Job Hunting http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/7800/all en-US 12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_80119927_LARGE.jpg" alt="asking questions before accepting a job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A job offer is exciting. It can mean new opportunities, more money, a move to a new city or state, and a big promotion. But wait just a second. Before you hurriedly take that offer and sign your name on the dotted line, you need to ask the following 12 questions. They can be the difference between a good job, a great career, and a position you don't actually want at all. Remember, with a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">job offer</a>, the ball is in your court. They want you. You hold the power, and you should make sure you get exactly what you want.</p> <h2>1. How Many Vacation, Personal, and Sick Days Do I Get?</h2> <p>You cannot assume you will get the same vacation package you got with a previous employer. In fact, if you are moving to America from another country, you may be in for quite a nasty surprise. For instance, the UK mandates <a href="https://www.gov.uk/holiday-entitlement-rights/entitlement">28 days of paid vacation every year</a>, and this does not include public holidays. There are no such rules in the U.S., and most people are lucky to get 10 paid vacation days per year when starting a new job. So, ask, and see if it's negotiable.</p> <p>You also want to find out if these allowances increase over time. Some employers will add an additional five paid days after three and five years of continuous employment. Or, paid days off may increase with a promotion. You also want to ask about personal days, which have different conditions than vacation days (personal days may not be allowed to carry over). Is there a maximum amount of days that can be carried over before you stop accruing? These will all be outlined in the contract you sign, but you want clarification long before it is printed up.</p> <h2>2. What's Included in the Benefits Package?</h2> <p>Benefits cost employers a great deal of money, and so they are seen as a big incentive when hiring a new employee. The biggest cost is health insurance, and there will be options there, too. Some employers have a sliding scale of insurance options, including HMO, PPO, EPO, and HAS plans, and all will cost different amounts and have varying degrees of cover. Aside from health insurance, ask about other kinds of insurance, too. Are vision and dental included? Is life insurance included, or long and short-term disability? These options, if offered at no charge to you, can add up considerably to the basic pay package you are being offered. This is why a site like Salary.com will list base salary, and salary plus benefits. The latter can be a lot more. And if there is a bonus, ask about that. How much, what do you have to do to get it, and when is it paid?</p> <h2>3. What's the Parking Situation?</h2> <p>Parking can be a big deal in some cities, especially New York and L.A. If the company has a lot set aside for employee parking, you're usually in great shape. Is the parking offered close to the building, or is it quite a walk? Your personal safety may be an issue here. If you have to find your own parking, things can start getting tricky, and costly. Does the company cover employee parking costs, and if so, how much do they cover? For instance, you may be covered for street parking, but not a covered lot, and if you are worried about hail or other weather conditions, that can be a deal breaker. Does the company have a discount plan on public transportation? This can be a better option for some, as parking and gas money can be too expensive.</p> <h2>4. What Are the Actual Hours?</h2> <p>Depending on the industry in which you work, this can greatly <a href="http://www.calculators.org/savings/wage-conversion.php">impact your hourly wage</a>. If you are offered a starting salary of $60,000 per year, and work 40 hours per week, you're getting roughly $29/hour. If you work 60 hours per week with no overtime, that drops to less than $20/hour. So, ask for realistic working conditions. If you are going to be stuck in the office nights and weekends, you may want to negotiate your base pay, or ask for additional vacation and personal days. Your hiring manager may paint a very rosy picture of the conditions, so ask people whom you'll be working with. Be informed. You do not want to find out you just quit a $50,000 job working 40 hours per week for a $60,000 job working 60 hours per week.</p> <h2>5. When Am I Expected to Start?</h2> <p>It may seem like a no brainer, but some people get bitten badly by not asking this question before accepting the job. Then, they're in sticky mud when they realize the start date is too far away to make ends meet, or too soon to allow relocation, or finishing up a position at another firm. Although most employers will give you two weeks, it's possible you need more time than that to get your affairs in order. If you're moving across the country (or from another country), it can take months to find a new place and get situated. On the other hand, it may be that the position needs to be filled immediately, and your contract with your current employer demands two weeks' notice. Whatever the conditions, you need to know the start date. You can always negotiate coming in later, or earlier, or it may be that you cannot accept the job at all based on the start date offered. You do not want to find this out after you have resigned from your current position.</p> <h2>6. What Are the Promotion Opportunities?</h2> <p>In a fantastic episode of <em>The Office (UK)</em>, Tim says &quot;It's better to be at the bottom of a ladder you want to climb, than halfway up one you don't.&quot; This is very good advice, and something you must keep in mind when you are considering the new job. You may not be happy at your current job, but there may be more promotion opportunities than at the company you're thinking of moving to.</p> <p>Even worse, you may find out that it is impossible to get promoted out of the department you're applying for. Suddenly, you have gone from climbing a ladder, to hitting a glass ceiling. So, examine the organizational structure (ask for a company org chart if you can). See who is above you, and below you. Find out how quickly you can get promoted if you work hard. It may be that the starting salary is not ideal, but that the opportunities for promotion are excellent. And of course, the reverse may be true&hellip; you do not want a job that pays well now, but goes absolutely nowhere.</p> <h2>7. Will There Be Considerable Travel Involved?</h2> <p>For some people, travel is a perk that they cannot wait to take advantage of. For others, travel means valuable time away from family and friends, and the hassle of living out of suitcases and hotels. Wherever you stand on this, you should know beforehand what the travel expectations are. Some jobs will actually list it in the ad (20% travel required). Others will play it by ear, but tell you that some travel each month will be happening.</p> <p>On the other hand, some will tempt you with travel opportunities, but they are empty promises and you will actually be chained to your desk, year in, year out. Get this knowledge up front. Can you talk to the person you are replacing? What was their specific experience of travel like? If you enjoy traveling on the company dime, and walk away from a job that gives you such a benefit, you want to make sure you are getting it from the new position.</p> <h2>8. Is There a High Turnover Rate Here?</h2> <p>A revolving door is not a good sign, and if people are constantly leaving, that is a sign of systemic issues plaguing the company. Usually, the biggest reason for high turnover is poor working conditions. This could mean very long hours, oppressive management, favoritism, low pay, or the lack or promotion opportunities. The company could also have a history of hiring and firing people on demand for projects. Whatever the reason, high turnover is a huge red flag. The hiring manager may well be reluctant to give you this information, so ask other employees. Or better yet, take a look at Glassdoor.com and see what former employees are saying. If there is a pattern there, especially for harassment or abuse, you know what to avoid.</p> <h2>9. What Is the Onboarding Process Like?</h2> <p>Onboarding is a buzzword term that means &quot;the mechanism through which new employees acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, and behaviors to become effective organizational members and insiders.&quot; In short, how long you will be given to get up to speed on the job, the daily duties, and the projects you are given. If they are going to give you extensive training and a grace period, that's worth knowing. If they expect you to hit the ground running, you need to know this beforehand. You do not want to take a job for which you are not yet qualified if they expect instant results. That will show quickly, and you could be laid off after a month or two.</p> <h2>10. What's the Company Culture Like?</h2> <p>Is it a fun place to work? Is there a strict dress code? Is there a great social life outside of the office? Are the hours somewhat flexible, or do you have to be there exactly at 9 a.m., and leave at 5 p.m.? Is lunch a strict one-hour affair, or is there wiggle room? Are there office parties, and gift exchanges? Is the office full of cliques that make it difficult to fit in and make friends? You want to know as much about the culture as you can. You spend more time at the office than you do at home, so it should be a place you enjoy working at.</p> <h2>11. Who Will Be My Supervisor?</h2> <p>A name is just a name if you're new to a company, but you can easily research that person with the availability of information on LinkedIn and social sites. Is it someone who is a go-getter, driven to get results, with high expectations of every team member? Is it someone with a lot of experience that you can learn from, and grow? Is it someone who hates competition, especially from subordinates? Find out who you will be reporting to, because a bad manager is one of the biggest reasons people quit their jobs.</p> <h2>12. Where Will I Be Working?</h2> <p>If you're taking a position as a mechanic, you're working in the garage. But if it's an office job, this could make a big difference for you. Right now, you may have an office, and the new job comes with a cubicle, or a desk in an open plan facility. This could be a deal breaker. Do you have a window? Again, for some people it's not important, but for others, natural light and a view is a must. If you can, ask to see the space and if it's not good enough, ask for something better. You want to get this nailed, possibly in writing, before you start.</p> <p><em>What other questions should you ask before taking a job offer? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">6 Things You Must Do After the Interview to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting important questions Job Interview job offer job search job seeker new job Wed, 29 Jun 2016 09:30:28 +0000 Paul Michael 1740968 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_79220855_LARGE.jpg" alt="being passive killed her job prospects" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Nothing can sink a job interview faster than a visibly nervous or passive interviewee. The interview allows the applicant a chance to prove that they have the knowledge, the skill, and the experience laid out in their resume. A good interview can make a weak resume shine. A bad interview can make even the most experienced individual seem incompetent.</p> <p>No matter how many years of professional work experience you have, don't let the job interview process become your Achilles' heel. Here are four ways being passive can kill your job prospects. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions?ref=seealso">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a>)</p> <h2>Rambling</h2> <p>Job seekers are meant to paint a picture of professional competence, or at the very least, the potential for professional competence. Nothing can undermine that image faster than second guessing the answer you give.</p> <p><em>&quot;How fast can I write an article? I can write an article in two hours&hellip; well maybe three hours&hellip; I guess it really depends on the type of article...I mean&hellip;&quot;</em></p> <p>Give an answer and stick with it. Trust yourself. The interviewer doesn't need to know your entire thought process. They just want to know your norm. Rambling different answers to the same question could make the interviewer question the validity of your entire resume. If you can't answer a simple question, maybe the entire resume is a lie.</p> <h2>Thinking You Can't Do It</h2> <p>Before stepping foot into an interview, take a moment to reflect on how you view yourself. Personally, I tend to undervalue my own work. When asked during an interview if I can work under pressure, my gut instinct is to say no.</p> <p>The answer has nothing to do with reality and everything to do with self-doubt. I always underestimate my ability to work in new environments and on new types of projects. I need to remind myself in interviews that how I view myself has nothing to do with the reality of the situation. I can, and have, worked well under pressure before.