promotions http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/799/all en-US 9 Smart Moves to Make After Getting a Raise or Promotion http://www.wisebread.com/9-smart-moves-to-make-after-getting-a-raise-or-promotion <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-smart-moves-to-make-after-getting-a-raise-or-promotion" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/nothing_can_break_our_team.jpg" alt="Nothing can break our team" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You've worked hard, and you've impressed the boss: You've been rewarded with a raise, promotion, or both. That's great news.</p> <p>The worst mistake you could make right now is to use this time as an excuse to slack off at work or spend more money. Your new challenge is to figure out how to handle your new responsibilities and your new money in a way that will help you continue to succeed.</p> <p>Here are some smart career and money moves to make after your employer rewards you with a raise or promotion.</p> <h2>After a promotion</h2> <p>Getting a promotion is a sign that you've been a hardworking, valuable employee. You should pat yourself on the back for your achievement.</p> <p>But, promotions can also prove stressful. You may be managing people for the first time, or maybe you'll be taking on more responsibilities. Regardless, there are a few key things you should do immediately following a promotion. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Signs You're Making All the Right Career Moves</a>)</p> <h3>1. Be confident, but humble</h3> <p>There's a reason you earned that promotion. There's something that your employer values about you, your decision-making, and your leadership. It's great to feel confident, but don't let this make you cocky.</p> <p>You still have a lot to learn after a promotion. You'll be taking on new duties. Your job description might have swelled. You might even be overseeing others for the first time. Remain humble, grateful, and don't alienate your peers. It's harder to reach your new goals if your co-workers don't like you.</p> <h3>2. Ask plenty of questions</h3> <p>Questions are your friend after a promotion. You want to make sure that you understand all that is required of you in your new position. If you have any doubts or confusion on this matter, get concrete expectations and instructions from your superiors.</p> <p>You also want to come up with as many good ideas for improving your company's performance as you can get. Ask your co-workers &mdash; even if you are now managing them &mdash; for their input on what steps the company can take to improve morale, boost productivity, and compete more successfully in the marketplace.</p> <h3>3. Get ready to work hard</h3> <p>You'll want to reassure your boss that they made the right decision when they promoted you, so put in the hours necessary to show them how dedicated you are to your company. Now is not the time to take extra days off or leave the office early. Instead, work even harder than you did before you earned your promotion.</p> <p>Take the initiative at the next company meeting. Research what new skills would help you thrive in your role, and make a plan to learn them. Not only will this impress your boss, it will help you catch up more quickly with your new duties and responsibilities.</p> <h3>4. Start churning out the ideas</h3> <p>Does worker productivity at your office slump after lunch? Is employee morale low? Is a big project behind schedule? Come up with potential solutions to these problems. Crafting new ideas to solve important problems is the best way to show your supervisors that they were right in giving you that promotion.</p> <h2>After getting a raise</h2> <p>A promotion doesn't always come with a big pay boost, but if it does, it's the perfect reason to give your finances a makeover. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-get-a-promotion?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Money Moves to Make the Moment You Get a Promotion</a>)</p> <h3>5. Calculate exactly how much more you'll be getting each month</h3> <p>It's tempting to start spending your raise before it even shows up in your paycheck, but be careful: Taxes and other withholdings will eat up a portion of your raise before it even hits your bank account. Getting a $3,000 raise does not mean there will be exactly $3,000 extra dollars in your pocket at the end of the year. Wait until your salary increase is reflected in one of your paychecks before changing your saving or spending patterns. That extra chunk of change might not be as large you originally expected. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-withholding-the-right-amount-of-taxes-from-your-paycheck?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Withholding the Right Amount of Taxes from Your Paycheck?</a>)</p> <h3>6. Rework your household budget</h3> <p>Once you know exactly how much extra money you'll get with each paycheck, it's time to tweak your household budget. Your expenses should remain the same &mdash; lifestyle creep is a dangerous thing &mdash; but your monthly income, obviously, will change. What should also change? How much money you contribute each month to retirement and savings. Rework that budget to help you determine your new savings goals. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-budget-when-youre-no-longer-broke?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Budget When You're No Longer Broke</a>)</p> <h3>7. Boost your retirement savings</h3> <p>It's fun to imagine using your new funds to buy a high-end laptop, flat-screen TV, or shiny new car. While no one can stop you from buying those things, make sure to first use your extra funds to boost your retirement savings. Building a retirement nest egg should be your ultimate goal starting your very first day of work. That might not seem like a whole lot fun now, but you'll be thankful for the foresight as retirement grows closer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-meeting-the-2018-401k-contribution-limits-will-brighten-your-future?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways Meeting the 2018 401(k) Contribution Limits Will Brighten Your Future</a>)</p> <h3>8. Build your emergency fund</h3> <p>You should always have an emergency fund of savings that you can tap to cover unexpected expenses &mdash; whether it's a big vet bill for your dog or a blown gasket in your car. Having such a fund makes it less likely that you'll need to turn to credit cards to pay for an emergency.</p> <p>Financial experts recommend that your emergency fund have enough dollars in it to cover your daily living expenses for six to 12 months. If your fund isn't stocked to this level, use the extra money from your raise to hit that target. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-build-an-emergency-fund-from-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Easy Ways to Build an Emergency Fund From $0</a>)</p> <h3>9. Continue to live frugally</h3> <p>Too often, people boost their monthly spending as their income rises. They spend more on cars, clothing, entertainment, and meals. The problem is this lifestyle creep can quickly erase any added savings that come with a larger paycheck.</p> <p>Resist the temptation to overspend after earning a raise. Instead, focus on the less fun but more important task of building your savings, emergency fund, and retirement accounts. After getting a raise, don't spend more. Save more. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-one-nice-thing-can-ruin-your-whole-budget?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How One Nice Thing Can Ruin Your Whole Budget</a>)</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-smart-moves-to-make-after-getting-a-raise-or-promotion">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/money-a-mess-try-this-personal-finance-starter-kit">Money a Mess? Try This Personal Finance Starter Kit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-money-moves-to-make-on-a-rainy-day">7 Easy Money Moves to Make on a Rainy Day</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-rules-every-working-adult-should-know">10 Money Rules Every Working Adult Should Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-minute-finance-create-financial-goals">5-Minute Finance: Create Financial Goals</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Career Building budgeting career moves emergency fund lifestyle creep money moves promotions raise retirement saving money Thu, 26 Apr 2018 08:00:13 +0000 Dan Rafter 2131008 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Ways to Profit Off Your Cabin Fever http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-profit-off-your-cabin-fever <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-ways-to-profit-off-your-cabin-fever" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_sitting_near_windows.jpg" alt="Woman sitting near windows" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Winter can be the pits. The weather's cold, and getting outside can be tough. You've got cabin fever, and you can't wait for spring.</p> <p>But perhaps you can use the time stuck inside to your advantage. Now may be the time to get a handle on your finances and perhaps even make a little extra money while you're cooped up.</p> <p>Consider these ways to improve your finances during the long, cold winter.</p> <h2>1. Optimize your investments</h2> <p>You may have spent much of the last year simply watching your investments do their thing, and thankfully they've probably done well. Every portfolio is due for a review now and again, so consider taking a look at your investments to ensure you're set up for maximum returns.</p> <p>This may mean rebalancing your stocks and mutual funds so you aren't disproportionately invested in one area. It may mean selling some investments that have underperformed, or doing the same for stocks that may be due for a sharp fall. Making some good choices now could allow you to enjoy another year of worry-free investing. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-an-exit-strategy-can-make-you-a-better-investor?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How an Exit Strategy Can Make You a Better Investor</a>)</p> <h2>2. Get your taxes in order</h2> <p>Your tax returns will be due in mid-April. It's always wise to avoid waiting until the last second to file, and you should consider using this winter time to research the best ways to avoid paying too much at tax time.</p> <p>Perhaps there are tax credits and deductions you never knew you could take advantage of. Maybe you have time to make IRA contributions or make other moves to reduce your tax liability. Or maybe you need time to dig up those receipts from charities you donated to in 2017. Doing taxes may not seem like fun, but it can be interesting, especially if you do the work to maximize your savings. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-surprising-tax-deductions-you-might-miss?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Surprising Tax Deductions You Might Miss</a>)</p> <h2>3. Put together a pitch for a raise</h2> <p>Now may be the time of year when you can focus on advancing your career. Maybe you've been seeking a raise or promotion for a while, but haven't had the time to build your case. With a little time on your hands, now you may have the ability to develop a solid pitch to your supervisor. This may mean collecting examples of goals you've achieved, or ways in which you've helped the company. It may mean collecting data on salaries and how yours compares to the industry average. Take the time to find the right tone, make the right arguments, and go for it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a>)</p> <h2>4. Look for a new job</h2> <p>What if you don't want a promotion or raise, because you can't stand your job to begin with? What if you feel like the only way to make more money is to switch companies or careers? Well, use the winter months to look for a new one. If you're stuck inside, take the time to update your resume, get active on LinkedIn, and reach out to your online network.</p> <p>There are many employers that post new jobs at the start of the year, because they may have received the budget approval to hire. The caveat to this is that many people look for new jobs as part of their New Year's resolutions, so you may face some stiff competition. But if you want a new job and know what you're looking for, take advantage of the time to search for a new career in a thoughtful and deliberate way. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-you-should-quit-your-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Signs You Should Quit Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>5. Develop a side hustle</h2> <p>Perhaps a raise or a new job isn't yet in the cards. That's OK, you can still boost your income by finding other ways to make money on the side. Maybe now is the time to develop that pottery hobby into something revenue producing. Perhaps all this time inside the house will lead you to start a profitable blog or podcast. Whatever it is, you have the ability to make some extra cash just by leveraging your current talents. And who knows? Maybe the side hustle can eventually become your main hustle. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-best-side-jobs-for-fast-cash?ref=seealso" target="_blank">14 Best Side Jobs For Fast Cash</a>)</p> <h2>6. Create budgets</h2> <p>Why not use the start of a new year to get smarter about spending less money than you earn? Now is the time to take a look at your spending and develop real limits on what you're buying and how much you are paying.</p> <p>Ideally, you should have numerous budgets for things like eating out, entertainment, housing costs, automotive expenses, and even gifts. These budgets should be attainable but allow you to save money at the end of each month. Sticking to budgets can be hard, but even if you lose discipline during the year, you may succeed in reducing expenses in some areas and making progress in reducing debt or boosting your savings. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-your-first-budget-in-5-easy-steps?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Build Your First Budget in 5 Easy Steps</a>)</p> <h2>7. Review your insurance policies</h2> <p>Oh yeah, everyone loves looking at insurance policies in their spare time. Exciting stuff, huh? It's true that this does not seem like fun, but a periodic review of your policies related to auto insurance, homeowners insurance, health insurance, and life insurance &mdash; as well as the rates you are paying &mdash; is a good financial move.</p> <p>During this process, you may find that you are underinsured and placing yourself at risk, or that you are paying too much for insurance for someone in your situation. If you do a little rate shopping, you may find you can save significant money by switching providers. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-times-to-update-your-homeowners-insurance?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Times to Update Your Homeowners Insurance</a>)</p> <h2>8. Put on a sweater</h2> <p>When you're inside during the winter, you'll be tempted to crank that thermostat for maximum comfort. Consider instead keeping the house temperature lower and simply wearing more layers. While you may feel like you need the thermostat set to 72, you could probably get used to having it below 68.</p> <p>Last year, my family's main heater broke during a snowstorm, and our house temperature fell into the 50s. Guess what? We threw on some extra sweatshirts, cuddled under some more blankets, and survived fine. Every few degrees of temperature on the thermostat could add up to hundreds of degrees &mdash; and dollars &mdash; annually, so dial it back and save. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-big-winter-expenses-that-could-freeze-your-budget?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Big Winter Expenses That Could Freeze Your Budget</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-ways-to-profit-off-your-cabin-fever&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Ways%2520to%2520Profit%2520Off%2520Your%2520Cabin%2520Fever.jpg&amp;description=8%20Ways%20to%20Profit%20Off%20Your%20Cabin%20Fever"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Ways%20to%20Profit%20Off%20Your%20Cabin%20Fever.jpg" alt="8 Ways to Profit Off Your Cabin Fever" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-profit-off-your-cabin-fever">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-get-a-promotion">8 Money Moves to Make the Moment You Get a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-biggest-ways-procrastination-hurts-your-finances">7 Biggest Ways Procrastination Hurts Your Finances</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-software-tools-worth-the-price">7 Money Software Tools Worth the Price</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-financial-perks-of-being-in-your-20s">The Financial Perks of Being in Your 20s</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-fast-ways-to-restock-an-emergency-fund-after-an-emergency">6 Fast Ways to Restock an Emergency Fund After an Emergency</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance budgeting cabin fever deductions investing job hunting making money promotions raises rebalancing side gigs side hustle taxes Fri, 09 Feb 2018 10:00:05 +0000 Tim Lemke 2100157 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/it_is_settled_then.jpg" alt="It&#039;s settled then" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Congratulations: You have just been promoted to a management position. While you're figuring out your next steps, and how to spend that raise, take a few minutes to make sure you don't turn your first managerial position into your last. The job can be daunting, but by making the right moves early on, you can be a roaring success.</p> <h2>Spend more time listening than speaking</h2> <p>When you first enter your new role as a manager, you may be tempted to let your staff know as much as you can about yourself and your agenda. Don't go in that direction. Instead, focus on listening to people, and make sure you take it all in.</p> <p>Schedule one-on-one sessions with each of your direct reports. Ask what their pain points are. Identify the major positives and negatives that they encounter on a weekly basis, and ask them what ideas they have to deal with the biggest challenges they face. Chances are, they've had much longer to think about them, and provide a solution, than you've had.</p> <p>What's more, let your staff know that you are always ready to listen. This is not just a &quot;new boss&quot; thing, but the beginning of a relationship that will be beneficial for everyone. And when you start to act on the information you've been receiving, your staff will know that you really did listen. This will make you stand out as someone who follows through. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-skill-can-make-you-a-better-boss?ref=seealso" target="_blank">This One Skill Can Make You a Better Boss</a>)</p> <h2>Communicate your ground rules and management style early</h2> <p>Some managers are laid back. Others are methodical. Some managers like to keep things casual and conversational. Others go by the book and have strict rules. Whatever your management style may be, let your employees know.</p> <p>For example, a former manager may have been extremely strict, requiring reports at specific times throughout the week, and running meetings by the book. If you're more of an easygoing manager, tell the staff. It will make them feel at ease.</p> <p>On the other hand, a previous manager may have wanted the staff to challenge their authority, ask questions often, and work autonomously. If that's not your style, tell them as soon as possible. If they have been used to challenging directives, and that really bugs you, they'll be unknowingly ticking you off. But if you communicate your management style early on, they have no excuses later.