you're connected to someone you work with, or someone who knows someone you work with. These services may help you make connections faster, but it's best to target individuals in your network directly who may be able to help you. It'll certainly be less dangerous than making a blanket post on Facebook about how you'd like a better job.</p> <h2>Don't send resumes to blind ads</h2> <p>When applying for positions, make sure you know to whom you're sending your resume and information. On platforms like Craigslist, often the job description is listed but the employer remains anonymous. This could spell trouble if you inadvertently respond to an ad your current employer is running.</p> <p>Certified career coach Cheryl Palmer relays a story of a job seeker who made that mistake.</p> <p>&quot;A woman once told me that her coworker responded to a blind ad and then was confronted a short while later by someone in the company from Human Resources,&quot; she says. &quot;The HR professional asked her if she was looking for another job. The woman lied and said no. The HR professional responded, 'I got your resume.' It turned out that the job that this woman had unwittingly applied for was at her own company.&quot;</p> <p>If you're posting to job boards, do that anonymously as well. You never know who's on there. If HR is searching for candidates for your office and they find you, you'll have some explaining to do.</p> <h2>Keep your interview attire in your car</h2> <p>Try not to take time off work to go on job interviews, if only to avoid raising a red flag on why your attendance is suddenly sporadic. If need be, schedule interviews during your lunch break or possibly after work. If there's no wiggle room, as a last resort, take one day off from your current job and try to schedule multiple interviews on that day.</p> <p>To expedite the interview process during work hours &mdash; like lunchtime, for instance &mdash; keep interview attire in your vehicle so you can change in and out of it at a discreet location. A suit and tie will be a dead giveaway if you normally wear jeans and a polo. You can only use the &quot;I have a funeral to attend after work&quot; excuse so many times before your coworkers start to think you're an agent of death.</p> <h2>Use references outside your current company</h2> <p>If you're trying to keep your job search a secret, why would you list your current employer as a reference? Surely you can find other people to vouch for you who don't have the power to fire you for making poor decisions.</p> <p>To avoid this predicament, Schuman suggests letting a prospective employer know that you will offer a current reference once you have a job offer. &quot;But do have other references lined up who know you and your work well for them to contact in the interim,&quot; she adds.</p> <h2>Ask for confidentiality at your interview</h2> <p>You may even go so far as to ask the person with whom you're interviewing not to reach out to your current employer. Just mention that you'd rather keep your current employer out of it; most hiring managers will understand.</p> <p>Schuman suggests, &quot;If you are working with a recruiter, tell them your confidentiality must be maintained; ask to be made aware of all prospective opportunities <em>before</em> your resume is referred.&quot;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jumpstart-your-job-search-with-instagram">Jumpstart Your Job Search With Instagram</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting career confidentiality discreet interviewing new jobs privacy resumes social media work Thu, 01 Jun 2017 08:30:18 +0000 Mikey Rox 1957429 at http://www.wisebread.com The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/confident_young_job_applicant.jpg" alt="Confident young job applicant" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Interviewing for a new position can be stressful. It's also a balancing act that can take time, and practice, to perfect.</p> <p>When it comes to salary expectations, the pressure increases exponentially. How much will they pay you? How much dare you ask for? What about benefits, and other deciding factors? The way you play this game can put thousands of extra dollars in your paycheck. So how should you bring it up?</p> <h2>When to discuss salary</h2> <p>There are a few different schools of thought on this. Some people say that you should wait until the person asking the questions mentions it. If they don't bring it up, you stay silent and wait for the next interview (if there is one). Others say that you should bring it up yourself if the interviewer doesn't mention it or skates around the subject. And some people are of the firm belief that you should only discuss salary once you've been offered the job.</p> <p>The fact is, there's no right or wrong answer here. You have to get a feel for how the interview process is going, and also the demeanor of the person doing the interview. If you have an instant rapport with this interviewer, and the meeting is going exceptionally well, you can be fairly confident that bringing up the subject of salary without being prompted will be OK.</p> <p>However, if you have one of those interviews with a cold interviewer behind the desk and very little chitchat, asking about salary in an already tense atmosphere could just make things worse.</p> <p>If the interviewer starts talking about the subject, without actually mentioning salary directly (for instance, they discuss benefits packages, paid time off, sick leave, and so on) then you have a natural &quot;in&quot; to bring it up.</p> <h2>Salary research is imperative</h2> <p>Chances are you already know the salary range for this position. If you don't, be prepared. Before you go into the first interview, or even apply for the job, do your research. Look on sites like Salary.com and Glassdoor.com to find the salaries of people in the position for which you're applying. Get a good range. Then, look at what different companies are paying for that role, and how that salary differs from state to state (or even country to country).</p> <p>You need to understand what you are worth and what the market will pay for someone with your skills and expertise. When you have that information, you put yourself in a position of confidence. Knowledge is power, and you will have a much stronger negotiating position if you have the research to back you up.</p> <h2>Use the anchoring technique</h2> <p>It's a technique widely used by people in sales, advertising, and marketing, and it works. Contrary to popular opinion, <em>you</em> need to come out with the first number in the interview. Old school interviewers and interviewees will say this is risky because you could name a number so high it disqualifies you, or so low you'll miss out on more money. Actually, as long as you've done your research, it's good business, and puts you in control of the discussion. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-simple-negotiating-trick-puts-money-in-your-pocket?ref=seealso" target="_blank">This Simple Negotiating Trick Puts Money in Your Pocket</a>)</p> <p>Let's take a hypothetical: You know that this position is worth, say $95,000 a year plus benefits. You also know that you are highly-qualified, have a superb resume, impeccable references, and that the company in question has had trouble filling the role. Therefore, you ask for much more than $95,000. Start at $120,000, or more. You have good reason to want this much money. You are worth it, and every day the company does not have this role filled, they are wasting time and money looking for a candidate. If they really want you, they'll pay it. If they don't, they won't.</p> <p>By anchoring the interviewer to a higher figure, you can eventually haggle your way to a salary that you are comfortable taking &mdash; say $100,000, which may be $5,000 more than the company wanted to spend, but $20,000 less than your asking price. Everyone's a winner.</p> <h2>How to tackle some of the tricky salary questions</h2> <p>You are going to get asked about salary in a variety of ways. Remember, you're in a negotiation; you want the most money for the role and they want to pay as little as possible. Here are some typical questions, and how to handle them.</p> <h2>&quot;What kind of salary range are you looking for?&quot;</h2> <p>Think about that for a second. It's a ridiculous question. They're asking you, &quot;What is the least amount of money you would be willing to take for this role, and what is your high-end?&quot; Do you think they're going to give you the top end of your salary range? Of course not, you've already told them how cheaply they can get you.</p> <p>So, narrow the answer down to something that gives very little wiggle room. For example, &quot;I'm looking for a salary in the high $90s&quot; focuses on a salary that's at least $97,000 a year. If you say &quot;$90,000&ndash;$100,000,&quot; guess what &hellip; you're getting $90,000.</p> <h2>&quot;How much are you currently making?&quot;</h2> <p>This is another nasty question, although it may seem like a perfectly innocent one to ask. You may currently be earning $60,000 a year, but so what? After doing the research, paired with your experience, you know you should be getting at least $80,000 a year for the job to which you're applying.</p> <p>Don't fall into this trap, because you are selling yourself short. Simply answer with something like, &quot;It's an apples to oranges comparison to compare my current salary to this role. If you supply me with more information about the role, the benefits package, the hours, the workload, and so on, I can let you know what salary I am looking for.&quot;</p> <h2>&quot;What are your salary expectations?&quot;</h2> <p>&quot;Ummm &hellip; I'd like as much money as possible please!&quot; Clearly, that's not the right answer, but that's what you're thinking. Again, you need to be realistic based on the research you've done, your current level of experience, and what you can bring to this new firm. There is no harm in saying &quot;That's not a question I can answer until I have a much better grasp on the requirements of the position, and what benefits come with it.&quot;</p> <h2>&quot;We really want you, but can't afford you. Would you take a pay cut?&quot;</h2> <p>If you've already named your price and they ask you this question, don't give up. If they really want you, they should be willing to pay. This is a sly way of setting your expectations low. They're saying &quot;We're cheap, we want to pay the minimum.&quot;</p> <p>Well, until you know what that minimum is, you cannot possibly answer this question. Never say, &quot;I'd consider it,&quot; or, &quot;Sure, if that's what it takes to get my foot in the door.&quot; That's just rolling over for them. Instead, make them put the entire offer on the table first, including benefits, travel allowances, vacation time, sick time, and so on. It's possible that you could take less money than you're earning now if they give you other concessions, like working only four days a week, working remotely, or getting six weeks of paid time off.</p> <p>Remember, salary negotiation is a crucial part of the interview process, but you should not be chastised for wanting a good living wage. Good luck out there.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting advice anchoring technique interviewing negotiations new jobs pay questions research salary strategies wages Tue, 23 May 2017 09:00:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1951908 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Have a Successful Skype or Video Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-have-a-successful-skype-or-video-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-have-a-successful-skype-or-video-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-656378092.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We all had a good laugh over the British journalist <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mh4f9AYRCZY" target="_blank">being upstaged by his kids</a> while trying to give a BBC video interview. All laughs aside, it did bring up an important subject: How do you conduct a great video interview for a new job?