</p> <p>Job seekers need to know whether they're in danger of letting their self-doubt destroy their ability to land a job they would flourish in. Be self-aware enough to realize when you need to go against what you're brain and gut are screaming at you.</p> <h2>Having Nothing to Ask</h2> <p>Interviews are meant to be a conversation where both the job seeker and the company determine whether they are a good fit. Many job seekers, who are desperate to find a job, might not realize that they're still expected to act as if they're personally evaluating whether the job is a good fit.</p> <p>Why? Even if saying no to the job isn't an option, trying to feel out the company can make you seem more invested in finding an organization where you contribute to that company's financial growth. And acting as if you're evaluating how you would fit in at the company can make you seem self-aware.</p> <p>In order to cultivate an image of evaluating the worth of the job, you should:</p> <ul> <li>research the company before the interview;</li> <li>check out their website;</li> <li>read their blog;</li> <li>read articles where the company is mentioned;</li> <li>check out any of the company's webinars;</li> <li>research their competitors;</li> <li>come prepared with questions to ask the interviewer.</li> </ul> <h2>Being Too Laid Back</h2> <p>Interviews are the time and place to carefully cultivate the right mannerisms. The interviewer needs to know that, even if the culture of the office is more relaxed, you can recognize when formality is needed and act accordingly. As an added bonus, the right body language and mannerisms can also make you appear more professional and confident.</p> <p>Due to a lack of emphasis on professional behavior these days, it can be hard to pinpoint what personal habits might be ruining the professional image you're attempting to create. Here are a few habits to add to your professional interview persona:</p> <ul> <li>wait for permission before taking a seat;</li> <li>give a firm handshake;</li> <li>don't fidget;</li> <li>maintain eye contact;</li> <li>have good posture (no slouching).</li> </ul> <p><em>What bad interview habits do you have that are hampering your ability to find a job? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">6 Things You Must Do After the Interview to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting interview etiquette interview process Job Interview job search unemployed Wed, 29 Jun 2016 09:00:06 +0000 Samantha Stauf 1740970 at http://www.wisebread.com Day Job or Freelance: Which Is Right for You? http://www.wisebread.com/day-job-or-freelance-which-is-right-for-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/day-job-or-freelance-which-is-right-for-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_freelance_work_82597869.jpg" alt="Woman learning if a day job or freelance is right for her" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, one in three American workers earn their keep through a model of work that is <a href="http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2015/article/freelancers-in-the-us-workforce-1.htm">not a traditional 9-to-5 job</a>. Many of these are freelance and contract workers, earning their income from one or more different jobs, and known alternatively as &quot;portfolio careerists&quot; or the slightly less glam &quot;slashers&quot; (as in writer/coach/unicycle performer).</p> <p>For some people, a portfolio career is proof that necessity is the mother of invention. When the economy tanked and jobs were scarce, this was a great way to make ends meet. But it's a very different work environment than a typical full-time job.</p> <p>While it is unsurprising that the number of people taking multiple part-time jobs might rise during a recession, the trends seem to show that these numbers are continuing to grow &mdash; a sign that the days of the traditional model of work are numbered. By 2020, it is anticipated that <a href="http://http-download.intuit.com/http.intuit/CMO/intuit/futureofsmallbusiness/intuit_2020_report.pdf">40% of the American workforce</a> will work as a freelancer, with a mix of part-time, contingent roles. But which is really better? Here are some pros and cons of each lifestyle.</p> <h2>In Favor of Full Time</h2> <p>For now, at least, full time work is still the norm. So what's so attractive about the traditional approach to careers?</p> <h3>1. High Rollers Are Seldom Part-Time</h3> <p>If what you want out of your working career is to rise through the ranks and achieve the status and salary that comes with that, then a full-time, permanent job is definitely the right option for you. While people in portfolio careers certainly <em>can</em> achieve wealth and status in their respective fields, this is much harder to do. If you want a healthy 401K, benefits package, and paid vacation, then stick to the full-time gigs.</p> <h2>2. Society Is Still Structured to Suit Full-Time Employees</h2> <p>Bringing in a steady full-time income, from a company that is established and understood, has a number of benefits above and beyond the cash. Organizing your taxes, planning your retirement, keeping a healthy credit record, and getting a mortgage are all easier with a full-time job than a portfolio. The variety you get with working several part-time or freelance jobs has to be offset by the increased burden of admin. and organization, particularly in a financial sector which has not adjusted to the needs of this population.</p> <h3>3. It Leads to Better Work Relationships</h3> <p>For many people, the reason you get up to go to work is not so much about the work itself, but rather about the people around you. With bonds built over years of employment, your colleagues can often be the closest people to you &mdash; an experience that few freelancers get to share. Consider your social needs carefully before you think too hard about a portfolio career!</p> <h2>The Pros of Freelancing</h2> <p>It's growing at a rapid pace, but will it last? Why is portfolio living attractive to people who could choose a nice, safe 9-to-5?</p> <h3>1. Freelancers Have Multiple Sources of Income</h3> <p>Ironically, a portfolio career might mean better job security than a full-time job. Having multiple income streams means that if one dries up, others can fill its place more easily. Since the economic downturn, more people than ever have found themselves being laid off from their regular jobs. As a portfolio careerist, this can be less of a terrifying option, and more a redirection of your time.</p> <h3>2. You Build a Diverse Set of Skills</h3> <p>One of the reasons that a portfolio career can snowball into a very lucrative choice, is that you naturally develop sets of varied but complementary skills, which can be sold at a premium. Take a freelance writer, who can also take (and sell) a decent photograph, teach writing, or build a personal blog that draws in advertising revenue. Each individual effort links to the next, growing valuable skills all the time.</p> <h3>3. Variety Is a Given</h3> <p>If you're even vaguely thinking about a portfolio lifestyle, then you're probably a fan of new experiences. Since the &quot;same job for life&quot; concept disappeared a generation ago, people have increasingly questioned why staying in one career field is necessary. If you can't climb a traditional career ladder anyway, then why not seek new and varied working experiences. Welcome to the world of portfolio careers.</p> <h2>How to Make Freelancing Actually Work</h2> <p>We are still learning what it looks like to be a successful freelancer. There's probably no single correct way to nail this lifestyle. However, some useful advice has certainly emerged.</p> <p>If you're thinking of taking this route, then remember:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Keep one or two reliable income sources</strong>. Consider an anchor-orbiter model, in which you have one or two steady roles (the anchor), with other work which is more flexible, orbiting around this main income source. This works especially well for people who want to keep some form of a steady job on a part-time basis and build a freelance income on the side.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Build up an emergency fund.</strong> And learn to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-smart-way-to-budget-on-a-freelance-income">budget as a freelancer</a>. With no fixed income, budgeting becomes more complex, even before you start to worry about paying taxes and keeping up insurance and other necessary payments.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Nothing is forever.</strong> If you try the portfolio life and it is not for you, there is no reason why you can't take your newly acquired skills and experiences back into a traditional role. In fact, the broadened horizons of having worked independently might even mean you can find a better role than ever.</li> </ul> <p><em>What's your best advice for others looking to follow in your footsteps? Tell us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/day-job-or-freelance-which-is-right-for-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-biggest-mistakes-freelancers-make">The 5 Biggest Mistakes Freelancers Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-the-9-to-5-is-right-for-you">8 Signs the 9-to-5 IS Right for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance">4 Best Jobs for Work Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-websites-that-will-pay-you-to-write-for-them">22 Websites That Will Pay You to Write for Them</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Extra Income Job Hunting 9-to-5 day job freelance freelancer job hunting job search workday working Tue, 28 Jun 2016 09:30:28 +0000 Claire Millard 1740456 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 $100k+ Jobs You Can Do Online http://www.wisebread.com/8-100k-jobs-you-can-do-online <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-100k-jobs-you-can-do-online" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_makeup_kit_000084480065.jpg" alt="Woman finding online jobs that can earn $100K" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Work no longer has to be a place. As the world of web-entrepreneurship and digital nomadic life becomes more and more mainstream, people are starting to realize that it's easier than ever to make good money online. These aren't get rich quick schemes by any means, and it will take a considerable amount of time and commitment to truly excel in these fields, but who doesn't want to earn $100K per year from virtually anywhere in the world? Here are five jobs that can help you do just that.</p> <h2>1. Travel Blogger</h2> <p>If you thought that travel blogging was just a hobby, you're not alone. In fact, before I started <a href="http://www.goatsontheroad.com/">my travel blog</a> in 2011, I had no idea that I would one day be earning over $5,000 a month after tax, doing what I love.</p> <p>The great thing about becoming a travel blogger is the perks that come along with the salary. $100,000 a year sounds great, but when you couple that with airlines flying you for free and tourism boards paying for all of your accommodations, food, and travel, it's pretty much the ultimate dream job.</p> <p>Travel bloggers who are doing it right barely have any day-to-day expenses, despite the fact that they&rsquo;re living a life fit for millionaires. Because there are literally thousands of travel blogs online, the market is definitely saturated, but that doesn't mean it's impossible to etch out a niche and make real money from this line of work.</p> <p>If you want to leave your cubicle behind and turn the world into your office, consider learning <a href="http://www.goatsontheroad.com/how-to-start-a-travel-blog/">how to start travel a blog</a> today. It could change your life.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Matt Karsten &mdash; <a href="http://expertvagabond.com/paid-to-travel-world/">Expert Vagabond</a></li> <li>Caz and Craig &mdash; <a href="http://ytravelblog.com/">yTravelBlog</a></li> <li>Natalie Sisson &mdash; <a href="http://suitcaseentrepreneur.com/">Suitcase Entrepreneur</a></li> </ul> <h2>2. Internet Poker Player</h2> <p>If you love a good game of five-card stud, this job may just sound like it's too good to be true. The fact that you can sit on your computer and play digital poker, while looking out at a Caribbean beach, is a dreamlike thought for sure.</p> <p>But for online gamblers like Patrick Leonard, it is not uncommon to have single days where winnings break the $100,000 mark. Forget making more than six-figures per year, this guy once earned $220,000 on a rainy Sunday afternoon in Hungary (where he currently lives).</p> <p>It should be noted that most estimates point to 90% of all online poker players coming out on the losing end, which is why online poker sites make so much money. But if you're a freakishly good poker player like Patrick, you could make it rain digital dollars all over the world.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Diego Ventura</li> <li>Patrick Leonard</li> </ul> <h2>3. Web Designer</h2> <p>Designing websites can be a lucrative career, especially if you build a name for yourself and you start having big brands knocking on your door, asking you to pimp their blogs. Of course becoming a web designer isn't something you can do overnight.