</p> <h2>Do not be tempted to clean house</h2> <p>Whenever a new manager starts, there are fears of layoffs, and those fears are not without good reason. A lot of bad managers come into a new environment and want to surround themselves with people they know. They will quickly look into the possibility of getting rid of certain employees, and replacing them with their own hires. This happens a lot regardless of the industry you're in. Do not be one of those managers.</p> <p>Now, there may be issues with some people on the staff. Over the course of your first few months, you will figure that out. Hopefully you can correct those issues. If you can't, and those staff members are not performing as you'd like, or are disruptive to the department, talk to human resources about next steps. But make it fair, and make it known to your team that you did everything you could to turn the situation around for those employees.</p> <h2>Make positive changes as early as possible</h2> <p>They're often called &quot;easy wins&quot; or &quot;early wins,&quot; and they are action items that are easy to fix. If you have been promoted from within the department, you may already know what the issues are. They could be as simple as a broken microwave in the break room, or one of those daily meetings that lasts an hour and makes everyone miserable.</p> <p>Identify the low-hanging fruit and grab it quickly. By making these simple but much-appreciated fixes early on in your tenure, you will be seen as a go-getter and a problem solver. You've made an impact. Things are changing, and changing for the better. Morale will improve immediately, giving you time to tackle the bigger issues that will require significantly more work on your part.</p> <h2>Don't try and do everything yourself</h2> <p>You have just gone through a significant career shift. You're no longer a regular employee, you're a manager that has a staff of employees. It is now your job to spend time focusing on the bigger picture, and leave the smaller tasks to the professionals you manage. This can be very tough, especially if you were good at what you did and want to make sure it gets done your way.</p> <p>For example, let's say you're a graphic designer in an advertising agency, and have been promoted to creative director. As a graphic designer, you were very hands on. You sat in front of a computer and sketch pad, designing, editing, and producing work for clients. As the creative director, you must now step back. As tempting as it may be to move the designer out of the way and do it yourself, that's no longer your job. You need to provide feedback and let the staff figure it out. Hire smart people, then get out of their way.</p> <h2>Only make promises you can keep</h2> <p>You're new to the job. You're probably nervous, especially during your first few weeks. And on top of all that, you're going to hear about problems from the staff. Perhaps there's a particular project or process that everyone finds painful to work on. Maybe there's an issue with a supplier. There's also the eternal issue of pay raises, promotions, and benefits.</p> <p>Whatever you do, don't try and win a popularity contest by promising to fix all of the issues, or offer incredible incentives that you cannot actually provide. Sure, in the short term, it'll make you flavor of the month. Pay raises for everyone? No more weekends and late nights? Extra vacation days? Everyone will be over the moon. You may genuinely want to give the staff all of those awesome things. But what if you can't? What if you are making promises that your company cannot keep? What if those decisions are completely out of your control?</p> <p>The short term gain of happy staff will be trounced by the incredible disappointment, and distrust of you, in the long term. You can promise to look into those issues, but only offer solutions when you know 100 percent that you can follow through.</p> <h2>Remember: You're not supposed to know everything</h2> <p>As a manager, you have stepped into a leadership role, and that means you call more of the shots. However, just because you are now in a position of authority, it does not mean that you're the smartest person in the room. And if you openly admit this in a professional way, you will garner more respect than if you pretend to know about every aspect of the company.</p> <p>By all means tell the staff your strengths, but point out any knowledge gaps you have. If you are new to the company, or the department, it's only natural that you'll need to be brought up to speed on certain information. And even if you are promoted within the department, your new role comes with responsibilities you have never had before. If you want to hit the ground running, ask about the things you don't know about, and your team will be more than happy to assist you. If you're a good manager, they'll want you to succeed.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Be%2520Successful%2520as%2520a%2520First-Time%2520Manager%2520%25281%2529.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Be%20Successful%20as%20a%20First-Time%20Manager"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Be%20Successful%20as%20a%20First-Time%20Manager%20%281%29.jpg" alt="How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-11"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-subtle-signs-youd-make-a-good-boss">12 Subtle Signs You&#039;d Make a Good Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-skill-can-make-you-a-better-boss">This One Skill Can Make You a Better Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves">9 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Career Moves</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-your-boss-wishes-youd-tell-them">7 Things Your Boss Wishes You&#039;d Tell Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-free-ways-to-impress-your-boss">10 Free Ways to Impress Your Boss</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building bosses climbing the ladder empathy employees leadership management managers morale promotions Wed, 31 Jan 2018 09:30:09 +0000 Paul Michael 2091002 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Signs You're Making All the Right Career Moves http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/having_a_positive_attitude_is_rewarding_0.jpg" alt="Having a positive attitude is rewarding" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your career is important. It provides financial stability for you and your family, and in many ways, it can dictate your future &mdash; where you live, what you can afford, and the type of lifestyle you're able to lead.</p> <p>When there&rsquo;s a possibility for career advancement on the horizon, it&rsquo;s good to be able to spot it early. That way, you won't risk jumping ship too early or passing up on a great opportunity. If you see these signs at work, that's good news; you're making all the right career moves.