</p> <p>It's now possible to interview for positions all over the country, if not the world, using modern technology. It's also easy to get distracted or interrupted. If you're getting ready to jump online for your next interview, follow these steps for success.</p> <h2>1. Clean up the area</h2> <p>It's imperative that you have everything you need at hand before starting the video interview, including a clean home office. Organize your workspace thoroughly, clean the desk, and tidy up the room. You may look the part, but a messy, disorganized background can send red flags to the interviewer.</p> <p>If you really don't have the time or ability to clean up the space behind you, consider a backdrop. Something as simple as a plain bedsheet (nothing patterned or &quot;loud&quot;) hung from the ceiling can work. Black or gray works best, but as long as it doesn't distract, it will do the job.</p> <h2>2. Look directly into the camera</h2> <p>This cannot be emphasized enough &mdash; the camera lens should be treated like the eyes of the person interviewing you. If you don't focus your attention there, you're not making eye contact with the interviewer, and that can come across just as rude as if you were doing it face-to-face.</p> <p>There are a few steps you can take to make this easier. First, you could place something next to the camera, like a bright sticky note (you can even draw eyes on it as a reminder). Throughout the interview, that will prompt you to focus your gaze there.</p> <p>Another option is to turn off the webcam preview that shows you what your interviewer is looking at &mdash; you. It's in our nature to look at ourselves, and when we see that little window with our picture in it, our eyes immediately wander there. By turning that off, you'll be much more inclined to look at the camera.</p> <h2>3. Go to the bathroom first</h2> <p>It may sound like a no-brainer, but before you know it, you're shifting in your seat five minutes into a one-hour interview. This is not good. Not only will the interviewer pick up on how uncomfortable you are, but it will totally hamstring your performance. You won't be able to think clearly, your responses will be rushed, and you might even start sweating.</p> <p>Do yourself a favor: Go to the bathroom beforehand, even if you're not feeling the need. And don't drink a lot of water right before you start.</p> <h2>4. Keep the interview room off-limits</h2> <p>If there's one thing we can take from the poor journalist being interrupted by his kids, it's that he should have found a way to secure the room. If you have the ability to lock the door, do it. If you don't, consider putting a bolt on the door, or use something to block the entrance (as long as it isn't showing on camera).</p> <p>Take it a step further and ask the people you live with if they'd be willing to step out of the house when the interview is scheduled. Even if the room is secured, noises from outside the room can still be very distracting. Ideally, you want a quiet room in an empty house.</p> <h2>5. Do your homework</h2> <p>Just like any other interview, you need to have your ducks in a row. With a video interview, your facial expressions are actually more apparent, because that is all the interviewer will be focusing on. So, when you're stumped on a question, or struggling to find a reply, it will really show.</p> <p>To avoid that, spend time studying the company. Prepare a series of questions to ask the interviewer. Do a practice run with a friend or colleague. Make sure you know as much as you possibly can, and then, practice a great response for questions that really will stump you.</p> <h2>6. Check the equipment thoroughly</h2> <p>Any time anyone does something live, they fear gremlins in the works. Technological glitches are common, and they can happen to anyone. Life being what it is, they often happen at the worst possible times.</p> <p>So, do everything you can to test your equipment thoroughly the day before the interview. Make sure the camera is working, and focused. Check the microphone. Check the sound levels. Check the cables. Do a test run, record yourself, and play it back. By doing this a day before, you give yourself plenty of time to fix the issues without risking missing your interview.</p> <h2>7. Dress for success</h2> <p>A video interview is no excuse to wear casual clothing and look like you've just gotten out of bed. This is not a phone interview. You are presenting yourself to your potential employer, and you want to look the part.</p> <p>That means dressing for the occasion, and that can differ between industries. If you're in a corporate career, you'll need to dress for business. If it's a more creative profession, you can obviously be a little less formal, but you'll still need to look the part. And of course, you need to look fresh and camera-worthy. Hair, makeup, clean teeth, clean nails, the works. Treat this just like you'd treat a regular interview, and give yourself plenty of time to get ready.</p> <h2>8. Remember you're on camera</h2> <p>The interviewer can see you, and you can see them. But if you're sitting in front of a computer that doubles for your personal use, it can be easy to forget, and slip into a more comfortable position. Gradually, you may start to slouch, scratch your nose (or pick it &hellip; disaster), divert eye contact, or even start flicking through messages on your phone.</p> <p>If these things happened in a face-to-face meeting, you'd be hard pressed to finish the interview. You'd have blown it. It's just the same over video chat. The interviewer will feel insulted and disrespected, and you will have blown any chance of a follow up. If it helps, put a sign next to the camera that says &quot;Smile, you're on camera!&quot; It may sound silly, but it really makes a difference.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-have-a-successful-skype-or-video-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-ways-to-make-a-good-first-impression-at-your-next-job-interview">13 Ways to Make a Good First Impression at Your Next Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-you-should-ask-at-every-job-interview">5 Questions You Should Ask at Every Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-did-wrong-at-your-last-job-interview">10 Things You Did Wrong at Your Last Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-snapchat-in-your-job-search">How to Use Snapchat in Your Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting Technology conference call distractions Job Interview preparedness skype video chat video interview Mon, 15 May 2017 08:30:06 +0000 Paul Michael 1945044 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Things Employers Care About More Than Your Degree http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-employers-care-about-more-than-your-degree <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-things-employers-care-about-more-than-your-degree" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-587892248.jpg" alt="Woman learning things employers care about more than a degree" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A college education is a wonderful asset. You get a foundation on which you can build a great career, life experiences, and friendships that can last a lifetime. However, a degree is not the be-all and end-all of what makes you an ideal job candidate. Employers are looking for other key factors that separate you from the crowd.</p> <h2>1. Hands-on experience</h2> <p>There is a world of difference between college experience and real world experience. As it was so profoundly put in <em>The Secret of my Success</em>, it comes down to this: &quot;What you've got is college experience, not the practical, hard-nosed business experience we're looking for.&quot;</p> <p>Education is great, but it doesn't compare to being in the trenches, and employers know that. If you've got years of experience under your belt, it can often take the place of a degree or other form of education. And, it means you have references from people in the industry. This is by far the best way to separate yourself from the competition.</p> <h2>2. Ability to solve problems</h2> <p>It doesn't matter whether you have an office job, work in a garage, or are out in the fields every day. Whatever your chosen career, you are going to encounter problems; it's a daily part of every job. How you handle those situations will hold you in good stead, and problem solvers are highly prized.</p> <p>Do you think laterally? Can you condense the problem into key issues that should be addressed? Do you take charge when faced with a challenge? If you can hold your head up high and demonstrate your ability to solve problems quickly and effectively, your future employer will find you very hirable.</p> <h2>3. Communication skills</h2> <p>Directly related to problem solving, how well you communicate can be just as important as what you're communicating. It's no good having a great solution to a problem if you're afraid to speak up, or find yourself unable to distill your thoughts into actionable directions. Someone who can communicate well, and in a way that motivates and produces results, is a great asset to any employer.</p> <h2>4. Collaboration skills</h2> <p>Loners tend not to do well in most jobs. Sure, there are a few exceptions here or there, but for the most part, you must be able to work well as part of a team. In fact, one of the keywords you'll see most frequently listed in job postings is &quot;team player.&quot; Employers want candidates who can quickly and easily become part of a team, even if individuals in the group have clear differences. A candidate that can put aside those differences to produce a great team effort is worth their weight in gold.</p> <h2>5. Work-related achievements</h2> <p>Think about what achievements you can use as a plus during your application and hiring process. Have you written a successful blog or book about the industry? Are you a guest speaker at industry-related events? Have you appeared on television or radio? Have you won any industry awards?</p> <p>Any and all of these things can go a long way to getting you hired, and are often far more valuable than a degree. It shows that you know your stuff and know it well. Don't be afraid to list your achievements, even if they're not directly related to the job. They still count, and they have cachet.</p> <h2>6. Volunteer work</h2> <p>Charitable endeavors can do a lot to highlight the kind of person you are, and employers love seeing this on a resume. First and foremost, it's a sacrifice of personal time to do something for the greater good, and that says a lot about your character. The kinds of charities you work for can also sway the employer even more.</p> <p>For example, while volunteering at an animal shelter is great, helping people in need, like military veterans, will hold a little more value. How long you have been volunteering is also important. If you have been at it for 10 years, despite a poor economy and changing jobs a few times, it shows real dedication. And of course, you will get excellent references from anywhere you volunteer for, which leads to the final point.</p> <h2>7. Awesome references</h2> <p>The old saying &quot;It's not what you know, it's who you know&quot; is directly applicable to your career. In fact, many people climb the corporate ladder with great speed due to knowing the right people, regardless of skills or accomplishments.</p> <p>For example, let's say you're in the film industry, and you have no formal education in video production, editing, sound, or any of the other required skills. The employer will obviously overlook all of that if you have a reference from Steven Spielberg, Ron Howard, or Martin Scorsese. This is, of course, an extreme example. But if you have references from well-respected professionals in the industry, you're golden.</p> <p>When it comes to getting a job, you need to use every advantage you have; especially if you do not have the &quot;right&quot; kind of education for the position. But if you're smart and inventive, you can still get the job without the diploma. Good luck.