</p> <p>Have you ever seen the code behind a website? It's an entire language that you have to learn before you can start to customize the look of the web. But if you have a background in CSS, HTML, PHP, and other geeky web acronyms, then you can probably earn a good living from your computer, no matter where you are in the world.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Scott Eldridge &mdash; <a href="http://www.eldowebdesign.co.uk/">Eldo Web Design</a></li> <li>Preston Lee &mdash; <a href="http://millo.co/">millo.co</a></li> <li>Paul Jarvis &mdash; <a href="http://creativeclass.io/">creativeclass.io</a></li> </ul> <h2>4. Day Trader</h2> <p>For some reason, the sound of day trading on the stock market already has a wealthy ring to it. You may picture a dude with slicked back hair, holding a glass of scotch while betting on the changing stock market from a five-star hotel in Maui. Well, if you go to successful day trader <a href="http://wanderingtrader.com/about/">Marcello Arrambide's website</a>, you'll see just that.</p> <p>Like online poker playing, making money as a day trader is a gamble and if you have no prior experience, you're likely to lose before you gain &mdash; but this job is no joke. Some top earners are making upward of $20,000 a month, and they can do it from anywhere that has a decent Wi-Fi connection.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Marcello Arrambide &mdash; <a href="http://wanderingtrader.com/about/">The Wandering Trader</a></li> <li>Steve Gomez &mdash; <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/sgomez858">Today Trader</a></li> </ul> <h2>5. Travel Writer</h2> <p>The difference between a travel <em>writer </em>and a travel <em>blogger </em>is that a travel writer is getting paid to write for other publications, while a travel blogger is probably making most (or all) of their income from writing on their own site.</p> <p>Earning six figures a year as a freelance writer is a difficult job indeed. Tim Leffel, one of the world's leading experts in travel writing, explains that making money as a freelance writer is truly a world of feast and famine. One minute you can have numerous publications waiting to feature you, while the next, you may be barely earning anything, just waiting for an assignment.</p> <p>Despite the relative uncertainty of income, some of the world's top-earning travel writers do take home $100K a year or more and they live a life that many of us could only dream of. Exploring the world, getting published in big magazines, and sharing their stories and adventures with millions of people. What a life.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Tim Leffel &mdash; <a href="http://travelwriting2.com/about/">Travel Writing 2.0</a></li> <li>Carol Tice &mdash; <a href="http://www.makealivingwriting.com/about-carol/">Make a Living Writing</a></li> </ul> <h2>6. YouTuber</h2> <p>If you read the word &quot;YouTuber&quot; and immediately thought that there's no way anyone is making real money from uploading videos to YouTube, you might just pass out when I tell you that the top earning YouTuber, Felix Kjellberg, is grossing over $12 million per annum.</p> <p>The 25-year-old Swede runs the popular gaming channel PewDiePie, and he is not alone in making millions of dollars from Internet videos. Rhett McLaughlin and Charles Lincoln Neal III made over $4 million in 2015 and there are literally dozens of other creators making seven to eight figures per year from their YouTube channels.</p> <p>For channels to earn this much money, they have to have a huge following. The top 10 YouTubers have a combined subscriber base of more than 230 million viewers and their most watched videos have had more views than the 2015 Super Bowl.</p> <p>Taking all of this into consideration, it's no surprise that these artists are making big money. If you're just starting out as a YouTuber, it may feel like you have nobody watching your videos, but if you promote yourself and market your channel properly, you could one day earn a solid income from embedded ads and sponsorships.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Felix Kjellberg &mdash; <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/PewDiePie/videos?view=0&amp;flow=grid&amp;sort=p">PewDiePie</a></li> <li>Rhett and Link &mdash; <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/rhettandlink2">Good Mythical Morning</a></li> </ul> <h2>7. App Programmer</h2> <p>Have you ever played the game Candy Crush on your smartphone? While you were aligning jelly beans and stopping chocolate blockers, you probably weren't aware that the app currently earns $277,500,000 yearly. That's right, the addictive finger swiping platform earns two hundred seventy-seven million five hundred thousand dollars every year. That's $3.5 million per day.</p> <p>Of course, the average programmer isn't going to make as much as Toby Rowland, the creator of the Sugar Crush Saga, but there are many app developers out there making good money from their digital creations.</p> <p>Simon Fairbairn and Erin McNeaney of <a href="http://www.neverendingvoyage.com/">Never Ending Voyage</a> have created a brilliant travel app called <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/trail-wallet-travel-budget/id547171665?mt=8">Trail Wallet</a> that is selling very well in the App Store and earning them a reliable income. The app helps travelers to track their budget and has been downloaded thousands of times from the app store.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Tasnim Ahmed &mdash; <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/santa-claus-merry-christmas/id764935420?mt=8">Santa Claus Photo Booth</a></li> <li>Ethan Nicholas &mdash; <a href="http://appadvice.com/appnn/2009/02/ishoot-developer-makes-600000-in-one-month">iShoot</a></li> </ul> <h2>8. Affiliate Marketing Guru</h2> <p>What is affiliate marketing? According to Pat Flynn, founder of the <a href="http://smartpassiveincome.com/">Smart Passive Income Blog</a>: &quot;It's the process of earning a commission by promoting other people's (or company's) products. You find a product you like, promote it to others, and earn a piece of the profit for each sale that you make.&quot;</p> <p>Forget earning $100,000 a year, Pat earns that every month and he does so using a passive income model, which means he doesn't spend every waking hour of his life on his computer. His blog is the most informative on the subject and he helps to teach others how to make a full-time income from affiliate sales.</p> <p>While having a blog with a huge amount of traffic like Pat's definitely helps to generate sales, there are plenty of people with much less traffic who are still making a lot of money through affiliate marketing. If earning money in your sleep sounds appealing to you, you may want to check out Pat's blog and consider starting your own blog today.</p> <h3>$100K+ Examples:</h3> <ul> <li>Pat Flynn &mdash; <a href="http://www.smartpassiveincome.com/">Smart Passive Income</a></li> <li>Steve Scott &mdash; <a href="http://www.stevescottsite.com/affiliate-marketing-strategies">SteveScottSite.com</a></li> </ul> <h2>You Can Do It &hellip;</h2> <p>These jobs may have once been reserved for people with fancy degrees, a background in technology, or Internet geniuses, but these days there are enough resources online that pretty much anyone can make money from their computers.</p> <p>Like the people in the examples above, you could work hard and one day be earning a six-figure income from your laptop. The great thing about computer work is that you can start it in your free time, while you&rsquo;re still working your normal job. If your online business takes off, you can retire to a life of digital freedom.</p> <p><em>Have you or someone you know earned a good income online? How did it work? Share with us in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nick-wharton">Nick Wharton</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-100k-jobs-you-can-do-online">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-websites-that-will-pay-you-to-write-for-them">22 Websites That Will Pay You to Write for Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-interview-technique-will-get-you-hired">This Interview Technique Will Get You Hired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">How to Ace Your Next Coffee Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting day trader high paying jobs online jobs poker six figures travel work from home YouTube Mon, 20 Jun 2016 10:30:05 +0000 Nick Wharton 1721733 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 High-Paying Medical Jobs You Don't Need an MD For http://www.wisebread.com/4-high-paying-medical-jobs-you-dont-need-an-md-for <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-high-paying-medical-jobs-you-dont-need-an-md-for" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_36586808_XLARGE.jpg" alt="you don&#039;t need an md to work in these medical fields" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Doctors are the rock stars of the medical world. They complete life-saving procedures, diagnose complicated illnesses, and in their free time, enjoy a lavish lifestyle from their six-figure salary. Doctors make a lot of money, so it's not surprising that &quot;doctor&quot; is commonly listed as one of the top <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-real-world-salaries-of-8-childhood-dream-jobs">dream jobs of children</a> in the United States.</p> <p>By the time children reach adulthood, most realize that the high salary often correlates with a huge time commitment. Doctors typically spend eight years as a medical students and then can spend another three to eight years completing a residency before they become a fully independent doctor. For those who want to work in the medical field, but cannot commit more than eight years to receive highly intensive medical training, there are other medical career options to pursue. Here are some other lucrative job options.</p> <h2>Nurse Practitioner</h2> <p>Nurse practitioners are RNs that have completed a Master of Science in Nursing. According to Ohio University<em>, </em>NPs typically make an&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes291171.htm">annual salary around $100,000</a>.</p> <p>The salary might be around significantly less than a doctor's salary, but it only takes anywhere from 15 months to 24 months to complete an MSN degree (depending on education level). If a nursing student took four years to complete a BSN, it will only take around another year or so to become a certified NP.</p> <p>What's so special about NPs? Right now in 16 states and Washington D.C., nurse practitioners can work without the oversight of a doctor. This means that NPs can open their own health clinics in some states.</p> <h2>Health Informatics Specialists</h2> <p>Health informatics specialists are responsible for monitoring and helping health establishments as they utilize various pieces of technology. Job duties often include training staff how to use technology, creating written and visual guidelines on how to properly utilize technology, and helping hospital staff as they have problems with the technology in the hospital.</p> <p>Health informatics specialists typically make on&nbsp;<a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Health_Informatics_Specialist/Salary">average around $61,050 per year</a>. Lower end health informatics jobs don't always require a college degree. These have an annual salary in the $35,000 range. Not bad if you consider that you won't be paying off student loans.</p> <p>For slightly higher paying jobs, individuals can either pursue a four-year bachelor of computer science or a bachelor of science in nursing. The RN trajectory tends to be slightly more competitive and offers a slightly broader range of potential jobs (including informatics nurse and clinical informatics specialist).</p> <h2>Biomedical Engineer</h2> <p>Biomedical engineers are responsible for creating, designing, installing and maintaining the equipment, computer systems, and software utilized in different health care settings. They're not working directly with patients, but the tools they create and maintain are vital to an efficient and safe medical setting.</p> <p>The amount that biomedical engineers are paid is&nbsp;<a href="https://collegegrad.com/careers/biomedical-engineers">dependent on where they work</a>. Hospital biomedical engineers make an average annual salary of $72,060 per year. Biomedical engineers that work for companies designing equipment can make around $91,000 per year.</p> <p>There are a few paths individuals can take to become a biomedical engineer. They can complete a bachelor's program in biomedical engineering or bioengineering. Or they can complete a bachelor's degree in engineering and either take biological science electives or complete a biomedical master's program.</p> <h2>Health Care Entrepreneur</h2> <p>If you have dreams of starting your own business, you might want to consider becoming a small business owner of a health care franchise. The franchise business model (most commonly known for the fast food business model) has become a fairly lucrative business model for senior care and home care.