Job Hunting http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/7800/all en-US 5 Job Hunting Roadblocks Millennials Must Overcome http://www.wisebread.com/5-job-hunting-roadblocks-millennials-must-overcome <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-job-hunting-roadblocks-millennials-must-overcome" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/young_couple_signing_contract.jpg" alt="Young couple signing contract" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Millennials are the demographic born between the early 1980s and the early 2000s. If you fall into that category, you are going to come across some disadvantages when it comes to getting a job. While these roadblocks are not applicable to every candidate, and are certainly not impossible to overcome, they are going to make your job search more difficult than the Gen Xers you'll be competing with. Here are some of the struggles you can expect to face.</p> <h2>1. Older generations may have a bad impression of you</h2> <p>Most millennials are like every other age group of job seekers: hardworking, driven, and ready to knuckle down and have a positive impact on the company that hires them. Sadly, millennials have gotten a pretty bad rap over the years, tainted by the actions of a few. Words like &quot;entitlement&quot; and &quot;opinionated&quot; are bandied about, and it is having a negative impact on those looking for work. In particular, older generations, most of whom are doing the hiring, have bought into those stereotypes.</p> <p>For example, in a Daily Mail article published earlier this year, some bosses and hiring managers <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-4232696/Millenials-generation-huge-sense-entitlement.html" target="_blank">complained about a workforce</a> made up of young people that are &quot;spoiled, full of themselves, averse to hard work, and expect 'success on a plate.'&quot; Sadly, articles like these are a dime a dozen.</p> <p>These blanket statements, of course, are simply not true. There are selfish, entitled people of every age and background &mdash; but in the case of millennials, it can be a hard perception to shake off. Millennials will have to overcome these preconceived notions and prove they're every bit as determined as their peers. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-millennials-can-become-bosses-sooner?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Ways Millennials Can Become Bosses Sooner</a>)</p> <h2>2. Student loans can leave you desperate</h2> <p>Let's talk about student loans and crippling debt. The average student in the class of 2016 graduated with $37,172 in student loan debt. According to the New York Federal Reserve, in the U.S. alone, there are over 44 million borrowers that have amassed over $1.3 trillion in student loans &mdash; and this number continues to grow as the cost of higher education skyrockets.</p> <p>This is a massive liability, especially when you consider that in 1990 the average student loan debt was just $12,110. What's more, in that time median wages have basically flatlined &mdash; rising from $42,342 in 1990 to just $43,000 in 2016, according to the New York Federal Reserve. That's a 1.6 percent pay raise and a whopping 163.8 percent debt raise.</p> <p>As a millennial, you are facing the very likely possibility that you'll be stuck with this debt for decades. For this reason, finding work becomes nothing short of desperation. College graduates are taking jobs well below their education and skill level simply because it's better to have a low paying job than none at all. And this can lead to a vicious cycle of low level gigs, standing at the foot of a ladder that looks impossible to climb. No other generation has had to start their careers with this kind of burden. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Unique Ways Millennials Are Dealing With Student Loan Debt</a>)</p> <h2>3. Technology has its disadvantages</h2> <p>Millennials were born into a world of rapidly advancing technology, and for the most part, they are very comfortable interacting with it. That can be positive in many ways, and it can certainly help in their job search. But this reliance on technology can also lead to some social issues that may hamper a job interview process. Namely, millennials aren't as accustomed to talking on the phone or sitting down face to face as older generations.</p> <p>Many millennials would much rather communicate through text, instant messenger apps, emails, and social media posts than through traditional voice and in-person methods. These preferences can impact a candidate's chances during phone or face to face interviews. To be sure, many millennials are comfortable with and perfectly capable of acing a phone or in-person interview. But for others, this can be an obvious struggle. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-59-tips-to-help-you-nail-that-job-interview?ref=seealso" target="_blank">59 Tips to Help You Nail That Job Interview</a>)</p> <h2>4. There hasn't been enough time to establish great credit</h2> <p>In some countries, no news is good news when it comes to a credit history. As long as you have a good salary, a stable family life, and are current on loans and other debts, you're good to go. But in the U.S. it takes time to build great credit and get a credit score above the magic 700 number. Unfortunately for millennials, they haven't had that kind of time. Millennials are also less likely to want credit cards and large financial obligations, which further hampers their ability to build credit.</p> <p>Indeed, the 2008 crash, coupled with the increase of student loan debt, has made many millennials wary of getting into any kind of debt at all. But employers these days are getting thorough on background checks, and a low or nonexistent credit score can be a black mark against a candidate. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-credit-cards-for-millennials?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Best Credit Cards for Millennials</a>)</p> <h2>5. Education is no match for experience</h2> <p>There's a scene in <em>The Secret of My Success</em> that sums up this problem to a tee. Michael J. Fox's character applies for a job and says, &quot;I was trained in college to handle a job like this, so in a sense I already have experience.&quot; The interviewer replies, &quot;What you've got is college experience, not the practical hard-nosed business experience we're looking for.&quot;</p> <p>This is a problem that millennials run into often. They have an education and a few years in the field, but not enough to match the candidates that have a solid 10+ years of business experience under their belts. Plus, more and more employers are placing way more emphasis on work experience than a college degree. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-successful-millennials-do?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Things Successful Millennials Do</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-job-hunting-roadblocks-millennials-must-overcome&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Job%2520Hunting%2520Roadblocks%2520Millennials%2520Must%2520Overcome.jpg&amp;description=5%20Job%20Hunting%20Roadblocks%20Millennials%20Must%20Overcome"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Job%20Hunting%20Roadblocks%20Millennials%20Must%20Overcome.jpg" alt="5 Job Hunting Roadblocks Millennials Must Overcome" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-job-hunting-roadblocks-millennials-must-overcome">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan">These 17 Companies Will Help You Repay Your Student Loan</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-biggest-ways-millennials-risk-their-retirements">5 Biggest Ways Millennials Risk Their Retirements</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-questions-you-should-always-ask-at-the-end-of-a-job-interview">15 Questions You Should Always Ask at the End of a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting challenges discrimination education job interviews millennials roadblocks student loans technology young adults Wed, 11 Oct 2017 08:30:11 +0000 Paul Michael 2034468 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/we_are_hiring_sign_530186607.jpg" alt="Learning how to keep a job hunt from busting a budget" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Searching for a new job can be a stressful ordeal. There is always a feeling that you could be doing more to make yourself attractive to employers: more networking, more updates to your LinkedIn profile, more classes to boost your skills. This desire to do more, however, sometimes comes with an urge to spend money on products and services that you may not need.</p> <p>Are you throwing away money during your job search? Here are a handful of things that may not be worth spending money on in your quest for new employment. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-forget-about-these-7-job-hunting-expenses?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Don't Forget About These 7 Job Hunting Expenses</a>)</p> <h2>Resume writers</h2> <p>There are many people who offer advice on how to craft your resume to help you land a job. This can be a useful service, but keep in mind that there's also plenty of free advice out there.</p> <p>Before spending a significant amount of money on a resume consultant, do a search of some well-regarded business and career publications to see if they've written extensively on this topic. There are also countless examples online of well-crafted, effective resumes that are easy to replicate.</p> <p>Additionally, it's easy to turn to knowledgeable friends and family for feedback before deciding to pay for outside help. A resume consultant may be useful if you really don't feel confident crafting a resume yourself, but most people are able to get by without one. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/great-ways-to-improve-your-resume-today?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Great Ways to Improve Your Resume Today</a>)</p> <h2>Costly networking meals</h2> <p>When you are networking, you may feel it necessary to treat a contact to an expensive meal in order to make a good impression. But this is rarely necessary. People are busy, and generally have no desire to set aside an entire lunch hour or evening just to hear you pitch yourself.</p> <p>If someone is willing to help you in your job search, they will be fine meeting over a cup of coffee or even just an in-person chat in their office. Remember that your work history and accomplishments are what matter most in your job search, not your ability to pick up the check for a steak dinner. If you feel the need to make a grand gesture to thank someone for their help, do it after you've landed the job.</p> <h2>Expensive clothes</h2> <p>If you are interviewing to be the CEO, it makes sense to spend some bucks to look right for the job. Most job applicants, however, don't need to spend $3,000 for a custom Italian suit.</p> <p>Sure, you'll want to have appropriate dress clothes and shoes that make you look like a professional. But there's no need to go overboard. Also keep in mind that many employers allow for casual dress. In those situations, you may be able to save money by skipping the suit altogether and wearing tailored, well-fitting clothing. If you don't already have these in your closet, you can buy them for less than $100.</p> <h2>Premium job search engines</h2> <p>Many job boards and career networking sites offer paid services that promise enhanced job listings and the ability to be labeled as a &quot;featured&quot; applicant. These services can come with some bells and whistles that might help you in your job search, but they are not cheap. LinkedIn Premium, for example, starts at $25 per month. These services can't guarantee you'll get a job, and aren't a replacement for having good qualifications and networking.</p> <h2>Costly technology</h2> <p>You may be tempted to go out and get a new computer or smartphone to help you with your job search. Perhaps you think a costly piece of software will enhance your chances of landing a position.</p> <p>In reality, it's rarely necessary to upgrade your technology just to search for jobs. Sure, a reliable computer will help, along with a phone so companies can reach you. But there are many technological solutions that don't cost a dime, including free online software that can help you easily set up a professional website. Besides, the most important component to getting a new job is the most low-tech one there is: you. Your skills, qualifications, and experience are what matter most.</p> <h2>Travel for jobs you don't want</h2> <p>I'm a firm believer that interviewing for a job can be beneficial, even if it's for a job you aren't crazy about. But if you have to incur significant expense to show up, it's probably not worth it. There's no need to hop on a plane and book a hotel for a job that does not interest you, unless you have a strong indication that it could lead to a more attractive opportunity. Even train fare and parking may be a waste of money if you really don't have an interest in the job.</p> <h2>Education or certifications you don't need</h2> <p>It is true that you should never stop learning, and it's never a bad idea to enhance and expand your skill set to give your career a boost. But you need to be thoughtful in what you pursue.</p> <p>Why spend thousands of dollars for an associate degree in accounting when your background is in engineering? Why spend thousands more to be trained in Adobe Creative Suite if you have no real interest in graphic design? Remember, there are many professional &quot;certifications&quot; that are not worth the paper they are written on. Taking some classes or gaining skills can boost your career, but only when they can truly help you, and only when these efforts are properly aligned with your goals and strengths. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-online-certifications-worth-the-price?