Job Hunting http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/7800/all en-US Here's How Your Credit Score Affects Your Job Search http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-your-credit-score-affects-your-job-search <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/heres-how-your-credit-score-affects-your-job-search" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/000083852417.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If your FICO credit score is weak, you probably already know that this low score might keep you from qualifying for a mortgage loan, auto financing, or a new credit card. But can a low credit score keep you from landing your dream job?</p> <p>The answer is a bit complicated.</p> <p>Many people believe that employers check the three-digit credit scores of job applicants. But in reality, employers are forbidden from pulling your credit scores. (Yes, <em>scores</em>. You actually have three FICO credit scores, one from each of the three national credit bureaus &mdash; TransUnion, Experian, and Equifax.) What they <em>can</em> study is what is known as an employment screening report.</p> <h2>The Employment Credit Report</h2> <p>An employment screening is a version of the three credit reports that TransUnion, Experian, and Equifax maintain on you.</p> <p>Experian's employment credit report, for instance, includes public record information such as bankruptcies, foreclosures, and liens. It also includes a credit history that shows any late payments that you might have made in the last seven years.</p> <p>But one thing employment credit reports <em>don't</em> include is your three-digit FICO credit score.</p> <p>You can thank the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act for this. This act limits how your credit information can be used. For example, thanks to the act, employers can't even run an employment screening &mdash; with limited exceptions &mdash; without you first providing written consent. If you refuse to provide this consent, prospective employers are forbidden to order any employment credit reports on you, though your refusal might make your potential new bosses think twice about hiring you.</p> <p>If companies don't hire you because of information in your report, they must provide you with a copy of it. You can then review the report for possibly incorrect information. This gives you the chance to correct any mistakes that could cause potential employers to think less of your history with credit. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/whats-a-split-credit-report-and-how-much-is-it-hurting-your-score">What's a Split Credit Report - And How Much Is It Hurting Your Score</a>)</p> <h2>When Employment Credit Reports Can Hurt</h2> <p>Not all employers check the credit of all potential hires. In most cases, employers will only check the credit of potential employees who will be working in a financial capacity or role.</p> <p>For instance, if you are applying for a job as a chief financial officer, accountant, or bookkeeper, your employer might want to make sure that you&rsquo;ve managed your own personal finances properly. The good news is you can take steps to improve your credit history, making your employment credit report more palatable to potential employers. The bad news is that improving your report takes time and discipline.</p> <p>First, those negative marks on your employment credit report will take a long time to fall off. A Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing, for instance, will stay on your report for 10 years, as will a foreclosure. A late credit card payment will remain on your report for seven years.</p> <p>But these financial missteps look less damaging as the years pass. Employers might not place as much weight on a bankruptcy filing that is eight years old, as long as your employment credit report doesn&rsquo;t show any other financial mistakes after that filing.</p> <p>So vow to pay all of your bills on time from now on. You can&rsquo;t make those negative marks disappear prematurely. But you can make sure that your report remains clean from this day forward.</p> <p>And while you're rebuilding your credit reports, take solace in the fact that the use of credit checks for employment is increasingly coming under fire. The Society for Human Resource Management in 2015 reported that 11 states limited employers' use of credit information in hiring decisions. The society also said that 17 additional states were considering legislation that would limit how employers can use credit information.</p> <p>For instance, in Colorado, employers can't use credit information in hiring decisions unless the information is related to the job. In Delaware, most public employers can't check applicants' credit, while in Illinois employers are not allowed to rely on credit information when making hiring, firing, or compensation decisions, with limited exceptions.</p> <p><em>Has your credit negatively impacted a job search?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-your-credit-score-affects-your-job-search">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-things-you-dont-know-about-your-credit-report-but-should">13 Things You Don&#039;t Know About Your Credit Report — But Should</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-why-credit-scores-and-reports-are-not-the-same">Here&#039;s Why Credit Scores and Reports Are Not the Same</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-why-you-shouldnt-freak-out-if-you-miss-a-payment-due-date">Here&#039;s Why You Shouldn&#039;t Freak Out If You Miss a Payment Due Date</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-credit-report-mistakes-that-could-be-costing-you-big">4 Credit Report Mistakes That Could Be Costing You Big</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/save-70000-or-more-with-4-simple-credit-score-boosts">Save $70,000 (or More!) With 4 Simple Credit Score Boosts</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Job Hunting credit report credit score employers employment screening fico Thu, 04 Feb 2016 14:00:03 +0000 Dan Rafter 1649368 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_job_interview_000078187585.jpg" alt="Woman learning what really annoys hiring managers" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You've made it to the interview, and all that's standing between you and your dream job is the hiring manager &mdash; but winning her over may be easier said than done. So what will it take to make her like you? Well, one thing you can do is avoid annoying her. We reached out to several hiring managers who shared their biggest pet peeves on the condition of anonymity.</p> <p>RELATED:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/What-Name-Your-Resume-Cover-Letter-26126164" target="_blank">What to Name Your Résumé and Cover Letter</a></p> <h2>1. When You Don't Understand the Company or Product</h2> <p>There's nothing a hiring manager hates more than wasting time, and you will definitely be seen as a waste of time if you don't understand the company or the product. It'll show that you're not even doing the basic research you need for the interview. Why should they even consider you if you're not putting forward the effort? It'll seem like you don't have any passion for or interest in the company, which is one of the biggest pet peeves of any hiring manager.</p> <h2>2. When You Don't Ask Questions</h2> <p>When you don't ask questions, it shows disinterest and lack of effort. One hiring manager told us, &quot;It makes me feel like they're just looking for any job. Anyone can make up good answers to an interview question, but I want to see how they think and what they care about.&quot; Need some help with this step? Check out some <a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Good-Questions-Ask-During-Interview-33652741">great questions to ask</a> during the interview.</p> <p>RELATED:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Make-My-Resume-Better-38831500" target="_blank">6 Ways to Revamp Your Résumé</a></p> <h2>3. When You Are Too Persistent</h2> <p>Persistence is an admirable trait, but be careful not to go overboard. &quot;A little persistence is good &mdash; I've often given a candidate a second look after a follow-up email,&quot; said one hiring manager. &quot;But emailing multiple times a week, stopping by the company's headquarters, and reaching out to every employee you can find on LinkedIn can seem desperate and annoying, and none of those things will get you hired.&quot;</p> <h2>4. When You Don't Follow Directions</h2> <p>The job listing says to email and not call or maybe that a cover letter is required. Follow those instructions to a T, because if you can't follow simple directions, it's likely that your application will be ignored.</p> <p>RELATED:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Change-Your-Life-Year-26709448" target="_blank">36 Moves to Change Your Life For the Better</a></p> <h2>5. When You Get the Company's Name Wrong in Your Application Materials</h2> <p>You'll be surprised how often candidates mess this up in their applications. If you're sending your résumé to a lot of places, you may accidentally copy and paste the wrong company name. &quot;Nothing gets a cover letter tossed in my trash faster than seeing another publication's name in the 'to' field,&quot; said a hiring manager.</p> <h2>6. When You Don't Include Links For Easy Reference</h2> <p>Hiring managers will appreciate the little details that make the process easier for them. One hiring manager advised, &quot;If you mention your portfolio, a website, or your social media profiles, make it easy for me to view them! I want to read more about you and see what you can do, but I'm not going to spend time digging for it myself if you don't include.&quot;</p> <h2>7. When You Don't Follow Up After an Interview</h2> <p>This seems like an obvious step, but a lot of people don't follow up after an interview. At the very least, said one hiring manager, send a quick one-line thank you, although a thoughtful follow-up referencing something from your discussion is very much preferred. Here is a good&nbsp;<a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Interview-Follow-Up-Email-Template-19179139">template for the follow-up email</a>.</p> <p>RELATED:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Best-Jobs-America-2016-39873247" target="_blank">The 25 Best Jobs in America This Year</a></p> <h2>8. When You Make Up an Answer</h2> <p>You may be startled by an unexpected question, but don't resort to making up an answer. First of all, your interviewer can probably tell, and secondly, she will not be impressed. Take some time to think before crafting your answer, and read these steps on what to do when you're <a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/What-Do-You-Cant-Answer-Interview-Question-33925868">stumped by a question</a>.</p> <h2>9. When You're Too Casual</h2> <p>You may get along with the hiring manager, but remember that you should always still be professional even if the company culture seems casual. &quot;Keep emails professional and always include greetings and sign-offs, not just one-liners sent from your phone, and present yourself as poised and confident but not overly familiar in your interview,&quot; advised one hiring manager.</p> <p><em>Did we miss anything else that annoys hiring managers? Let us know in the comments!</em></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-blog-teaser"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> When heading to a job interview, you want to impress the hiring managers. So make sure to avoid doing these nine things that really annoy them. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p style="text-align:center;"><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com" style="border:none;"><img alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u921/POPSUGARrgb.jpg" style="height:95px; width:300px" /></a></p> <p><em>This is a guest contribution from our friends at </em><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/"><em>POPSUGAR Smart Living</em></a><em>. Check out more useful articles from this partner:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/What-Name-Your-Resume-Cover-Letter-26126164">What to Name Your Résumé and Cover Letter</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Make-My-Resume-Better-38831500">6 Ways to Revamp Your Résumé</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Change-Your-Life-Year-26709448">36 Moves to Change Your Life For the Better</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Best-Jobs-America-2016-39873247">The 25 Best Jobs in America This Year</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/popsugar-smart-living">POPSUGAR Smart Living</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-career-tips-you-wish-you-could-give-your-younger-self">7 Career Tips You Wish You Could Give Your Younger Self</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">6 Things You Must Do After the Interview to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance">4 Best Jobs for Work Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting career tips hiring manager hr job hunting Job Interview job search Fri, 29 Jan 2016 15:00:04 +0000 POPSUGAR Smart Living 1643602 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Entry Level Jobs With Surprisingly High Salaries http://www.wisebread.com/12-entry-level-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-entry-level-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000050586960_Large.jpg" alt="entry level workers with surprisingly high salaries" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Many of us leave school knowing it will take several years to achieve a decent standard of living. There is a ladder to climb, and we all know we have to start on the bottom rung. However, there are some professions that offer hefty paydays the second you enter the field. Here are 12 careers that can pay big bucks from day one.