</p> <p>According to Forbes, start-up costs for health care franchises are lower ($150,000 or less) than they typically are to open a fast food franchise ($500,000 or more). Revenue for home health care businesses are currently high and as more baby boomers begin to need the services, those numbers will continue to skyrocket.</p> <p>Becoming a franchise owner doesn't have any educational requirements. The only requirements tend to be the ability to meet a certain cash investment without the help of small business loans. Franchise owners must also commit to uphold set franchise rules and standards.</p> <p>Like all business ventures, opening a health care franchise is a risky venture. There is a chance that you will fail to create a lucrative business, so have a solid game plan before you commit.</p> <p><em>Have you explored a career in the medical field? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-high-paying-medical-jobs-you-dont-need-an-md-for">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-12"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/day-job-or-freelance-which-is-right-for-you">Day Job or Freelance: Which Is Right for You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-interview-technique-will-get-you-hired">This Interview Technique Will Get You Hired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-really-make-a-living-in-the-gig-economy">Can You Really Make a Living in the Gig Economy?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting doctor medical medical careers medical industry nurse nursing school Fri, 17 Jun 2016 09:00:05 +0000 Samantha Stauf 1732947 at http://www.wisebread.com Can You Really Make a Living in the Gig Economy? http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-really-make-a-living-in-the-gig-economy <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/can-you-really-make-a-living-in-the-gig-economy" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/hiking_guide_trail_11139920.jpg" alt="Woman finding way to make a living in gig economy" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The gig economy is here to stay. That's the prediction, anyway. And while some underemployed workers are rejoicing at the growing opportunity to choose their own hours and boost their post-recession income, some experts are concerned that more and more Americans will wind up working gigs for the whole of their income rather than just the occasional cash infusion. If traditional, salaried jobs take a back seat to one-time gigs, one of the biggest fears among folks studying the sharing economy is that workers will get stuck with lackluster or wholly nonexistent benefit packages and an unstable job outlook. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-ways-to-make-it-rain-today?ref=seealso">6 Smart Ways to Make It Rain Today</a>)</p> <p>So, how much can the average freelance-gigger really earn piecing together an income from a string of odd jobs? Is it plausible to jump headfirst into the sharing economy and expect to earn a good living? We did the math for you.</p> <h2>Ridesharing</h2> <p>The claim: Uber says its <a href="https://timedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/uber_driver-partners_hall_kreuger_2015.pdf">drivers earn $6 more per hour</a> than traditional cabbies. This statement, however, fails to take into consideration the fact that Uber drivers are not reimbursed by the company for insurance, gas, car maintenance, nor the ever-depreciating value of the vehicle itself &mdash; a combined cost that the company estimates to be about $15,000 per year in New York City. The data is shaky, but, at least in some cities, Uber drivers still make out better than regular cabbies when these expenses are accounted for. Of course, a lot of it has to do with peak hours and regional gas costs. So take these estimates for what they are &mdash; estimates.</p> <p>Perhaps, just as important as the financials is Uber employee satisfaction, which just so happens to rank notably high. A 2014 survey of 601 Uber drivers found that <a href="http://www.bsgco.com/insights/uber-the-driver-roadmap">78%&nbsp;of participants are very satisfied</a> or somewhat satisfied with Uber, and 71% said their income had increased since they started working for the company. That bodes well for ridesharing's future.</p> <p>And while Uber isn't the only ridesharing company out there, its workers tend to earn more than those at competing brands, such as Lyft. According to an analysis by NerdWallet, Uber drivers earn an average of $16 per ride, while Lyft drivers earn about $11.50. Based on those estimates, the average Uber driver needs to give about 60 rides per week to make an annual income of $50,000, while those working for Lyft need to provide about 84 rides a week.</p> <p>Conclusion: It's possible to make a solid living in the ridesharing market, but you have to hustle. You also have to have patience and financial flexibility to weather the ebb and flow of peak hours, peak seasons, and fluctuating gasoline prices.</p> <h2>Gigs With TaskRabbit</h2> <p>From picking up groceries to weedwacking, TaskRabbit is the one-stop-shop for finding a set of nearby helping hands. As a Tasker, you can shop for tasks that you are willing and able to perform in your area. For each task that you successfully complete, you collect a predetermined payment, of which TaskRabbit collects a 30% service fee. There are also occasional overhead costs, like when a task requires you to use public transit or drive your own vehicle.</p> <p>Jamie Viggiano, Taskrabbit's VP of marketing, reports that roughly 10%-15% of the site's Taskers regularly earn $6,000 to $7,000 a month, after the commission is deducted. Exhibit A: Brian Schrier of San Francisco told Time Magazine that he averages about $2,000 per week performing tasks ranging from carpentry to folding shirts. And David Cordova, 31, of New York City, said he earns up to $4,000 per month working six-hour days (two to three gigs per day) Monday through Friday, and sometimes Saturday, too.</p> <p>Conclusion: It's important to note that Brian and David are <a href="http://time.com/money/3714829/working-for-taskrabbit/">examples of exceptional Taskers</a> &mdash; only a small minority of Taskers are making a living using TaskRabbit. But, if you commit yourself, it's possible.</p> <h2>Tour Guiding With Vayable</h2> <p>Vayable, the app that pairs tourists with local guides in major cities, offers users an authentic travel experience in exchange for a fee, which amounts to whatever the local guide decides is fair. (The company takes a 15% cut.) This marketplace for personalized and unique travel experiences is transforming the travel market. But can it transform your wallet?</p> <p>Right now, the going rate &mdash; which, of course, you set yourself &mdash; for an eight-hour tour of West Maui is $500, while a three-hour after-dark tour of Moscow is $107. In New York City, one of the most popular offerings is <a href="https://www.vayable.com/users/2521">a customized running tour of New York</a>, priced at $50 per hour. Sebastien, the athlete who offers the New York running tour, has 34 reviews, which means he's earned at least $1,445 using Vayable.</p> <p>Conclusion: Depending on how tourist-friendly your locale is, you can earn a nice hunk of extra change offering guided tours and experiences through Vayable. But until the network grows, it's nothing to quit your day job over.</p> <p><em>Are you making a stable living in the gig economy? Share your tips!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-really-make-a-living-in-the-gig-economy">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-places-to-find-freelance-writing-jobs">6 Places to Find Freelance Writing Jobs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-part-time-jobs-to-do-while-your-kids-are-at-school">17 Part-Time Jobs to Do While Your Kids Are at School</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-must-know-about-money-before-you-take-a-side-job">10 Money Moves You Need to Make Before You Take a Side Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-side-jobs-for-people-who-are-good-with-money">6 Side Jobs for People Who Are Good With Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting freelance work gig economy job part-time job side gig side hustle side job work Wed, 15 Jun 2016 09:00:13 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1731284 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Places to Find Freelance Writing Jobs http://www.wisebread.com/6-places-to-find-freelance-writing-jobs <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-places-to-find-freelance-writing-jobs" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_computer_cafe_84295655.jpg" alt="Woman looking for places to find freelance writing jobs" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you have ever read about work-at-home opportunities, freelance writing was probably listed as a top choice. While freelance writing offers a lot of flexibility for those who enjoy stringing words together, it is not always easy to find writing jobs.</p> <p>We've already linked you to 22 websites that&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-websites-that-will-pay-you-to-write-for-them">pay individuals to write articles</a> for money. That is a great list to start with. I strongly recommend pitching directly to websites that are open to submissions, since they will pay for your work and can help build up your portfolio.</p> <p>Here are six other sources will connect you to a mass of writing jobs and individuals looking for regular writers.</p> <h2>1. ProBlogger's Job Board</h2> <p>ProBlogger is one of the top authorities on blogging. The&nbsp;<a href="http://jobs.problogger.net/">ProBlogger Job Board</a> is updated daily with unique writing positions. Companies pay ProBlogger directly to advertise their open positions, which I have found to mean two things. First, many of the positions pay pretty well. Secondly, since ProBlogger is the creator of this job board, you aren't going to see the same ad over and over again, like you might on Craigslist.</p> <h2>2. Craigslist</h2> <p>Finding a writing position on Craigslist should be approached with caution. There are many new websites that seek writing services, yet they do not offer compensation, or offer the bare minimum. Look for legitimate websites and make sure compensation is clear before starting. A sign of a good company is one that asks you to fill out a W-9 form.</p> <p>With that being said, I have written for some great companies through my search on Craigslist. I recommend searching under Craigslist's writing/editing section. Also, try searching for writing jobs in large cities across America. (See also:<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-freelance-jobs-that-pay-surprisingly-well?ref=seealso">11 Freelance Jobs That Pay Surprisingly Well</a>)</p> <h2>3. FreelanceWriting.com Job Board</h2> <p>Another great site to check often is the job listings at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.freelancewriting.com/freelance-writing-jobs.php">FreelanceWriting.com</a>. The site has been around since 1997 and pulls jobs listings from all across the Internet. You will find a wide variety of listings, but the listings do not seem to be updated daily. The site's&nbsp;<a href="http://www.freelancewriting.com/newsletters/morning-coffee-freelance-writing-jobs.php">Morning Coffee Newsletter</a> sends new job listings to your email each weekday morning.</p> <h2>4. LinkedIn</h2> <p>If you don't already have a LinkedIn profile that details your experience as a freelancer, then I strongly suggest you get one. LinkedIn has allowed me to search for remote freelance writing jobs with success. Even better, I have been contacted by recruiters for writing work.</p> <p>I think it is also a good idea to follow other freelance writers to get an idea of who they are writing for.</p> <h2>5. MediaBistro</h2> <p>What I like about&nbsp;<a href="https://www.mediabistro.com/jobs/search/?Duration=130&amp;countrycode=US&amp;Page=2">MediaBistro</a> is that their listings are geared towards more professional writers. They have listings for all types of writers, including remote listings for freelancers and contractors.</p> <h2>6. Journalism Jobs</h2> <p><a href="http://www.journalismjobs.com/index.php">Journalism Jobs</a> lists hundreds of writing positions across the U.S. While most jobs are for in-house positions, there is an option to search freelance positions. It's a good idea to add this to your weekly search routine. (See also:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-great-side-jobs-for-introverts">10 Great Side Jobs for Introverts</a>)</p> <h3>What to Avoid</h3> <p>There will be many job listings that make their way on Craigslist or other freelance writing boards that only pay $3&ndash;$4 per article. They write their ads to say individuals can earn $15&ndash;$30 an hour, and that it just depends on how fast you write. I recommend staying away from these types of jobs, too, since you basically become an article mill for others who will profit off of your hard work.