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-employers-care-about-more-than-your-degree">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-skills-todays-employers-value-most">7 Skills Today&#039;s Employers Value Most</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan">These 17 Companies Will Help You Repay Your Student Loan</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-part-time-jobs-that-offer-college-benefits">8 Part-Time Jobs That Offer College Benefits</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-to-pay-off-your-student-loans">8 Surprising Ways to Pay Off Your Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Job Hunting accomplishments college education employers experience getting hired no diploma skills volunteering Fri, 12 May 2017 08:30:07 +0000 Paul Michael 1943629 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Budget Overhaul Tricks for the Recently Unemployed http://www.wisebread.com/5-budget-overhaul-tricks-for-the-recently-unemployed <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-budget-overhaul-tricks-for-the-recently-unemployed" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-626693162.jpg" alt="Man learning budget overhaul tricks for the recently unemployed" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Losing your job is an overwhelming experience. Not only do you have to deal with the emotional and psychological fallout of being let go, but you also have to quickly figure out how to survive financially until you land a new job.</p> <p>Fortunately, there are some budgeting tricks that even the most budget-averse can use to stretch their dollars after a job loss. Here are five tips that can help you make the most of your finances while you are unemployed. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-manage-debt-while-unemployed?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Manage Debt While Unemployed</a>)</p> <h2>Cut spending from easiest to hardest</h2> <p>The trick to an effective budget overhaul is to start your cuts with the expenses you care the least about. Freeing up money that is going to budget items you don't care about is much easier than having to restructure your life by moving to a cheaper place or selling your car. So it is always smart to start with the easy cuts, and move up the chain to the ones that are harder to cut.</p> <h3>1. Cancel unused subscriptions</h3> <p>Subscription-based companies are a huge part of our economy right now, and many companies make their money through subscription services their customers no longer use. You are probably aware of your subscriptions to services such as Audible or Stitch Fix if you use them often, but if you're like many consumers, you're still paying for older subscriptions you've forgotten you signed up for.</p> <p>Taking a couple of hours to comb through your statements to find unused subscription charges and cancel them can free up a surprising amount of money without you having to give up anything you need or use. Even if you are unwilling to do the work of canceling these subscriptions yourself, apps like Trim and Truebill will do the work for you for free.</p> <h3>2. Reduce necessary expenses</h3> <p>Once you've taken care of the expenses that you didn't know you had, you can start working on reducing your necessary expenses &mdash; without eliminating them entirely. In particular:</p> <ul> <li>Cut your cellphone bill by reducing your data plan. Not only will you probably be using less data while you are job hunting from home, but you may already be paying for more data than you need. Android and iPhone users can download the free My Data Manager app to track their data usage.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Call your internet or cable company to downgrade your package. Canceling cable is the standard advice for saving money, and for a good reason &mdash; it's an easy place to trim budget fat. However, even if you don't have cable, you can often negotiate a lower price with your internet service provider simply by asking. When you call, know the lowest going rate your provider is offering to new subscribers, as well as the rates of the competition. Mention that you are a loyal customer for however many years, and ask for some price consideration. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-tv-must-haves-once-you-cut-the-cable-cord?ref=seealso" target="_blank">3 TV Must-Haves Once You Cut the Cable Cord</a>)<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Reduce your energy bills by <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/shrink-your-utility-bill-by-plugging-these-surprising-home-energy-leaks" target="_blank">plugging energy leaks</a>, lowering (or raising) your thermostat, and using your appliances more efficiently.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Lower your food bill by reducing or eliminating dining out, and by following the rules of frugal grocery shopping: eat beforehand, make a list and stick to it, and shop your pantry before you go to the store.</li> </ul> <h3>3. Call your creditors</h3> <p>If you have a student loan, it's a good idea to call your lender let them know of your job loss. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-is-student-loan-forbearance-anyway" target="_blank">Federal student loans offer options</a> for hitting the pause button on your payments if you are struggling financially. While there are no such options for private loans, calling your lender and explaining the situation can still potentially get you a reduction in your monthly payment. Creditors would prefer to have you be proactive about a financial hiccup than have to get in touch with you after you miss a payment.</p> <p>You can make a similar call to your credit card issuer if you are unable to afford the minimum payment. Many banks will work with you if you explain the situation and propose some sort of repayment plan. They may even waive fees and reduce your interest rate. You may also want to request that they report your payments as on time to the credit bureaus. They can always say no, but it's worth asking.</p> <p>Just be aware that many of these actions will mean you are spending more for your loan overall, because they will increase your repayment timeline. If this will give you the breathing room you need until you find another job, it will certainly be worth it, but be mindful of the long-term consequences. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tricks-to-consolidating-your-debt-and-saving-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Tricks to Consolidating Your Debt and Saving Money</a>)</p> <h3>4. Negotiate your rent payment</h3> <p>Even though your rent payment may seem like it's a take-it-or-it leave amount, there is often some wiggle room, especially if you are a reliable tenant and have plans to stay where you are for a while. The best way to accomplish this is by asking your landlord for a longer-term lease in exchange for a discount on your rent. That can be a win-win for both of you.</p> <h3>5. Slash your car payment</h3> <p>Having a car payment is a tough Catch-22 when you are unemployed. Unless you live in a place like New York City, you generally need the car to be able to effectively search for a job and show up to interviews. But without a job, the payments can be overwhelming.</p> <p>If you have good credit, your lender may be willing to let you adjust your loan by extending the term to lower the monthly payment. This helps you keep your car and lower your monthly expenses, although it will increase the amount you pay overall for the life of the loan.</p> <p>If eliminating the expense of the car payment will make a big difference to your unemployment budget, then it might be a good idea to sell the car. This option is best if it will enable you to secure other transportation. In some cases, car owners with enough equity in their cars can sell it off and buy an inexpensive used car for cash.</p> <h2>Know what luxuries you need to keep going</h2> <p>After a major financial setback, many people are tempted to cut every expense to the bone in an attempt to stretch their money as far as it'll go. While you certainly do need to cut back and be mindful of how you spend your money, an austerity budget can be a mistake because it can be next-to-impossible to adhere to. The minute you cheat a little bit on your budget, it triggers the <a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/changepower/201111/beware-the-what-the-hell-effect-especially-holidays" target="_blank">&quot;what-the-hell&quot; effect</a>, wherein you think that you've already screwed up your budget a little, so why not screw it up a lot?</p> <p>In addition, being unemployed and looking for a job is emotionally taxing. If you cut out every little luxury, then you'll have less emotional bandwidth to keep up the difficult slog of applying for jobs.</p> <p>So it's a good idea to maintain a small line item in your budget for a luxury that will help sustain you through the unemployment. For example, you might maintain your gym membership, so you can keep working out and enjoying the mood-enhancing effects of endorphins. Or you could keep the occasional happy hour with friends, so you can stay connected with your favorite people or former colleagues (who may even provide knowledge that could help you find your next job).</p> <p>The important thing to remember about these types of luxuries is that they do need to be small line items. There is a difference between sustaining yourself and indulging yourself, and you need to keep that difference in mind until you find a new job.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-budget-overhaul-tricks-for-the-recently-unemployed">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-resist-the-expensive-once-in-a-lifetime-mentality">How to Resist the Expensive &quot;Once in a Lifetime&quot; Mentality</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-things-that-should-never-cost-more-than-99">11 Things That Should Never Cost More Than $99</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/39-mindless-ways-youre-wasting-money-in-every-part-of-your-life">39 Mindless Ways You&#039;re Wasting Money in Every Part of Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-one-nice-thing-can-ruin-your-whole-budget">How One Nice Thing Can Ruin Your Whole Budget</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Job Hunting budget budget tips budget tricks out of work saving money Spending Money unemployment Wed, 03 May 2017 07:49:36 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1938922 at http://www.wisebread.com 11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-476073295.jpg" alt="College grad learning how to get ahead on the job hunt" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's a dog-eat-dog post-college world out there for new grads. It was when I graduated in 2003, and I hear the same grumblings today from next-gens looking for work.</p> <p>While I can't promise that any of my advice will get you hired, I can ensure that it'll at least help you get your professional endeavors off on the right foot. As such, consider these ways to get ahead in the job hunt.</p> <h2>1. Explore entrepreneurship while you're still in school</h2> <p>Entrepreneurship isn't for everyone, but I do recommend it to everyone. I started my first business while I was still in college, which eventually evolved into a successful media business. That has, in turn, provided me with the financial and recreational freedom to pursue other interests and revenue streams.</p> <p>More than that, though, trying to become your own boss at a young(ish) age, even if you don't quite know what you're doing yet, will never be considered a failure. At the very least, you'll gain skills than can help you in future prospects, learn how to interact with customers, and make connections networking with other professionals. This will give you a major edge over your contemporaries.</p> <h2>2. Volunteer to enhance work ethic and build references</h2> <p>Volunteering, especially right after college, looks great on a resume because it lets an employer know that you're committed to a cause. It's not just about listing the noble charities to which you've given your time, but rather how you turned these opportunities into in-the-field, ethic-building ventures. The experience will undoubtedly help you make contacts and build references who will sing your praises when called upon. Of course, seeing the world, meeting and helping people, and gaining a sense of purpose and self are pretty cool, too.