</p> <h2>1. Video Game Designer</h2> <p>For some people, this is a dream job &mdash; working all day on video games, and being paid handsomely to do so. And what's more, a bachelor's or associate's degree is not always required. This is a case of &quot;if you've got it, flaunt it,&quot; and many people these days are already programming their own games at home. The job requires not just aesthetic design capabilities, but also coding, development, and testing skills. This is a combination that is often hard to come by, with most designers having poor coding skills, and vice versa. But for those with the chops, it can pay dividends. An <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Video_Game_Designer/Salary">average entry-level salary of almost $60,000</a> is easily achieved, with the best of the best earning six figure salaries in the very first year.</p> <h2>2. Air Traffic Controller</h2> <p>Make no mistake, the job of an air traffic controller is extremely stressful. In fact, if you do a quick search for &quot;air traffic controller&quot; and either &quot;stress&quot; or &quot;suicide,&quot; you'll be shocked at the results you get back. These professionals literally have hundreds of thousands of lives in their hands every day, and one misstep could result in tragedy.</p> <p>This, of course, is why it is such a high paying job, with an&nbsp;<a href="http://industry-salaries.careertrends.com/l/22593/Air-Traffic-Controllers-in-Professional-Scientific-and-Technical-Services">entry level salary above $64,000</a>. Duties include: coordination of arriving and departing aircrafts, authorizing flight path changes, providing up-to-the-minute weather updates, and dealing with emergencies. After a few years, the salary can climb to $120,000 or more. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-jobs-with-high-earnings-and-growth?ref=seealso">11 Jobs With High Earnings and Growth</a>)</p> <h2>3. Nurse Midwife</h2> <p>For those with a compassionate nature &mdash; who have no problem seeing blood &mdash; the job of a nurse midwife can be very lucrative. Working closely with OB/GYN professionals, the nurse midwife will assist in all stages of pregnancy, including labor and delivery, and postpartum care. Nurse midwives are in greater demand due to the rise in parents who want a more natural delivery, and who also want someone on hand that they share a special, trusting bond with. The position requires a post-graduate degree in nurse midwifery, but as the starting salary is so high (<a href="http://industry-salaries.careertrends.com/l/119712/Nurse-Midwives-in-Colleges-Universities-and-Professional-Schools">over $80,000 to start</a>), the education loans can be paid down relatively quickly. A six figure salary within a few years is very achievable.</p> <h2>4. Computer Hardware Engineer</h2> <p>If you have a way with technology, a mind for mathematics, and can see yourself working with circuit boards and computer systems, this is the job for you. As a computer engineer, your primary responsibilities include: designing and developing computer hardware and systems, creating circuit boards and computer chips, and supervising the manufacturing and production of parts. It's a complex job that requires a degree, but it's well worth it. With a <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Computer_Hardware_Engineer/Salary/cf623d09/Entry-Level">starting salary of around $65,000</a>, rising to $100,000 in just a few years, this is a job that blazes the technological trail. And as the demand for computer technology is only going to increase, it's a stable job that will let you live a very comfortable lifestyle.</p> <h2>5. Podiatrist</h2> <p>How much do you like feet? For many, it's not the most attractive part of the anatomy, but the lure of a big payday can change that opinion. Few professions offer six figure salaries for newbies, but podiatry is one of them, giving entry-level professionals&nbsp;<a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Podiatrist/Salary/05035fa8/Entry-Level">over $100,000 per year</a>.&nbsp;It's hard work, and can often have demanding hours, with daily duties that include diagnosing and treating foot diseases, injuries, and deformities, a well as performing complex surgeries. More money can be earned by specializing in sports injuries, especially for major sporting teams. But of course, a doctorate is required to enter the field, and that can take many years to acquire.</p> <h2>6. Dentist</h2> <p>If feet aren't your thing, maybe you could consider dentistry. As Payscale points out, not only is the entry-level salary very high, but bonuses and benefits can top that first year salary out at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Dentist/Salary/add53175/Entry-Level">almost $180,000 per year</a>. For most of us, that's an income we one day dream of having. Just like any other medical profession, this is not a career you can just fall into. It takes years of training, and a bachelor's degree is required before admittance to dental school. Once there, it takes another four years to become certified and licensed, which requires both a written and practical examination. But, for those willing to put in the hard work, the benefits are extraordinary.</p> <h2>7. Psychiatrist</h2> <p>You're no-doubt familiar with the names Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, or Hermann Rorschach. These were pioneers in the field of psychiatry, which has become a multi-billion dollar business today. Payscale data shows that not only are&nbsp;<a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Psychiatrist/Salary/3585960b/Entry-Level">psychiatrists handsomely paid</a> in the first year of practice (starting over $80,000), but more professionals are women than men (53% to 47%). The steps to becoming a certified psychiatrist are long and arduous, however. Not only do aspiring psychiatrists need to have a bachelor's degree, but they then need to take a medical college admissions test, complete a doctorate, complete a residency, and then get licenses and certification.</p> <h2>8. Actuary</h2> <p>If you are unsure what an actuary does, it can be summed up in one word: risk. Actuaries use skills in mathematics, statistics, and financial theory to study unforeseen events. As you can imagine, this is a skill that is highly prized by insurance and pension companies, who base their business models on the unforeseen. Obviously, the profession requires a proficiency in mathematics, statistics, and analytical skills. Good actuaries also require high technical abilities, good communication and presentation skills, and a &quot;studious nature.&quot; <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Actuary/Salary">Starting salaries for actuaries</a> range from $50,000&ndash;$60,000.</p> <h2>9. Landscape Architect</h2> <p>For those with a love of the outdoors, and a passion for creating beautiful scenery, landscape architect is a position well worth looking into. However, this is not a career that can be done simply be having a green thumb and an eye for details. Landscape architects usually have at least a bachelor's degree in this field, and more often than not, a master's degree as well. A good knowledge of geology, urban planning, landscape ecology, and soil science is essential. And these days, proficiency in computer-aided design software is a must. But, it can pay off. First year salaries&nbsp;<a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Landscape_Architect/Salary/607a0502/Entry-Level">average around $45,000</a>,&nbsp;with bonuses and benefits boosting that to almost $60,000. Those with great talent can expect to earn stellar salaries in the coming years, especially if they work with high-end retail outlets, country clubs, or wealthy estates.</p> <h2>10. Pharmacist</h2> <p>The next time you have your prescription filled, take a look at the person in charge behind the counter. It may very well be someone quite young, and yet, they are already earning a significant salary. Pharmacists, on average, <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Pharmacist/Salary/8fe870fa/Entry-Level">earn around $103,000</a>&nbsp;in their first year on the job. Once again though, this kind of high-end salary does not come without sacrifice. Pharmacists require a great deal of training &mdash; typically a bachelor's degree with a focus on organic chemistry and biology &mdash; before entering a four-year &quot;PharmD&quot; program. After that, even more tests are required, as well as a license to practice in a specific state.</p> <h2>11. Market Research Analyst</h2> <p>Advertising agencies, product development companies, and most corporations, find market research analysts invaluable. The job is self-explanatory, with entry-level professionals being expected to study products and services, determine pricing, analyze future trends, increase demand, develop rebate programs, and many other facets of marketing and research. A bachelor's degree in this subject, or a closely related field, is required. It can be a very satisfying job for those with a penchant for crunching numbers, analyzing patterns, and working with focus groups. And of course, the starting salary,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Market_Research_Analyst/Salary/794299b9/Entry-Level">just shy of $50,000</a>, is not to be scoffed at.</p> <h2>12. Pharmaceutical Sales Representative</h2> <p>Although a bachelor's degree in sales or marketing is beneficial in this field, it's not essential. What is, however, is salesmanship, charisma, assertiveness, and the ability to close a sale. In fact, prior evidence of great sales in another industry is often all that is needed, from cars and homes, to food, and even farming supplies. Pharma sales reps often have to travel a great deal, selling products to customers around the country. They need a good head for technical details, exceptional interpersonal skills, and a way with numbers. With this, and on-the-job training, pharma sales reps can easily&nbsp;<a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Entry-Level_Sales_Representative,_Pharmaceuticals/Salary">earn over $50,000</a>&nbsp;in their first year alone, with many earning beyond $85,000.</p> <p><em>Did we miss any other high paying entry level jobs on this list? Share with us in the comments below!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-entry-level-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">6 Things You Must Do After the Interview to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting entry level entry level jobs first job job search salary Wed, 20 Jan 2016 12:00:03 +0000 Paul Michael 1639402 at http://www.wisebread.com 15 Great Jobs That Don't Pay Much http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000019714598_Large.jpg" alt="A DJ is a great job that doesn&#039;t pay much" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Can money buy happiness? Should you spend years in a job you don't like? Or, are you better off working at a job you really love, even if you don't make a pile of money? If you are an average American, you'll work for for 90,000 hours over your career lifetime. If you have a &quot;happiness in my job is more important&quot; mindset, here are 15 jobs you might really like &mdash; even if they don't pay much. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor?ref=seealso">6 Ways That Job You Hate Keeps You Poor</a>)</p> <h2>1. Cruise Ship Bartender</h2> <p>Right out of school, my high-school classmate, Luci, went to work on a cruise ship. As soon as she was able, she became a bartender for the cruise line. At our 10th reunion, she announced that she was retiring from cruise ship bartending, and moving to Kauai to work a small farm she had purchased. Yes, she had lived frugally, and also saved her tips. It paid off. Today's ship bartenders earn between $2,200&ndash;$3,600 per month (depending on the size of ship and gratuities from passengers).</p> <h2>2. EMT</h2> <p>Every time I read the average hourly wage for EMTs and paramedics &mdash; $31,700 per year, or around $16 an hour &mdash; I'm shocked. How can this be? These folks are brave, strong, quick-witted, personable, and caring. I'll never understand why they don't make more, but I'm extremely glad that there are people who are drawn to this career.</p> <h2>3. Roadie</h2> <p>I always thought being a roadie would be <a href="http://www.yesandyes.org/2013/07/true-story-im-roadie.html">a ridiculously fun job</a> to have &mdash; and from this funny interview, I was right. Sometimes glamorous, sometimes not... but if you abhor sitting behind a desk and love music, maybe it would be a good choice. What does a roadie make? It varies. If the band for whom you are working is enormously popular, that apparently makes a big difference. One source quoted around $200 to $400 per day, but become a successful tour manager, and you may expect to make $1,500 to $2,000 per week.</p> <h2>4. Massage Therapist</h2> <p>While the job outlook for massage therapists is good, and the BLS reports that 2014 median pay was over $37,000 per year. If you have ever seen the movie, <a href="http://amzn.to/202F4q2">Enough Said</a>, you know one of the major drawbacks: dragging a massage table around. That's not a must, though. One of my neighbors has clients who come to her house. Others are employed by chiropractor's offices, physical therapists, spas, cruise ships, etc. I'm told it is a rewarding career, and who doesn't love a good massage? Check with your state's governing board of massage therapists to find accredited programs.