</p> <h2>1. Getting a raise out of nowhere</h2> <p>If you are brought into a meeting with the boss (and possibly human resources) and told you&rsquo;re getting a raise, then congratulations &hellip; you&rsquo;re climbing the ladder to success.</p> <p>Raises without notice, separate from the annual 3 to 4 percent raise every employee gets, are a surefire indicator that the company is very happy with the work you&rsquo;ve been doing. So happy, in fact, that they value you enough to spend more money to keep you around. They may also add to the pot by giving you additional vacation days, sick days, and flexible hours. All of these rewards are designed to get you to stay put, be happy, and keep the company happy. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what?ref=seealso" target="_blank">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a>)</p> <h2>2. Being invited to more meetings featuring important people</h2> <p>Is your calendar getting fuller? Are you now in meetings with those &ldquo;higher-ups&rdquo; that you&rsquo;ve only heard mentioned in annual reports and water cooler talk? Well, get ready for the big time.</p> <p>When your boss decides that you should be put in front of people that make important decisions, she is doing so because you will make her look good. She wants to show you off and attach herself to someone who is clearly making all the right moves. This, of course, may bring additional pressure. You don&rsquo;t want to mess up in front of the executives, so take the time to prepare yourself, know your stuff, and be on your best behavior both in and out of important meetings.</p> <h2>3. You&rsquo;re put in charge of more high-profile projects</h2> <p>Being put on a key initiative the company is working on says a lot about your chances of a promotion. Every business, large or small, has that one major development or client; and they only put their top people on it. If you are asked to join the team of Project X, you know you&rsquo;ve just been given a great deal of credit. Most likely, how you perform on that project, under pressure, will determine the promotion and raise your boss is planning to give you. So, don&rsquo;t let him or her down.</p> <h2>4. You&rsquo;re invited to spend more free time with the boss</h2> <p>A boss usually works longer hours than the team, although there can be exceptions to that. However, if your boss is getting in early, leaving late, and still wants to spend some of his extracurricular time getting to know you, that&rsquo;s a good sign.</p> <p>For instance, being invited to lunch to discuss your role and your contributions to the team is great for you. If your boss asks you to play a round of golf over the weekend, that&rsquo;s another great sign that you&rsquo;re being considered for a bigger role. He is looking to get to know more about you than the day-to-day work stuff. How&rsquo;s your family life? Are you happy in your position? How do you treat people when you&rsquo;re out of the office? You&rsquo;re being eyed up for a promotion. Of course, if there is any hint of impropriety, and this feels like anything other than business, talk to HR immediately.</p> <h2>5. The boss wants to know about your goals within the company</h2> <p>One of those tricky interview questions we often get is, &ldquo;Where do you see yourself five years from now?&rdquo; That question takes on a different meaning once you&rsquo;re within the company.</p> <p>Now, it&rsquo;s not just about loyalty to the company, but your ambitions within it. Are you driven? Do you have your eye on a management position? Do you have plans that could increase the growth of the business? Are you a go-getter, or are you happy to coast? Chances are, if you respond with &ldquo;I&rsquo;ll be happy just doing what I&rsquo;m doing now,&rdquo; you&rsquo;ll throw a huge red flag up for the boss. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-you-might-be-sabotaging-your-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Ways You Might Be Sabotaging Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>6. You&rsquo;re going on more business trips and conferences</h2> <p>Here&rsquo;s a cold, hard fact: Businesses do not like to invest in people that are not important to them. Budgets for conferences and business trips are watched carefully, and a select few get to take advantage of these benefits. If you&rsquo;ve gone from sitting in an office all day to jet-setting and attending industry events, all on the company&rsquo;s dime, you&rsquo;re sending the right signals to management. They are investing in you, and they want you to stay.</p> <h2>7. Co-workers have nothing but praise for you</h2> <p>Are you suddenly the apple of everyone&rsquo;s eye? Are people actively coming to you just to tell you what a great job you did on that last big project, or asking you to help them on other projects? Do your co-workers, some of whom have been fairly cold or hands-off in the past, now want to hang out at lunch? Well, guess what? Someone, somewhere, knows that you&rsquo;re popular with the people that matter. They want to be associated with a winner.</p> <p>If people suddenly <em>stop</em> talking to you, and you cannot get anyone to return a call, that&rsquo;s a sure sign that the opposite is true &mdash; you&rsquo;re on the way out.</p> <h2>8. The boss is in line for a promotion</h2> <p>When your boss starts hinting that she is about to get a cushy new role within the company, don&rsquo;t panic. While it may seem like things are about to change, they could very well be changing for the better.</p> <p>Promotions have a knock-on effect, meaning that the boss&rsquo;s shoes will be filled by a direct report. If that&rsquo;s you, or you&rsquo;re one of the contenders, you are almost certainly in the running to fill that spot. All you have to do now is prove you can do the job. Volunteer for more tasks. Assume a mentoring role in meetings. Look the part, act the part, and chances are, you&rsquo;ll get the job.</p> <p>Even if you don&rsquo;t, your relationship with your boss could be an asset in the future. Perhaps there are other projects or roles she could refer you for, in which case her newly enhanced status makes you look even better.</p> <h2>9. Your annual appraisals are off the charts</h2> <p>If your company has a review or appraisal system in place, you can quickly see what your chances are of a promotion from the grades and comments you get. For example, if you&rsquo;re judged on a scale of one to five for specific skills, and you are hitting mostly fours and fives, you&rsquo;re excelling. This is used as a bargaining chip by your boss when it comes time to recommend departmental promotions.