</p> <h2>3. Pursue internships to gain industry experience</h2> <p>I held two internships at a time in college because I knew I wanted to work in media, specifically journalism. Unfortunately for me, I fell in love with a college that didn't offer a journalism major, and that meant I had to make up the difference &mdash; big time.</p> <p>One of my internships was writing news for an ABC-affiliated AM news-radio station, while the other was writing about music for a local magazine. Each of these internships provided me with vastly different skills, but they both prepared me for applying to my first paid writing positions. I went into those jobs better prepared, perhaps, than other candidates.</p> <p>Alexis Chateau, founder and managing partner of her own eponymous public relations firm, credits internship for her success. In addition to the internship, she suggests taking on spec assignments for free to show potential employers what you've got.</p> <p>&quot;College students should take on pro-bono work, to build their portfolio, if they work in an area that requires it,&quot; she says. &quot;An impressive portfolio can open up almost any door in business.&quot;</p> <p>I can personally vouch for this tactic. When I started my journalism career, I wrote many articles for free just to get published. When I had enough clips that showed that I was a capable and cognizant writer, editors responded in kind by hiring me for work.</p> <h2>4. Connect with prospective companies online</h2> <p>If there are particular companies at which you're interested in working, follow them online so you can get a better idea of what they're all about. When you go into an interview with something smart and relevant to say about the company, you won't go unnoticed by the interviewer.</p> <p>&quot;These days, smart companies are using their social media to have a dialogue with the public, and this dialogue is a great way for people to figure out a company's core values, their mission, and the language they use in order to connect with them, and present yourself as an ideal candidate,&quot; explains Carlota Zimmerman, a New York-based career coach and success strategist.</p> <p>Zimmerman suggests also liking the company's Facebook page, as someone through the grapevine may notice and reach out. It may not be that easy, but any potential connection is a valuable connection.</p> <h2>5. Clean up your social media</h2> <p>This is the digital age, when everyone and their mother has a social media presence. Chances are, if you're fresh out of college, you've got a few things floating around your Facebook or Instagram account that may not paint the prettiest picture of you to an employer. And believe me, your prospective employers will be looking.</p> <p>Before you even send out your resume, do a deep clean of all of your social media accounts. Scrub embarrassing posts, delete or untag yourself from unflattering photos, and double check your privacy settings. Then, view your profile publicly to see what information is still accessible. A tedious process? Yes, but so is unemployment. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-clean-up-your-image-on-social-media?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Easy Ways to Clean Up Your Image on Social Media</a>)</p> <h2>6. Tap into your personal network for professional tips</h2> <p>Nearly every single adult you know is a professional with years of experience in their field. Some of them have had the same jobs forever, and some of them have changed careers frequently. No matter the case, these folks can be helpful not only in the advice they can provide, but they may also be able to point you in the right direction of employment.</p> <p>Kristine Thorndyke, who landed a full-time gig in Los Angeles before she graduated, offers advice on how to apply this principle within your own college community.</p> <p>&quot;Join a club or school committee based around a particular skill or interest you intend on pursuing in the future,&quot; she says. &quot;For example, if you are a business major, see if there are any groups or committees that meet up or, oftentimes, a designated business fraternity. These kinds of groups usually have access to professionals in the field you intend on pursuing and can help coordinate meet and greets with these professionals or alumni.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Take advantage of your school's career services resources</h2> <p>When I was looking for a job in Manhattan, I was willing to take all the help I could get. Enter Career Services at my alma mater. These centers provides free resources that not only help students write proper resumes, but also facilitate conversations between alumni and new grads based on field of interest, skill level, and more. My own Career Services connected me with the right people so I could start putting out feelers and getting a handle on what my options were.</p> <p>&quot;Reach out to alumni from your school and ask them out for a coffee to 'pick their brain,'&quot; Thorndyke suggests. &quot;Oftentimes, this alumni has connections or ties to companies that are hiring and will be impressed that you were driven enough to meet and learn more about the kind of work they do and their insight and/or suggestions for you.&quot;</p> <h2>8. Practice how to give a good interview from start to finish</h2> <p>Interviewing for a job is an art form. There are a million things that go into giving a great one, from how you dress to your follow-up thank-yous. As with everything else, of course, practice makes perfect &mdash; and you have ample time to hone your skills since, ya know, you're currently unemployed. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a>)</p> <p>Thorndyke advises, &quot;Interview with a professional career counselor. It's the best way to figure out how to most effectively convey your thoughts and accomplishments before the big interview. Oftentimes, it's difficult to get any honest feedback from HR or interviewers about notes on your qualifications or interviewing ability from a gig you were declined an offer from.&quot;</p> <p>An interview counselor can point out where you need to improve before the rejections become a trend.</p> <h2>9. Learn how to write a resume that will get you noticed</h2> <p>First, let's start with the number one thing you shouldn't do with your resume: Do not send the same one to every job prospect, regardless of industry or field. Your resume should be specifically tailored to the job you're seeking. If that means changing it 57 times a week to make sure it's relevant to each prospect, that's what you need to do. Secondly, it needs to stand out. There are lots of ways you can do that, but the highest on the list is providing details about past accomplishments opposed to generic lines like, &quot;Provided marketing assistance to the director of sales.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a>)</p> <p>You know what HR people do when they read resumes full of bland descriptors? They slam dunk it into the circular file and move on to the next one.</p> <h2>10. Put your GPA on your resume</h2> <p>Maybe I've been out of college for too long, but I don't remember including my GPA on my resume &mdash; or anybody ever suggesting I do so. But Chris Kolmar, co-founder of Zappia.com, makes a good point about adopting the practice, at least for the first couple years after graduation.</p> <p>His logic?</p> <p>&quot;Any good hiring manager will ask for it because it's a decent predictor of success right of out college,&quot; he says.</p> <p>Not gospel, but it certainly won't hurt.</p> <h2>11. Start your job hunt months before graduation</h2> <p>Looking for a job well before you graduate doesn't always work, but getting a head start never hurts.</p> <p>&quot;I secured a job in public relations three days before graduation because of this,&quot; explains Alyssa Pallotti, an account supervisor at Montner Tech PR in Connecticut. &quot;I began applying, participating in phone interviews, and meeting potential employers in person as early as the beginning of my final semester. This allowed me to tweak my resume, cover letters, and interview style based on feedback from those companies. Therefore, my overall presentation and nerves were refined by the time I was actually eligible to take on a position.&quot;</p> <p>Yes, job hunting takes work &mdash; and that can be an overwhelming prospect when you're still dealing with school &mdash; but don't put this off. It could potentially save you months of job-hunt headaches.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-tax-deductions-job-hunters-can-t-afford-to-overlook">6 Tax Deductions Job-Hunters Can’t Afford to Overlook</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting advice career college grads internships interviewing looking for work networking new grads resumes tips Mon, 24 Apr 2017 08:30:13 +0000 Mikey Rox 1931722 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_work_thinking_473428184.jpg" alt="Woman learning things she should never include on a cover letter" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Writing the perfect cover letter is a job skill unto itself. In just a few paragraphs, you need to capture the reader's attention and expertly sell your skills and experience, all while striking the right professional tone.</p> <p>It's tempting to slap something together and tell yourself that your resume is more important. Truth be told, though, your cover letter is a key part of the package. Avoiding these seven cover letter gaffes will get you through the interview door faster.</p> <h2>1. Wrong information</h2> <p>Make sure that you have all the details right. Double check that you have the correct company name and spelling, the correct job title, the right address, and, where necessary, the correct name of the hiring manager.</p> <p>If you don't have the name of the hiring manager, you can often find it by calling the company's human resources department. Let HR know which position you're applying for and ask, &quot;To whom should I address my cover letter?&quot; They won't always tell you, but sometimes they will.</p> <p>Also double check your own personal information, including your name, address, email, and phone number. It may sound like common sense, but you'd be surprised how often these tiny typos cost people a job opportunity. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/almost-half-of-job-applicants-make-this-same-foolish-mistake?ref=seealso">Almost Half of Job Applicants Make This Same Foolish Mistake</a>)</p> <h2>2. Poor writing</h2> <p>Use complete sentences. Spell words correctly. Check (and have someone else check) your grammar and punctuation. You want this letter to be the best possible reflection of who you are and how you work, and making silly mistakes won't put your best self forward.</p> <h2>3. What you're lacking</h2> <p>Don't mention any skills or qualifications that you don't have. The cover letter is not the place to bring up any shortcomings.</p> <p>Instead, use this as an opportunity to sell yourself. Tell the potential employer why your skills and experiences are a perfect fit for the position. Remember, your cover letter isn't actually about you. It's about the company you'd like to work for and why you would be a good fit for them. Wow them with what you're offering, and maybe they won't even notice the experience you don't have.</p> <h2>4. Generic, cliché language</h2> <p>Show that you care and that you spent time on your cover letter by eliminating any generic, cliché phrases that could be part of any cover letter, for any job. Don't say that you're a &quot;team player&quot; with &quot;leadership experience&quot; who is also a &quot;hard worker.&quot; Nothing about that is unique, and it'll do nothing to differentiate you from other applicants.</p> <p>Instead, fill your letter with facts that demonstrate your unique skills. Emphasize results whenever possible. Talk about how you led a diverse team to solve a particular problem, or increased revenue by X percent. Then, explain how you would bring those skills to your new job.