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are Online Certifications Worth the Price?</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Keep%2520Your%2520Job%2520Hunt%2520From%2520Busting%2520Your%2520Budget.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Keep%20Your%20Job%20Hunt%20From%20Busting%20Your%20Budget"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Keep%20Your%20Job%20Hunt%20From%20Busting%20Your%20Budget.jpg" alt="How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving">How to Ask for Your Old Job Back After Leaving</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">How to Ace Your Next Coffee Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-resume-sucks-try-one-of-these-instead">Your Resume Sucks — Try One of These Instead</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting certifications expenses job interviews job search meals networking resumes skills travel wasting money Mon, 02 Oct 2017 08:30:16 +0000 Tim Lemke 2029156 at http://www.wisebread.com Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-544340484.jpg" alt="job hunting with an employment gap" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Looking for a job after taking time off, either by choice or circumstance? You're not alone. In the recovery years since the Great Recession, career gaps have been stubbornly common. While an employment gap can make finding a new job trickier, there's no need to panic. Experts say there are plenty of ways to get your foot in the door.</p> <h2>Network</h2> <p>It's always important to tap your social and professional connections when job hunting, but even more so if you are facing the headwind of getting back into the workforce after an absence. If you find your network has shrunk in recent years, make new connections by joining a professional organization or meetup in your area and attending local events. Volunteer work is also a great way of expanding your professional skills and network. A job recommendation from the right connection can help answer an employer's questions about your dedication and capabilities before they even get asked.</p> <h2>Go back to school</h2> <p>One of the big worries employers have about people who haven't worked in awhile is that their skills will be out of date. Getting a graduate degree, taking a certification course, or even just attending a continuing education class in your field can quell those concerns. This activity also shows that you're serious about returning to work and not just fooling around. Best of all, attending some kind of training gives you a recent activity to list on your resume, pushing the work gap lower on the page.</p> <h2>Look for a &quot;returnship&quot;</h2> <p>Some companies, including Goldman Sachs and Sara Lee, have offered these short-term jobs as a springboard for returning workers getting back into their careers. If you can't find a returnship, consider an ordinary internship, especially if you want to change or shift your career role. Yes, it could be humbling to compete against college grads and possibly work for no pay, but it's a lot better than doing nothing and letting the gap widen.</p> <h2>Write your resume carefully</h2> <p>One of the first images a potential employer sees of you likely comes via your resume, so it's important to use this as a tool to stop the door from being slammed in your face. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search" target="_blank">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a>)</p> <h3>Don't be super specific on dates</h3> <p>If your employment gap is a matter of months, not years, there's no need call attention to it by using the month that you started and ended each job. Say you started at XYZ Corp in June of 2012 and were laid off in August of 2015: Just list it as &quot;XYZ Corp. 2012&ndash;2015.&quot;</p> <p>This is not being dishonest with the hirer; you can disclose the gap if it comes up in the interview. But it could save your resume from being discarded before you get the chance to have that interview.</p> <h3>Include temporary jobs</h3> <p>So you made lattes or answered phones when your job as a graphic designer ended. You may want to include these gigs on your resume rather than leave a gaping hole. And expect the subject to come up in the interview as well. &quot;Regression&quot; in job responsibility and pay is not taken lightly by employers, but it's still better than a gap.</p> <h3>Self-employment counts</h3> <p>If you did freelance or contract work in between jobs, you could cover that period with a heading that conveys this. If you have a company name, list the company as the employer. The fine line here is to avoid misleading the hirer, or to appear to be engaging in puffery. Give yourself credit for achievements in self employment, but don't try to make it seem like more than it was.</p> <h3>Just list the gap</h3> <p>If your gap was more than a few months, and you weren't working a temp job or working for yourself, you're still going to have to address the gap. You don't want to jump right from a job that ended in 2015 to the present with no explanation.</p> <p>That doesn't mean you have to title it &quot;unemployed&quot; and leave it at that. You could title it with a substantial volunteer position you held during that time, or any training courses you attended.</p> <p>Another idea is to describe what you were doing, without going into unnecessary detail about anything that's not relevant to your job search. If you spent your employment gap caring for children or other family members, or recovering from an injury or illness, simply leave it at that.</p> <h2>Look beyond the resume</h2> <p>While the resume will be just the facts, the other information you provide to your potential employer can offer context.</p> <h3>The cover letter</h3> <p>The great thing about this document is that you're not tied to a chronological format like with a resume. The cover letter is your sales pitch, so start with why you're excited about this specific opportunity, and sell your skills and achievements. Then, take a line or two to explain your career lapse. Keep it upbeat and forward-looking, and never apologize.</p> <h3>The interview</h3> <p>If you're lucky enough to land an interview, expect to address the career gap. Recruiters and managers give the following tips for dealing with employment gaps in an interview: Be prepared with a list of talking points about the gap. Don't act surprised or defensive when it's brought up. Be honest, even if you were fired. Dishonesty is a big red flag. And whatever you do, don't dwell on negativity.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fjob-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FJob%2520Hunting%2520With%2520a%2520Long%2520Employment%2520Gap.jpg&amp;description=Job%20Hunting%20With%20a%20Long%20Employment%20Gap"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Job%20Hunting%20With%20a%20Long%20Employment%20Gap.jpg" alt="Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving">How to Ask for Your Old Job Back After Leaving</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-networking-tips-for-the-recently-unemployed">7 Networking Tips for the Recently Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-crucial-job-searching-steps-most-people-skip">6 Crucial Job Searching Steps Most People Skip</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting back to work employment gap job interviews networking recession resumes time off unemployed Thu, 28 Sep 2017 08:31:09 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2028008 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Work-From-Home Jobs for People Who Hate Talking on the Phone http://www.wisebread.com/7-work-from-home-jobs-for-people-who-hate-talking-on-the-phone <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-work-from-home-jobs-for-people-who-hate-talking-on-the-phone" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/bored_office_worker_on_the_phone.jpg" alt="Bored office worker on the phone" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Many work-from-home jobs involve answering or making phone calls as customer service agents or sales representatives. But what if you don't have the noise-free environment required for many of these jobs? Or you'd simply rather walk over broken glass in bare feet than talk on the phone? Well, that's actually not such a big problem these days.</p> <p>There are many options available for people who want the freedom of a work-from-home job, without the hassle of being glued to the phone day and night. Here are some of the best options for &quot;phonephobics.&quot;</p> <h2>1. Customer service email and chat support</h2> <p>How are your people skills? Can you happily sit and chat over a messenger app, or reply to emails like a pro? Well, you could do very well in a customer service position where you write your responses to customers. Several big companies now employ work-at-home reps to assist with issues over email and chat, including AppleCare and Convergys. In fact, at the time of this writing, AppleCare at Home has positions for over 60 advisers available.</p> <p>You can make over $30,000 per year, or about $15 per hour, performing this kind of work for Apple and other companies, and all you need is a computer, reliable internet access, and good typing skills. Most of the time, you are provided a document telling you how to reply to specific questions or concerns. If you cannot handle the request, you can elevate it to an adviser with specific knowledge of the problem at hand.</p> <h2>2. Data entry</h2> <p>Perhaps the most popular choice for people who hate talking on the phone but want to work from home are data entry jobs. The typical data entry job is just as is sounds; you take data from one form, be it audio recordings or handwritten documents, and usually enter that information into a computer.</p> <p>What you get paid for this kind of work depends on the kind of data you're entering, and the skills required to do it. You'll be paid more if it's a specialized service, such as medical transcription or language translation. Standard data entry jobs usually pay minimum wage, or less (if you're working per piece, for example, and aren't particularly fast), but it's relatively easy work and you can do it any time of the day or night.</p> <p>Just beware of fraudulent data entry schemes that are really pyramid schemes or other scams that make you pay for classes or certifications that should be free. It's often hard to find reputable sources for data entry jobs, so be sure to research any potential employer company you find.</p> <h2>3. Tutoring</h2> <p>You can use your skills to make money at home doing one-on-one tutoring in a subject at which you excel. Whether it's math or physics, a musical instrument, or a foreign language, at-home tutors are in demand in every state. What's more, you can set your own hours, your own hourly rate, and the students can come to you. If you prefer, you can travel to them for an additional fee.</p> <p>If you're looking to get into this kind of work, you have a few options. You can simply place ads online, on outlets like Craigslist and Nextdoor, or you can register yourself with an institution like <a href="https://kaplan.com/work-with-us/join-our-team/" target="_blank">Kaplan</a> or <a href="https://www.pearson.com/us/higher-education/products-services-institutions/smarthinking-online-tutoring/become-a-tutor.html" target="_blank">Smarthinking</a>. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-earn-1000-a-month-or-more-as-an-online-tutor?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Earn $1,000 a Month or More as an Online Tutor</a>)</p> <h2>4. Accounting, taxes, and bookkeeping</h2> <p>If you are skilled with numbers, you can set up a home office and help clients with their books, budgets, and taxes. To do the latter, you will need to be up to speed on all the latest tax laws, and have the best tax software available. For bookkeeping and accounting, you can actually do well even if you don't have a degree in those subjects. However, it usually takes several years of experience before you can build a roster of dependable clients from whom you get regular business.</p> <p>Some of the biggest names in taxes, including Intuit and TurboTax, employ work-at-home accountants and bookkeepers, and places like AccountingDepartment.com offer full benefits. If you're self-employed, you could easily charge $250&ndash;$350 for a session that lasts just a few hours.</p> <h2>5. Freelance writing and blogging</h2> <p>If you have a way with words and research, this is a perfect gig for you. Content is king these days, and there are thousands of websites and publications that are desperate for good, well-written articles and stories.</p> <p>When you're just starting out, you should not expect to get a lot of money for your work. And if you are starting your own blog, it can take many months to even see a dime for your efforts. But blogging, and writing for the web and magazines in general, is a slow burn. Once you build an audience and get a reliable following, the money will start to trickle in. Do it well, and that trickle can become a rolling rapid. Some of the top bloggers out there earn six-figure salaries, all from the comfort of home. You can get started by browsing sites like <a href="http://www.freelancewritinggigs.com/freelance-writing-job-ads/" target="_blank">Freelance Writing Gigs</a>&nbsp;for jobs. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-easy-ways-to-make-extra-money-blogging?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Easy Ways to Make Extra Money Blogging</a>)</p> <h2>6. Proofreading and editing</h2> <p>How's your grammar? Do you have an eye for detail? Does the prospect of poring over hundreds of pages of text scare you, or could you handle the challenge? Proofreading and editing is meticulous and laborious work, and therefore it's not for everyone. But if you have a fabulous grasp of language, and know (or can learn) the various editorial style guides (such as AP), you could have a great career as a proofreader or editor.