</p> <p>In the end, finding the best writing jobs for your experience level that fit your desired rate will take some time. Keep looking and keep building up your portfolio and experience. Almost a decade ago, I started writing online, and I can assure you that I did not make very much money at first. It took a lot of time, practice, and years of pitching to get paid a decent rate and to get regular freelance work.</p> <p><em>Where do you find freelance writing gigs? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-places-to-find-freelance-writing-jobs">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-really-make-a-living-in-the-gig-economy">Can You Really Make a Living in the Gig Economy?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-websites-that-will-pay-you-to-write-for-them">22 Websites That Will Pay You to Write for Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-part-time-jobs-to-do-while-your-kids-are-at-school">17 Part-Time Jobs to Do While Your Kids Are at School</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting freelance jobs gig economy job search side hustle side job work from home writer writing writing gigs Mon, 13 Jun 2016 09:30:22 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 1728672 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Ace Your Next Coffee Interview http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000051956032_Large.jpg" alt="acing her coffee interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Ah, the modern job hunt. You've optimized your online profiles, mastered the art of digital networking, and figured out how to stay on the right side of the line between using the Internet to research a hiring manager, and full-on stalking. So far, so good.</p> <p>And you've even landed an interview, but there a catch. Your first face-to-face contact with your prospective dream boss is a &quot;coffee interview.&quot; Say what?</p> <p>Using an informal screening stage in recruiting isn't new, but since this important kind of meeting has moved to a cafe setting, it has become an etiquette minefield.</p> <p>If you've got a coffee interview booked and you're stumped by such vital questions as what to wear, how to identify your interviewer, and, if it's okay to order a double skinny lactose free caramel latte, read on. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview?ref=seealso">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a>)</p> <h2>Be Informal, Not Relaxed</h2> <p>Don't be fooled into feeling that the informal environment will lead to a <em>relaxed </em>meeting. One of the most common mistakes job seekers make is to underestimate the expectation of the interviewer and arrive underprepared at this type of interview. If you don't want to fail at the first hurdle, you need to get prepped!</p> <p>Ask the interviewer what the format of the interview will be, and if there is anything in particular you can prepare in advance, or bring along, such as references or a portfolio. Often the first meeting will be a gate keeping exercise, to test basic suitability for the job, and to sound out candidate expectations about salary, working conditions, and availability. Expect to be asked practical questions, and have answers in mind, so they don't become a barrier.</p> <p>Preparing for the meat of the conversation starts with research. Pick out the key skills and experience detailed in the job posting, and make sure you're clear on your unique selling point &mdash; what makes you suited to the role. Learn everything you can about the company, and think of ways you can make your mark even at this early stage. You might consider visiting a competitor, for example, or preparing some thoughts on the biggest challenges and opportunities facing the company. By having knowledge and unique ideas, you will stand out for the right reasons.</p> <h2>Map It Out</h2> <p>The logistics of a coffee interview can feel somewhat daunting. Make sure you know exactly where you're going &mdash; especially if you're meeting in a chain cafe that has several different locations in town &mdash; and arrive a little early if possible.</p> <p>Identifying your interviewer from an anonymous crowd is the next challenge. If you know exactly who you're meeting in advance, have a look at their social media presence to find a picture to increase your odds of picking them out in a crowd. Take a seat facing the door if you can, and text or call your interviewer a few minutes before you're due to meet, to describe your location. Be aware that recruiters often batch meetings, so your interviewer might already be in the cafe with another candidate.</p> <p>Once you've found the right person, remember it's an interview, not a date. Take your lead from them when ordering, and don't order anything too wacky! If you're eating, spend a second figuring out what on the menu is suitable. Spraying yourself with spaghetti sauce, or trying to talk while gnawing on ribs isn't a good look!</p> <p>Although you're there to talk about the position, remember that you're creating an impression before you're ever been asked a question. More so than in an office environment, your interviewer will pick up on your interactions with others. Treat everyone with <em>real </em>respect. This is no time to get snarky with your waitress, even if the order is muddled up.</p> <p>Similarly, what you choose to wear is more open in a coffee interview. While office attire is fairly well defined, anything goes in a cafe. Choose something that makes you feel good and that fits with your perception of the company culture. If you're in any doubt, err on the side of more formal. Unless you habitually hang out in your tux, it's hard to be overdressed, in any interview situation.</p> <h2>Exit Gracefully</h2> <p>As your meeting is coming to an end, hopefully you've developed a great rapport with your interviewer, and are parting on good terms &mdash; but you still need to avoid an etiquette fail. Getting the bill is the first challenge. It's pretty common for the recruiter to pick up the tab, but have some cash just in case. Having to borrow a few dollars from your prospective boss is not the best start to a working relationship.</p> <p>When you're done, shake hands and part ways. Even if you might really want to hang round in the same cafe, or grab a bite to eat, it's usually best to leave. If your interviewer has another meeting lined up directly after you, they won't want you in a position to spy on the competition. Make a dignified exit and get your lunch elsewhere!</p> <h2>Always Follow Up</h2> <p>As with any interview, it's a good idea to follow up with a thank you note. An email is fine in such an informal scenario, just to reiterate your interest in the role, and say thanks for the meeting. If you touched upon anything in your conversation that really resonated with you both &mdash; maybe a book you mentioned, or an interesting article about a mutual passion &mdash; then mention this as an anchor to your conversation, and to help your interviewer remember the connection you had.</p> <p>A coffee interview is never going to be quite as much fun as hanging out with friends over a latte and lunch, but it shouldn't be too terrifying, either.</p> <p><em>What do you think? Have you had coffee interview successes, or disasters? Tell us in the comments.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting coffee interview how to interview etiquette job interview tips job interviews job search Thu, 02 Jun 2016 09:00:11 +0000 Claire Millard 1722227 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Signs the 9-to-5 IS Right for You http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-the-9-to-5-is-right-for-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-signs-the-9-to-5-is-right-for-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000089400227_Large.jpg" alt="the 9-to-5 is right for her" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There's so much buzz about escaping the 9-to-5 and becoming your own boss, or working from home. But&hellip; this isn't for everyone, and you may actually be cut out for the 9-to-5 grind.</p> <p>I had the experience of going back to a 9-to-5 job after running my own business for five years. After returning to my cubicle, I realized that there are some significant benefits to working for someone else at a regular job instead of starting your own business.</p> <p>Here are signs that you might be happier and more successful staying with the classic workday grind.</p> <h2>1. You Need Your Next Paycheck</h2> <p>Unlike a 9-to-5 job, owning a business often means variable income. Some months you might make a lot of money, and others not so much. Those first few months after you start a business are often months when you are not likely to make much income as you are establishing customers. Could you afford to go a few months without any income? If not, you might be better off staying with your 9-to-5 job.</p> <h2>2. You're Making More Money</h2> <p>If you are <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-money-does-buy-happiness">getting paid more</a> at your current job, working for your current employer, than you think you could make on your own, then you might be better off staying at the office.</p> <p>For one thing, some companies offer regular raises. After a few years of good performance reviews, you could find yourself with a salary that would be hard to replicate doing the same work as an independent contractor and competing with other hungry independent contractors.</p> <p>Another reason you could be paid more at a 9-to-5 job is leverage of resources. At work, you might be a small cog in a big machine, but the big machine is making a lot of money. If you strike out on your own &mdash; no longer surrounded by all of the resources of a big company &mdash; you may provide less value to your customers and get paid less as a result.</p> <h2>3. Your Hours Really Are 9-to-5</h2> <p>A lot people would be thrilled to work from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and then go home. Many positions demand working much more than 40 hours per week, plus working evenings, weekends, and sometimes holidays. If you have a regular job that gives you a full-time paycheck for working 40 hours per week or less, think twice before giving that up.</p> <p>If your current job leaves you with some spare time, consider keeping your 9-to-5 job and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-side-jobs-for-people-who-are-good-with-money">adding a side hustle</a> to bring in some extra money.</p> <h2>4. You Are a Specialist</h2> <p>When I started my business, there was a time when I was the only one working there. It was exciting to be the boss and work on technical projects, but someone needed to vacuum the floors, pay the utility bills, answer the phone, etc. Since I was the only employee, that person was me!</p> <p>Working at an office with lots of other people around allows employees to specialize. A &quot;real&quot; business might have custodians that take care of vacuuming, financial analysts that take care of paying bills, and administrative assistants that take care of answering phones.</p> <p>The job descriptions at a 9-to-5 job are typically a lot more specialized than if you work for yourself. If you have special skills and provide value by performing specialized work, you might end up doing a lot less of that specialized work and a lot more general tasks if you leave your regular job.</p> <h2>5. You Like to Finish Things</h2> <p>People have different working styles and different comfort levels with chaos and changes in direction. I know some people who work really well on a defined task and can drive away at it steadily until it is completed. At a typical 9-to-5 type job, if other demands or tasks pop up, the management will help sort out priorities. Additional staff can be pulled in to deal with new work. Most employees have a few top priorities and focus on getting those things done on time.</p> <p>Working on your own, there is no one available to help juggle the chaos of real life. If additional tasks pop up, you may need to let some balls fall to the ground in order to catch more important ones. You can often end up stopping in the middle of some tasks to take on more urgent work. If letting things go unfinished would frustrate you, then you might be more satisfied in the more stable environment of a regular job.</p> <h2>6. You Are Afraid of Financial Risks</h2> <p>Financial risk is the main reason I left my own business to go back to a 9-to-5 job. While running my own business, I would sometimes use personal credit cards to make payroll. As the business grew, I applied for small business loans to keep the business operating until we got the next big contract. It was my name signed on the two-year facility lease. Income was good at times, but not predictable. At any time, the income could stop coming in and the payroll and facility expenses would still need to be paid.</p> <p>I decided that I liked where I lived, and with kids getting to school age, I wanted a more stable source of income and to take on less financial risk. Fortunately, I was able to transition to a great career in a 9-to-5 position.</p> <p>Being your own boss has greater income potential than working for someone else, but this potential comes at the cost of greater risk. If you are already stressed out about your finances, taking on additional risk by leaving a steady income behind may not be a good move for you.