</p> <h2>5. Lies</h2> <p>Most people who lie on a cover letter don't do so intentionally. They panic &mdash; maybe feel inadequate &mdash; and then they either make something up or, more often, stretch the truth so it looks like they have more experience or qualifications than they actually do.</p> <p>The problem is, these things are easy to check, and besides &mdash; why would you want a job requiring skills you don't actually have? Instead, focus on qualifications you do have. If you feel tempted to stretch the truth often, maybe you need to look at different jobs or take some online courses so you actually have the skills you need for the work you want to do.</p> <h2>6. Personal information</h2> <p>This is not the time to talk about your dog, or your divorce, or about how you need this job because you have to support your three kids all on your own. Yes, those are important things to you, but they don't belong in your cover letter.</p> <p>Like I mentioned above, the cover letter isn't actually about you. It's about the company where you're applying, and how you can make it better. Even if your need for work is desperate, or if there are some personal things you think the company should know about you before they make a decision, the cover letter isn't the place to list them. Wait for an interview.</p> <h2>7. Long paragraphs</h2> <p>No one wants to read a wall of text, especially when they are scanning cover letters for keywords. So, keep your paragraphs short and limit your letter to a single page.</p> <p>This means that you have to be pithy in what you say. Straightforward is usually best. Describe your experience and qualifications, highlight how they satisfy key requirements of the job you're applying for, and then wrap it up. More words aren't necessarily better.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/almost-half-of-job-applicants-make-this-same-foolish-mistake">Almost Half of Job Applicants Make This Same Foolish Mistake</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-resume-rules-you-should-be-breaking">4 Resume Rules You Should Be Breaking</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting advice career cover letters employment job applications Mistakes new jobs resumes Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:30:11 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1929793 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Tricky Interview Questions Successful CEOs Always Ask http://www.wisebread.com/5-tricky-interview-questions-successful-ceos-always-ask <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-tricky-interview-questions-successful-ceos-always-ask" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-505892722.jpg" alt="Woman learning tricky question CEOs ask" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you're vying to get an exciting job run by a brilliant CEO, you may have to answer some pretty tough questions. If you want to stand out you'll have to have your response as polished as your suit. Here's a list of tricky interview questions some of the most successful CEOs ask.</p> <h2>1. &quot;Tell me the story of your life&quot;</h2> <p>The business acumen of serial entrepreneur Elon Musk is so impressive, it became the inspiration for Robert Downey Jr.'s big-screen portrayal of Iron Man's Tony Stark. The CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, and Chairman of SolarCity, is known for having job applicants explain their thought process behind solving a problem. But that isn't all he's interested in learning. While he does throw in questions about space travel and car manufacturing, he has revealed in several interviews one other very detailed interview question: &quot;Tell me the story of your life, and the decisions that you made along the way, and why you made them, and also tell me about some of the most difficult problems you worked on and how you solved them.&quot;</p> <p>Sound like a long conversation? Well, better have your life story all squared up! Previous job applicants recall that interviews with Musk are <a href="https://www.quora.com/Whats-it-like-to-have-a-job-interview-with-Elon-Musk/answer/Jeff-Nelson-32" target="_blank">highly conversational</a>.</p> <h2>2. &quot;What is your favorite property in Monopoly, and why?&quot;</h2> <p>According to renowned board game designer <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/articles/2013/03/20/what-monopoly-can-teach-you-about-smart-investing" target="_blank">Philip Orbanes</a>, Monopoly teaches players of any age an understanding of the concept of diversification and offers practical training in managing money. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-fun-games-that-make-you-smarter-too?ref=seealso" target="_blank">11 Fun Games That Make You Smarter, Too</a>)</p> <p>So, that's why Ken Moelis, founder and CEO of investment bank Moelis &amp; Co., loves asking this question during interviews to recent MBA graduates seeking midlevel positions. Why? Moelis strongly believes that to attract top talent, the investment and banking industry needs to update its hiring practices.</p> <p>&quot;Through innovation and creativity we need to actually underwrite the exceptional experience we are promoting,&quot; says Moelis. And with this question, he seeks to infuse that creativity into the process of assessing risks and rewards of financial assets.</p> <h2>3. &quot;If you had 10 years left to live, would you take this job?&quot;</h2> <p>Talk about commitment! But that's exactly what Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky is looking for in his job applicants. If you think this is a bit of an extreme, think again.</p> <p>&quot;Whatever you want to do in those last 10 years you should just do. I really want you to think about that, that was enough time for you to do something you really cared about and the answer doesn't have to be this company,&quot; <a href="https://genius.com/Alfred-lin-lecture-10-company-culture-and-building-a-team-part-i-annotated" target="_blank">explains Chesky</a>. Given that he interviewed the first 300 Airbnb employees and his company was valued at $30 billion in 2016, this CEO may be onto something about requiring that level of commitment from his employees &mdash; or at least that level of self awareness.</p> <h2>4. &quot;What didn't you get a chance to include on your resume?&quot;</h2> <p>When you're knighted by the Queen of England for your &quot;services to entrepreneurship,&quot; you probably know a thing or two about running a business and hiring the right people. Known for his extreme antics, Founder of Virgin Group Sir Richard Branson is no stranger to thinking outside of the box.</p> <p>&quot;Obviously a good CV is important, but if you were going to hire by what they say about themselves on paper, you wouldn't need to waste time on an interview,&quot; Branson wrote about his favorite interview question in his book <a href="http://amzn.to/2odTsyt" target="_blank">The Virgin Way: If It's Not Fun, It's Not Worth Doing</a>.</p> <p>He added in a LinkedIn post why he looks <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20130923230007-204068115-how-i-hire-focus-on-personality" target="_blank">beyond qualifications</a>: &quot;I only look at them after everything else. If somebody has five degrees and more A grades than you can fit on one side of paper, it doesn't necessarily mean they are the right person for the job.&quot;</p> <h2>5. &quot;Sell me this pen&quot;</h2> <p>Some CEOs don't just want you to talk the talk, they want you to walk the walk. And that's precisely what Jordan Belfort, former CEO of brokerage firm Stratton Oakmont, would ask his job applicants to do.</p> <p>While the real life &quot;Wolf of Wall Street&quot; isn't the best example of business ethics, there's no denying his master salesmanship. Even after spending four years in federal prison and being mandated to restitue $110 million to his victims, Belfort was still able to command <a href="http://www.theaustralian.com.au/life/weekend-australian-magazine/whos-afraid-of-jordan-belfort-the-wolf-of-wall-street/story-e6frg8h6-1226906434759" target="_blank">up to $75,000</a> for a speaking fee in 2014.</p> <p>His classic interview question has been adopted by several recruiters beyond just the sales industry. Why? This question tests your ability in value-added sales skills (&quot;This pen has refillable ink cartridges so you never need to buy a new one&quot;) and solution-based sales skills (&quot;What color pen are you in the market for?&quot;).</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tricky-interview-questions-successful-ceos-always-ask">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-outdated-job-search-techniques-to-avoid">10 Outdated Job-Search Techniques to Avoid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-you-should-ask-at-every-job-interview">5 Questions You Should Ask at Every Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-awesome-websites-to-help-you-get-a-job">25 Awesome Websites to Help You Get a Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting banking big companies CEO dream jobs interview questions resumes sales technology Tue, 04 Apr 2017 09:00:13 +0000 Damian Davila 1917877 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Breakfast Foods to Help You Ace Your Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/10-breakfast-foods-to-help-you-ace-your-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-breakfast-foods-to-help-you-ace-your-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_interview_handshake_174768003.jpg" alt="Woman having breakfast to help ace her interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your wardrobe is ready, you have practiced the tough questions, and you've visualized the job interview. What else can you do to increase your odds of success? Try eating a balanced breakfast that will keep you alert, provide you with energy, and sharpen your memory. Here are 10 suggestions to start your big day off right.</p> <h2>1. Coffee</h2> <p>Coffee will help you stay alert and focused. The trick is to not over-caffeinate, because that will make you jittery and shaky. One to two cups should be your limit. Not a coffee drinker? Try some green tea, which is also an energy stimulant.</p> <h2>2. Eggs</h2> <p>You'll need protein for energy to get through an interview, which can be exhausting. There are about five grams of protein in an egg, along with iron, vitamins, and minerals. Eggs also contain choline, which may delay fatigue. Choose your preferred <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-make-perfectly-cooked-eggs?ref=internal" target="_blank">way to prepare eggs</a> and get crackin'.</p> <h2>3. A Whole Wheat Carb Option</h2> <p>Sorry, but doughnuts are not what we want to eat on the day of an important job interview. Complex carbs are what you're after, such as a bowl of oatmeal, whole wheat toast, whole grain pancakes, or whole grain cereal. Think of complex carbs as fuel to keep your brain moving, which will be handy when you get the &quot;Tell me about a time when you had a difficult situation at work&quot; query. As a bonus, whole grains release glucose slowly, which will keep you alert for longer.</p> <h2>4. Salmon</h2> <p>Try tucking some smoked salmon into an omelet with a little sour cream. Salmon is an oily, cold-water fish high in omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3's will help you with your concentration.</p> <h2>5. Yogurt</h2> <p>Interview questions like &quot;What salary range are you looking for?&quot; can make you downright queasy. If you have a nervous stomach, it's time to make yogurt your new BFF, pre-interview. Good, healthy bacteria found in yogurt will give you a boost of energy and help you digest food. Look for plain yogurt with no added sugar or flavors, which might cause stomach irritation.</p> <h2>6. Blueberries</h2> <p>A 2010 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry suggests that <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2850944/" target="_blank">blueberries may help to improve memory function</a>, so count on those little blue orbs to help with the &quot;What do you know about our company?