</p> <h2>5. Veterinary Assistant</h2> <p>Love animals? At about $11 an hour, you really need to. It's hard work. As it turns out, most pets don't really enjoy having their blood drawn or parts poked. Prepare to get dirty, too. But it is extremely rewarding, since you'll be helping to relieve pain and heal animals. Most of the &quot;help wanted&quot; ads I viewed wanted assistants who had been through an educational program or have a college degree.</p> <h2>6. Dog Groomer</h2> <p>Would you enjoy the challenge of beautifying man's best friend? This career might be for you. Well, you'll probably start out as a dog bather, making $13&ndash;$17. Median pay for a groomer is around $20,000 annually. It's important to note that many grooming-business owners also pay commissions. It's not easy work, but again, if you'd rather spend time with animals than people, it's worth considering.</p> <h2>7. DJ</h2> <p>Got the gift of gab? Are you a natural at mashing up different songs? How about a background in journalism or communications? You might like being a DJ or radio announcer. Sometimes, they also find work as emcees at events, weddings, or at private clubs. The job outlook, sadly, is in decline at the moment; with median pay at $13.50 per hour. But serving as a freelance DJ as a side job could provide a very nice chunk of change each month. And the DJs I've followed for years on the radio seem to be very happy people who love their jobs. Test the waters using DJ software (there are many free options available) and see if this is worth exploring.</p> <h2>8. Reporter</h2> <p>A friend of mine works for a news agency. The pay is low &mdash; median pay is about $37,000 &mdash; and the hours are long. The pace is very fast, she works on deadlines, and often has to wear all the hats. The plus side is that the job is rarely boring. To get hired, you usually need a journalism or communications degree and an internship.</p> <h2>9. Private Investigator</h2> <p>I worked part-time for a P.I. for several years. As a retired policeman, he knew a remarkable number of people, and where to find a lot of the unsavory ones. It wasn't glamorous. Most of his bread-and-butter work involved serving legal papers and tracking people down. The work was on a flat-fee basis, $25 per service, or $50 per hour for research. However, he could set his own hours, take only the work he wanted, not be cooped up behind a desk, and he had a nice additional income for retirement.</p> <h2>10. Flight Attendant</h2> <p>I admit, this job doesn't have the glamour it once had. But the opportunity to travel is still intriguing. Getting a flight attendant position doesn't happen quickly, though &mdash; new flight attendants have to pay their dues before they get to go see the world. Average pay is over $42,000 a year. Job growth is slow, and it can be a challenge to get hired. Being able to speak a second language is a plus. However, according to the BLS, job prospects are better for those with college educations.</p> <h2>11. Model</h2> <p>Nice work, if you can get it. The competition is fierce. Very few make it to the &quot;supermodel&quot; level, but there is work, if you are prepared to be creative. Joining a website such as Model Mayhem is a good start. Photographers often want to build their portfolios and will exchange good photos for modeling work. Sometimes, budding fashion designers will trade clothes for modeling time. If a model is versatile, there are more possibilities out there. Initially, look for low pay &mdash; as low as $10 an hour &mdash; but if a model catches on and has a good work ethic, the day rate is usually about $100 to $400. Yeah, not great. &quot;Fit&quot; models make more, but they need to be very strict about maintaining their size. So why do it? Well, it's fun, and glamorous.</p> <h2>12. Tour Guide</h2> <p>Enjoy meeting people? Do you like to talk and answer questions? Maybe you'd be a good tour guide. In my town, there are museum tour guides, historical town tours, tours to national parks, and all-day driving tours. Often, it will help if you speak a second language, particularly the one with the greatest influx of tourists. You need to have a friendly, yet &quot;take-charge&quot; personality, be quick on your feet, and be gregarious. Pay ranges from $11 to almost $17 per hour.</p> <h2>13. Professional House-Sitter</h2> <p>We employ a wonderful lady to house and pet-sit when we go away, and we have to book her months in advance because she's<em> that good</em>. We pay a daily rate, plus tip. You can find house-sitters on TrustedHousesitters, or similar sites. If you are considering going into the business, because getting paid to hang out in someone's home sounds like a stellar gig, you should look into getting bonded, and you'll need impeccable references. Being able to watch pets is a bonus.</p> <h2>14. Brewmaster</h2> <p>If you love beer, why not become a brewmaster? <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Brewmaster/Salary">Pay is pretty good</a> for brewmasters at about $46,000 a year. You might try making beer at home first &mdash; which is fun and rewarding &mdash; then consider working in a pub or brewery. The next step would be taking an official course and getting the proper credentials at a brewing academy.</p> <h2>15. Event Planner</h2> <p>For some, the logistics involved in planning a wedding, a business conference, or meetings are cringe-worthy. Fortunately, there are people who are pleasantly challenged by these logistics and thrive on getting even the smallest details organized. During events, expect to work long, grueling days. But growth in the field of event planning is faster than average; expect to earn over $45,000 annually. A Bachelor's degree is helpful, as is experience working in the field.</p> <p>Note: All data via the <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/">Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook</a>, which is a terrific resource for job searchers and the career-curious.</p> <p><em>Do you have a job you love that doesn't pay very much? What is it? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-entry-level-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries">12 Entry Level Jobs With Surprisingly High Salaries</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting career goals job search new job salary side job Mon, 18 Jan 2016 12:00:03 +0000 Marla Walters 1638731 at http://www.wisebread.com The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_using_laptop_000053433486.jpg" alt="Woman learning the best times of year to start her job search" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>So, you're ready to search for a new job. The good news? One of the best times to job hunt is coming soon.</p> <p>January happens to be one of the best times to begin a job search. As massive jobs site Monster.com said in a recent feature story, winter is the time of year when the greatest number of decision makers are in the office at the same time, because these key people are done with the vacations so many of them take during the winter holidays. And this is important, because these decision makers often work as teams when making hiring choices.</p> <p>At the same time, January is when office work at many companies tends to pick up again after a slowdown in December. Some companies still mostly shut down during the last two weeks of the year. These firms won't be making any hiring decisions around the holidays.</p> <p>Then the best time to get your resume out there would be right after the New Year's holiday, when hiring managers are back at work and no longer thinking of holiday parties, gift-giving, and ski vacations.</p> <p>There's a financial reason for the new hiring, too. Many companies get their new yearly budgets in January. Once they have these in place, they can then make hiring decisions with confidence.</p> <h2>The Early Fall Rush</h2> <p>The beginning of the new year isn't the only good time to start a job search. Career advice site Career Sidekick recommends, too, that job hunters send out resumes and cover letters during the early fall, especially in September and October.</p> <p>The holiday season plays a role again. Companies often want to make hiring decisions before the winter holidays and the year-end lull. If you want to catch businesses when they are shifting into hiring mode, the early fall months are a good choice.</p> <p>It's not just that hiring managers don't focus on work during the holiday season. As Career Sidekick writes, it's easier for them to schedule interviews and complete the hiring process during the fall months when they don't have to schedule them between the days off and vacation time that other key managers are taking.</p> <h2>Summer Can Be Rough</h2> <p>There is also one time of year that is a particularly slow period for hiring, and that's summer. Again, this often has to do with the number of vacation days that key managers take. Those managers who don't take time off during the end-of-the-year holidays often do it instead in June, July, or August. This is a particularly busy time for family vacations.</p> <p>This makes it difficult for hiring managers to schedule a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">series of interviews</a> with job candidates who have to earn the approval of several key office personnel. If you're searching for a job in the summer, it might be a while before you actually hear back.</p> <p>There is an exception here, though. Recent college graduates applying for more entry-level positions might find better luck applying for jobs in the summer. That's because hiring managers expect to see these resumes during this time of year.</p> <p>It's also easier to hire recent college graduates because they are usually applying for lower-level jobs. They don't need to meet with as many key decision makers before they are hired. Summer vacations don't play as big a role in these interviews.</p> <h2>Find the Right Time for You</h2> <p>It's important to remember that these are just rough guidelines. The best time to look for a new job is often when you make the decision to take on a new challenge, no matter what time of year it happens to be.</p> <p>And the best time to job-hunting might also be when your life has slowed down enough. If you're in the middle of moving to a new home, if you're planning a wedding, or if you've returned to graduate school, this might not be the best time to hunt for a new job, even if it is early fall or the beginning of a new year.</p> <p>You need the time and energy to run a successful job search. If you're bogged down with too many big responsibilities, it might be best to wait before sending out those resumes, no matter what the calendar says.</p> <p><em>What time of year have you had the most luck in finding jobs? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-6-craziest-things-people-have-done-to-land-a-job">The 6 Craziest Things People Have Done to Land a Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">6 Things You Must Do After the Interview to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-essential-steps-to-take-before-a-job-interview">10 Essential Steps to Take Before a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting job hunt job search new job resume unemployed Tue, 15 Dec 2015 10:00:07 +0000 Dan Rafter 1621148 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways That Job You Hate Keeps You Poor http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_exhausted_work_000063560641.jpg" alt="Woman learning ways the job she hates keeps her poor" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the mid-1990s, I accepted a position at a large consulting firm in suburban Chicago. This was only my second &quot;real&quot; job post-college and I was delighted because this single career move bumped up my salary 20%. I realized my mistake quickly. My very first day on that sprawling corporate campus confirmed the place was a terrible fit. I hated every minute of it... two years worth of minutes, to be exact.</p> <p>Looking back, that job may have made my paychecks a little fatter and put a shine on my resume, but it cost me a lot, too. If you find yourself in a similar situation, it might be time to ask if all that misery is actually costing you money.</p> <p>Here are six ways that job you hate just might be keeping you poor.</p> <h2>1. It Keeps You Busy</h2> <p>Even a job you hate has a way of consuming your day. It's nearly impossible to find time to explore higher paying opportunities, invest in your education, network with other professionals, or properly plan for the future. In the end, what keeps you busy can easily keep you stuck. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-take-a-break-at-work-and-still-look-busy">8 Ways to Take a Break at Work and Still Look Busy</a>)</p> <h2>2. It Stresses You Out</h2> <p>Working at jobs we hate can be particularly stressful and exhausting. We often cope by trying to eliminate all other stressors and pursuing a life of absolute convenience. Forget taking public transit to work; drive and pay to park instead. Forget packing your lunch; dine out. Forget housework and yard work; just hire it done. It all adds up to this cold, hard fact: Stress is expensive. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-cheap-ways-to-beat-stress">13 Cheap Ways to Beat Stress</a>)</p> <h2>3. It Might be Making You Sick</h2> <p>The connection between mental and physical health has been proven time and again. If you're unhappy at work, it affects other parts of your life, including your physical well-being. And (surprise!) being sick is usually bad for your budget.</p> <h2>4. It's a Constant Punishment That Requires a Constant Reward</h2> <p>If you're dragging yourself to a job you hate day after day, you deserve some sort of pay off, right? And the more the job seems like a punishment, the bigger the reward needs to be. A new car, an indulgent vacation, and a bigger house may feel like fair compensation for your efforts. But unchecked, those things can create a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-debt-trap-factors-that-have-led-us-to-our-debt">debt trap</a> that keeps you poor and limits your choices.</p> <h2>5. It Saps Your Motivation</h2> <p>I call it the Who Cares? Syndrome. If you're in a job you hate, it's extremely hard to motivate yourself. Who cares if you get promoted? Who cares if you get a raise? Who cares if you spend too much money? Who cares if you fund your 401K? Without that primary motivator &mdash; being invested in a job you care about and enjoy &mdash; everything else becomes less important. Plans don't get made and all sorts of goals fall by the wayside.</p> <h2>6. It Feeds Your Fear</h2> <p>People stay in jobs they hate for a number of reasons, and I don't want to suggest that everyone has the luxury of choice. But often fear can keep us stuck in negative situations both personally and professionally. Over time, we lose confidence, stop looking for new opportunities, and settle for a life of less. From how we work, to how we love, to how we manage our money &mdash; fear limits our potential.</p> <p>I still remember the afternoon my phone rang with a job offer &mdash; a new job that allowed me to bid a final, enthusiastic farewell to the one I'd detested for two whole years. I think a few joyous expletives were involved... and maybe an air punch. I gave my required two weeks' notice immediately and never looked back. And though there have been the inevitable ups and downs since, moving on enriched my life in more ways than one.</p> <p><em>Have you ever suffered through a job you hated? How did it affect your finances? How did leaving improve things?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-guide-to-getting-a-job-right-out-of-college">Your Guide to Getting a Job Right Out of College</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-can-do-right-now-to-become-more-hirable">10 Things You Can Do Right Now to Become More Hirable</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-your-linkedin-profile-noticed-with-a-few-attention-grabbing-tweaks">Get Your LinkedIn Profile Noticed With a Few Attention-Grabbing Tweaks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview">Using Times New Roman on Your Résumé Is Like Wearing Sweatpants to an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting career mistakes depressing jobs job search money mistakes poor Thu, 03 Dec 2015 18:01:37 +0000 Kentin Waits 1617975 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Best Jobs for Work Life Balance http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mother_working_baby_000048338582.jpg" alt="Woman finding best jobs for work-life balance" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>More and more Americans want better work-life balance. In the U.S., <a href="http://www.ey.com/US/en/About-us/Our-people-and-culture/EY-study-highlights-dual-career-dynamics-in-the-us#.VjqfBOn8uhM">57% of full-time employees</a> indicate that their spouse or partner works 35 hours or more a week, too.</p> <p>However, no other group craves a better work-life balance more than millennials. While 78% of full-time working millennials have a spouse or partner also working full-time, only 47% of full-time working baby boomers and 68% of Gen X experience this scenario. With two full-time working parents, quality couple time, family time and &quot;me time&quot; are becoming more and more scarce.</p> <p>If your employer doesn't sympathize with your desire for a more flexible arrangement, it may be the time to switch jobs. To help you escape the rat race, here are the four best jobs for work-life balance.</p> <h2>1. Data Scientist</h2> <p>According to Glasdoor's 2015 list of <a href="http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/25-jobs-worklife-balance-2015/">best jobs for work-life balance</a>, the role of data scientist provides the best work-life balance. With an average 4.2 rating out of a possible 5.0, data scientist took the top spot in work-life balance across users of the recruiting site over the past year.</p> <p>If you keep on hearing everywhere about the &quot;power of big data,&quot; this is what it's all about. A data scientist uses the power of algorithms to process large amounts of data and use those findings to make recommendations that drive customer engagement and monetization. You'll have to be comfortable working with monster spreadsheets and databases (think millions of rows and several terabytes), develop mad SQL and SAS skills, and keep up with the latest data mining tools and techniques.</p> <p>Companies well-known for providing great perks and flexible schedules, including Facebook and Google, are hiring data scientists. With an average salary of $114,808 (according to Glassdoor), data scientist is one attractive career to look for.</p> <h2>2. Web Developer</h2> <p>U.S. News maintains a <a href="http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/rankings/the-100-best-jobs">list of 100 best jobs</a> in the nation. The list uses seven criteria, including 10-year growth volume, employment rate, and work-life balance, to rank the jobs. While U.S. News gave the dentist occupation the top spot in its list of best jobs, a closer look to the job satisfaction reviews shows that the web developer occupation provides better work-life balance.</p> <p>According to U.S. News, web developers tend to have above average upward mobility, below average stress level, and high flexibility. Interviewed employers indicate that often their web developers <a href="http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/web-developer/reviews">don't have to punch a clock</a>. &quot;We set deadlines, and as long as they get their work done, we're flexible with hours.&quot; two employers said to U.S. News.</p> <p>The median annual salary of a web developer was <a href="http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/web-developer/salary">$63,160 in 2013</a>, with individuals earning between $33,320 and $110,350.</p> <h2>3. Tutor</h2> <p>In a study from Ernst &amp; Young, respondents pointed out that the <a href="http://www.ey.com/US/en/About-us/Our-people-and-culture/EY-study-highlights-people-want-flexibility">option to telecommute</a> (working from another location other than the office or client site) is an important flexibility issue. In the same survey, millennials are more likely to say it's important to be able to telecommute one to two days a week.</p> <p>Tutoring enables individuals looking to telecommute as much as possible to really own their schedule. For example, since 2006 I have been tutoring business professionals to prepare for the GMAT, a standardized admission test used by most MBA programs around the world. I have been able to consistently tutor students first in Mexico and now in the United States. Currently, I work with Kaplan, a test prep company, and I'm able to teach students in person and online on my own schedule. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-3-best-jobs-for-expats-and-travelers">The 3 Best Jobs for Expats and Travelers</a>)</p> <p>With the advent of several online tutoring sites, such as Tutor.com, Skillshare, and Wyzant, you're not limited to your geographic area and can find students across the world. Some sites, such as Tutor.com, require you to commit to tutor at least five hours per week. However, you decide when those hours happen.</p> <p>Having the ability to do their job in any country is key for millennials as 38% of them would make the sacrifice to <a href="http://www.ey.com/US/en/About-us/Our-people-and-culture/EY-study-highlights-dual-career-dynamics-in-the-us#.VkV5zt-rSRu">move a country with better parental leave</a> benefits.</p> <h2>4. Talent Acquisition Specialist</h2> <p>Ranking third on Glassdoor's list, the talent acquisition specialist has a rating of 4.0 out of 5.0 in work-life balance satisfaction. Also known as recruiters or human resources (HR) specialists, talent acquisition specialists are in charge of finding, screening, interviewing, and recommending the best candidates for a job opening. One key requirement for talent acquisition specialists is people skills. If you can't get along with different people in different settings, then this may not be the field for you.</p> <p>While Glassdoor says that the average salary for this position is $63,504, U.S. News puts the <a href="http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/hr-specialist">median salary at $56,850</a>. One of the main advantages of this occupation is stability, given that employment in this field is expected to balloon 15.5% from 2012 to 2022.</p> <p>To some, it may come off as a surprise that respondents to the Glassdoor survey gave such a high rating to the work-life balance satisfaction of this job. However, those critics should keep in mind the following points:</p> <ul> <li>Like web developers, talent acquisition specialists have to meet deadlines and have flexibility as long as they can hit their numbers.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Like tutors, talent acquisition specialists can leverage the web and their cellphone to do the bulk of the work remotely. With cloud-based HR software becoming the industry norm, a recruiter can do her work as long as she has an Internet connection.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Depending on their field of specialization, HR specialists have different hours and hiring seasons. Many recruiters welcome the break of pace and opt to work only during hiring seasons or on a part-time basis.</li> </ul> <p><em>What are other great jobs to achieve better work-life balance?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-guide-to-getting-a-job-right-out-of-college">Your Guide to Getting a Job Right Out of College</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-a-job-learn-the-secret-from-a-bad-movie">How to get a job--learn the secret from a bad movie</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-common-job-hunt-tips-you-should-ignore">8 Common Job-Hunt Tips You Should Ignore</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-depressing-jobs-that-arent-worth-the-money">10 Depressing Jobs That Aren&#039;t Worth the Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting career job hunting job search work life balance Mon, 23 Nov 2015 16:00:32 +0000 Damian Davila 1614975 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_hiding_desk_000052944964.jpg" alt="Woman learning ways to job hunt without getting caught" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Applying for a new job is often a Catch-22: You've got to put yourself out there as a candidate, but you don't want to get caught by your current employer for fear of being prematurely fired. Yes, it's a fine line to walk for career advancement, but you can totally perfect this skill with these nine ways to conduct a stealthy job search.</p> <h2>1. Keep Your Social Media Profiles Current at All Times</h2> <p>If you're active on social media in general, your various profiles are probably up-to-date on the regular. If they're not, and you update them out of the blue, it could raise suspicions, particularly on LinkedIn and if you're connected to coworkers &mdash; which you probably are.</p> <p><a href="http://alexandermannsolutions.com/about-alexander-mann-solutions/our-talent/key-person/ian-cluroe">Ian Cluroe</a>, director of global brand and marketing for Alexander Mann Solutions, warns against this sudden attention to your social media profiles.</p> <p>&quot;Keeping your social profiles up-to-date ensures that you don't raise flags when you're the one actively searching, and enables you to be found by sources who may have an opportunity that you're the perfect person for but you would have otherwise known nothing about because your outdated profile made you impossible to find,&quot; he says.</p> <h2>2. Don't Send Resumes to Blind Ads Online</h2> <p>If you don't know who the recipient of your resume is, do not send it. I repeat, DO NOT SEND IT. You don't know who is on the other end, and serendipity has a way of biting you in the butt for not being careful.</p> <p>&quot;A woman once told me that her coworker responded to a blind ad and then was confronted a short while later by someone in the company from Human Resources,&quot; reveals certified career coach <a href="http://www.calltocareer.com/about/">Cheryl E. Palmer</a>. &quot;The HR professional asked her if she was looking for another job. The woman lied and said no. The HR professional responded, &quot;I got your resume.&quot; It turned out that the job that this woman had unwittingly applied for was at her own company.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Be Cautious When You're Networking</h2> <p>Of course you have to network when you're searching for a new position &mdash; just be smart about it. Be very careful to whom you're telling your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-low-key-jobs-for-people-who-hate-stress">plans to switch jobs</a>, because you never know who you're talking to. As a rule, don't go to networking events at a bar where you're going to have a couple drinks and become less inhibited. That's a recipe for certain disaster.