</p> <h2>7. You Crave Balance</h2> <p>One reason people think about leaving their day job is to get a more flexible work schedule. It is true that working on your own can result in a more flexibility, but this schedule may include working a lot more hours! If your goal from striking out on your own is to be able to spend more time with your family, you may be disappointed.</p> <p>Many 9-to-5 jobs will allow some schedule flexibility if you work with management. If you can still get your job done, you may be able to arrange working hours that are a bit different than standard office hours or even do some of your work from home.</p> <p>Before leaving your regular job to get some schedule flexibility, see if your current employer can support this request. You might be able to get better work-life balance without the need to take on the challenges of starting your own business.</p> <h2>8. You Have Friends In the Next Cubicle</h2> <p>For many people, work is an important part of their social structure. You become friends with people at work since you spend time with them and get to know them. Your position at work facilitates meeting new people and quickly establishing relationships.</p> <p>If you leave your regular job, these friendships and connections will fade. Working at home on your own makes it harder to meet new people and keep up with old friends. If you leave your 9-to-5 job, you might be leaving more than just your old cubicle behind.</p> <p><em>Do you think working 9-to-5 or owning your own business is a better fit for you? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dr-penny-pincher">Dr Penny Pincher</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-the-9-to-5-is-right-for-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/day-job-or-freelance-which-is-right-for-you">Day Job or Freelance: Which Is Right for You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance">4 Best Jobs for Work Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting 9-to-5 job search office hours office job work life balance work schedule workday Tue, 31 May 2016 10:00:06 +0000 Dr Penny Pincher 1719034 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000061108306_Large.jpg" alt="bouncing back from job rejection" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>What's your go-to coping mechanism when faced with rejection? Openly sob in between giant bites of chocolate cake? Punch a pillow? Or maybe you bend the ear of every passerby about the sheer injustice of it all?</p> <p>We learn these methods when we're young, and while most of our toddler tactics dissipate with time, it's not unusual to hang onto these particular rejection responses for life.</p> <p>But there is a better way. Take it from the indefatigable Babe Ruth, who said, &quot;It's pretty hard to beat a person who never gives up.&quot; You can take rejection and bounce back stronger than ever. Here's how. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-to-get-over-rejection?ref=seealso">11 Ways to Get Over Rejection</a>)</p> <h2>Don't Wallow</h2> <p>Get a handle on the emotional stages you pass through when faced with rejection. The most common model of emotional stages &mdash; known as the <a href="http://www.change-management-coach.com/kubler-ross.html">change curve</a> &mdash; categorizes them as shock, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. Although the model was initially designed to describe the stages of grief, they have been found to hold true with much more minor changes such as rejection.</p> <p>Between the shock and anger stages, you're going to want to let off a little steam. Have a bellow. Take it out on the gym equipment. Pour yourself a large glass of wine. Whatever does it for you.</p> <p>But moving on through the natural stages of adjustment is the key to a quick recovery. It can be easy to grind to a halt at the stages of bargaining and depression, and to find yourself wallowing in the defeat. If you start to feel yourself <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-this-one-thing-every-day-to-defeat-negativity">getting overwhelmed by negativity</a>, take stock. Pull yourself up. But should the feeling persist, and you feel trapped, don't be afraid to seek help from family, friends, and medical professionals if necessary.</p> <h2>Don't Take It Personally</h2> <p>Remember that rejection happens to all of us. From being stood up on a date, to missing out on a great job, to being <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mortgage-application-declined-here-s-how-to-respond">declined for a mortgage</a>, we've all been rejected at least once. If you want to take it all to heart, and find the personal slight in every rejection, you're going to live a life full of resentment and sadness. But the thing is, it's not about you.</p> <p>Try to create a little distance between yourself and your negative thoughts. If a rejection feels personal, take a step back and put it into perspective. If you didn't get that promotion, maybe there was simply another candidate who fit the position better. Maybe you're lined up for a different opportunity you simply don't know of yet. Maybe the interviewer was just plain bad. Either way, it's not about you, so don't beat yourself up.</p> <h2>Reflect and Review</h2> <p>So now that you have a sense of perspective, acknowledge if there is anything you can or should learn from the experience. Be wary of falling back into the hole of self-doubt or blame. But if there's anything you can learn from this, then the experience has been worthwhile in its own way.</p> <p>Hindsight, of course, is 20/20, and this isn't an exercise in wishful thinking. Ask yourself if, with the knowledge you had at the time, you could have taken a different course. If you were turned down for a bank loan, for example, could you have presented your case differently, or understood the assessment criteria better? Could you have improved your credit file or chosen a different bank to suit your circumstances? You cannot change the outcome, but you can turn regret into a life lesson instead.</p> <h2>Move Forward With a New Challenge</h2> <p>To reach the acceptance stage of the change curve takes time, and requires you to shift your focus from what has happened to what will happen. In other words, you need to get back on the horse.</p> <p>Whether you can pick up the same challenge and try a different angle, or find a new goal to pursue, will depend on the circumstances. If you've been rejected from a particular job, for example, then reapplying to the same role is probably futile. But reminding yourself of what you were looking for more broadly, before restarting your search elsewhere is the perfect antidote to rejection.</p> <p>If you've had a financial setback, then it might be time to rethink and set some entirely new money goals. What's crucial is having a meaningful target to shoot for, to stop yourself from slipping back in your adjustment process, and dwelling for too long on a rejection that has long passed. And this is where you have the possibility to not only recover from rejection, but to bounce back stronger than ever. Set a truly impactful goal, and use the pendulum effect as you swing from pent up frustration into full-on goal oriented action.</p> <p>Rejection should be redirection, not defeat.</p> <p><em>What's your top tip for overcoming rejection and bouncing back stronger than ever? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">6 Things You Must Do After the Interview to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting career confidence drive first impression Job Interview job rejection job search rejection Mon, 16 May 2016 09:00:05 +0000 Claire Millard 1709581 at http://www.wisebread.com Flashback Friday: 68 Best Ways to Make Money That Are Actually Fun http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-68-best-ways-to-make-money-that-are-actually-fun <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/flashback-friday-68-best-ways-to-make-money-that-are-actually-fun" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_outside_photographer_000025506033.jpg" alt="Woman making money and actually having fun" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most people rarely have fun during their workday. And that's because you're there to work, not play. But with the gig economy going full steam ahead, folks young and old are finding ways to make money by doing things they enjoy. Besides, if you thoroughly enjoy your work, it won't feel like work. You'll be more interested in taking on similar projects, and you'll make more money as a result. You might even get to a point where you can turn your fun side job into a full-time career. Not bad, right?</p> <p>Here are 68 coolest ways to make extra money that won't feel like work at all.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/woman_working_from_home_000025337892.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-websites-that-will-pay-you-to-write-for-them?ref=fbf">22 Websites That Will Pay You to Write for Them</a> &mdash; If you spend your free time writing stories and poetry, why not make a little money at it? Tons of websites and brands are looking for digital content creators, and these 22 sites are a fantastic place to start.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-great-side-jobs-for-book-lovers?ref=fbf">6 Great Side Jobs for Book Lovers</a> &mdash; If you prefer the company of books to people, these side gigs are perfect for you. That's right, your love of literature will help you bring home the bucks! Not bad, right?</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/iStock_000057673262_Large.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-great-side-jobs-for-outdoorsy-types?ref=fbf">12 Great Side Jobs for Outdoorsy Types</a> &mdash; Being trapped inside behind a desk sounds like a nightmare, yes? Well, there's no need to be stuck indoors all day when you could be making extra cash while spending your days in the great outdoors.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-paid-to-watch-your-favorite-tv-show-live?ref=fbf">Get Paid to Watch Your Favorite TV Show Live</a> &mdash; Yep, that's right. You can actually make money by watching TV. Being paid to be an audience member at a live show in cash, prizes, and free food isn't a bad way to earn a buck. And it certainly won't feel like work.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-places-besides-etsy-to-sell-your-handmade-goods?ref=fbf">20 Places Besides Etsy to Sell Your Handmade Goods</a> &mdash; If your hobbies include arts and crafts, you might want to consider selling them online. Your creative projects deserve more than to collect dust on a shelf. Sell them on etsy or any of these 20 sites and you might develop a booming little side hustle.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/iStock_000024530979_Large.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-400-a-week-as-a-pet-sitter?ref=fbf">How to Make $400+ a Week as a Pet Sitter</a> &mdash; Believe it or not, you can make a solid income from walking dogs, and hanging out at other people's homes with their pets. You will obviously need to care for their pets and keep things tidy, but it's not a bad way to earn extra money, especially if you're an animal lover.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-make-extra-money-using-social-media?ref=fbf">6 Ways to Make Extra Money Using Social Media</a> &mdash; If you're a social media maven and have accrued a large mass of followers on your own, here are six brilliant ways to make some cash from your likes and shares. Becoming a brand ambassador or influencer can land you a load of free stuff and potentially a decent chunk of change. Cha-ching!</p> <p><em>What are some other fun side jobs? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/chrissa-hardy">Chrissa Hardy</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-68-best-ways-to-make-money-that-are-actually-fun">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-summer-side-jobs-for-new-grads">6 Smart Summer Side Jobs for New Grads</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-side-jobs-for-people-who-are-good-with-money">6 Side Jobs for People Who Are Good With Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-can-earn-more-money-heres-how">You CAN Earn More Money — Here&#039;s How</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/day-job-or-freelance-which-is-right-for-you">Day Job or Freelance: Which Is Right for You?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Extra Income Job Hunting easy jobs extra income fbf flashback friday fun jobs job search jobs make money side hustles side jobs Fri, 13 May 2016 10:00:10 +0000 Chrissa Hardy 1708887 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000061725250_Large.jpg" alt="staying calm to ace her job interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Next time you have a job interview, take a few deep breaths before walking in. Research shows that anxious candidates perform at a lower level in interviews than their relaxed peers. And not only are you stressed to the point of distraction about the interview, but the simple fact you're nervous &mdash; and probably showing it with sweaty palms and jittery energy &mdash; might mean that things won't work out for you, creating the worst sort of vicious circle.