</p> <p>If you&rsquo;re hovering around the threes and fours, you&rsquo;re doing well, but are probably going to stay put for a while. That&rsquo;s OK too. At least you know what you need to work on. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-bring-up-with-your-boss-at-your-annual-review?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Things to Bring Up With Your Boss at Your Annual Review</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520Signs%2520Youre%2520Making%2520All%2520the%2520Right%2520Career%2520Moves.jpg&amp;description=9%20Signs%20Youre%20Making%20All%20the%20Right%20Career%20Moves"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20Signs%20Youre%20Making%20All%20the%20Right%20Career%20Moves.jpg" alt="9 Signs You're Making All the Right Career Moves" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters">The Ugly Truth of Workplace Success: Popularity Still Matters</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion">5 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Next Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-facts-women-should-know-before-asking-for-a-raise">5 Essential Facts Women Should Know Before Asking for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building climbing the ladder employment good signs management meetings promotions raises Thu, 18 Jan 2018 10:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 2087012 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Career Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/buisnessman_using_laptop.jpg" alt="Businessman Using Laptop" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your career takes up a huge chunk of your life, and over the years, you will mature in many aspects of it. However, some of us will reach different levels of maturity at different stages of our careers.</p> <p>Being a grown-up at work is all about attitude and decision-making rather than age and experience. You don't have to wait until you're older to try any of these mature career moves.</p> <h2>1. Asking for a raise or promotion</h2> <p>There are several ways to get a raise or promotion. The first is that you put in the hard work, the boss notices, and you get rewarded. The second is that you are offered a higher paying job somewhere else, and you ask the company to match it. The third is that you sit around hoping you'll get one, and maybe you'll get lucky. And the fourth is to just go and ask for one.</p> <p>By far the most surefire way to get what you want is to ask for it. If it's been awhile since your last pay bump, you know you're not getting the money you deserve, or you did something outstanding, then collect the evidence, book a time, and make your case to your boss. More often than not, you will get a good result. It also makes you look more confident and professional. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-should-always-negotiate-a-raise-here-are-10-reasons-why?ref=seealso" target="_blank">You Should Always Negotiate a Raise: Here Are 10 Reasons Why</a>)</p> <h2>2. Having a career, not just a job</h2> <p>A job is a task that someone is paid for. A career is an occupation with opportunities for advancement. Which one are you currently in?</p> <p>Some people might say working behind the counter at McDonald's is just a job, but that's not necessarily true. If that person wants to one day run their own franchise, that's a career. On the flip side, you could be sitting in an office wearing a suit and tie and going nowhere fast.</p> <p>It's all about motivation, resolve, and looking to the future. If you can honestly say that you are focused on that right now, that's a great sign of maturity. If you're coasting and collecting a paycheck without thinking about where you'll be in five years, you may need to reevaluate. Soon. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Don't Let These 6 Common Job Traps Derail Your Career</a>)</p> <h2>3. Making peace with coworkers you dislike</h2> <p>Every workplace has them: It's the guy who points out every mistake you make, but never notices the good stuff. It's the woman who complains every time you raise your voice above a whisper. It's the boss who has office favorites, and you're not one of them. The people we work with are capable of making our work lives miserable. But once you realize that only <em>you</em> have the power to make yourself feel bad, it can be life-altering.</p> <p>Let the stupidity of their actions roll off your back. Don't contribute to their negative energy. Make an effort to find the nice part of their personality. At the end of the day, you'll be the bigger person and you'll feel better for it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-driving-your-coworkers-insane?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Ways You're Driving Your Co-workers Insane</a>)</p> <h2>4. Taking genuine responsibility for mistakes</h2> <p>It's not easy to admit to a mistake, especially in a corporate environment. Finger pointing is rife, and assigning blame to other people is commonplace. But as Bruce Lee so famously said, &quot;Mistakes are always forgivable, if one has the courage to admit them.&quot; The key word here is <em>courage</em>. It takes real maturity to step up and say something like, &quot;That's my fault, I should have been more prepared.&quot; Is it something that could get you in trouble? Possibly. But the other option is hiding from the truth or blaming others, and that's not very mature.</p> <h2>5. Chasing real growth, not accolades</h2> <p>Accolades may come in the form of trophies or awards, or they may be a pay raise or promotion. And while they are certainly nice to have, if they are your <em>only</em> source of motivation, you're missing out on the inner growth necessary to become a better employee. Work is most enjoyable when it's fulfilling, and if you're stuck in a cycle of chasing praise and rewards, it can start to feel very empty. Put those carrots to the side and focus instead on becoming your best self. Then, you'll have really stepped into the grown-up world.</p> <h2>6. No longer engaging in water cooler gossip</h2> <p>Let's keep this one short and sweet, because it's obvious: If you're hanging around the breakroom or water cooler engaging in all kinds of gossip, you're not even close to being a grown-up. Leave that to the kids and concentrate on doing a better job. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-office-politics-goofs-that-can-set-your-career-back-years?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Office Politics Goofs That Can Set Your Career Back Years</a>)</p> <h2>7. Asking for help</h2> <p>As much as it takes guts to admit a mistake, it also takes courage to admit you cannot do something that was asked of you. If you play pretend, or spend sleepless nights wondering how on earth you are going to get something done, you're not being very grown-up about the problem.