</p> <h2>4. Don't Let Your Attire Give It Away</h2> <p>Here's a prime example of amateur tactics that absolutely raise red flags: When your everyday work attire is chinos and a button-down and you all of a sudden show up to work in a suit and tie. The jig will be up immediately, and you're better than that, bro.</p> <p>&quot;Dressing up more than normal can be a real giveaway that you are interviewing for another position,&quot; says Palmer. &quot;To avoid suspicion, put your interview clothes in your car and change in a discreet location before the interview. It's also a good idea to schedule interview appointments during times when your absence won't raise questions. Taking too much time off from work can signal that you are interviewing at other companies.&quot;</p> <h2>5. Don't Tell Your Coworkers That You're Looking</h2> <p>I'm sure there are coworkers you trust to keep the secret that you're looking for a new job, but my life motto has fared me well so far &mdash; trust no one, and fear everyone. Besides, you don't know what plans they have in mind for their own career advancement. They may view your undercover search as an opportunity to swoop in and take your job right out from under you. And if that happens, you'll kick yourself for being so loose-lipped. Ruthless comes in all shapes, sizes, and smiles.</p> <h2>6. Consider Having an Executive Recruiter on Your Side</h2> <p>If you're afraid of getting caught searching for a job (and you should be), there are ways to ease your anxiety. Hiring an executive recruiter is one such solution, and it won't even cost you. Recruiters are paid by employers, and their fees are usually based on your starting salary. Depending on the type of job you're seeking &mdash; like CEO or VP of Somethingorother &mdash; working with a recruiter is often the only way to go.</p> <p>Zach Brown, a senior sourcing recruiter for David Brown International, details a few of the benefits of using a recruiter.</p> <p>&quot;A skilled recruiter can leverage their network and industry connections to get your resume and portfolio in front of employers in your field that are looking for top talent,&quot; he explains. &quot;Going this route will get you exposure with the right companies without having to post your resume everywhere for all to see. Look for an established recruiter that specializes in your career field and has worked with the types of organizations that you are interested in working for.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Keep Your Search Quiet, Especially on Social Media</h2> <p>As a professional, you should be mindful of what you're posting to social media, in general &mdash; no more drama! &ndash; but you should particularly be conscious to keep your job search updates off Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other sites. Even if you're not connected to your boss or coworkers online, what you post has a mysterious way of popping up in places you don't want it to be seen &mdash; security settings, be damned.</p> <h2>8. Don't Use Anyone at Your Current Job as a Reference</h2> <p>If you don't want to raise a red flag that you're looking for a new job, WHY would you use one of your coworkers as a reference? Surely you have three other people with whom you're not currently working who can vouch for you, no?</p> <h2>9. Search for Your New Job on Your Own Time and Equipment</h2> <p>And, finally, don't be sketchy and use company time to search for a position with another company. That's not only dumb, but also disloyal and rude. Use your own computer and other resources on your own time. Get caught and you're likely to get fired on the spot. The only silver lining is that it will seriously speed up your job search. You don't want it to go down like that.</p> <p>Palmer says, &quot;You should never put your work email or work phone number on your resume. Also, you should use a personal email address that sounds professional &mdash; i.e., ralph.smith@[emailservice].com, not wonderboy@[emailservice].com &mdash; and list your cell phone number so that communication with potential employers will remain private. In addition, you should use your computer at home to send emails to hiring managers. Using the computer at work is risky since many companies monitor their employees' computer use.&quot;</p> <p><em>Do you have tips on how employees can search for a new job without raising a red flag? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">6 Things You Must Do After the Interview to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting boss Job Interview job search new job resume Thu, 12 Nov 2015 11:15:12 +0000 Mikey Rox 1606587 at http://www.wisebread.com What Pays More: Online Surveys or the Gig Economy? http://www.wisebread.com/what-pays-more-online-surveys-or-the-gig-economy <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-pays-more-online-surveys-or-the-gig-economy" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_online_bills_000047644762_2.jpg" alt="Woman learning which pays more: online surveys or the gig economy" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Working from home seems like the ultimate dream for most people. You can make your own hours, be your own boss, and accept projects that you like. Fortunately, with the booming gig economy and increase in <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/cool-convenient-cash-11-easy-ways-to-make-money-online">paid online surveys</a>, your days working from home may be closer than you think. We&rsquo;ve covered some of the main differences between accepting gigs and completing paid surveys, so you can begin finding the right fit for you.</p> <h2>What Is the Gig Economy?</h2> <p>With the gig economy, or freelance nation, a worker can take advantage of money-making gigs, which can add up to a notable income. Sites like Thumbtack have all types of paid gigs available and offer a simplified way to match employers with the right freelance worker for the job.</p> <p>The gig economy is nothing new. In fact, as&nbsp;<a href="https://www.thumbtack.com/blog/future-of-work/?utm_campaign=August+SBFS&amp;utm_source=hs_email&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=22403945&amp;_hsenc=p2ANqtz--EOHx_pUjwh7ks4_bwXy6WtvO7Sn9eUzdHpDxGSYWK1QPisfZ9_bZGv7_rINdHPBdacPsCovhVX1G7IW25P2flvYldRQ&amp;_hsmi=22403945">Thumbtack&rsquo;s chief economist explained</a>&nbsp;to a Congressional committee, about half of the service professionals on the site have been in business for themselves for about five years or more. This means that freelance workers have been in the business long before the gig economy became more popular, but now they are able to use the convenience of the Internet to find more work. Today, the GAO estimates that as many as&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/669766.pdf">40% of the U.S. workforce</a> may be considered contingent workers (or independent contractors).</p> <h2>Potential Gigs</h2> <p>While the high-tech industry is taking particular advantage of the gig economy, there are a range of available gigs in all different categories, so you are likely to find something you are qualified for. For instance, you can get involved with Uber or Lyft as a driver, rent your home out on Airbnb, and/or take gigs for painting or home repairs.</p> <p>Studies have shown that <a href="http://www.fastcompany.com/3051754/why-presidential-candidates-are-starting-pay-attention-to-the-gig-economy">68% of freelancers</a> are concerned about finding more clients or projects in the future. Fortunately, with the gig economy, you can take advantage of multiple gigs and make money for all your varied talents, using various reputable gig sites. Some of the most common available gigs include:</p> <ul> <li>Secret shopping and personal shopping</li> <li>Driving</li> <li>Bookkeeping</li> <li>Personal training</li> <li>Moving and packing</li> <li>Photography</li> <li>Interior design services</li> <li>Cleaning</li> <li>Home repairs, improvements, and painting</li> </ul> <h2>Reputable Gig Sites</h2> <p>Taking advantage of the gig economy will allow you to set your own alternative work arrangements, so you can work whenever and however is most comfortable for you. You can create your own hours and work as often as you like. You will either receive a notification when there is a gig available that matches your skill set, or employers can contact you directly when they need your services.</p> <p>Either way, it is an easy way to find work, by taking advantage of the recent advancements in technology. If you are looking for money-making gigs, some of the most reputable gig sites include:</p> <ul> <li>Thumbtack</li> <li>Taskrabbit</li> <li>Angie&rsquo;s List</li> <li>HourlyNerd</li> <li>Etsy or Craigslist: If you are able to create your own DIY art or crafts, you may consider selling them on Etsy, eBay, or Craigslist to make money off your creativity.</li> </ul> <h2>Average Gig Pay</h2> <p>On sites like Thumbtack, you can apply your professional skills to make an equivalent hourly wage to what you were making in-office. This means that you can expect to make a comparable salary, while enjoying the work-from-home lifestyle.</p> <p>On the other hand, some gigs pay between $3-$10 for quick tasks, so it will vary depending on the gig and company. With some sites, you can also send a custom quote to interested parties, allowing you to set your own wage. For this reason, it is really difficult to set an average gig pay.</p> <p>Keep in mind there are also fees involved with most gig sites, which will reduce your total take-home pay. Usually, you will pay a fee based on how much you make. Being self-employed can be expensive, no matter what route of work you choose. When you count your own insurance costs, higher utility bills, taxes, office supplies, and increased fees, it can really add up, so you need to determine what your priorities are and how much you really want to work from home.</p> <h2>Making Money With Surveys</h2> <p>Many large companies are willing to spend money to get their customers&rsquo; opinions. Part of their marketing budget is invested towards finding out what you think. This means you can compete online and mobile surveys, whenever and wherever you like, getting paid for your opinion. It may be hard to believe, but you can actually make a decent amount of money just taking online surveys, once you find the right site.</p> <p>You can also take advantage of referrals by getting your friends involved. They will be able to make a little extra money taking online surveys, and you&rsquo;ll make money off the referral. A number of reputable survey sites also offer money or points for other simple activities, such as reading emails, signing up for offers, playing online games, reviewing free products, and completing online searches.</p> <h2>How to Sign Up</h2> <p>To make a large amount of money, you&rsquo;ll need to join several survey sites at once (which are free to join) and check them at least once daily. You should never have to pay to sign up or complete surveys. Sign up for all of the survey sites at once and you&rsquo;ll quickly determine which ones are your favorites and which ones work for you. When you sign up, you will be asked a number of questions about your income, lifestyle, and demographics. The surveys you receive will be based on the information you provide, so you will receive surveys that are appropriately matched to you.</p> <p>Once you sign up, it can take a couple of days for the system to start sending you survey invites, so be patient. You can usually set notifications, so that you are alerted by email when a new survey becomes available to you. You can even set up a separate email account, specifically set aside for survey and gig invite emails. You won&rsquo;t get rich by completing surveys, but the work is easy and fun. Most survey sites and gig sites pay with PayPal, so if you don&rsquo;t already have a free account set up, you might want to look into that.</p> <h2>Reputable Survey Sites</h2> <p>The risk with survey sites is finding the right one that will actually pay on time. If you find a survey site that you think may be legitimate, search on Better Business Bureau to see if the site is registered and if there are any complaints. Some of the most reputable survey sites include:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.kqzyfj.com/click-2822544-10872178-1444864530000">Swagbacks</a></li> <li>Vindale Research</li> <li><a href="http://trk.cotterweb.net/?a=13562&amp;c=16696&amp;s1=1079289">InboxDollars</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.jdoqocy.com/click-2822544-11027666-1354817767000">iPoll</a></li> <li>My Survey</li> <li>Pinecone Research</li> <li><a href="http://www.cashcrate.com/1168012">CashCrate</a></li> <li>Toluna</li> <li>OpinionPanel</li> <li>Ipsos</li> <li><a href="http://www.kqzyfj.com/click-2822544-10468489-1439249338000">MyPoints</a></li> <li>SpringBoard</li> <li>SurveySavvy</li> </ul> <h2>Average Survey Pay</h2> <p>Each survey site is different, so the average payout will vary. Sometimes, they&rsquo;ll average around $30/hour, while other sites will only offer around $0.50 per survey. Some survey sites offer different payouts, depending on the length and complexity of the survey, while sites like Pinecone Research offer a flat payout for every survey.</p> <p>Once you sign up for all of the survey sites and compare the average payout and available surveys, you&rsquo;ll quickly determine which ones are worth your time. For reference, according to an ABC News report, the largest cash payment for one full-time survey member was $50.