&quot; question. Sprinkle berries over yogurt, cereal, or pancakes.</p> <h2>7. Avocados</h2> <p>Mash some avocado on whole grain toast, and you'll be better prepared for the tough questions. Avocados contain vitamin K and folate, as well as good fats. Folate helps with cognition, which may help you keep calm under stress.</p> <h2>8. Nuts and Seeds</h2> <p>Nuts and seeds are generally good for you to eat, for all kinds of reasons, but walnuts specifically seem to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21923981" target="_blank">support &quot;inferential reasoning&quot; ability</a>, which will come in handy if you get a question like &quot;How did you manage to finish that project by the required deadline?&quot;</p> <h2>9. Almond Butter</h2> <p>A super source of protein, almond butter is filled with good fats and less saturated fat than peanut butter. Try spreading it on apple or banana slices.</p> <h2>10. Water</h2> <p>I realize that water isn't a food, but your brain will be all kinds of foggy if you don't keep yourself hydrated. If you're thirsty, you'll have a harder time staying focused. If you're offered a glass of water in the interview, it's not a bad idea to accept, both for hydration and just in case your mouth goes dry.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-breakfast-foods-to-help-you-ace-your-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-41-coffee-hacks-that-will-instantly-improve-your-morning">Flashback Friday: 41 Coffee Hacks That Will Instantly Improve Your Morning</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-and-worst-times-to-go-grocery-shopping">The Best and Worst Times to Go Grocery Shopping</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-a-ton-by-eating-soup-every-day-and-never-get-bored">How to Save a Ton by Eating Soup Every Day (and Never Get Bored!)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/french-press-coffee">French Press Coffee: Step-by-Step Guide to Handcrafted Coffee</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/eat-these-6-foods-to-stay-healthy-while-traveling">Eat These 6 Foods to Stay Healthy While Traveling</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink Job Hunting breakfast foods coffee Food healthy breakfast interview tricks job interview tips Tue, 14 Mar 2017 10:30:17 +0000 Marla Walters 1908923 at http://www.wisebread.com 15 Questions You Should Always Ask at the End of a Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/15-questions-you-should-always-ask-at-the-end-of-a-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/15-questions-you-should-always-ask-at-the-end-of-a-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-493088844.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are two important moments that occur in every job interview &mdash; the first impression, and the last. The first impression is about instantly portraying a positive image of yourself to the interviewer. You want to be confident, personable, and eager to talk. By the time the interview is over, you will have relaxed, and will hopefully have a rapport with the other person. This is the time to hit them with some questions that can be enlightening, and leave things on a lasting, positive end note.</p> <h2>1. &quot;Why Is the Person I am Replacing Leaving the Company?&quot;</h2> <p>This question can be considered quite assertive, but it's definitely fair game. If you are filling the shoes of someone else, you want to know why they are leaving. Maybe they got a promotion. Perhaps they were headhunted. Or, they may have hated the job, the people, and the hours so much, they quit. The interviewer may not be as open to answering this if it's the latter, but the reaction on their face, and any hesitation in answering, can speak volumes.</p> <h2>2. &quot;What Would a Current Employee Say About This Position?&quot;</h2> <p>You could always ask them directly (and that's not a bad idea at all&hellip; reach out on sites like LinkedIn and Facebook). But in this situation, you can find out how the interviewer reacts to that question. A grimace or raised eyebrows gives away the probability that although the interviewer has talked a good game, the job may not be all it's cracked up to be.</p> <h2>3. &quot;What's the Corporate Culture Like Here?<strong> </strong></h2> <p>Is this an environment of backstabbing and name-calling? Do you have to really flatter egos and go the extra mile to get a promotion or a raise? Will your political leanings be looked upon unfavorably? (Some people have been let go due to Facebook and Twitter posts.) Is the atmosphere relaxed, or uptight? You need to know before you sign.</p> <h2>4. &quot;What are the Main Challenges That the Company, and My Department, Are Facing Right Now?</h2> <p>This is a doozy after rounds of questions from the interviewer. You are showing an interest in the issues that you will want to help solve, and you can also gauge the reaction of the person sitting opposite of you. Hopefully, they will be open, honest, and engage in the answer. If they can't think of any, you may want to run and hide. Every company has issues&hellip;denying their existence is a red flag of an oppressive corporate culture.</p> <h2>5. &quot;If I Get the Job, What Will Be My First Major Assignment or Goal?&quot;</h2> <p>This shows your eagerness to dive into the role, and gives you fair warning of what your first few weeks, or months, on the job will look like. It may also be a red flag for you that you're about to bite off way more than you can chew, or that the company doesn't entirely understand the role for which you're being hired.</p> <h2>6. &quot;What Qualities Does Your Ideal Candidate Possess?&quot;</h2> <p>Basically &mdash; am I the person you had in mind? Of course, you don't ever want to come out and say that. By asking it this way, you can weigh up your own strengths and weaknesses and get a good temperature reading on your chances of success. Oh, and if he or she says, &quot;Actually, you have them all&quot; then you're probably a shoo-in for the job.</p> <h2>7. &quot;What Does Success Look Like for My Particular Role?&quot;</h2> <p>This will vary drastically depending on the company, and the job itself. For some jobs, success comes directly from sales results or hitting hard financial goals. In other jobs, success is based more on your creative output, or how you help raise the company profile. Get to know the parameters for success, so you can meet them and move upward.</p> <h2>8. &quot;Name One Thing You Like, and Don't Like, About Working Here.&quot;</h2> <p>The first part of this question is easy. It's a softball to set the interviewer up for the real question: What's not so good about life at your company? They may well be reluctant to answer. They could say something trite, like &quot;Sometimes the people are too nice.&quot; But hopefully, you'll get an honest answer. The hours can be long. The work is very challenging. This will give you more meat to contemplate the role you will be filling.</p> <h2>9. &quot;Which of Your Competitors Do You Look Up to, and Why?&quot;</h2> <p>Make no mistake, every company should be looking at their rivals. If you're Pepsi, you take note of everything Coke is doing. If you're Avis, you look at Hertz. How the interviewer answers gives you a good indication of their competitive spirit, and what they are doing to either stay on top, or become a bigger player. There's nothing wrong with admiring a rival; if the interviewer doesn't think anyone is worth his or her respect, this could reflect a narcissistic company culture.</p> <h2>10. &quot;What Are the Opportunities for Growth and Training in This Role?&quot;</h2> <p>Does the company offer help with expenses for further education? Can you expect to climb the ladder quickly, if you meet and exceed your duties? Is the job a dead end, with few chances of advancement? Find out now, before you say yes to a role that could be career suicide.</p> <h2>11. &quot;Is There Anything You Haven't Told Me About the Job That I Should Know?&quot;</h2> <p>This one catches a lot of interviewers off-guard. Many will &quot;um&quot; and &quot;ah&quot; and come back with &quot;Not that I'm aware of.&quot; But it's worth asking, because sometimes you get an insight or confession that would not have been presented unless you probed in this manner.</p> <h2>12. &quot;Does the Company Have a History of Layoffs and/or High Turnover?&quot;</h2> <p>You may be able to get some of this information from sites like LinkedIn and Glassdoor, or by Googling articles on the company. But many times, this kind of information is just not out there. You might get stonewalled here, but you could also get an honest answer. Yes, the company does lay off people for certain reasons, and yes, the turnover is high because many people cannot handle the pace, or the hours.</p> <h2>13. &quot;Is There Anything About My Resume or Experience That Causes Concern?&quot;</h2> <p>Find out what your weaknesses are now, and change the interviewer's opinion if you can. Perhaps they don't see a certain skill listed. You can reply that you are taking courses on that and will be up to speed in weeks. This is your chance to remove doubt from the interviewer's mind, and it also makes you look humble and eager to improve.</p> <h2>14. &quot;Why Did You Decide to Work Here?&quot;</h2> <p>This is a more cunning way of asking about the pros (and maybe cons) of working at the company. It prompts the interviewer to bring in personal experience, and may give you some unique insights into the job, the company, and the competitive landscape.</p> <h2>15. &quot;When Can I Expect to Hear Back From You?&quot;</h2> <p>Finally, you should set expectations for yourself on when you will hear from the company, good or bad, about the position. If the interview process is in its infancy, and there are many candidates to consider, it could take weeks for a decision to be made. On the other hand, you could get a call within a few days. It's important to know this so that you do not harass the recruiter too early. It also gives you a timeline for sending a follow up card or email.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-questions-you-should-always-ask-at-the-end-of-a-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-warning-signs-youre-going-to-bomb-your-job-interview">8 Warning Signs You&#039;re Going to Bomb Your Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/weird-job-interview-questions-and-how-to-answer-them">Weird Job Interview Questions (and How to Answer Them)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-forget-about-these-7-job-hunting-expenses">Don&#039;t Forget About These 7 Job Hunting Expenses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-questions-you-must-ask-at-your-next-job-interview">4 Questions You Must Ask at Your Next Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting employers first impressions hiring insight job interviews last impressions new hires professional questions Tue, 07 Feb 2017 11:00:09 +0000 Paul Michael 1885696 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Warning Signs You're Going to Bomb Your Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/8-warning-signs-youre-going-to-bomb-your-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-warning-signs-youre-going-to-bomb-your-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-533992297.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you have a job interview coming up, you will no doubt be preparing for it. Depending on the type of industry you are in, that could mean refreshing a portfolio, getting a haircut, and warning friends and colleagues that they may be called to give you a reference.</p> <p>However, even with all that in the bag, you could be walking into a potential interview failure. If any of the following warning signs hit close to home, you should correct them before you ever step foot in that interview room.</p> <h2>1. Your Social Media Accounts Are Filled With Problems</h2> <p>We live our lives in public. Employers know this, and as such they now comb through social media accounts of potential employees, looking for reasons not to hire you. Any inappropriate photos will not bode well for you. If you are very political, one way or the other, it could be a black mark against your name. If you slag off your current, or previous, employer, that will make you appear difficult and dangerous. If your posts are filled with spelling errors, that could also cross you off the list.