</p> <p>The money you will make depends on what you're proofing, how quickly it needs to be turned around, and how many pages there are. Some places pay around $3&ndash;$4 per page, which can be to your benefit if you're fast. Other places charge a standard hourly wage, or you could find a gig that pays an annual salary with benefits.</p> <h2>7. Social media moderator</h2> <p>Also known as a content specialist, a social media moderator is responsible for the content of a brand's Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram channels. To do this job well, you need to have a strong grasp of the brand's core values, as well as the ability to speak in a tone of voice that is appropriate. For example, the contents of Nike's social media will differ vastly in tone from Dove.</p> <p>You will also need to have almost unlimited availability, as social media is a 24/7 advertising medium. Social media monitors have to pay close attention to customer posts, and must be ready to respond quickly, even pulling posts if they cause offense or come at a bad time. The pay for this ranges from minimum wage up to $80,000 including benefits and bonuses. Just remember &mdash; you must be available day and night, and that can be stressful.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-work-from-home-jobs-for-people-who-hate-talking-on-the-phone&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Work-From-Home%2520Jobs%2520for%2520People%2520Who%2520Hate%2520Talking%2520on%2520the%2520Phone.jpg&amp;description=7%20Work-From-Home%20Jobs%20for%20People%20Who%20Hate%20Talking%20on%20the%20Phone"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Work-From-Home%20Jobs%20for%20People%20Who%20Hate%20Talking%20on%20the%20Phone.jpg" alt="7 Work-From-Home Jobs for People Who Hate Talking on the Phone" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-work-from-home-jobs-for-people-who-hate-talking-on-the-phone">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-websites-that-will-pay-you-to-write-for-them">22 Websites That Will Pay You to Write for Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-money-as-a-chat-or-forum-moderator">How to Make Money as a Chat or Forum Moderator</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-100k-jobs-you-can-do-online">8 $100k+ Jobs You Can Do Online</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/convince-the-boss-to-let-you-work-from-home">How to Get Your Boss to Let You Work From Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-paid-real-money-from-virtual-work">Get Paid Real Money From Virtual Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting blogging chat customer support data entry editing phones proofreading remote jobs telecommuting Tutoring work from home writing Mon, 25 Sep 2017 08:30:10 +0000 Paul Michael 2023632 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Networking Tips for the Recently Unemployed http://www.wisebread.com/7-networking-tips-for-the-recently-unemployed <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-networking-tips-for-the-recently-unemployed" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/having_a_positive_attitude_is_rewarding.jpg" alt="networking tips for the recently unemployed" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Through no fault of your own, you find yourself unemployed. After the immediate shock, how do you start to look for work and connect with people who can get you back into the nine-to-five? Here's some much-needed advice.</p> <h2>1. First, take a breath</h2> <p>Before you go diving into social events, sending out mass emails, and making panicked phone calls, you need to take a little time to regroup. Losing a job is a traumatic experience, and you need to give yourself time to decompress, regroup, and reevaluate.</p> <p>We're not talking about two worry-free weeks vacationing on a beach in Cancun. This is more about not jumping into the stress and fatigue of a job hunt immediately after the stress and fatigue of a job loss. Do anything but networking for the first few days, whether it's spending a week at home tidying up or hanging out with family, heading to the mountains for a weekend, or visiting relatives in another state.</p> <h2>2. Get your ducks in a row before talking to anyone</h2> <p>Now, you're ready to get back in the game. Before you make a call or send an email, you have to be prepared. Is your resume up to date? Do you have a personal website that hosts samples of your most recent work? Do you have all the files needed from the office? If not, you may be able to ask human resources to send you whatever you need; after a layoff, some companies are happy to help employees with the transition (if you're fired, it's a different story).</p> <p>Make sure you also know exactly what you'll say to people. How will you explain being out of work? Why were you let go? Do you even want to bring it up? Some employers may see a layoff as part of life, others may think you were expendable for a reason. You want to have your answers rehearsed, and never play the victim. Don't go jumping into calls unprepared; you only get one chance to make a first impression.</p> <h2>3. Start with people you know well</h2> <p>It may seem like stating the obvious, but when anyone is laid off, they are not always thinking clearly. Often, the first thing people do is to start applying for jobs, and that's all well and good. But your own network of friends, colleagues, and even relatives may have just what you need to get ahead.</p> <p>So, call or email (calling is better) your top prospects. These are people you know well, you share a great relationship with, and potentially have leads for you. If they aren't directly connected to the industry you work in, they could very well know someone who is. And a lot of the time, these kinds of connections lead to job openings that have not even been posted on the employment sites yet.</p> <h2>4. Use sites like LinkedIn to connect with new contacts</h2> <p>LinkedIn is a great way to make new contacts through your existing networks of colleagues and friends. And if you really don't have any kind of connection with anyone, you can still ask to be linked to them. People like to build their networks, and it's usually easy enough to connect and send a message. Don't be shy about telling people your current situation and what you are looking for. If they're not hiring, they may know someone who is. You can also use other social media sites, like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, to let people know you're searching for work.</p> <h2>5. Attend local networking events</h2> <p>In almost every city, you will find opportunities to meet up with people who are in your industry. You can start by looking at a site such as <a href="https://www.meetup.com/" target="_blank">Meetup</a>, which gives you access to hundreds of different groups that meet regularly in your area. This is not just for people who like football or book clubs. The vast range of subjects to choose from makes it easy to hone in on your field, and talk to people who may have opportunities for you.</p> <h2>6. Join online forums and industry-related sites</h2> <p>Online forums are a great way to get advice. If you do an online search for your industry of choice, you should find a few active forums quickly. Also, a site like Reddit has sub-pages (subreddits) on thousands of careers. Join that subreddit, and start commenting and posting as soon as you can. You may quickly connect with someone who knows of a job opening.</p> <h2>7. Do not be afraid to take a break</h2> <p>This is crucial. You can suffer from networking burnout if you go all-in, trying to contact as many people as you can in the first week of your job search. Attending events, making calls, crafting resumes, writing emails, and chatting in forums is a lot of work. And it can also cause you to become incredibly deflated and discouraged when you get very little response in return.</p> <p>The truth is, in almost every industry, you are up against some stiff competition. It can take months to get a great lead that turns into a job interview and offer of employment. So, when you start to feel the pressure, take a day off. Do something that lets you decompress a little. Finding work is a job in and of itself, and you should give yourself the downtime you need to stay healthy and optimistic.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-networking-tips-for-the-recently-unemployed&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Networking%2520Tips%2520For%2520The%2520Recently%2520Unemployed.jpg&amp;description=7%20Networking%20Tips%20for%20the%20Recently%20Unemployed"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Networking%20Tips%20For%20The%20Recently%20Unemployed.jpg" alt="7 Networking Tips for the Recently Unemployed" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-networking-tips-for-the-recently-unemployed">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-crucial-job-searching-steps-most-people-skip">6 Crucial Job Searching Steps Most People Skip</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-a-professional-association-can-boost-your-career">11 Ways a Professional Association Can Boost Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-someone-to-accept-your-linkedin-invitation">How to Get Someone to Accept Your LinkedIn Invitation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting applying connections events job loss LinkedIn networking unemployed Thu, 07 Sep 2017 08:31:07 +0000 Paul Michael 2016467 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Ask for Your Old Job Back After Leaving http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/anxious_woman_during_business_interview.jpg" alt="Anxious woman during business interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Every day, people dream of quitting their jobs to move on to greener pastures. And then, that glorious day happens: You get a new job offer and start planning your &quot;I quit&quot; speech. But for some reason, things don't work out with the new gig. The company folded soon after you started, or maybe the new job just wasn't a good fit. Suddenly, you need to go back to your old job. What do you do now?</p> <h2>First, assess the damage</h2> <p>How did you quit? Was it a polite and respectful resignation letter, with a send-off party and tearful goodbyes? Well, no worries &mdash; in this case you probably won't have much trouble getting your foot back in the door. If you were a great employee, you are a known quantity and need less time to get up to speed; in fact, you're actually a superb candidate.</p> <p>However, not everyone leaves on such good terms. If you quit in spectacular, dramatic fashion, you've got a problem. Still, even burned bridges can be repaired. Take stock of how you left, what you did, and what impression your former employer has of you. Then you can figure out the steps you need to take to get back in their good graces.</p> <h2>Contact current employees that you know</h2> <p>You will know at least a handful of people who still work at the company you quit. Hopefully, you have a great relationship with them. Now is the time to reach out and see exactly what kind of ground you stand on.</p> <p>First and foremost, find out if your old job is even available anymore. It's highly likely the position was filled, but maybe your former colleagues can let you know if there are other suitable positions open.</p> <p>Probe them to also see how management, and the hiring manager in particular, feels about you. Has your name come up a lot in conversation, in a positive or negative way? Are you missed? Would they secretly kill to have you back, or were they glad to see the back of you? The answers to these questions will help you in your approach to your old boss. You don't want to be tone deaf when first approaching him or her about a job.</p> <h2>Lay the groundwork &mdash; carefully</h2> <p>It takes baby steps to get back in the door. You cannot assume that you will be welcomed back with open arms to a ticker-tape parade. Even if you left on the very best terms, you still have to be humble about your approach. And if you parted ways on bad terms, even more so.</p> <p>Start by making a call (not sending an email) to the person responsible for the position you're interested in. Do not go to the human resources department: If you attempt to get the job through the usual channels, you will be doing yourself a disservice. Remember, you have history with this company, and you know people. Human resources is primarily there to protect the company, and they will not be looking to rehire someone who quit. They can get involved once you have gained momentum, and have senior people in the company ready to go to bat for you.</p> <h2>Get ready to eat a whole lot of crow</h2> <p>It's time to kiss your pride goodbye and approach this as you would a partner with whom you've had a falling out &mdash; even if you left on good terms. If you are looking to get your exact same position back, tell the hiring manager that you made a mistake in leaving. You loved your job and you will do whatever it takes to get back in the door. You miss your work colleagues. You miss the food in the cafeteria. You miss Hawaiian shirt Fridays. And be genuine: If you fake this, it will be glaringly obvious.</p> <h2>Make sure you can explain why you left</h2> <p>You still may be asked &quot;If the job was so great, why did you leave in the first place?&quot; That can really stump you if you're not prepared. Here, you will have to be a little economical with the truth, or downplay some of the reasons.</p> <p>For instance, many people leave because of a bad relationship between a boss or coworker. If that boss or coworker is still around, how does that play out? You can explain there were some misunderstandings that got out of hand, or that you had differences that you have worked through and resolved. You can be completely honest if it was something out of your control that didn't work out, like moving to a different state. Just make sure you can allay any fears the hiring manager may have about your return. If they suspect that you could up and leave again, or that you'll cause trouble, you won't get back in.