</p> <p>A sign of real maturity is to look around and see who is actually ideal for this task. You have your own set of skills, other people have theirs. Find someone who can do this job well and ask for help. Or, ask to trade projects if it's feasible. It will be better for everyone. And remember, one day someone will come to you, nervous and unsure, asking for the same kind of help.</p> <h2>8. Offering to help coworkers</h2> <p>Whether you're in an office or working on a factory floor, there are jobs that need doing. And these jobs are usually assigned to specific people. After you've spent a few years in your career, especially in corporate America, it's easy to have a &quot;head down, do my own job, stay out of other people's problems&quot; mentality.</p> <p>If you can get over all of that and help people out whenever you have the time, it shows real maturity. Sure, the other person may take credit, or may have gotten themselves into the mess they're in. But by being the bigger person, you will shine as a great employee. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-improve-your-performance-at-work?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Ways to Improve Your Performance at Work</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Career%2520Moves%2520That%2520Prove%2520Youre%2520Finally%2520a%2520Grown-Up.jpg&amp;description=8%20Career%20Moves%20That%20Prove%20Youre%20Finally%20a%20Grown-Up"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Career%20Moves%20That%20Prove%20Youre%20Finally%20a%20Grown-Up.jpg" alt="8 Career Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise">The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters">The Ugly Truth of Workplace Success: Popularity Still Matters</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job">12 Things You Should Do in the First Six Months of a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-types-of-people-who-will-help-grow-your-career">7 Types of People Who Will Help Grow Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building asking for help asking for raise career moves coworkers grown-up maturity Mistakes promotions self growth self improvement Fri, 20 Oct 2017 08:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 2038478 at http://www.wisebread.com The Ugly Truth of Workplace Success: Popularity Still Matters http://www.wisebread.com/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/another_success_for_the_team.jpg" alt="Another success for the team" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you thought the popularity contests of high school would end once you entered the workforce, you might be in for a rude awakening.</p> <p>Sadly, almost every place you will ever work places a value on popularity. They may not admit it, or even realize they do it, but managers and clients will always reward it. Here's why popularity matters so much at work, and how you should handle it.</p> <h2>Popular employees get promotions and raises</h2> <p>No manager is ever going to confess that they promote people simply because they like them, but it's a fact of working life.</p> <p>If you want to climb the ladder, you need to become a well-liked figure in your department. If you want to climb the ladder quickly, you should become one of the most well-liked figures in the whole organization. If you're highly respected, well-known, and people only have good things to say about you, then it's easier for someone in the decision-making process to sign their name on a promotion form.</p> <p>Conversely, if you're not popular, or even worse, disliked, then your hard work may never be rewarded. It sounds childish. After all, if you do your job well and make the company money, isn't that all that matters? No, it's not. People are people, and they won't want to reward someone they don't like.</p> <h2>Popularity at work can help you stay physically and mentally healthy</h2> <p>It seems like an obvious conclusion to draw, but it was actually part of a recent Duke University study performed on macaque monkeys. Macaques are close evolutionary relatives to humans, and were considered ideal subject matter for the research.</p> <p>Female macaques were introduced to an enclosure, and the order of their arrival dictated their social ranking. Newcomers were at the bottom rung of the social ladder. Researchers found that lower-ranking monkeys showed lower levels of some disease-fighting cells than their higher-ranking counterparts. When researchers changed up status rankings by reorganizing the groups of macaques, they found the same results. Monkeys moved into higher-status groups showed improvements in their immune systems. &quot;Those whose status improved became more sought-after grooming partners once they were promoted, giving them more opportunities to relieve stress through bonding,&quot; according to the university's website.</p> <p>Now, while it's clearly not possible to test this in an office environment, the results do show that the popularity and social standing of each monkey directly correlated to their health and well-being.</p> <p>This makes sense in the workplace, where we spend the vast majority of our time. If you are popular, you get the stress-busting rewards of social bonding. Your self esteem takes a boost, and you feel like an important part of the team. You look forward to coming to work, and you have a great attitude.</p> <p>Conversely, if you are excluded, you generally feel like the odd one out, and your self esteem is going to nose-dive. You will likely take more sick days, and will not attend the social functions put on after work hours. This will all have a detrimental effect on your career.</p> <h2>Being perceived to be popular carries even more weight</h2> <p>According to Alan Redman, a business psychologist at the Criterion Partnership, there are actually two different types of popularity. And for work purposes, one is much more valuable than the other.</p> <p>The first type is known as being &quot;sociometrically popular.&quot; In layman's terms, this means that you are a genuinely popular, well-liked person who socializes well. You treat people fairly, you care for your coworkers, and you may even organize events and bring in food and treats for the team. This, although helpful to your career, is not going to go over as well as the second type &mdash; &quot;perceived popularity.