</p> <p>Don't let your interview nerves sabotage your chances. Use these tips to make sure you get the big break you deserve &mdash; and give interview anxiety the boot.</p> <h2>1. Recognize the Telltale Signs</h2> <p>The emotional twitchiness that comes with interview nerves quickly translates into physical symptoms, which can undermine your confidence and also indicate your level of anxiety to the interviewer. Whether it's feeling flushed, avoiding eye contact, or fiddling with your clothing, we all have our own personal range of mannerisms that come out when we are feeling the heat.</p> <p>Understanding how you tend to react when anxious is key. If you're not already aware, ask colleagues, family, or friends what they think. Chances are, they've noticed the small nervous ticks you turn to, even if you have not.</p> <p>Interestingly, research shows that speed of speech &mdash; speaking unnaturally slowly &mdash; is the only indicator that both interviewers and candidates agree is a <a href="https://www.springer.com/gp/about-springer/media/springer-select/interview-blues---anxious--slow-talkers-often-do-not-get-the-job-/55382?token=prtst0416p">telltale sign of nerves</a>. All other habits tend to be a personal cocktail of small things that vary among individuals. So if you're facing an interview and not sure where to start, then practicing pacing your speech in answers can help you overcome this most common of giveaways.</p> <h2>2. Harness the Jitters</h2> <p>Feeling nervous, to a certain extent, is actually a massive advantage to you. As long as your anxieties don't become so severe they're paralyzing, you can use the nervous energy to focus on preparation for your big day.</p> <h2>3. Do Your Research</h2> <p>If you already have an interview lined up, find out how many interviewers there will be, and whether there will be any pre-work or exercises to complete on the day. If you can find out the interviewer's name, then Google them. Knowledge is always power. Learn all you can about the company, including what others in the same field &mdash; industry insiders and the trade press &mdash; think of the business, for a balanced view. Simply following the right people on Twitter will glean you a whole lot of information that might come in handy.</p> <h2>4. Plan Your Answers</h2> <p>Learn how to answer some of the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">most common interview questions</a>, to make sure you're feeling confident. The STAR technique is useful for planning out answers to <a href="http://theinterviewguys.com/behavioral-interview-questions-and-answers-101/">behavioral questions</a>, as it forces you to think of the Situation, Task, Actions, and Results of any given example you might choose. Draft a list of the questions you might predict, and sketch out answers, including the relevant examples you might share. And plan how you might phrase any less-than-perfect experiences you've had along the way.</p> <h2>5. Practice!</h2> <p>You have your answers scoped out, now you just need to get them into your head. Try posting the key questions and your possible answers in places you will see them often. Think about the inside of your fridge door, or the bathroom mirror. Then start using your down time to run through your answers. Do them in your head if you have to, but out loud is far better. If you're in the shower, or in your car, talk an answer through.</p> <h2>6. Keep a Sense of Perspective</h2> <p>And finally, cut yourself a break. Everyone sits in an interview <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-scary-thoughts-everyone-has-during-a-job-interview">thinking scary thoughts</a>. Pretty much everyone has interview nerves, and learning to cope is a useful skill that pays dividends outside of the interview room, too. Ask yourself: <em>What is the worst that can happen?</em> And consider whether anything that comes to pass today will still feel important in 10 years time, to get your fears in perspective. Most importantly, take a deep breath, and keep smiling. You'll knock 'em dead!</p> <p><em>How do you get over your interview jitters? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks Job Hunting calm your nerves interview jitters Job Interview job search nerves nervous new job Thu, 12 May 2016 09:30:24 +0000 Claire Millard 1708049 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Smart Summer Side Jobs for New Grads http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-summer-side-jobs-for-new-grads <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-smart-summer-side-jobs-for-new-grads" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000092438829_Large.jpg" alt="bartending is a great summer job for a grad" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>With a high school diploma in hand, you probably feel like the world is yours. And hey &mdash; you should! But you've still got to pay to play. It's a long, hot summer that lies between graduation and dorm room move-in day, and all the camping trips, summer concerts, and ice cream cones you'll want to enjoy during that time don't come free of charge. Someone's gotta pay for all that revelrie. That's where the trusty part-time job comes in. And, if you're lucky, you'll land a gig you can keep doing part-time once school begins. Here's a bunch of smart summer side gigs for new grads. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-great-side-jobs-for-outdoorsy-types?ref=seealso">12 Great Side Jobs for Outdoorsy Types</a>)</p> <h2>1. Score a Paid Internship</h2> <p>You can kill two birds with one stone in the side job department. Land a paid internship in your desired field to make money now and earn experience for your future. Whether it's engineering (inquire with the engineering and tech companies in your area), teaching (search for opportunities with summer schools and camps), or journalism (look for a gig at your local newspaper), there's probably an internship, apprenticeship, or regular part-time job out there that will pay you to get a head start on your career.</p> <p>If you don't find any advertised gigs that appeal to you, utilize your go-getter attitude and call some local businesses that do work that you find appealing. Sometimes the best jobs are the ones we create for ourselves.</p> <h2>2. Make Money Tutoring</h2> <p>Fresh out of calculus, you're a prime candidate to prime the incoming senior class, especially those who are struggling with Pythagorean theorem basics. Or maybe you're a wiz at essay composition with the patience and creativity to help students who are looking to spruce up their college admittance essays. Whatever your academic strong suit, use it to bring in a little extra cash while aiding the scholastic pursuits of others.</p> <p>And if you're not comfortable teaching academics, don't think you can't make money teaching skills you <em>are</em> comfortable sharing, such as computer word processing, social media basics, or a musical instrument. Lots of kids (and adults) need help in these areas. In addition to working face-to-face with students in your area, you can also tap into the deeper pool of students-in-need-of-tutoring online. Check out <a href="http://student-tutor.com/online-tutoring-jobs/">Student-Tutor</a> and <a href="http://www.tutor.com/apply">Tutor.com</a> to get started. The going rate for a private tutor falls around $15 and $20, depending on your age and experience level.</p> <h2>3. Cash In on the Summer Festival Circuit</h2> <p>Summer brings a flurry of fairs, markets, outdoor theatre, and concerts to the neighborhood, and all of these activities need temporary employees to keep things running smoothly. From ticket salespersons to parking lot attendants, there are a slew of jobs available, and many of them come with perks such as ticket discounts or free entry to these events. Keep your eye on the local paper or contact event organizers and concert venues directly to inquire about part-time job opportunities.</p> <h2>4. Master the Art of Bartending</h2> <p>Bartending means big tips and &mdash; bonus &mdash; it's a gig that most often leaves you with your days wide open for sunbathing and river tubing, or however you choose to spend your final days before college. And if you need one more good reason why it's smart to learn the art of pouring the perfect cocktail: Time and time again, no matter where you wander in life, you can take up a bartending gig when you're in need of fast cash. Like when you land your first full-time job, but want to pay off those student loans faster than your salary allows. When you get laid off from that full-time job and need some time to calculate the next step in your career. Or when you decide to up and move to Paris for a year and you need to fund your new diet of fine wine and cheese.</p> <p>To get started, find a small, locally owned bar that's willing to show you the ropes. The average hourly <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Bartender/Hourly_Rate">pay for a starting bartender</a> falls around $16 per hour, including tips. Note that in some U.S. states you must be 21 or older to be a bartender &mdash; but in most states, 18 is old enough. Check with your local authorities.</p> <h2>5. Profit Off of Wedding Season</h2> <p>The American <a href="http://www.ibisworld.com/industry/default.aspx?indid=2008">wedding industry</a> is worth $60 billion and employs more than 900,000 people. Why not cash in on nuptial mania by picking up a part-time gig with a caterer, make-up artist, florist, photographer, or outdoor lighting company? Bonus: June is one of the most popular months to say &quot;I do,&quot; thanks to the delightful early summer weather. Just in time for the post-graduation grind.</p> <h2>6. Try Your Hand at Landscaping</h2> <p>Sweet summertime. It's a season to be spent out on the lawn grilling up dinner for the family, basking in the sun, or playing a game of kickball with the neighbors. Of course, trim, green lawns and nicely sculpted hedges don't appear out of thin air. And many folks are willing to pay a sizeable wage to avoid doing all that mowing, watering, and planting themselves. That's where you come in. Join a landscaping business or score your own clients by posting fliers and Facebook posts advertising your services.</p> <p><em>What are some other smart side jobs for new grads? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-summer-side-jobs-for-new-grads">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-make-an-extra-1000-this-summer">9 Ways to Make an Extra $1,000 This Summer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-68-best-ways-to-make-money-that-are-actually-fun">Flashback Friday: 68 Best Ways to Make Money That Are Actually Fun</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/day-job-or-freelance-which-is-right-for-you">Day Job or Freelance: Which Is Right for You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-great-retirement-jobs">6 Great Retirement Jobs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-money-as-a-chat-or-forum-moderator">How to Make Money as a Chat or Forum Moderator</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Extra Income Job Hunting extra money graduation job search new grads real world side gigs side jobs summer jobs Wed, 11 May 2016 09:30:30 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1707437 at http://www.wisebread.com Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000020079119_Large.jpg" alt="using guerrilla tactics to land a job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Guerrilla job hunting means: adopting unconventional tactics to land the job of your dreams. This method hits the headlines every now and again. And occasionally, we hear about a stroke of brilliance and a deserving candidate landing the job. But all too often, these stories are about job seekers who go to enormous lengths to catch the eye of a prospective employer, only to have it backfire horribly.</p> <p>Did you hear about the one where the candidate back-flipped into the interview room? Or where she arrived armed with items purchased from the interviewer's Amazon wishlist? Those tales did not have happy endings. But even if your usual approach is a little more low key, you can still use some guerrilla skills without needing to hire a billboard to advertise yourself, or tattoo your resume on your forehead.</p> <p>Here's how to make this job seeking approach actually work for you, without making a total fool of yourself. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked?ref=seealso">6 Extreme Interview Tactics That Worked</a>)</p> <h2>Make Yourself Stand Out</h2> <p>Recruiting managers might receive hundreds of applications for any single position advertised. Even with the most rigorous screening process in place, resume number 357 has to be pretty special to stand out. Some job seekers have gone to great lengths to make sure their applications memorable, including one famous tale of a job hunter sending a note asking for a coffee meeting, inside a coffee cup, using a FedEx tracking number. Monitoring the delivery notes online, she was able to see the exact moment it was received and signed for, and placed a call immediately to follow up. But don't panic. You don't need to do anything so extreme to make sure you get noticed.