</p> <h2>Be open to getting less for the same role</h2> <p>If you're looking to get your exact same job back, you're in no position to make any kind of demands, and the employer knows this. It's possible that your old company will take you back with the same benefits and salary that you had before, but there's absolutely no guarantee. They know you need this job, and they can play that to their advantage.</p> <p>Now, some companies will have a benefits policy that they have to stick to. For example, if you return within 12 calendar months of leaving, all of your former benefits, including vacation days, sick days, personal days, 401(k) match, and employee discounts will be reinstated. So, if you left the company after 10 years of service, and come back within the year, it could just be a continuation of those 10 years. But not all companies do this.</p> <p>Chances are, if you left with four weeks of vacation per year, you'll be coming back with the standard two weeks. And your salary could be cut to whatever the going market rate is for that position. After years at the company with raises and promotions, you may have left earning more than most people in your position earned. Expect that to be ironed out in your return.</p> <p>Overall, making a return to an old job is very doable. Just be prepared to turn up the charm, make a whole lot of apologies, and start on a lower rung of the ladder than the one on which you left. Good luck.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Ask%2520for%2520Your%2520Old%2520Job%2520Back%2520After%2520Leaving.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Ask%20for%20Your%20Old%20Job%20Back%20After%20Leaving"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Ask%20for%20Your%20Old%20Job%20Back%20After%20Leaving.jpg" alt="How to Ask for Your Old Job Back After Leaving" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-crucial-job-searching-steps-most-people-skip">6 Crucial Job Searching Steps Most People Skip</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting advice applying for jobs eating crow job interviews networking pride quitting Tue, 29 Aug 2017 08:30:08 +0000 Paul Michael 2010038 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Land the Job When You're Overqualified http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/more_than_qualified_for_the_job.jpg" alt="More than qualified for the job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For whatever reason, be it a career change or the need to pay the bills after a layoff, many people apply for jobs that require much less experience than they have. And far too often, it's considered a negative: &quot;Sorry, you're too overqualified.&quot;</p> <p>The employer sees a litany of reasons why you would be a bad fit. They think you'll be unhappy, or take a better job the second one comes along. You may even be gunning for the boss's position.</p> <p>To combat these perceptions, you need to find ways to convince the employer that you are right for the job, regardless of your experience. Here's how to approach it.</p> <h2>Edit your resume to fit the job you want</h2> <p>If your resume is three pages long, and filled with impressive titles and experience, it's a good time to start editing it. You are not lying; you are simply not putting down every single thing you have accomplished.</p> <p>You don't even have to list job titles if you don't want to. Just list the companies you worked for, and then the appropriate experience for each one. Sure, you may well have overseen the international distribution for a major multinational. But did that job also entail getting on the phone and delivering great customer service (regardless of who those customers were)?</p> <p>Find ways to temper some of your achievements. It will seem counterintuitive to everything you've done in your career, but if you want this job, you need to find ways to bring your resume down a peg or two.</p> <h2>Use your industry connections for introductions</h2> <p>A resume and a cover letter, even if they are exceptional and targeted, don't always do the job. You will want to tap into the many connections you have made over the years, and find people who can vouch for you.</p> <p>Ideally, you'll know someone at the company you want to work for. Or, you know someone who knows someone at the company. LinkedIn is an excellent place to find these kinds of connections. When you find the right person, ask them to make the first move for you. A recommendation from someone trusted and reliable is worth far more than any polished resume.</p> <p>They can also talk about what you bring to the table, and why you're a good fit. By the time your over-qualifications come up, you will already be seen as someone who could easily fit the role. And if the salary is right, why not you? They're getting more bang for their buck.</p> <h2>Talk about what you can do for them</h2> <p>Employers are selfish, and rightly so. They are ready to pay you a salary and benefits, so they want someone who will be a good return on that investment. And if you show them that your experience will benefit them, but won't cost them any more, then they'll be all in.</p> <p>One great example comes from the movie <em>The Wolf of Wall Street</em>. After Jordan Belfort loses his job on Wall Street, he can't find a new gig anywhere. Then, he sees an ad for a little brokerage selling penny stocks. When they first see Belfort, they think it's a joke. He's way too qualified. Why would he even set foot in this place? Then, he brings his experience (albeit morally bankrupt experience) to the firm, and before they know it, they're making more money than they ever dreamed of.</p> <p>So, highlight what you can do, not what titles you have earned. Explain how the experience you have is perfect for the job. And remember, only talk about the experience that is relevant to this employer. All your other accolades and achievements are best left out of the conversation.</p> <h2>Explain why you're excited for the position being offered</h2> <p>Money isn't everything. Titles aren't for everyone. Sometimes, people genuinely want to change the course of their careers, and if that's you, you have to find a way to make your potential new employer understand this. You may well have been part of the top brass at your last company, but you could also have become tired of the rat race. You want to take a job with less money and less responsibility, but one that gives you exciting new challenges.</p> <p>Many people in advertising, for instance, find that after they get to the top of the ladder, they are not doing the fun and creative work that they did early on in their careers. For this reason, a lot of creative directors will actually step back from the role, and apply for lower-paying jobs as copywriters and art directors. As long as you can make the case for why you are ready to work for less money and less power, the employer should have no reason not to take your application seriously.</p> <h2>Acknowledge that you know you're taking a step down</h2> <p>If you're the victim of corporate downsizing, you will usually have to find a job quickly to replace the lost income. And that usually means taking whatever is available, even if it's a considerable step down. Hiring managers are wary of candidates in this situation. They believe the overqualified candidate is simply taking the job as a stopgap, and will be looking for something better immediately. The last thing any hiring manager wants to do is be interviewing for that same role a few months down the line. But, this can be addressed early on.</p> <p>Acknowledge that this is a step down for you, in salary and experience. But let the employer know that you also see it as providing a wealth of benefits, including new experiences, new challenges, and perhaps better work-life balance. Assure the employer that this is not a temporary position, but one you are going to dig into and be successful at.</p> <h2>Do not let salary come into play until the last minute</h2> <p>One of the biggest problems that comes with being overqualified is your salary history. As you climbed the ladder of success, your income was right there rising with you. And in your last position, you may have had a most impressive salary. However, now that you're looking for a job that requires less (or different) skills, the money that goes with it will also be less.</p> <p>The easiest way for a human resources manager to sort through candidates is salary expectations, or previous salary. If the current role offers $60,000 a year, and your most recent salary was $100,000, you're going to be rejected in a heartbeat. Why would you even consider this role, they wonder. They don't know your current situation, your wants and needs, and why you're switching to a role that requires less experience.</p> <p>So, don't bring salary into it. If there's a space on the form that must be completed, put $1. If it comes up initially, tell HR that salary is not something you're concerned with right now. You want to focus on being the right person for the job, regardless of money.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Land%2520the%2520Job%2520When%2520Youre%2520Overqualified.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Land%20the%20Job%20When%20Youre%20Overqualified"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Land%20the%20Job%20When%20Youre%20Overqualified.jpg" alt="How to Land the Job When You're Overqualified" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting connections experience interviewing new job overqualified references resumes salary skills Thu, 24 Aug 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 2008287 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Ways to Ace Your Next Phone Interview http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-ace-your-next-phone-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-ways-to-ace-your-next-phone-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/taking_notes_of_her_business_call.jpg" alt="Taking notes of her business call" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A solid resume is important, but rarely is that enough to get you through the door with a prospective employer. If you make it past the first round of recruitment, often you'll also be asked for a phone interview.</p> <p>If you do get asked for a phone interview, are you prepared to blow away the person on the other end of the line? You definitely shouldn't leave it to chance. These tips will guarantee you hit the ball out of the park. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-have-a-successful-skype-or-video-job-interview?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Have a Successful Skype or Video Job Interview</a>)</p> <h2>1. Have everything you need in front of you</h2> <p>Your resume, career notes, research on the company, and anything else that you think will come up in the interview, should be close at hand. When you're on a phone call, the interviewer can easily pick up on the fact that you've left your desk to rummage through a filing cabinet, and the sound of you frantically trying to find what you need will not leave a good impression. It will only make you come across as disorganized and unprepared.</p> <p>Remember, this is a phone interview, so you can use that to your advantage. Tape your information up on the walls around you. Have folders in front of you, organized and ready at a moment's notice. Pull up the website of the employer. You can have everything you need spread around you, which is not an option in a video conference or in-person interview. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/secrets-to-a-great-phone-interview-for-job-hunters?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Secrets to a Great Phone Interview for Job Hunters</a>)</p> <h2>2. Ensure that you will not be interrupted</h2> <p>For any remote job interview, privacy is paramount. You do not want to start the conversation only to have your four-year-old come in and ask for help going to the toilet. You also don't want to have ambient background sounds making it hard to concentrate, such as loud music, heated conversations, or video games.</p> <p>So, if you live with other people, let them know the importance of the interview, and that you need them all to be quiet for the next 30 minutes or so. If you can, take the call in a place that is always quiet &mdash; a home office, a bedroom, or even the basement. And if you lock the door, put a sign on it saying why it's locked. You do not want your family or friends hammering on the door because they want your attention.</p> <p>Also, don't interrupt <em>yourself</em>. It's unprofessional to leave the interview after 15 minutes because you desperately need to use the restroom. Take care of that before you even pick up the phone.</p> <h2>3. Listen carefully for appropriate times to talk</h2> <p>One of the biggest problems with a phone interview is talking over the interviewer. Since you don't have visual cues to work with, you have to rely on natural breaks in the conversation. For some people, this comes easily. For others, it's not as intuitive. You should hold practice conversations with your family and friends to perfect this.</p> <p>You should also be aware of how much you tend to hog the conversation. In person, with your gestures and enthusiasm, it can come across as great passion for the job. But on the phone, you can be seen as a chatterbox who is only interested in talking about yourself.</p> <p>Take your lead from the interviewer. Give answers that are complete, without being verbose. If the interviewer starts to talk while you are talking, they will probably have a question directly related to something you have just said. Pause, and let them get their question out. Remember, most communication is visual, and you do not have that going for you here. Listening is now your most vital sense.