</p> <p>Social media accounts can lead to you failing the interview before the first question is even asked. Comb through them carefully, and delete anything you think could be an issue. If you see something that makes you cringe, or would make you embarrassed to show the interviewer, get rid of it. We may have freedom of speech, but that doesn't stop the employer from using it against you.</p> <h2>2. Your Resume Is Not Current</h2> <p>One of the best habits to get into when you're employed is regularly updating your resume and/or portfolio. Not only does it benefit you when posted on sites like LinkedIn and Krop, but it also gives you a regular gut-check on how your career is progressing (or not). If you have had three promotions in the last five years, those need to be on your resume. If you have taken on much greater responsibilities, put those down. If you landed a big new account, or helped the company make the local news, find a way to work all that in.</p> <p>A stale resume signals to a prospective employer that you are lazy, uninterested, or disorganized. And you do not want the interviewer to think you are anything but a great addition to his or her team. Look at your resume right now, and if it's even a little dated, fix it.</p> <h2>3. You Know You'll Nail It</h2> <p>Confidence is good. Arrogance, not so much. While you should definitely believe in yourself, your achievements, and your abilities, you cannot afford to think that this job is already in the bag. That kind of cocky attitude can easily lead to your downfall. It can prevent you from doing the requisite preparation, and you may not ask yourself the tough questions that the interviewer will definitely fire at you.</p> <p>Of course, you don't want to let too much doubt slip in, because that can be just as damaging. Think of this like the time you first met the parents of your longtime partner. You hope they'll really like you, and you're going to do everything to make sure they see the real you without coming across as God's gift. Hubris has no place in your life before this meeting, and the same goes for the interview.</p> <h2>4. You Can't Wait to Dump on Your Current Employer</h2> <p>Big mistake. You may feel like they don't appreciate you, or hate the fact that you've gone without a raise or promotion for the last five years. You may also despise the boss, your coworkers, and the product or service offered by the company itself. You can feel the need to unload just rising up inside of you. But the absolute worst thing you can do is unburden yourself in the interview. You will sound bitter, hostile, and show your prospective employer that you have very little loyalty or respect.</p> <p>The interviewer will think you to be a challenge, and you may well turn that same hatred on any company that hires you. Why take the chance? If you have to let it all out, tell a friend or relative. Write it down in a letter (even addressing it to your current boss&hellip; but don't mail it, obviously) and exorcise those demons. If the interviewer asks about your current employer, talk openly about some of the challenges you have faced, but in a very positive way.</p> <h2>5. Your Interview Is Near the End of the Day</h2> <p>Uh oh. If you're being asked to come in late in the day, chances are you are going to have a bad time. People who have been interviewing candidates all day are tired, irritable, and have often already seen the person they want for the job. They have had to endure hour after hour of the same kinds of answers, and may well have been knocked out by someone you now have to follow. All in all, the last interview of the day is a slot that can really work against you.</p> <p>Now, some people say it can be beneficial. Being the last person means you will be freshest in the mind of the interviewer, and that gives you a better chance to stand out and make the cut. This is a myth. Most interviewers schedule the candidates they are interested in for the earlier time slots. If your resume and cover letter knocked them out, you would not be given this slot&hellip; unless, of course, it is the only time you can make it. But realistically, you should be doing your best to work around the employer's schedule, not vice-versa.</p> <h2>6. You Don't Know Enough About the Company</h2> <p>A big part of your preparation for the interview should be about the company itself. You need to know whom you are going to work for, what the company has been doing over the last few years (or longer), and what the marketplace is like. Who are its biggest competitors? Has it had any major breakthroughs recently? Has it made the news, for good or bad reasons? Does it have a reputation for laying off employees, or paying below the industry average?</p> <p>If you are going to an interview soon and cannot answer any of these questions, you are not going to do well. And, you can't wing it, either. Get your research done. Use Glassdoor to search what people are saying about the working conditions. Google the company name, and see what comes up under &quot;news&quot; or &quot;videos.&quot; A site like Reddit may even have a subreddit devoted to it (think Apple or Microsoft, for example). Do your homework, and you will be in a much greater position in the interview. You'll also know what to ask for when it comes to salary, benefits, and perks.</p> <h2>7. You Don't Have Any Questions Prepared</h2> <p>An interview is not a one-way street. Your interviewer will start the ball rolling with a whole lot of questions, probing to see if you're the right candidate for the job. They will be watching everything you do, writing down positives and negatives, and will be eyeing-up your personality, too. But they also want you to ask some questions, as well.</p> <p>They want to know that you're interested in the position, the company, the benefits, and the opportunities for growth. They may well prompt you by saying, &quot;Is there anything you'd like to know?&quot; or &quot;What questions do you have for me?&quot; If you don't have some zingers ready, something that really shows your passion for working at the company, you will come across as blasé or going through the motions. That is not a good impression to leave with anyone.</p> <h2>8. You Haven't Thought About Your Outfit</h2> <p>From the moment you step into the office or meeting room where the interview takes place, you are being judged. How you walk, how you greet the interviewer, and how you dress are all being evaluated. What you wear, and how you wear it, can have a huge impact on that vital first impression.</p> <p>It also varies greatly depending on the type of job you're going for. If you're in a very creative industry, such as graphic design, advertising, music, filmmaking, or beauty, you will probably want to look just as creative. A stale suit and tie will make the opposite impression, and even though you may be a creative genius, you will look like an accountant or sales person.</p> <p>That doesn't mean sloppy; it should be put together with care, even if it's a pair of designer jeans and a T-shirt. Similarly, that very same outfit would be a disaster for an industry that expects formal clothing. Banking, finance, medicine, law &mdash; they would consider you sloppy if you wear anything other than a well-tailored suit or equally professional outfit. If you still don't know what to wear, get some advice from people who work at that company.</p> <p>Don't waste an opportunity like a job interview by slipping up on these simple things. Be prepared in order to give yourself the best chance possible at achieving your career goals.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-warning-signs-youre-going-to-bomb-your-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-questions-you-should-always-ask-at-the-end-of-a-job-interview">15 Questions You Should Always Ask at the End of a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-forget-about-these-7-job-hunting-expenses">Don&#039;t Forget About These 7 Job Hunting Expenses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-body-language-mistakes-that-sabotage-most-interviews">10 Body Language Mistakes That Sabotage Most Interviews</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/weird-job-interview-questions-and-how-to-answer-them">Weird Job Interview Questions (and How to Answer Them)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting employers first impressions job interviews Mistakes overconfidence social media wardrobe Wed, 25 Jan 2017 10:00:08 +0000 Paul Michael 1879591 at http://www.wisebread.com Almost Half of Job Applicants Make This Same Foolish Mistake http://www.wisebread.com/almost-half-of-job-applicants-make-this-same-foolish-mistake <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/almost-half-of-job-applicants-make-this-same-foolish-mistake" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-513955428.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="142" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hiring professionals in industries far and wide, when looking at applications ranging from entry-level to upper management, say almost 50% of the applicants are making the same mistake. Is it grammar? Poor choice of words? Not completing an online test, or answering questions incorrectly?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It's actually something much more basic. And it's a mistake that is completely inexcusable. </span></p> <h2>Almost Half of Job Applicants Are Not Following Directions</h2> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As bizarre as it may sound, job applicants are just </span><a href="http://www.thesimpledollar.com/hr-pros-at-least-40-of-job-applicants-dont-follow-instructions/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">not following basic instructions</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> or directions given out by the employer or recruiting agency. Every application is different, but the basic problem is the same across the board </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">&mdash; </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">the inability to follow the directions to the letter. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Most of the time, this means omitting information required by the employer, from a resume or cover letter, to background information, references, and even contact information. For example, many applicants include a name and address, but not a phone number or email. That instantly puts them out of the running, as the HR department is too busy to track down people that don't have an immediate form of contact. No one is going to write you via snail mail inviting you to come in for an interview. Plus, the fact that you left out such a basic piece of information simply doesn't look good. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">HR professionals also indicated that a simple visual test is often done on applications. If anything is blank, messy, or missing, the application goes into the trash. With so many people competing for the same job these days, removing applicants who cannot follow instructions makes life a lot easier, instantly thinning the pack. </span></p> <h2>Employers May Actively Test Your Ability to Follow Directions</h2> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It's not just about noticing mistakes. Some employers may actually lay traps that you have to avoid. Perhaps one of the most famous instances of an employer testing the suitability of a candidate goes back to an Army recruitment campaign in England. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Army ran ads asking people to order a special recruitment kit. The kit included a VHS cassette (yes, it was a while ago). When the prospective new recruit put the tape into the VCR and hit play, the video showed an explosion. It then went on to tell people who saw that explosion that they were not the right candidate for the Army, because they did not follow the instructions. As it turns out, there was a small message on the cassette that said &quot;rewind me first.