</p> <p>Make sure all the basics are covered first. Write a tailored resume and cover letter, making your enthusiasm for the role clear. Using a resume template is a great way to create a resume that stands out for the right reasons.</p> <p>Then try this:</p> <ul> <li>Make an effort to find out the name of the individual recruiting, and use it.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If you can start adding value to the business at this early stage, you'll be remembered. Is there a business improvement idea, or some customer insight you can share as part of your application?<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Have an &quot;elevator pitch&quot; summing up your unique abilities, ready to use whenever you get the ear of a potential recruiter.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Gather intelligence. If you send an email application, follow up with a call. Ostensibly this is to check that the email was received, but take the chance while you're on the phone to get any insight into the business that you can.</li> </ul> <h2>Leverage Your Contacts</h2> <p>Once upon a time, &quot;it's not what you know, but who you know&quot; was the embodiment of a system that favored the elite. With the democratization of information resulting from Internet use, this is no longer the case. If don't have contacts who can help you in some way, then it's probably because you're not trying hard enough.</p> <p>First of all, think through your real-life connections. Do you have friends, family, or previous business contacts who might be able to help you? Can they put you in touch with managers at businesses you're interested in applying to, or who you can tap for information and ideas? Even if your direct connections don't work directly at the company in question, they may be partners, suppliers, or contractors, who can still offer valuable insight.</p> <p>Then try this:</p> <ul> <li>If you want to pump connections for ideas, ask to meet for a coffee. An informational interview sounds too formal and demanding.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Follow the right people: businesses, recruiters, industry insiders, and the trade press, on social media. The knowledge you gain can be game-changing. For example, if you learn about an organization's expansion plans, reach out directly even before they start to officially recruit, to get ahead of the game.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>A referral opens doors. If you have an inside contact, ask them to send your resume directly to the recruiter with a recommendation.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If you have the nerve, call the CEO (or another senior manager) directly. Ask them where you should address your application. And when you do send in your resume you can legitimately say, &quot;the CEO recommended I apply to you directly.&quot; It's cheeky, but this implied recommendation has been known to work.</li> </ul> <h2>Follow Up</h2> <p>Recruiting managers are only human. There's research to show that if you've scored an interview, you're more likely to be selected if you are the first or last person seen, as memories are sharper, and the recruiter's mood is perhaps more forgiving. You can't necessarily dictate the order in which your interview falls, but you can increase your chances of being remembered with a polite follow-up note after an interview. Failing to follow up is a common <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">complaint of recruiting managers</a>, so don't miss the chance to do so.</p> <p>Try this:</p> <ul> <li>Handwritten notes, in more traditional businesses, are preferred. In more modern or tech-focused organizations, an email is fine. Include a link to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired">your LinkedIn profile</a>, and you'll be able to see if the reader clicks through to check you out.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Thank the interviewer for their time, and reiterate your interest in the role in authentic terms. If something came up in the conversation that impressed you about the business, then say so.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Refer to a point of connection. If you mentioned an interesting article or book during your conversation, pass over the link in your message.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If you felt you did not get across some skills, or answers as well as you could have, this is a chance to elaborate. The interviewers are likely to be flattered that you're still thinking of them after the meeting.</li> </ul> <p>Traditionally, a job search follows a regular pattern: find a relevant role advertised, apply, interview, and if all goes well, receive an offer. These days, finding a job is a more fluid process. Many roles are not even openly advertised, putting the ball firmly in the job seekers' court. Use your intuition, employ some of these tactics, and you will stand out for the right reasons. No backflips required.</p> <p><em>What tactics have you tried to get a job? Did they work for you? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">How to Ace Your Next Coffee Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting interview etiquette job application Job Interview job interview questions job search resume unemployed Thu, 05 May 2016 09:30:26 +0000 Claire Millard 1703709 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Questions a Potential Employer Cannot Ask You http://www.wisebread.com/7-questions-a-potential-employer-cannot-ask-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-questions-a-potential-employer-cannot-ask-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_job_interview_000061752264.jpg" alt="Woman being asked questions a potential employer cannot ask" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's taking U.S. companies longer and longer to hire new employees. In June 2014, it took an <a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/companies-are-taking-longer-to-hire-1409612937">average of 24.9 work days</a> for employers to fill vacant positions. The average hiring time for companies with 5,000 or more employees is even longer at 58.1 work days.</p> <p>In the rush to fill vacancies faster, some employers are making some bad judgment calls. According to a 2014 poll conducted by Harris Poll, one in five U.S. employers has unknowingly asked an interview question that ran afoul of the law. Here are seven questions a prospective employer cannot ask you during an interview.</p> <h2>1. What Is Your Religious Affiliation?</h2> <p>Being concerned about whether or not you can meet the required work schedule for a position, some employers go the wrong way about finding out about your availability. While the <a href="http://finduslaw.com/civil-rights-act-1964-cra-title-vii-equal-employment-opportunities-42-us-code-chapter-21#3">Title VII Equal Employment Opportunities chapter</a> of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 doesn't provide a specific list of questions that &quot;thou shalt not ask,&quot; it certainly provides clear guidelines as to what is off the negotiation table. So, it is illegal for an employer to ask you about your religion. While an employer can legally ask you if you can work on a required work schedule or select from a choice of work days, he can't inquire about your willingness to work any particular religious holiday.</p> <h2>2. Are You Pregnant?</h2> <p>Before hiring you, an employer can't ask you if you're pregnant, plan to have kids, or plan to have more kids. Any of these matters can directly or indirectly result in limitation of a job opportunity in any way, so that's why the Civil Rights Act takes them off the table as well. After hiring you, your employer or HR department rep can inquire on your status for qualified reasons, such as health insurance, retirement accounts, or tax withholding.</p> <h2>3. What Is Your Political Affiliation?</h2> <p>With the U.S. presidential election coming up in November, some interviewers may drop this one on you. Under the <a href="https://archive.opm.gov/biographyofanideal/PU_CSreform.htm">Civil Service Reform Act of 1978</a>, federal employers are prohibited from asking political party preference questions of federal employees and job applicants. This is to guarantee that all employees and job applicants receive fair and equitable treatment in all aspects of personnel management without regard to political affiliation.</p> <p>While there are no federal laws that prohibit employers in the private sector from asking about political affiliation, they should refrain from asking such questions anyway. Some states, including Mississippi and the District of Columbia, have specific <a href="http://www.ncsl.org/research/labor-and-employment/discrimination-employment.aspx">laws on employment-related discrimination</a> that include political affiliation.</p> <h2>4. What Is Your Nationality?</h2> <p>Immigration is one of the key issues being discussed by candidates from both parties of this election. While an employer has every right to check that you can legally work for them, they can't ask any questions regarding your nationality.</p> <p>During a prospective job interview, it's illegal to inquire where you were born, whether you were born a U.S. citizen or naturalized, your national origin, and what is your first language. Only when it's relevant to the job can you be asked about your language proficiency. After employment, you can be asked to submit a birth certificate, proof of U.S. citizenship, or other proof of the legal right to work in the U.S.</p> <h2>5. How Old Are You?</h2> <p>The <a href="https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/statutes/adea.cfm">Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967</a> protects job applicants who are age 40 and older against ageism, which is discrimination against individuals on the basis of their age. Any sneaky questions to try identifying persons between 40 and 60 years are illegal.</p> <p>For those age 18 and over, some state employment laws, including those from Oregon, provide some protection with a few exceptions. Still, it's legal to inquire before hiring if you could furnish proof of age if hired, and to request such proof after hiring.</p> <h2>6. Are You Disabled?</h2> <p>The <a href="https://www.disability.gov/rehabilitation-act-1973/">Rehabilitation Act of 1973</a> prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in all types of federal employment. Since 1990, <a href="https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/fs-ada.cfm">Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act</a> (ADA) prohibits private employers, state and local governments, employment agencies, and labor unions from discriminating against qualified individuals with disabilities in all job application and employment processes.</p> <p>The definition of disabilities is quite extensive. For example, an employer can't legally ask you whether or not you socially drink. Under the ADA, a recovering alcoholic is protected and doesn't have to disclose any disability information before landing an official job offer.</p> <h2>7. What is Your Credit Rating?</h2> <p>You may have heard that your credit history may affect your employment options. However, there are limitations for employers to use credit information in employment decisions.</p> <p>First, the <a href="https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/pdf-0096-fair-credit-reporting-act.pdf">Fair Credit Reporting Act</a> outlines that employers require your written consent to get access to your credit report. The one exception is the trucking industry. Your potential employer must have a valid reason to request for your credit data and she can't disqualify you from employment unless the data directly affects your ability to perform the position you're interviewing for. In the event that she denies you employment, she must release the credit report to you and provide an explanation.</p> <p>Second, <a href="http://www.ncsl.org/research/financial-services-and-commerce/use-of-credit-info-in-employ-2013-legis.aspx">10 states</a>, including California, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington, have enacted legislation that bans employers from using credit information in employment decisions. If you're seeking employment in one of those states, potential employers <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-questions-you-never-have-to-answer">can't ask for your credit history or score</a>.</p> <p><em>What are other questions that a prospective employer can't ask you? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-questions-a-potential-employer-cannot-ask-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-you-should-ask-at-every-job-interview">5 Questions You Should Ask at Every Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/weird-job-interview-questions-and-how-to-answer-them">Weird Job Interview Questions (and How to Answer Them)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-interviewers-really-want-to-know-when-they-ask-these-questions">10 Things Interviewers Really Want to Know When They Ask These Questions</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting boss harassment interview questions off limits personal questions potential employer questions Wed, 04 May 2016 10:00:08 +0000 Damian Davila 1700128 at http://www.wisebread.com