</p> <h2>4. Dress almost like you would for an in-person interview</h2> <p>It's tempting to sit there in your most comfortable clothes, perhaps wearing your favorite T-shirt with the holes and the spaghetti sauce stain. This is a huge mistake that many people make when getting ready for a phone interview. Sloppy attire may not be something the person on the phone can see, but your attitude can change dramatically according to what you're wearing.</p> <p>If you dress in lounge attire, you may inadvertently come across as more lax, and less professional. Now, this doesn't mean you have to wear a suit and tie, or spend an hour getting your hair and makeup perfect. But you should make the effort to be clean, presentable, and in clothing that gives you a sense of pride and professionalism.</p> <h2>5. Do not wait until the last minute to get ready</h2> <p>Don't roll out of bed 10 minutes before your interview. You may well think that you can jump on the phone with bed head and morning breath, but this will handicap your attitude and responsiveness from the get-go.</p> <p>It's imperative that you treat a phone interview with the same urgency as an in-person interview, and that means treating it with the respect it deserves. If the interview is in the morning, get up early, shower, clean up, get dressed, eat breakfast, and give yourself plenty of time to get your engine running. If the interview is in the afternoon, do not come home, slouch on the sofa, and wait for the phone to ring. Stay active. Stay alert. Have a cup of tea or coffee, and catch up on the news.</p> <p>Whenever your interview is, you want to come across as prepared, eager, and sharp. Anything else will put you at a disadvantage.</p> <h2>6. Have a list of possible questions and answers at hand</h2> <p>This is another advantage of a phone interview. In person, bringing out a &quot;cheat sheet&quot; of questions and answers would not look good. But over the phone, you can get away with it, so you should definitely prepare this cheat sheet and use it whenever possible.</p> <p>Chances are, you are going to be asked the usual questions: &quot;Why do you want to work here?&quot; or &quot;Where do you see yourself in five years from now?&quot; You will also get the curveball questions, such as &quot;What would you like to ask me about the company?&quot; or &quot;What is your greatest weakness?&quot; These can be stumbling blocks, so prepare for them well in advance.</p> <p>When it comes to any question of weakness, be honest without being too blunt. The old &quot;I think I work too hard&quot; or &quot;I care too much about my colleagues&quot; will set off red flags immediately. Those aren't real weaknesses, and everyone knows it. For example, if you need to improve your public speaking, say so; but say how you are actively working to improve it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-not-to-answer-10-of-the-most-common-interview-questions?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How NOT To Answer 10 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a>)</p> <h2>7. Practice with friends and family</h2> <p>This may seem like overkill, but it can iron out some issues before your actual interview. Give someone you trust the job of calling you, and provide them with some background on the company. Tell them to throw a few curve balls your way, and also ask them to pay attention to how you sound, and how your personality comes across.</p> <p>You may think you have answered some questions beautifully, only to find that you actually came across a little aggressive or snarky. Take the feedback, and use it to improve your performance. You may even want to do a second practice interview to see if the advice you were given was incorporated. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-ways-to-ace-your-next-phone-interview&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Ways%2520to%2520Ace%2520Your%2520Next%2520Phone%2520Interview.jpg&amp;description=7%20Ways%20to%20Ace%20Your%20Next%20Phone%20Interview"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Ways%20to%20Ace%20Your%20Next%20Phone%20Interview.jpg" alt="7 Ways to Ace Your Next Phone Interview" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-ace-your-next-phone-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-websites-that-will-pay-you-to-write-for-them">22 Websites That Will Pay You to Write for Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-ways-to-make-a-good-first-impression-at-your-next-job-interview">13 Ways to Make a Good First Impression at Your Next Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-you-should-ask-at-every-job-interview">5 Questions You Should Ask at Every Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview">10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting conference calls Job Interview meetings phone calls professionalism remote telecommute Mon, 14 Aug 2017 08:30:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1999858 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Leave a Positive Impression on Everyone You Meet http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-leave-a-positive-impression-on-everyone-you-meet <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-leave-a-positive-impression-on-everyone-you-meet" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-599254644.jpg" alt="Woman making positive impression on everyone she meets" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>With the hustle and bustle of life, making a lasting and positive first impression goes a long way. You never know what may come of meeting someone. It can lead to a job, a friendship, or even a romantic relationship. That's why you should always be mindful as to how you're presenting yourself to others and the world. Here's how to show off your best self.</p> <h2>Make eye contact</h2> <p>It feels good to be seen. Let everyone you meet know that you're paying attention and that you're interested in what they have to say. Physically acknowledge them through eye contact. Most people don't know how to make solid eye contact, and it's an incredible habit that will make you memorable to others. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-ways-to-make-a-good-first-impression-at-your-next-job-interview?ref=seealso" target="_blank">13 Ways to Make a Good First Impression at Your Next Job Interview</a>)</p> <h2>Listen</h2> <p>Put your phone away and really listen to people when they speak to you. Be there 100 percent. And don't just wait for your turn to talk. Take in what someone else is saying, let it sink in, and respond. Listening is an underrated skill. It's such an effortless way to make someone else feel valued. I've often found that being a good listener has helped me learn and grow in ways I never imagined. And yes, people remember me because I so vividly remember our conversations.</p> <h2>Ask concise, insightful questions</h2> <p>I'm known for my curiosity and questioning nature. I find people fascinating, and I like to learn as much about them as I can. My ability to quickly assimilate information and make conversation that's far beyond cocktail party smalltalk has dramatically improved my life and career. I've made lifelong friends through chance meetings based on creating meaningful conversations with people I have just met, and you can, too.</p> <p>Don't ask the questions everyone asks. Don't be invasive, but make your questions interesting. And show you're paying attention to their answers by asking follow-up questions. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-terrible-money-moves-to-avoid-on-the-first-date?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Terrible Money Moves to Avoid on the First Date</a>)</p> <h2>Be open</h2> <p>The more open you are about your life and experiences, the more comfort you will engender in others. That comfort leads to the kind of openness and honesty that our society needs now more than ever. By putting out positive energy and being open, goodness comes back to us many times over. Vow to make meeting you the best part of someone's day.</p> <h2>Be sure to follow up</h2> <p>Did you have a great conversation with someone? Did you meet someone interesting and you want to learn more about them? Did you promise to follow up with someone or did they ask you to follow up with them?</p> <p>If you answered yes to any of these questions, make sure to follow through. Send that email. Connect on social media. Make the phone call. If you promise to do something and do it, you show your integrity and genuine interest. People won't forget that.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-leave-a-positive-impression-on-everyone-you-meet&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Leave%2520a%2520Positive%2520Impression%2520on%2520Everyone%2520You%2520Meet.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Leave%20a%20Positive%20Impression%20on%20Everyone%20You%20Meet"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <div align="center"> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Leave%20a%20Positive%20Impression%20on%20Everyone%20You%20Meet.jpg" alt="How to Leave a Positive Impression on Everyone You Meet" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/christa-avampato">Christa Avampato</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-leave-a-positive-impression-on-everyone-you-meet">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance">4 Best Jobs for Work Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-common-job-hunt-tips-you-should-ignore">8 Common Job-Hunt Tips You Should Ignore</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-guide-to-getting-a-job-right-out-of-college">Your Guide to Getting a Job Right Out of College</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting Lifestyle career first impressions job hunting Tue, 01 Aug 2017 09:00:04 +0000 Christa Avampato 1994510 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Job Myths Boomers Should Stop Believing http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-myths-boomers-should-stop-believing <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-job-myths-boomers-should-stop-believing" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/desperate_businessmen.jpg" alt="Desperate businessmen" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you were born between the early 1940s and the early 1960s, you are considered a baby boomer. And that means that in the year 2017, you are considered to be at the late stage of your career.</p> <p>However, as we all know, times have changed. Very few people can expect to start at a company in their 20s and retire with a gold watch in their 60s. Layoffs and downsizing are commonplace. But with these employment fears come myths that many baby boomers still firmly believe in. It's time to bust them once and for all.</p> <h2>1. Once you hit a certain age, you're unemployable</h2> <p>Let's make it clear: Getting a job in your 20s and 30s is always going to be easier than getting hired in your 50s and 60s. There are certain expectations about pay, and as we get older, we have more health concerns and less energy than we did at the start of our careers. But there's a difference between hard and impossible. If you have the skills, the drive, and the right attitude, you will be valued and you will get job offers.</p> <p>The key is to stop shooting yourself in the foot by believing that your age is an anchor. There are pros and cons for every stage of our career. Early on, we're too young and have no experience, but we're cheaper and are willing to work longer hours. At the height of our careers, we sacrifice time with our families for ladder-climbing, but the pay and rewards are there. Later, we can be considered too expensive for the open positions, but we have the experience and wisdom that employers crave. It's all give and take. Market yourself with the strengths that come from a long and successful career, and how those strengths can benefit your potential new boss.</p> <h2>2. You're too old to retrain</h2> <p>They say you can't teach an old dog new tricks, but that's a complete fallacy. In fact, to continue the analogy, skilled animal trainers can take an old dog with behavioral problems, and make it a loving, family-friendly pet. While it's true that it's a little harder to pick up certain skills later in life, it's not even close to being unmanageable.</p> <p>As <em>The Telegraph</em> reported in 2014, more middle-aged workers are <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/jobs/10555895/Youre-over-50-Great-youre-hired.html" target="_blank">retraining for new careers</a> as a response to their original careers dying out, or being too physically taxing. And in 2013, almost 12,000 people over age 50 in the U.K. found apprenticeships in health care and public services. In 2015, Time magazine reported that the job market was hot for <a href="http://time.com/money/3725034/jobs-older-workers-improved/" target="_blank">workers over the age of 50</a>.</p> <h2>3. Older workers are not as valued as their younger counterparts</h2> <p>You've probably heard some of these degrading statements thrown around the office (or even used them yourself at the start of your career): &quot;That guy's a dinosaur, don't listen to him,&quot; or &quot;She's been here for decades, she's not up on the latest news.&quot; It's complete nonsense.</p> <p>With age comes experience and wisdom, and the ability to solve problems much faster than those who are just starting to climb the ladder. Consider the story of Picasso. One day he was sketching in the park, when he was approached by a young woman who asked him to sketch her portrait. In a single pencil stroke that took just a few seconds, he captured her likeness completely. When asked how much she owed him, he said $5,000. Taken aback, she asked how he dare ask so much for something that took only a few seconds, to which he replied, &quot;Madame, it took me my entire life.&quot;</p> <p>This is so true of the experience you bring to the table. You have spent decades learning how to do things, how <em>not</em> to do things, and how to cut to the chase. Time is valued by employers, and if you can prove that your skills can save them time and money, age is just a number.