&quot; Clever. Very clever. Of course, there was no way to know if the candidate lied about seeing that explosion first, but what it did was plant the seed of doubt. If they missed that, what would they miss on a real mission? Maybe this is not the career for them. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another example comes from entrance exams that ask candidates to complete &quot;only three of the following four questions.&quot; If the candidate answers all four, even if they answer them perfectly, it is a huge red flag to the employer. The inability to follow this simple direction lets the employer know that you either don't pay attention to details, you're too eager to get started, or you just refuse to follow the rules. These are not good qualities in a candidate.</span></p> <h2>So&hellip;What Can You Do to Be a Better Job Applicant?</h2> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Perhaps the biggest piece of advice, and the simplest, is to slow down. You may well have several applications to fill out for different jobs, but you cannot afford to rush them. By slowing down, and reading everything, you are far less likely to make a mistake. Having said that, you can also follow these steps to make sure you do not end up in the reject pile, along with almost half of the other applicants.</span></p> <h3>1. Read Through Everything Twice Before You Start</h3> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It's a little bit like the old DIY adage, &quot;Measure twice, cut once.&quot; You should go through the entire application, line by line, and be clear about what you are being asked to provide. If you need to prepare something, such as a cover letter or a portfolio of your work, make a note of it. </span></p> <h3>2. Complete a Trial Application First</h3> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Think of it as a practice run. Fill it all out, and then read it back to yourself. What is missing? What sounds good, and what sounds bad? What can you improve, or edit? Are there sections that are stronger than others? Have you included the relevant dates and places, or achievements that could make you stand out? Mark it up, and then complete the application again. If you're doing this online, print out the application and fill it out by hand first. </span></p> <h3>3. Run Everything Through a Spelling/Grammar Checker</h3> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Even if your document is beautifully formatted and has all the required information, spelling errors can really mess you up. Some companies may even use software to weed out applications with too many grammar problems. If you're submitting an application using pen and paper, this may not be possible (unless you have a text recognition app or device). In that case, move on to the next step&hellip;</span></p> <h3>4. Have Someone Else Look Over Your Application</h3> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A friend. A colleague. A family member. Someone you trust. Put the application in front of them and ask them to go over it line by line. Ask them to read the instructions, too. Having someone else with a fresh eye can really help you out. They will notice glaring errors that you have become blind to.</span></p> <h3>5. Look Back at Your Notes Before You Submit Anything</h3> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Remember those notes you took at the very beginning? Now, after you have completed everything, is the time to check the &quot;to-do&quot; boxes off that list. Do you have your cover letter? Is it attached to the application? Is it stapled, or put on there with a paper clip (some employers want it done a specific way)? If you're sending something over the Internet, have you made sure the documents are formatted correctly, and saved the way the employer likes them (some prefer PDFs to Word documents)? All of this should be looked over carefully before putting it in the mail or hitting send.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Remember, the ability to follow simple directions is the very least an employer should expect from a candidate. If you don't do everything by the letter, you could be missing out on a great job, and a lucrative career. </span></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/almost-half-of-job-applicants-make-this-same-foolish-mistake">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview">10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-grammar-mistakes-that-are-making-you-look-stupid">12 Grammar Mistakes That Are Making You Look Stupid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-questions-you-should-always-ask-at-the-end-of-a-job-interview">15 Questions You Should Always Ask at the End of a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-more-grammar-mistakes-that-are-making-you-look-stupid">12 More Grammar Mistakes That Are Making You Look Stupid</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting following directions grammar hiring human resources job applications Mistakes recruiters Mon, 23 Jan 2017 11:00:13 +0000 Paul Michael 1877412 at http://www.wisebread.com Don't Forget About These 7 Job Hunting Expenses http://www.wisebread.com/dont-forget-about-these-7-job-hunting-expenses <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dont-forget-about-these-7-job-hunting-expenses" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_shaking_hands_492496092.jpg" alt="Man forgetting about job hunting expenses" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Thinking about changing careers this year? There's a lot that goes into the search, like sending out applications and brushing up on your interview skills. But you might not consider how much it'll cost you.</p> <p>From hiring a professional resume writer to bulking up your work wardrobe and factoring in transportation costs, let's review these tips on how to prepare your money for a job hunt.</p> <h2>1. Hire a Pro to Polish Your Resume</h2> <p>Plenty of HR directors will tell you that if your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=internal" target="_blank">resume contains errors</a>, if it's lackluster, or if it's just plain boring, it's likely to end up in the circular file. That's a trash can, for the uninitiated. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-resume-rules-you-should-be-breaking?ref=seealso">4 Resume Rules You Should Be Breaking</a>)</p> <p>To give yourself a fighting chance against all the other qualified candidates, you have to stand out. You can beef up your resume on your own if you know what you're doing (and there are plenty of resources online to help you), but you also may want to consider hiring a professional resume writer whose job it is to keep up on resume trends and provide you with the most up-to-date vitae.</p> <p>A good writer charges anywhere from $150 and up for a revamp of your resume, though I probably wouldn't pay more than $300. Before you begin, however, ask for samples and references. Anybody can put a resume together &mdash; we've all done it for ourselves &mdash; but does the person you're paying get results? Research a solid writer so you don't waste your money. Some other resume-related expenses for which to plan include resume paper and printer ink.</p> <h2>2. Invest in Professional Headshots</h2> <p>Social media has been a bane for job seekers since it took off 10 years ago, and I can almost guarantee that your future employer will look you up on Google and investigate your social media profiles to get a better idea of who you are outside of the interview. As such, don't shoot yourself in the foot before you get in the door by leaving up posts and photos that don't portray you as a reliable person who's looking to advance their career.</p> <p>First, scrub your profiles of any offensive material. You don't have to go through all your photos and delete every picture of you with a drink in it, but, you know, use common sense when deciding whether or not the photo of you hanging halfway out of a taxi window at 2 a.m. is the best representation of you. Second, if there are no photos of you looking professional, get some &mdash; stat!</p> <p>Career coach Devay Campbell recommends investing in a professional headshot for your LinkedIn Profile &mdash; at the very least &mdash; which may have residual effects.</p> <p>&quot;Your future employer will look you up and if your profile is optimized correctly, you may even have profile views from recruiters in organizations that you have not applied to,&quot; she says.</p> <h2>3. Save Up Enough to Cover the Transition Period</h2> <p>Not every job change has you leaving your old workplace on a Friday afternoon and showing up at your new place of employment early Monday morning. There may be a transition period &mdash; especially if you left the old job before you landed a new gig &mdash; and you should prepare for that financially. Give yourself at least a three- to four-week window of savings that you can rely on, Campbell says, so you're not struggling or teetering on the verge of debt.</p> <h2>4. Enhance Your Wardrobe to Show You Mean Business</h2> <p>They say you should dress for the job you want, not the job you have. And that makes perfect sense when you're interviewing for a new position &mdash; because you want that job. Thus, take your frumpy butt over to your favorite store that sells business attire and pick up a few new items. This will likely set you back a few hundred dollars. But it's well worth it to show your future employer that you know what's up as soon as you walk through that door. Looking fresh also will give you more confidence, and that'll show.</p> <h2>5. Factor in Transportation Costs</h2> <p>You'll need to get to your interviews somehow, and that'll raise your fuel bill if you're driving. But depending on where you're applying for new positions, you may have to get there via other methods, like train or plane.</p> <p>When I was looking for jobs in Manhattan a decade ago, I had to foot the bill myself, generally opting to take a bus or train from Baltimore to New York City. If you're being considered for a high-level position, you may get special treatment wherein the potential employer will fly you out, but otherwise you shouldn't count on anybody subsidizing the cost of getting you to that interview.</p> <p>If you are traveling a distance, remember to factor in arrival and departure times. Don't book a ticket in the morning for an afternoon interview. Give yourself more time to get there and relax. Besides, you don't know what could happen along the way in terms of delays, and you'll be disappointed in yourself when you're passed over because you couldn't show up at your scheduled interview time.</p> <h2>6. Will You Need Domestic Help?</h2> <p>Conducting a job search is time-consuming and other parts of your life could suffer if you're not careful. If you have children, you may need to hire a baby sitter or someone to help around the house if you're otherwise occupied. If you're a pet owner, you might need to spring for day care or sitting so your furbaby is well taken care of while you're out doing your thing. Think about the impact your search will have on the other parts of your life and plan accordingly.</p> <h2>7. Do the Math Before Accepting a New Position</h2> <p>For most of us, the goal of changing careers is to be happier at what we do with a higher salary. Hey &mdash; that's America.</p> <p>But before you accept that initial offer &mdash; which you should never do immediately as a general rule; take a day to think about it &mdash; look into what you're losing or gaining by switching things up. Your new employer may have higher-cost health insurance, and it may not provide matching funds to your 401K. If this is the case, you may not be winning financially in the long run, and you'll kick yourself for it eventually. Do your homework and crunch the numbers to ensure that all your needs are met before committing to the change.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-forget-about-these-7-job-hunting-expenses">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. 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