</p> <p>Oftentimes, surveys will pay out in credits, which you can use for things like free gift cards. You might also receive free products or valuable perks for your review. This may be a nice addition to your salary and can help during gift-giving season, but it won&rsquo;t pay the bills. In fact, most freelancers who take online surveys only <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Consumer/story?id=1937788&amp;page=1">average around $100/month</a> with online surveys. Even experienced avid survey takers only earn up to $500/month on average. Once you sign up, find out how often they pay, what their payout options are, and what the minimum cashout is, so you know what to expect.</p> <h2>How Much Time Needs to Be Invested?</h2> <p>Each survey is of a different length of time, so some may take you only five minutes, while others will last up to 30 minutes. You can choose which survey to answer, so it is up to you how much time you want to invest. Gigs tend to take at least one to two hours, so they are usually a larger investment of time, but usually also have a larger payout. Gigs are also often completed outside of the home, while surveys are always completed from your computer, smartphone, or tablet. While taking surveys is a much easier way to make money, you will earn much more by completing gigs or tasks, which can be conveniently scheduled online.</p> <h2>Can You Do Both?</h2> <p>You&rsquo;ll notice that during certain times of the day, survey sites are busier and it will be easier to find work. Otherwise, you can complete surveys and gigs whenever is convenient for you. Some survey sites, like iPoll, also offer mobile compatibility, so you can even complete surveys on your mobile phone, in between gigs.</p> <p>With the right time management and level of dedication, you can absolutely make money with both online surveys and the gig economy. In fact, taking advantage of both the gig economy and paid surveys will get you one step closer to working full-time from home.</p> <p><em>Are you involved in the gig economy? Have you made any money taking online surveys? Please share your experiences in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-pays-more-online-surveys-or-the-gig-economy">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-interview-technique-will-get-you-hired">This Interview Technique Will Get You Hired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor">6 Ways That Job You Hate Keeps You Poor</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting online surveys Paid surveys side job working from home Wed, 11 Nov 2015 17:15:29 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1610245 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Low Key Jobs for People Who Hate Stress http://www.wisebread.com/5-low-key-jobs-for-people-who-hate-stress <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-low-key-jobs-for-people-who-hate-stress" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/girl_video_games_000044435178.jpg" alt="Woman having low key career because she hates stress" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We all know people who really seem to thrive in high-profile, high-stress stress occupations. They're the ones who voluntarily come in early and stay late, those who don't ever stop talking about work, and the people who seem to eat, sleep, and live for their jobs.</p> <p>And then there are the rest of us.</p> <p>I don't know about you, but I don't love to work. When I have to do so because I need the money, I try to find jobs that are cool in some way and don't leave me all stressed out at the end of the day. Sound like you? Here are five <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-productive-ways-to-reduce-stress">low-key jobs</a> that pay the bills, and probably won't leave you a ball of nerves at the end of your shift.</p> <p>A note to remember: While these jobs are often fairly low-key, they too, like any other job, demand a strong work ethic and your ability to handle stressful situations should they arise.&nbsp;</p> <h2>1. Teach English Abroad</h2> <p>In many countries, but especially in China, there aren't terribly high standards for someone who wants to <a href="http://www.internationalteflacademy.com/china-english-teaching-jobs-abroad-asia">teach English</a>. Sometimes the only requirement is to be born and/or educated in an English-speaking country. As long as you have a good reputation, you can often choose your clients and your hours (so sleep in every day &mdash; why not?), and you can make enough to live a a pretty decent lifestyle.</p> <h2>2. Become a Security Guard</h2> <p>If you can land the right gig, being a <a href="http://study.com/articles/Security_Guard_Requirements_for_a_Career_as_a_Security_Professional.html">security guard</a> can be fun while not requiring a ton of energy, especially if you're guarding a posh country club or a gated neighborhood. You might get to sit in a guard shack monitoring camera feeds, walk through areas looking for people acting inappropriately, or drive around a neighborhood periodically. While there <em>is</em> a lot of training involved to teach you how to react in certain dangerous situations, luckily it's pretty rare &mdash; and you can get the police involved if need be.</p> <h2>3. Be a Professional Foreigner</h2> <p>In some countries, having white skin bestows status, all on its own. This means that &mdash; believe it or not &mdash; some companies will <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2010/07/rent-a-white-guy/308119/">recruit white people</a> to dress in a suit and represent them at formal functions, even if that person doesn't actually hold any official job in the company. You might have to give speeches, buy official clothes, attend parties, or hold a meet-and-greet. But you can make $1000 a week, just for standing around and looking like yourself.</p> <h2>4. Video Game Tester</h2> <p>Love to play video games? It's good for you, then, that &quot;<a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/what-its-like-to-be-a-video-game-tester-2015-6">video game tester</a>&quot; is a job that actually exists. Your salary will probably start low &mdash; between $10 and $18 per hour &mdash; but since you won't have to buy work clothes or eat out, your expenses will also be low. And, after six years or so, you could make over $70,000 annually. For someone who has gamed all their life, it could be the best career you've ever had. Just keep in mind that when it's &quot;crunch time,&quot; it can require a lot more of your time and energy.</p> <h2>5. Power Plant Operator</h2> <p><a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/production/power-plant-operators-distributors-and-dispatchers.htm">Operating a power plant</a>, especially for the government and if you're willing to work the night shift, often means a 12-hour shift with as few as two hours spent actually working. And you can make up to six figures with a few years of experience, simply because you have the right knowledge and you are there in case something gets out of whack. (Which, on second thought, may be a pretty stressful day!)</p> <p><em>Do you have a job that is both cool and not a lot of work? What do you do and how did you get into it?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-low-key-jobs-for-people-who-hate-stress">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-depressing-jobs-that-arent-worth-the-money">10 Depressing Jobs That Aren&#039;t Worth the Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance">4 Best Jobs for Work Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/video-resumes-and-5-other-cool-tricks-to-land-the-job">Video Resumes and 5 Other Cool Tricks to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting career easy work employment hate working lazy Tue, 10 Nov 2015 09:15:14 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1608487 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Creative Jobs With Surprisingly High Salaries http://www.wisebread.com/5-creative-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-creative-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/000035377036.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Creative pursuits can lead you down the most fulfilling career paths, but unfortunately, many artists and musicians are struggling just to make a buck. There are, however, some less obvious right-brained jobs that will pay your way, and then some. Here are five creative gigs that are unexpectedly, and handsomely rewarding.</p> <h2>1. Instagram Pro</h2> <p>While millions of people around the globe use the Instagram photo sharing app to boast views of sepia-enhanced sunsets for the sheer fun of it, others are striking it rich. The most successful Instagram professionals are earning six-figure salaries and being flown around the world to <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/nov/27/instagram-users-earn-income-advertising-brands">snap and share photos</a> with their thousands (sometimes hundreds of thousands) of followers. Companies and agencies ranging from Nike to state tourism boards are shelling out big bucks for sponsored photos designed to seem authentic, when really they are representative of a new wave of carefully architected branding.</p> <h2>2. Food Scientist</h2> <p>Charles Spence studies flavor. His research, ranging from <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/sep/24/charles-spence-food-scientist-changing-eat-flavour">how background noise affects taste</a> to why it matters who we eat with, has influenced top chefs and restaurateurs around the globe. Spence is a food scientist, which means discovering new food sources, researching ways to make processed foods safe, and inventing new food distribution methods are all within his domain. Food scientists like Spence earn a <a href="http://www1.salary.com/Food-Scientist-salary.html">median salary of more than $66,000</a>, giving us all a reason to question the ethics of &quot;don't play with your food.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Animator</h2> <p>The Flintstones. The Simpsons. Popeye the Sailor. The cartoon characters that star on television shows, cereal boxes, and book covers are the works of animators, the <a href="http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes271014.htm">artistic and technically inclined</a> folks who make a living doing what some of us already do for fun &mdash; drawing, coloring, and creating. Animators, also called multimedia artists, earn an average salary of $67,000 &mdash; and upwards of $112,000 for those at the top of the game. (Walt Disney, we assure you, earned far more than this.) While few animations gain the legendary status of Mickey Mouse, there certainly is opportunity out there. In 2012, there were about 70,000 animator jobs in the U.S. with a forecasted 6% growth rate.</p> <h2>4. Advertising Copywriter</h2> <p>Don Draper never worried about money. And if you've got the visionary thinking to come up with the next &quot;Just do it&quot; or &quot;Got milk?&quot; slogan, neither do you. Advertising copywriters help sell products by condensing big concepts into concise and catchy phrases. Think of them as mini mission statements. These tagline generators can <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Copywriter/Salary">earn a salary of $70,000</a>. But, paywise, the sky's the limit. It will be a handsome payday if you can devise the next &quot;Think Different&quot; campaign. <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/onmarketing/2011/12/14/the-real-story-behind-apples-think-different-campaign/7/">Apple's stock price tripled</a> within a year of the iconic &quot;Think Different&quot; commercial's release.</p> <h2>5. Geographer</h2> <p>World mapping may seem to have gone the way of the street lamp lighter, but there are actually <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/geographers.htm">1,700 modern-day geographer jobs</a> in the U.S. These gigs are centered on tracking human activity, charting demographic trends, studying migration patterns, and sketching and editing maps of points of interest across the planet.</p> <p>In addition to earning a contemporary job rooted in the age of global exploration, geographers earn a median salary of about $75,000. There's more good news: Geographer jobs have a rapid growth forecast rate of nearly 30%, which means new opportunities are sprouting across the country.</p> <p><em>Do you have a high-paying creative job? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-creative-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-entry-level-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries">12 Entry Level Jobs With Surprisingly High Salaries</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting artistic careers arts creative jobs high paying jobs job search Tue, 03 Nov 2015 09:15:20 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1605051 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Depressing Jobs That Aren't Worth the Money http://www.wisebread.com/10-depressing-jobs-that-arent-worth-the-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-depressing-jobs-that-arent-worth-the-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/sad_woman_desk_000049488598.jpg" alt="Woman stuck in depressing job that&#039;s not worth the money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>So you think your job stinks.</p> <p>We've all experienced a depressing job before. There are good jobs out there for those who need them, but there are also lot of bad jobs that few people are eager to do. Here are 10 of the most depressing jobs, based on career prospects, pay, and safety on the job.