</p> <h2>4. If you take time off or retire, you'll never get rehired</h2> <p>Retirement is not forever. You may decide to retire, then realize that you still want to be part of the workforce. Don't think that a gap of a few years at the end of your resume is going to tarnish it. The break between one career and a new venture is actually going to be looked upon favorably by employers. They will see that you have taken time off to reboot, clear your head, relax, and figure out how you want to spend the next decade of your life.</p> <p>So, feel free to take a break and recharge. Use the time to work out what you really want to do. Maybe retirement is just what you want. Maybe you want to try your hand at something completely different. When you start looking again, you will have options open to you.</p> <h2>5. Only part-time work is available for older workers</h2> <p>Once again, this is untrue in the present climate. In 1995, you could make a case for that argument. Back then, around 56 percent of the over-65 workforce was part time, with 44 percent being full-time. But by 2007, <a href="https://stats.bls.gov/spotlight/2008/older_workers/" target="_blank">those figures had completely reversed</a>, with 56 percent of the over-65 workforce now in full-time work, and just 44 percent doing part-time jobs.</p> <p>So, what kind of jobs are available? Well, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the majority of people over 55 are working in management positions, sales, and office jobs. Next comes the service industry, followed by production, transportation, construction, and maintenance. If the last two seem surprising, consider that we are living longer, and have made great advances in medical care. It's now possible for a 55+ man or woman to enter the construction and maintenance industries and enjoy great success, despite what they may believe about being too old for manual labor.</p> <h2>6. There are only certain jobs available to me</h2> <p>Greeter at a grocery store. Fast food server. Security guard at the mall. Delivering newspapers. Driving a cab or a school bus. The list goes on. These are the jobs many baby boomers think are in their future.</p> <p>However, while those jobs are available for those who genuinely want them, your options are much broader, and exciting. One of the most popular options right now is retraining to become an interior designer. If you have the eye for it, you can make great money on a schedule that suits you. Other options include working on a cruise ship, planning weddings, public speaking, casino work, consulting, and seasonal opportunities at ski lodges and resorts. The world is your oyster, especially if you're open to doing some traveling and taking a few leaps.</p> <p>Remember: As a baby boomer, you may have fewer years of your career in front of you than behind you, but that does not mean you have just a few paths to follow. With drive, enthusiasm, and the willingness to retrain, you can do almost anything you set your mind to.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-job-myths-boomers-should-stop-believing&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Job%2520Myths%2520Boomers%2520Should%2520Stop%2520Believing.jpg&amp;description=6%20Job%20Myths%20Boomers%20Should%20Stop%20Believing"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Job%20Myths%20Boomers%20Should%20Stop%20Believing.jpg" alt="6 Job Myths Boomers Should Stop Believing" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-myths-boomers-should-stop-believing">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-dream-jobs-youre-never-too-old-to-pursue">9 Dream Jobs You&#039;re Never Too Old to Pursue</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-escape-a-dying-industry">8 Ways to Escape a Dying Industry</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-work-from-home-jobs-for-people-who-hate-talking-on-the-phone">7 Work-From-Home Jobs for People Who Hate Talking on the Phone</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting age baby boomers experience job skills middle age myths rehired too old training unemployment Mon, 17 Jul 2017 09:00:10 +0000 Paul Michael 1981839 at http://www.wisebread.com These 17 Companies Will Help You Repay Your Student Loan http://www.wisebread.com/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/saving_for_education.jpg" alt="Saving for education" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Student loans can dampen the ability of new grads to get on their feet financially, causing stress at home and at work. According to Student Loan Hero, the graduating class of 2016 had an average student loan balance of $37,172 &mdash; up six percent from the year before.</p> <p>While it's daunting to see that number rise, the good news is that, in an effort to recruit and retain the best hires, a growing number of employers have started programs to help employees pay back those hefty student loans. Here are a few of those companies helping workers get out of debt.</p> <h2>1. Chegg</h2> <p>In April 2015, tutoring and study services company Chegg announced its college loan reduction plan for full-time employees in partnership with Tuition.IO, a company that provides a web-based platform for tracking and managing student loan payments. This benefit has an annual cap of $1,000 (less taxes), but has no cap on the total amount an employee can receive.</p> <h2>2. ChowNow</h2> <p>ChowNow has found this perk so useful in hiring talent that the company decided to double it from when it first started offering it to employees. The Los Angeles-based online food ordering company has an employer-paid student loan assistance program that matches up to $1,000 a year of employee payments.</p> <h2>3. CommonBond</h2> <p>Since December 2016, this lending marketplace platform has been granting $100 per month to its employees to pay down student loans. While CommonBond limits the perk at $1,200 per year, the company continues helping its employees until they fully pay off their student loans. Employees also have the option to refinance their student loans with CommonBond. On average, student borrowers save over $14,000 when refinancing through CommonBond, according to the company.</p> <h2>4. Credit Suisse</h2> <p>The financial services company doesn't offer a lump sum benefit to its employees, but instead provides a 0.25 percent discount on interest rates to workers that refinance their student loans with online lender SoFi.</p> <h2>5. Connelly Partners</h2> <p>Boston-based ad agency Connelly Partners works with Gradifi to offer a student loan repayment plan that improves the longer the employee stays with the company. Like a 401(k) plan, the agency matches up to $100 per month of its employees' debt payments. Employees who stick around for at least six months receive a $1,000 student loan payment bonus. Those who work for the company for five years receive another $1,000 bonus for the sixth year.</p> <h2>6. Fidelity Investments</h2> <p>The financial services firm makes an annual $2,000 direct payment to employees' student loan servicers, up to a total of $10,000. If your career with Fidelity requires you to continue your education, then Fidelity will reimburse you 90 percent of qualifying costs (up to $10,000 per year) of a work-related degree or certification program. You must have worked for the company for at least six months to qualify.</p> <h2>7. Kronos</h2> <p>Based in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, the workforce management software provider has partnered with solutions provider Student Loan Genius to pay up to $500 per year to help employees pay down student debt.</p> <h2>8. LendEDU</h2> <p>Since February 2016, the online marketplace for student loan financing has paid $2,400 per year ($200 per month) to employees with student loan debt.</p> <h2>9. Martin Health System</h2> <p>Employees working in the nursing field at Martin Health System in Florida can receive up to $2,000 per year to help pay down their student loans. In addition to this benefit from Martin Health System, Florida nurses can also work in areas with staff shortages to qualify for the state's Nursing Student Loan Forgiveness Program or the federal Perkins Loan Cancellation for Nurses and Medical Technicians.</p> <h2>10. Moonlite Bunny Ranch</h2> <p>In 2015, Dennis Hof, the owner of the legal brothel Moonlite Bunny Ranch in Nevada, promised to match 100 percent of his employees' student loan payments for two months, up to the full amount that they made during that period.</p> <h2>11. Natixis Global Asset Management</h2> <p>All Natixis employees receive an annual $1,000 student loan repayment benefit, up to $10,000 over a 10-year period. The company used to require that workers reached five years of employment in order to receive a lump sum benefit of $5,000, but did away with the requirement in July 2016.</p> <h2>12. Nvidia</h2> <p>This computing giant offers comprehensive student loan repayment options. First, employees working at least 20 hours per week who graduated within the previous three years can apply for a reimbursement of $6,000 a year for qualifying student loan payments, up to $30,000. Second, employees who successfully refinance their student loans with SoFi receive a bonus ranging from $200 to $500 and pay no loan origination fees. Third, employees who need to go back to college can receive a reimbursement of up to $5,250 each year for qualified job-related educational expenses, including tuition and books, as long as they earn at least a B average.</p> <h2>13. Powertex</h2> <p>The clothing design company was among the first businesses in Wisconsin to partner with Gradifi to offer a student loan repayment assistance program. Powertex gives eligible employees $100 per month for student loan payments for up to six years.</p> <h2>14. PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC)</h2> <p>Associates and senior associates at the consulting firm receive $100 per month ($1,200 a year) toward student loan payments for up to six years.</p> <h2>15. SoFi</h2> <p>Many employers partner with SoFi to offer a student loan repayment assistance program. The online lender also offers its own eligible employees $200 per month to help them fully pay back student loans.</p> <h2>16. Staples</h2> <p>The office supply retailer offers top-performing full-time employees $100 a month for three years, for a total of $3,600 in student loan assistance. To maintain their eligibility, employees must meet set criteria throughout the entire three years.</p> <h2>17. Aetna</h2> <p>As of January 2017, the health care company matches employees' student loan payments of up to $2,000 per year, with a lifetime maximum of $10,000. The program is available to employees who have graduated within the previous three years from an accredited institution.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthese-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThese%252017%2520Companies%2520Will%2520Help%2520You%2520Repay%2520Your%2520Student%2520Loan_0.jpg&amp;description=These%2017%20Companies%20Will%20Help%20You%20Repay%20Your%20Student%20Loan"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/These%2017%20Companies%20Will%20Help%20You%20Repay%20Your%20Student%20Loan_0.jpg" alt="These 17 Companies Will Help You Repay Your Student Loan" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-didn-t-learn-in-college-but-you-should-have">10 Things You Didn’t Learn in College (but You Should Have)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stop-student-loans-from-ruining-your-life">How to Stop Student Loans From Ruining Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-get-student-loan-debt-forgiveness">8 Ways to Get Student Loan Debt Forgiveness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-job-hunting-roadblocks-millennials-must-overcome">5 Job Hunting Roadblocks Millennials Must Overcome</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-every-new-college-student-should-make">7 Money Moves Every New College Student Should Make</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Job Hunting college companies contributions education employee benefits jobs loan repayment plans student loans Thu, 22 Jun 2017 09:00:10 +0000 Damian Davila 1968233 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/leading_a_great_team_to_success.jpg" alt="Leading a great team to success" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Some people have a dream job; others have a dream company. If your dream gig is more of a &quot;who&quot; than a &quot;what,&quot; you'll need to switch up your job-hunting technique. Use these tips, and hiring managers will be eager to extend you an offer at your dream company.</p> <h2>1. Do your homework</h2> <p>You'll give yourself a better fighting chance if you've done your homework before any face-to-face meeting. Find out who the C-level executives are and what the company's mission statement is. This ground-floor research will help you decide if the company's views are in line with your long-term objectives. It'll also demonstrate your dedication when interview day arrives.</p> <p>&quot;This means reading about the company in a variety of places &mdash; their own PR and website, articles about the company in industry publications, and the press,&quot; says human resources expert Laura MacLeod, founder of From the Inside Out Project. &quot;Try to find someone who works or has worked at the company and pick their brain. Try your connections and '2nd degree connections' on LinkedIn.&quot;</p> <p>Once you've done your research, use what you find to focus your pitch. Think about how you'll contribute to the company culture and its bottom line. Make your best case on why you're the best choice for the position.</p> <h2>2. Approach your search actively</h2> <p>If you're limiting your job search to passive online applications, you may be waiting a while for a call. Instead, take a more active approach to getting what you want by letting the decision-makers within the company's &quot;<em>hire-archy</em>&quot; know who you are and what you want.</p> <p>&quot;Your dream company is almost certainly looking for assertiveness, and this means attacking the process from the beginning,&quot; explains Ryan Naylor, CEO and founder of LocalWork.com. &quot;When you hear about the job, whether it's through online job boards or an acquaintance, find a way to make contact with someone. Reach out through your network, locate someone within the ranks, and send them an email or call them on the phone. Use networking tools such as LinkedIn and even Facebook. If you make contact, you have a much better shot at getting that prized interview.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Take advantage of social media</h2> <p>Of course, the best people to network with are those on the inside &mdash; but don't discount those on the outside, either. Creating a rapport with your dream company's clients and associates could turn into a good word on your behalf. It may be a slow build toward the end goal (you'll want to establish a relationship before asking for references or favors), but if patience is your virtue, you can succeed in this endeavor.</p> <p>Social media is a great way to make these connections. Check out the various platforms used by your dream company, and engage. Social media managers will then see that you're a constant presence and interested in the company. Leave comments and start conversations. This could be a great transition into reaching out directly via the platforms' messaging systems to inquire about how you can become part of the narrative permanently.</p> <p>Some larger companies, like Google and Huffington Post, also have separate social media accounts just for job openings. If your dream company has a Twitter, Facebook, or other social media platform just for recruiting talent, be sure to give it a follow and check the feed regularly.</p> <h2>3. Set daily progress goals</h2> <p>Looking for a new job is a marathon, not a sprint. You can't expect to land an interview because you sent over one email attachment detailing your accomplishments. Sometimes it happens like that, but companies that have their pick of the litter usual require a bit more involvement in the hiring process. You need to remind them you're in it to win it, regularly.</p> <p>&quot;Do something every day that gets you one step closer to achieving the interview and the job,&quot; advises corporate trainer Chavaz Kingman. &quot;The more often you submerge yourself in your dream company's ideals and goals, the more easily you'll be able to discuss these goals and ideals in your interview, and in turn on the job.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Adopt a &quot;whatever it takes&quot; attitude</h2> <p>Maybe you get a job offer from your dream company, but it's not exactly the position you wanted. Should you take it anyway? If your goal is getting your foot in the door by any means necessary, then yes. There are other factors to consider, such as taking a potential pay cut &mdash; you may be OK with it, or you may need to negotiate a salary you're more comfortable with. Either way, if you can make it work to accept this position, you should take it. The opportunity to work for your dream company may not come again.</p> <p>Once you're hired, you can really make an effort to shine. Keep up the good work, and it will eventually show management you'd be better suited for the position you really want. Don't go stepping on anybody's toes to get there &mdash; you won't make any friends that way &mdash; but go above and beyond whatever your current job is so your boss will see that you're a dedicated worker.</p> <h2>5. Brush up on basic job-hunting techniques</h2> <p>Getting hired by your dream company takes a little extra legwork, but that doesn't mean you can skip the basics. First, polish up your resume to make sure it's current, spell-checked, and tailored to align with the company's needs. Focus on your successes and achievements, especially any that might be relevant to the job you want. (<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a>)</p> <p>Then, prepare for interviews. Yeah, this might be old hat to you by now, but you'll only increase your chances of nailing it if you go in confident and ready to slay. Ask other professionals you know if they'd be willing to give you a practice run and an honest critique. Have them test your knowledge of the subject matter and familiarity with the company background. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-not-to-answer-10-of-the-most-common-interview-questions?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How NOT TO Answer 10 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a>)</p> <p>Kingman suggests using the S.T.A.R. method when asked to discuss previous work accomplishments. Describe the Situation you were in; the Task you were assigned; the Action you took; and the positive Result of your contribution.</p> <p>Last but not least, do a thorough <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-clean-up-your-image-on-social-media" target="_blank">social media cleanup</a>. Get rid of unflattering photos, questionable text posts, and anything else inappropriate. Double check your privacy settings, and then view your profiles as an outsider to see what's still visible. Social media searches are a fast way for a company to get an instant feel for your moral character and &quot;real&quot; personality &mdash; don't let a few drunk selfies derail your chance at your dream gig.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview">10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/video-resumes-and-5-other-cool-tricks-to-land-the-job">Video Resumes and 5 Other Cool Tricks to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting dream company dream job getting hired interviewing new job research social media strategies techniques Mon, 05 Jun 2017 08:30:13 +0000 Mikey Rox 1955702 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/interview_panel.jpg" alt="Interview panel" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Looking for a job can be tricky when you already have one. You want to take your career to the next level, but you don't want to risk the job you currently have &mdash; which can happen if your employer finds out you're trying to jump ship.</p> <p>Use these tips to keep your search a secret until you're ready to put in your two weeks' notice:</p> <h2>Keep your job search to yourself</h2> <p>There's no need to tell anyone else about your job search, least of all your coworkers. It doesn't matter how close you are, it's still none of their business. Loyalty is a fickle beast when positions are up for grabs, and if your coworkers see a chance to get a leg up, you may find yourself thrown under a proverbial bus. Rumors can spread like wildfire, and they'll eventually hit the boss. You could compromise your current employment if you don't have control of the narrative. Best to say nothing at all.</p> <h2>Stay away from company equipment</h2> <p>Using company equipment to conduct a job search seems like an obvious no-no, but you'd be surprised how many people don't recognize the risk until they get caught. Your activities may be monitored, and it'll be hard to explain yourself when IT has proof that you're wasting company time and resources to further your career elsewhere.</p> <p>Always use your personal computer and mobile devices to look for jobs and respond to emails, and only provide your personal phone numbers for calls. Don't use the office copier or fax for resume or other job-search materials, either; you could accidentally leave your resume on the machines, thereby ratting on yourself.</p> <h2>Continue giving 100 percent at your current job</h2> <p>Remember when you were a senior in high school? It was so hard to put forth the effort during that last week of class. It's common to adopt a similar attitude when you're planning to leave a job. You might tell yourself that you'll be gone soon anyway, so why bother trying to impress anyone? But this is a dangerous mentality. It's important to remain professional until the day your tenure ends at your current position.</p> <p>&quot;Don't ease off the gas just because you are thinking about leaving,&quot; says Ryan Naylor, CEO and founder of LocalWork.com. &quot;Maybe that new job won't come, or maybe you want a good referral later. If you do leave, you want to leave behind a continued path of goodwill, not burned bridges.&quot;</p> <h2>Don't announce your intentions on social media</h2> <p>Even though you think your social media accounts are &quot;private,&quot; remain cautious. People are nosy, and it's common practice these days for employers to check in on their employees' social media presence. If you don't say anything, you don't have to explain anything. This is especially true on LinkedIn; use the service to search for open positions and network with contacts, but don't outwardly declare that you're looking for a new job. It's almost guaranteed to get back to your employer.</p> <p>Nancy Schuman, chief marketing officer at recruitment firm Lloyd Staffing, adds, &quot;Make your activity stream on LinkedIn private and turn off broadcasts. Don't list your current employer by name on your resume. Instead, describe it as a 'large financial institution,' 'a well- known consumer products company,' etc.&quot;</p> <p>Same goes for Facebook, Twitter, and any other platforms you use. You may not be directly connected to your boss, but chances are you're connected to someone you work with, or someone who knows someone you work with. These services may help you make connections faster, but it's best to target individuals in your network directly who may be able to help you. It'll certainly be less dangerous than making a blanket post on Facebook about how you'd like a better job.</p> <h2>Don't send resumes to blind ads</h2> <p>When applying for positions, make sure you know to whom you're sending your resume and information. On platforms like Craigslist, often the job description is listed but the employer remains anonymous. This could spell trouble if you inadvertently respond to an ad your current employer is running.</p> <p>Certified career coach Cheryl Palmer relays a story of a job seeker who made that mistake.</p> <p>&quot;A woman once told me that her coworker responded to a blind ad and then was confronted a short while later by someone in the company from Human Resources,&quot; she says. &quot;The HR professional asked her if she was looking for another job. The woman lied and said no. The HR professional responded, 'I got your resume.' It turned out that the job that this woman had unwittingly applied for was at her own company.&quot;</p> <p>If you're posting to job boards, do that anonymously as well. You never know who's on there. If HR is searching for candidates for your office and they find you, you'll have some explaining to do.</p> <h2>Keep your interview attire in your car</h2> <p>Try not to take time off work to go on job interviews, if only to avoid raising a red flag on why your attendance is suddenly sporadic. If need be, schedule interviews during your lunch break or possibly after work. If there's no wiggle room, as a last resort, take one day off from your current job and try to schedule multiple interviews on that day.</p> <p>To expedite the interview process during work hours &mdash; like lunchtime, for instance &mdash; keep interview attire in your vehicle so you can change in and out of it at a discreet location. A suit and tie will be a dead giveaway if you normally wear jeans and a polo. You can only use the &quot;I have a funeral to attend after work&quot; excuse so many times before your coworkers start to think you're an agent of death.</p> <h2>Use references outside your current company</h2> <p>If you're trying to keep your job search a secret, why would you list your current employer as a reference? Surely you can find other people to vouch for you who don't have the power to fire you for making poor decisions.</p> <p>To avoid this predicament, Schuman suggests letting a prospective employer know that you will offer a current reference once you have a job offer. &quot;But do have other references lined up who know you and your work well for them to contact in the interim,&quot; she adds.</p> <h2>Ask for confidentiality at your interview</h2> <p>You may even go so far as to ask the person with whom you're interviewing not to reach out to your current employer. Just mention that you'd rather keep your current employer out of it; most hiring managers will understand.</p> <p>Schuman suggests, &quot;If you are working with a recruiter, tell them your confidentiality must be maintained; ask to be made aware of all prospective opportunities <em>before</em> your resume is referred.&quot;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jumpstart-your-job-search-with-instagram">Jumpstart Your Job Search With Instagram</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting career confidentiality discreet interviewing new jobs privacy resumes social media work Thu, 01 Jun 2017 08:30:18 +0000 Mikey Rox 1957429 at http://www.wisebread.com The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/confident_young_job_applicant.jpg" alt="Confident young job applicant" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Interviewing for a new position can be stressful. It's also a balancing act that can take time, and practice, to perfect.</p> <p>When it comes to salary expectations, the pressure increases exponentially. How much will they pay you? How much dare you ask for? What about benefits, and other deciding factors? The way you play this game can put thousands of extra dollars in your paycheck. So how should you bring it up?</p> <h2>When to discuss salary</h2> <p>There are a few different schools of thought on this. Some people say that you should wait until the person asking the questions mentions it. If they don't bring it up, you stay silent and wait for the next interview (if there is one). Others say that you should bring it up yourself if the interviewer doesn't mention it or skates around the subject. And some people are of the firm belief that you should only discuss salary once you've been offered the job.