</p> <h2>1. Newspaper Journalist</h2> <p>I worked for newspapers for more than a dozen years and had the time of my life. But the Internet era has crushed newspapers, leading to high stress and low pay for reporters and editors. And there are few journalists out there who haven't been laid off at least once. CareerCast placed this job <a href="http://www.careercast.com/jobs-rated/best-jobs-2015">dead last in its ranking of 200 careers</a>, and photojournalists don't fare much better.</p> <h2>2. Lumberjack</h2> <p>It's hard work and not particularly lucrative, and much of the work is now being done by machines. It's also a deadly job; the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that <a href="http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/cfoi.pdf">91 out of every 100,000 logging workers</a> suffers a work-related fatality. They are 30 times more likely to die on the job than the average worker.</p> <h2>3. Taxi Driver</h2> <p>It's never been the safest profession, and you'll be lucky to make $30,000 a year doing it. The arrival in many cities of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-earn-extra-money-driving-for-uber-or-lyft">Uber and Lyft</a>, which have completely disrupted the pay-to-ride industry, have hurt the prospects and earning potential of taxi drivers even further.</p> <h2>4. Data Entry Clerk</h2> <p>You sit at a computer all day and enter information into a database. It'd be one thing if the information you were entering was something cool, like a list of every Led Zeppelin concert in history. But it's often just names, addresses, and other banal data bits. And God help you if you make a mistake. The average annual median wage for data clerks is less than $30,000, though you usually don't need a college degree.</p> <h2>5. Security Guard</h2> <p>When you're in private security, you're either seriously bored because nothing is going on, or you're involved in a possible struggle with a criminal. There's not much in between. Pay is low (less than $25k annually, on average), but there is some growth in job opportunities.</p> <h2>6. Door-to-Door Salesman</h2> <p>Kiplinger <a href="http://www.kiplinger.com/slideshow/business/T012-S001-worst-jobs-for-the-future-2015/index.html">evaluated 784 jobs</a> based on their prospects for the future, and this job was in the bottom 10. These days, pushing a product by knocking on someone's door is amazingly inefficient, when you consider the technology available to salespeople. There was a time in America when door-to-door salesmen were welcomed by housewives and others looking to test out the latest products. Those days are long gone; the number of jobs in this field is expected to drop 18% by 2024, after dropping 23% between 2004 and 2014.</p> <h2>7. Mail Carrier</h2> <p>Let's face it, no one likes the U.S. Postal Service. And as a mail carrier, you often deliver nothing more than a bunch of junk mail, as technologies like email and texting have taken over. Career Cast's best jobs report noted that mail carriers have <a href="http://www.careercast.com/jobs-rated/worst-jobs-2015">one of the worst 10-year outlooks</a> in terms of job growth.</p> <h2>8. Administrative Assistant</h2> <p>You have virtually no power over your own existence, as you simply respond to the demands of whomever you work for. The high stress, no control environment has been <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/10/01/health.job.making.depressed/">known to cause higher rates of depression</a>. The good news for administrative assistants is that pay is about average, along with job growth.</p> <h2>9. Meter Reader</h2> <p>Technology is making it less and less necessary for someone to come around and check your electricity usage. The Bureau of Labor Statistics expects job demand to decline by 10% by 2020, and the pay is middle-of-the-pack, at best.</p> <h2>10. Restaurant Server</h2> <p>Your boss can get away with paying you less than minimum wage, because there's an expectation you'll get tips. But we all know that's hit or miss. Waiters and waitresses are on their feet all day, often fielding complaints about food that they didn't cook. The average mean wage is under $20,000 each year, assuming the restaurant you work for will even be around in the future. The Bureau of Labor Statistics said 70% of restaurants close within the first year.</p> <p><em>Did we miss any depressing jobs? Let us know in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-depressing-jobs-that-arent-worth-the-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-a-job-learn-the-secret-from-a-bad-movie">How to get a job--learn the secret from a bad movie</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance">4 Best Jobs for Work Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/seven-tips-for-the-newly-unemployed">Seven Tips for the Newly Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/whats-an-employee-to-do-part-2">What&#039;s an employee to do? Part 2</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting art career jobs museum Mon, 02 Nov 2015 09:15:13 +0000 Tim Lemke 1603184 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_crossed_arms_000046266010.jpg" alt="Man trying extreme job interview tactics that worked" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Getting a job is hard. These days, it may even be very hard. But so is getting an interview, and when you are given the chance to sit down and chat with someone who holds your future in their hands, you usually play it very safe. But sometimes safe isn't the best answer. Sometimes, like with these examples that came from an extensive <a href="https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-craziest-thing-you-have-ever-said-or-done-at-an-interview-and-still-got-the-job">Quora Q&amp;A,</a> you have to employ extreme <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">interview tactics to get the position</a>.</p> <h2>1. The Walkout</h2> <p>Let's start this series off with the story that inspired it &mdash; namely, mine. Advertising is a competitive and cutthroat industry, and getting your foot in the door, even for an interview, can be hard work. Even back in the early 2000s, before the Internet bubble burst, getting a decent job in the industry was tough.</p> <p>So, when getting an interview at a place known for doing outstanding work, the usual routine for candidates was to go in, sit down, be polite, let the interviewer tear your work apart, and hope for a callback. If you were lucky, he or she would actually like a few pieces in your portfolio.</p> <p>In my case, the hiring manager, who was a director of marketing, looked like a bulldog chewing a wasp as he went through my work. &quot;Seen it before. Crap. Not impressed. That's obvious.&quot; And so on.</p> <p>As he got halfway through the folio, I'd had enough. I needed a job, but not one that would be filled with this kind of derision. I stood up, closed it, and politely said, &quot;thanks for your time, but clearly my work is not suited for you or this company.&quot;</p> <p>As I walked out, he got out of his chair and patted me on the back. &quot;Wait, wait,&quot; he said. &quot;Maybe I was being a bit harsh. I think there are actually some strong pieces in there.&quot;</p> <p>I sat down with him, and it turns out this was his &quot;test.&quot; To see how candidates react to a real ego bashing. Would they cry? Would they get angry? Would they say nothing? Apparently, my reaction was the one he had been looking for.</p> <p><strong><em>Moral of this story:</em></strong><em> Trust your gut. If you really feel like you need to react in a certain way, and it does not seem inappropriate (like punching someone in the face for instance), go with it. Showing people who you really are can make a big difference. </em></p> <h2>2. The Pocket Surprise</h2> <p>This story comes from <a href="https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-craziest-thing-you-have-ever-said-or-done-at-an-interview-and-still-got-the-job/answer/Richard-Waddington?srid=isCn&amp;share=1">Richard Waddington</a>, who had been the same company for over 10 years, and was looking for a change. (Incidentally, a <a href="https://www.jobvite.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/jobvite_jobseeker_nation_2015.pdf">recent study</a> shows 50% of people see their current job as just a placeholder, and are actively looking around.)</p> <p>Richard had never been out on an interview in all that time, and so when he decided to move on and got an interview at another company, he was obviously nervous. The stress of finding the right clothes and shoes, the preparation, the background work &mdash; they can all get to a person.</p> <p>Richard was also a family man, and as he left for the interview, his four-year-old daughter handed him a little plastic cow from her farm yard play set and said, &quot;Daddy, take this for good luck.&quot;</p> <p>Richard went through hours of interviews, with different people (which is all too common these days) before sitting in front of the VP of HR. She sternly asked him, &quot;How do I know you'll fit in?&quot;</p> <p>Without thinking, he exclaimed, &quot;I have a cow in my pocket!&quot; He set the cow on the table, over an awkward silence. But, she burst out laughing, and he got the job.</p> <p><strong><em>Moral of this story:</em></strong><em> A real moment can go a long way toward showing people who you are when your guard is down. A genuine laugh, a reaction, something that lets the interviewer see a person and not just a candidate, may feel extreme or risky&hellip; but it can reap rewards.</em></p> <h2>3. The Refusal</h2> <p>Perhaps the most extreme thing you can ever do is refuse an offer of a job &mdash; if you actually want to get that job. Or, refuse to do something that the interviewer asks you to do. It's a risk, but for some people, it has definitely worked.</p> <p>This has a lot to do with catching the interviewer off guard. They know they are in a position of power. They have the job, you want the job, and therefore, they have the upper hand. But what if you take control?</p> <p><a href="https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-craziest-thing-you-have-ever-said-or-done-at-an-interview-and-still-got-the-job/answer/Stephan-Vladimir-Bugaj?srid=isCn&amp;share=1">Stephan Bugaj</a> did just that. His career was in a very technical field, and to start off the proceedings he dressed more like a biker than an office worker. When the interviewer asked him to solve a technical puzzle, he said no. Flatly, no. Then, he offered the reason; one that was given to him by a physics teacher some years back and said, &quot;How does putting a person in a situation where they're faced with a difficult and unfamiliar problem and then denying them access to equipment, reference materials, and discussions with colleagues in any way represent a realistic professional environment?&quot;</p> <p>He got the job. And so did Gil Yehuda, another interview candidate who actually refused the job offer. Gil's story is long; you can read it on Quora. But the short version is, Gil had surmised that the job in question was ill-defined, and was probably not one he should take. So he said no. But when he was then asked for a salary range, he asked the interviewer to make an offer impossible to refuse. She did.</p> <p><strong><em>Moral of this story:</em></strong><em> You can take control of the interview by doing the unexpected. Not in a way that would get you kicked out of the building for breaking public decency laws, but by questioning things, and refusing the requests or offers on the table. It will definitely make you stand out. </em></p> <h2>4. The Honest Approach</h2> <p>Of course, there's honesty, and then there's boorishness. You certainly don't want to be so brutally honest that you upset everyone in the room. But interviewers are so used to hearing rehearsed, bland answers that a touch of real honesty can be refreshing &mdash; and memorable.</p> <p>A case in point &mdash;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-craziest-thing-you-have-ever-said-or-done-at-an-interview-and-still-got-the-job/answer/Michael-Shiloh">Michael Shiloh</a>. As an infectious disease specialist, he was used to working in high-pressure environments, and was prepared for rigorous interview questions and techniques. He was sat in front of 25 members of the faculty admissions committee, and they all had questions for him.</p> <p>The answers came easy to him, as the questions were nothing out of the ordinary. But towards the end of the long process, one interviewer threw a huge curveball by asking, &quot;If you were to design an RGD peptide to potently inhibit the integrin IIb/IIIa receptor, what would it look like?&quot;</p> <p>Michael was stumped. He had nothing. So, trusting his gut he said, &quot;I have no idea. But if I did know, I wouldn't be here interviewing for your program, but rather there, working on it. And, they'd be paying me big bucks to do it.&quot;</p> <p>Hearty, deep laughter followed, along with the offer of a position.</p> <p><strong><em>Moral of this story:</em></strong><em> Don't be tempted to give the interviewer a lot of platitudes and vanilla responses. A lot of the time, an interviewer will be much more impressed by the truth; even if the truth is difficult to say, and sets you in a less favorable light. (Just think how we would react if politicians were honest.)</em></p> <h2>5. The Bluff</h2> <p>This is a case of, when all else fails&hellip; bluff.</p> <p>The interviewee, John Doe (who wants to remain anonymous for obvious reasons), was applying for a job as a consultant. And, the interview was not going well.</p> <p>The interviewer then asked John to solve a puzzle, and as he described it, John could not help the spread of a massive grin on his face. He had recently heard, and solved, this very puzzle, and interrupted the interviewer, saying, &quot;Sir, I'll be honest with you. I've heard this one before,&quot; and gave an outline of the solution.</p> <p>The interviewer appreciated his candor, and went on to another question. This one was a mind bender. A very hard, almost impossible, puzzle for John to solve. He had no idea. So, he did the only thing he could think of. Smiling broadly he said, &quot;Sir, I hate to admit it, but I've heard this one before as well!&quot;</p> <p>The interviewer did not ask for proof, but simply believed him and said, &quot;Wow&hellip; no puzzles today it seems.&quot; The bluff worked, and John got the job.</p> <p><strong><em>Moral of this story:</em></strong><em> Sometimes, you can bluff and win. But you really have to be prepared to have your bluff called. However, if that happens, simply use the honest approach &ndash; &quot;hey, I was bluffing, I just have no idea how to answer.&quot; It might just work, too. </em></p> <h2>6. The Backup Plan</h2> <p>Finally, we come full circle and finish on another story from my advertising past. Before the days of cheap Macbooks and readily available design software, ad portfolios still had to look the part. And spec work (work done for a client that has not asked for it, merely to showcase your talents) still had to look the business. Creative teams would often employ designers and photographers to help them comp up ads that would not look out of place in magazines or on billboards.</p> <p>The portfolio of my art director and myself was full of both produced and spec work. The produced work, as it was early in our careers, was not great. The clients weren't blue chip, and the spec work was put together in our spare time with stock photos and rub down transfers. It looked&hellip; acceptable.</p> <p>As we went into the interview, we were nervous. This was a big shop, and they demanded quality. The creative directors looked bored as they flicked through the portfolio, and we could tell they were getting ready give us the polite brush-off. As one stood, and started to say, &quot;well, thanks for coming in, but&hellip;&quot; I stopped him and said, &quot;honestly, the work is crap compared to the ideas we have sketched in the back pocket of the portfolio.&quot;</p> <p>They both looked a bit taken aback, but they reached in, and brought out the sketches my partner and I had been working on for much bigger ideas. Ones that were beyond our skill to produce with any great polish. We didn't plan on showing them to anyone, but figured, what the hell. They flicked through them, smiling, pointing, whispering, for 10 minutes. Then they said, &quot;when would you be able to start?&quot;</p> <p><strong><em>Moral of this story:</em></strong><em> Never be afraid to impress people with ideas you do not think are quite ready. Whether it's a new product, a sales plan, an app, or anything else relevant to your career, if it gives you goose bumps, it may well do the same to your future employer.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">6 Things You Must Do After the Interview to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-career-tips-you-wish-you-could-give-your-younger-self">7 Career Tips You Wish You Could Give Your Younger Self</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting hacks interview Job Interview job interview tips job search Thu, 22 Oct 2015 17:23:13 +0000 Paul Michael 1593842 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Things You Must Do After the Interview to Land the Job http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_work_success_000056629092.jpg" alt="Woman learning what to do after the interview to land the job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You've created a flawless resume. You've networked like a champion. You've managed to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-get-noticed-during-a-job-search">get noticed by the right people</a>. And you just aced a three-hour long group interview without so much as a nervous twitch. Don't stop there; here are six things you can do <em>after</em> the interview that will help you land the job of your dreams.</p> <h2>1. Send a Thank-You Note</h2> <p>Send a brief, but detailed thank-you email within 24 hours. Refer to the topics discussed in the interview and include the email address of every interviewer, regardless of title or job level. Though many career consultants suggest following up an electronic thank-you with the hand-written variety, it's not necessary and can often be interpreted as overkill.</p> <h2>2. Send a Personalized Follow-Up Email</h2> <p>A few days after the thank-you note, send a follow-up email that reinforces how your skills and experience directly related to the requirements of the position. Respect your readers' time by being specific and concise, but don't be afraid to mention relevant accomplishments or important points you didn't have a chance to cover during the interview.</p> <h2>3. Alert Your References</h2> <p>If your interview went well, it's likely your references will be contacted in short order. Both as a courtesy and a means of preparation, give your references a heads-up. Let them know a bit about the role and the skill set required. Advance notice will help each of your references craft their best pitch for you and stress the experience and qualities that matter most. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-great-job-references">How to Get Great Job References</a>)</p> <h2>4. Keep Researching</h2> <p>Research shouldn't end when the interview is over. Keep learning about the company and the position you've applied for. If there's an impromptu follow-up call or a second interview, your deeper knowledge will help inspire ideas and generate insightful questions.</p> <h2>5. Tap Into Your Network</h2> <p>Sometimes <em>who</em> you know is just as important as <em>what</em> you know. Leverage the power of your professional network to increase your chances of getting hired. If you know someone inside the company who can tilt the scales in your favor, reach out to her and tactfully ask for assistance. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40">10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40</a>)</p> <h2>6. Gracefully Accept Rejection</h2> <p>Rejection is part of every job hunt, but knowing how to gracefully accept rejection can sometimes help you get a job. Remember, not all new hires work out. In order to differentiate yourself at this final stage of the interview process, thank your interviewers for their time and wish them well. If new positions open up or if the person they hired turns out to be a bad fit, you're much more likely to be top-of-mind.</p> <p>I get it; job hunting can sometimes feel like a full-time job (and an exhausting one at that). Avoid feeling overwhelmed by breaking the process into a series of action phases. By the time you get to the face-to-face interview, the uphill slog is nearly done. Pat yourself on the back; your skills have been noticed. Now, enjoy the downhill slide by executing each post-interview task mindfully and thoroughly.</p> <p><em>What have you done after an interview that helped you beat the competition? What advice do you have for new graduates who may be interviewing for the first time?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-10"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-career-tips-you-wish-you-could-give-your-younger-self">7 Career Tips You Wish You Could Give Your Younger Self</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-entry-level-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries">12 Entry Level Jobs With Surprisingly High Salaries</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting hiring tips job hunt Job Interview job search unemployment Mon, 19 Oct 2015 09:15:23 +0000 Kentin Waits 1593784 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/couple_whispering_000072021719.jpg" alt="People learning what they should never do in a job interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Though the U.S. economy is alive and kicking again, the job market still feels a bit sluggish. If you've managed to land an interview, congratulations &mdash; you're doing something right. Build on that success by avoiding common interview blunders. Here are 10 things you should never do in an interview.</p> <h2>1. Don't Arrive Unprepared</h2> <p>Take time to learn about the company and the position you're applying for. Gathering a few basic facts shows motivation and will help you know what questions to ask later. Also, prepare by bringing along extra copies of your resume or CV; some interviewers may be pulled in at the last moment and appreciate your forethought.</p> <h2>2. Don't Show Up Late</h2> <p>No surprise here; don't show up late to a job interview. In fact, pad your schedule by 20&ndash;30 minutes just in case the train is running late or you can't find a parking spot. Arriving to an interview five to 10 minutes early is completely acceptable and gives you time to mentally prepare.</p> <h2>3. Don't Leave Your Phone On</h2> <p>If your phone rings during a job interview, you'd better hope there's an HR director on the other end of the line with a smokin' hot offer. Ringing cell phones and formal job interviews don't mix. As unnatural as it may feel, completely silence or turn your phone off during an interview (and remember, vibrating phones can still be heard and are still a distraction).</p> <h2>4. Don't Sit Down Before You're Invited</h2> <p>Sometimes small courtesies can make a big impression. It's good business etiquette to not sit down until you've been invited or shown to your seat.</p> <h2>5. Don't Slouch</h2> <p>It may sound terribly old-fashioned, but posture matters. Standing tall and sitting up straight not only conveys a sense of maturity and experience to others, it can boost your self confidence. If you're a chronic sloucher, improve your posture with <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-and-keep-amazing-posture-by-doing-these-10-stretches-today">10 targeted stretching exercises</a>.</p> <h2>6. Don't Talk Trash</h2> <p>Be honest, but stay positive when it comes to discussing your previous or current employer. The world is smaller than most of us imagine and it's impossible to know the personal or professional connections your interviewer may have.</p> <h2>7. Don't Talk Money</h2> <p>Don't talk money unless you're asked, or an offer has been extended. A premature focus on money and benefits sends the wrong message to your potential employer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview?ref=seealso">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a>)</p> <h2>8. Don't Mumble</h2> <p>Hold your head up, speak clearly, and make eye contact. Employers shouldn't have to work to hear you and mumblers don't come across as capable, confident employees. Remember, good communication is a skill you can learn. If you've had trouble in the past, explore <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-get-people-to-listen-when-you-talk">ways to speak more effectively</a>.</p> <h2>9. Don't Up Talk</h2> <p>Up-talking is that annoying linguistic habit of phrasing statements as if they were questions (&quot;I really enjoy my current position, but I think I'm ready for something more challenging?&quot;). Up-talking implies you're unsure of what you're saying, need approval, and lack confidence. Sure, it seems like everyone is doing it, but up-talking is still the verbal equivalent of nails on a chalkboard.</p> <h2>10. Don't Skip the Questions</h2> <p>Your interviewer is likely to ask if you have any questions about the role or the company. Don't be shy; be ready with a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-you-should-ask-at-every-job-interview">set of essential interview questions</a>. Speaking up shows that you're interested and have been listening.</p> <p>In our hyper-casual world, paying attention to the details during an interview can help you stand out in all the right ways. Especially for those positions that require interacting with clients or the public, knowing how to navigate a formal interview with grace and refinement is its own unique qualification.</p> <p><em>What's the biggest mistake you've made in an interview? If you've been on the other side of the desk, what advice do you have for interviewees?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-11"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/video-resumes-and-5-other-cool-tricks-to-land-the-job">Video Resumes and 5 Other Cool Tricks to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-can-do-right-now-to-become-more-hirable">10 Things You Can Do Right Now to Become More Hirable</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-sell-yourself-to-potential-employers">How to Sell Yourself to Potential Employers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-embarrassing-mistakes-everyone-makes-but-doesnt-talk-about">13 Embarrassing Mistakes Everyone Makes But Doesn&#039;t Talk About</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-how-you-get-a-new-job-this-year">This Is How You Get a New Job This Year</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting blunders etiquette getting hired interviewing Mistakes professionalism Tue, 13 Oct 2015 17:01:32 +0000 Kentin Waits 1583916 at http://www.wisebread.com