</p> <p>The fact is, there's no right or wrong answer here. You have to get a feel for how the interview process is going, and also the demeanor of the person doing the interview. If you have an instant rapport with this interviewer, and the meeting is going exceptionally well, you can be fairly confident that bringing up the subject of salary without being prompted will be OK.</p> <p>However, if you have one of those interviews with a cold interviewer behind the desk and very little chitchat, asking about salary in an already tense atmosphere could just make things worse.</p> <p>If the interviewer starts talking about the subject, without actually mentioning salary directly (for instance, they discuss benefits packages, paid time off, sick leave, and so on) then you have a natural &quot;in&quot; to bring it up.</p> <h2>Salary research is imperative</h2> <p>Chances are you already know the salary range for this position. If you don't, be prepared. Before you go into the first interview, or even apply for the job, do your research. Look on sites like Salary.com and Glassdoor.com to find the salaries of people in the position for which you're applying. Get a good range. Then, look at what different companies are paying for that role, and how that salary differs from state to state (or even country to country).</p> <p>You need to understand what you are worth and what the market will pay for someone with your skills and expertise. When you have that information, you put yourself in a position of confidence. Knowledge is power, and you will have a much stronger negotiating position if you have the research to back you up.</p> <h2>Use the anchoring technique</h2> <p>It's a technique widely used by people in sales, advertising, and marketing, and it works. Contrary to popular opinion, <em>you</em> need to come out with the first number in the interview. Old school interviewers and interviewees will say this is risky because you could name a number so high it disqualifies you, or so low you'll miss out on more money. Actually, as long as you've done your research, it's good business, and puts you in control of the discussion. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-simple-negotiating-trick-puts-money-in-your-pocket?ref=seealso" target="_blank">This Simple Negotiating Trick Puts Money in Your Pocket</a>)</p> <p>Let's take a hypothetical: You know that this position is worth, say $95,000 a year plus benefits. You also know that you are highly-qualified, have a superb resume, impeccable references, and that the company in question has had trouble filling the role. Therefore, you ask for much more than $95,000. Start at $120,000, or more. You have good reason to want this much money. You are worth it, and every day the company does not have this role filled, they are wasting time and money looking for a candidate. If they really want you, they'll pay it. If they don't, they won't.</p> <p>By anchoring the interviewer to a higher figure, you can eventually haggle your way to a salary that you are comfortable taking &mdash; say $100,000, which may be $5,000 more than the company wanted to spend, but $20,000 less than your asking price. Everyone's a winner.</p> <h2>How to tackle some of the tricky salary questions</h2> <p>You are going to get asked about salary in a variety of ways. Remember, you're in a negotiation; you want the most money for the role and they want to pay as little as possible. Here are some typical questions, and how to handle them.</p> <h2>&quot;What kind of salary range are you looking for?&quot;</h2> <p>Think about that for a second. It's a ridiculous question. They're asking you, &quot;What is the least amount of money you would be willing to take for this role, and what is your high-end?&quot; Do you think they're going to give you the top end of your salary range? Of course not, you've already told them how cheaply they can get you.</p> <p>So, narrow the answer down to something that gives very little wiggle room. For example, &quot;I'm looking for a salary in the high $90s&quot; focuses on a salary that's at least $97,000 a year. If you say &quot;$90,000&ndash;$100,000,&quot; guess what &hellip; you're getting $90,000.</p> <h2>&quot;How much are you currently making?&quot;</h2> <p>This is another nasty question, although it may seem like a perfectly innocent one to ask. You may currently be earning $60,000 a year, but so what? After doing the research, paired with your experience, you know you should be getting at least $80,000 a year for the job to which you're applying.</p> <p>Don't fall into this trap, because you are selling yourself short. Simply answer with something like, &quot;It's an apples to oranges comparison to compare my current salary to this role. If you supply me with more information about the role, the benefits package, the hours, the workload, and so on, I can let you know what salary I am looking for.&quot;</p> <h2>&quot;What are your salary expectations?&quot;</h2> <p>&quot;Ummm &hellip; I'd like as much money as possible please!&quot; Clearly, that's not the right answer, but that's what you're thinking. Again, you need to be realistic based on the research you've done, your current level of experience, and what you can bring to this new firm. There is no harm in saying &quot;That's not a question I can answer until I have a much better grasp on the requirements of the position, and what benefits come with it.&quot;</p> <h2>&quot;We really want you, but can't afford you. Would you take a pay cut?&quot;</h2> <p>If you've already named your price and they ask you this question, don't give up. If they really want you, they should be willing to pay. This is a sly way of setting your expectations low. They're saying &quot;We're cheap, we want to pay the minimum.&quot;</p> <p>Well, until you know what that minimum is, you cannot possibly answer this question. Never say, &quot;I'd consider it,&quot; or, &quot;Sure, if that's what it takes to get my foot in the door.&quot; That's just rolling over for them. Instead, make them put the entire offer on the table first, including benefits, travel allowances, vacation time, sick time, and so on. It's possible that you could take less money than you're earning now if they give you other concessions, like working only four days a week, working remotely, or getting six weeks of paid time off.</p> <p>Remember, salary negotiation is a crucial part of the interview process, but you should not be chastised for wanting a good living wage. Good luck out there.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting advice anchoring technique interviewing negotiations new jobs pay questions research salary strategies wages Tue, 23 May 2017 09:00:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1951908 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Have a Successful Skype or Video Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-have-a-successful-skype-or-video-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-have-a-successful-skype-or-video-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-656378092.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We all had a good laugh over the British journalist <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mh4f9AYRCZY" target="_blank">being upstaged by his kids</a> while trying to give a BBC video interview. All laughs aside, it did bring up an important subject: How do you conduct a great video interview for a new job?</p> <p>It's now possible to interview for positions all over the country, if not the world, using modern technology. It's also easy to get distracted or interrupted. If you're getting ready to jump online for your next interview, follow these steps for success.</p> <h2>1. Clean up the area</h2> <p>It's imperative that you have everything you need at hand before starting the video interview, including a clean home office. Organize your workspace thoroughly, clean the desk, and tidy up the room. You may look the part, but a messy, disorganized background can send red flags to the interviewer.</p> <p>If you really don't have the time or ability to clean up the space behind you, consider a backdrop. Something as simple as a plain bedsheet (nothing patterned or &quot;loud&quot;) hung from the ceiling can work. Black or gray works best, but as long as it doesn't distract, it will do the job.</p> <h2>2. Look directly into the camera</h2> <p>This cannot be emphasized enough &mdash; the camera lens should be treated like the eyes of the person interviewing you. If you don't focus your attention there, you're not making eye contact with the interviewer, and that can come across just as rude as if you were doing it face-to-face.</p> <p>There are a few steps you can take to make this easier. First, you could place something next to the camera, like a bright sticky note (you can even draw eyes on it as a reminder). Throughout the interview, that will prompt you to focus your gaze there.</p> <p>Another option is to turn off the webcam preview that shows you what your interviewer is looking at &mdash; you. It's in our nature to look at ourselves, and when we see that little window with our picture in it, our eyes immediately wander there. By turning that off, you'll be much more inclined to look at the camera.</p> <h2>3. Go to the bathroom first</h2> <p>It may sound like a no-brainer, but before you know it, you're shifting in your seat five minutes into a one-hour interview. This is not good. Not only will the interviewer pick up on how uncomfortable you are, but it will totally hamstring your performance. You won't be able to think clearly, your responses will be rushed, and you might even start sweating.</p> <p>Do yourself a favor: Go to the bathroom beforehand, even if you're not feeling the need. And don't drink a lot of water right before you start.</p> <h2>4. Keep the interview room off-limits</h2> <p>If there's one thing we can take from the poor journalist being interrupted by his kids, it's that he should have found a way to secure the room. If you have the ability to lock the door, do it. If you don't, consider putting a bolt on the door, or use something to block the entrance (as long as it isn't showing on camera).</p> <p>Take it a step further and ask the people you live with if they'd be willing to step out of the house when the interview is scheduled. Even if the room is secured, noises from outside the room can still be very distracting. Ideally, you want a quiet room in an empty house.</p> <h2>5. Do your homework</h2> <p>Just like any other interview, you need to have your ducks in a row. With a video interview, your facial expressions are actually more apparent, because that is all the interviewer will be focusing on. So, when you're stumped on a question, or struggling to find a reply, it will really show.</p> <p>To avoid that, spend time studying the company. Prepare a series of questions to ask the interviewer. Do a practice run with a friend or colleague. Make sure you know as much as you possibly can, and then, practice a great response for questions that really will stump you.</p> <h2>6. Check the equipment thoroughly</h2> <p>Any time anyone does something live, they fear gremlins in the works. Technological glitches are common, and they can happen to anyone. Life being what it is, they often happen at the worst possible times.</p> <p>So, do everything you can to test your equipment thoroughly the day before the interview. Make sure the camera is working, and focused. Check the microphone. Check the sound levels. Check the cables. Do a test run, record yourself, and play it back. By doing this a day before, you give yourself plenty of time to fix the issues without risking missing your interview.</p> <h2>7. Dress for success</h2> <p>A video interview is no excuse to wear casual clothing and look like you've just gotten out of bed. This is not a phone interview. You are presenting yourself to your potential employer, and you want to look the part.</p> <p>That means dressing for the occasion, and that can differ between industries. If you're in a corporate career, you'll need to dress for business. If it's a more creative profession, you can obviously be a little less formal, but you'll still need to look the part. And of course, you need to look fresh and camera-worthy. Hair, makeup, clean teeth, clean nails, the works. Treat this just like you'd treat a regular interview, and give yourself plenty of time to get ready.</p> <h2>8. Remember you're on camera</h2> <p>The interviewer can see you, and you can see them. But if you're sitting in front of a computer that doubles for your personal use, it can be easy to forget, and slip into a more comfortable position. Gradually, you may start to slouch, scratch your nose (or pick it &hellip; disaster), divert eye contact, or even start flicking through messages on your phone.</p> <p>If these things happened in a face-to-face meeting, you'd be hard pressed to finish the interview. You'd have blown it. It's just the same over video chat. The interviewer will feel insulted and disrespected, and you will have blown any chance of a follow up. If it helps, put a sign next to the camera that says &quot;Smile, you're on camera!&quot; It may sound silly, but it really makes a difference.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-have-a-successful-skype-or-video-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-ways-to-make-a-good-first-impression-at-your-next-job-interview">13 Ways to Make a Good First Impression at Your Next Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-you-should-ask-at-every-job-interview">5 Questions You Should Ask at Every Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-interview-technique-will-get-you-hired">This Interview Technique Will Get You Hired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting Technology conference call distractions Job Interview preparedness skype video chat video interview Mon, 15 May 2017 08:30:06 +0000 Paul Michael 1945044 at http://www.wisebread.com