&quot;</p> <p>Perceived popularity is more about balancing social activities with common strategies that lead to advancement. For example, you'll happily go to a team outing, enjoy drinks after work, play on the baseball team, and bring in snacks. But, you play office politics, too. You may manipulate situations to your advantage, work behind the scenes to remove certain people from the company, or go out of your way to be nice to people who can directly improve your position. You'll be seen as a nice person overall, but will also be seen as someone who means business.</p> <p>In short, &quot;If you just want to be popular, be socially popular, but if you want to get to the top, mix social popularity with relationally aggressive behavior,&quot; says Redman.</p> <h2>So, how do you become more popular?</h2> <p>It's not going to happen overnight. If you are already popular at work, it won't take much effort to launch yourself into the top. Attend a few more social functions, speak up a little more in meetings, show a little more empathy, bring in more treats, and basically be a more improved social version of your current self.</p> <p>However, if you are not considered popular, or worse still, you're actively disliked, then you have a mountain to climb. People formulate strong perceptions of you based on the first few encounters they have with you, compounded with the opinions of their peers. You will have to go out of your way to get into their good books without being blatant.</p> <p>If you suddenly start bringing food in every day, organizing team events, offering help on projects, and basically doing a complete 180 on your previous persona, people might smell a rat. So, be gradual. If there's a meeting and you're usually silent, or a naysayer, chime in a few times with some positive thoughts. Attend the occasional get together, without making it obvious that you're trying to fit in. Buy a round of drinks. Tell a few jokes.</p> <p>At work, occasionally bring in treats with a good reason, such as an early morning meeting that could use coffee and doughnuts. Slowly, but surely, you will start to change perceptions. Before you know it, you'll be asked to come out more. You'll be included in more lunchtime trips to the local cafe or restaurant. And people will say things like, &quot;Wow, I had no idea you could be so funny,&quot; or, &quot;You have really come out of your shell.&quot;</p> <p>Is it sad that this matters at work? Yes, it is. But we cannot change it. However, knowing that it makes a difference means we can make the system work for us. Good luck.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthe-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThe%2520Ugly%2520Truth%2520of%2520Workplace%2520Success-%2520Popularity%2520Still%2520Matters.jpg&amp;description=The%20Ugly%20Truth%20of%20Workplace%20Success%3A%20Popularity%20Still%20Matters"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/The%20Ugly%20Truth%20of%20Workplace%20Success-%20Popularity%20Still%20Matters.jpg" alt="The Ugly Truth of Workplace Success: Popularity Still Matters" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">8 Career Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves">9 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Career Moves</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job">12 Things You Should Do in the First Six Months of a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-types-of-people-who-will-help-grow-your-career">7 Types of People Who Will Help Grow Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building corporate ladder coworkers employment getting ahead office politics popularity promotions Wed, 26 Jul 2017 09:00:14 +0000 Paul Michael 1990504 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Reasons You Shouldn't "Vacation Shame" Your Coworkers http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-you-shouldnt-vacation-shame-your-coworkers <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-reasons-you-shouldnt-vacation-shame-your-coworkers" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_stressed_work_654187068.jpg" alt="Woman being vacation shamed by coworkers" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 2015, Americans left <a href="http://www.projecttimeoff.com/research/work-martyrs-cautionary-tale" target="_blank">658 million vacation days</a> unused. It's a problem that has continued to ingrain itself in the American way of life, and it's only going to get worse. It even has a name &mdash; &quot;work martyrdom&quot; &mdash; and one of the most troubling reasons for it is feeling guilty about taking paid time off.</p> <p>Have you ever felt guilty about taking vacation, or made your coworkers feel guilty for taking time off? Well, you shouldn't. It's dangerous, and bad for both you and your company. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Ways to Actually Take All Your Vacation Days This Year</a>)</p> <h2>1. Vacation is vital for good health</h2> <p>You wouldn't want to make your coworkers physically ill, but by guilting them out of their vacation time, you could be contributing to some very serious health risks. The Framingham Heart Study, the world's longest running study of heart disease, has some frightening statistics on vacation and health. The biggest &mdash; that men who failed to take a vacation for two years or more were 30 percent more likely to experience a heart attack than peers who took regular time off.</p> <p>A Marshfield Clinic study showed that women who took at least two vacations per year were less likely to suffer from depression than those who don't take time off. Other research has shown that not taking vacation can also lead to higher blood pressure, stress, poor family relationships, and if you're extremely overworked, even suicide. So, it's vital to actually encourage coworkers to take time off, especially if they look worn out. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/science-proves-it-you-need-to-take-a-vacation?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Science Says We NEED to Take a Vacation</a>)</p> <h2>2. Vacation refreshes the mind and body</h2> <p>Research has proved it; when you take a vacation, you are improving your mind and your overall health. And if you work with people who need to be great at their jobs in order to make you and the company thrive, then you should encourage vacation time.</p> <p>A vacation is to a person what a reboot is to a computer that is slow, glitchy, and taking forever to do tasks that used to be done quickly. Mental breaks <a href="https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/mental-downtime/" target="_blank">recharge the mind</a>, and improve memory, productivity, and creativity &mdash; all vital in almost every job out there. You will find that although you may miss them when they're gone, your coworkers are upgraded versions of themselves when they return. And, they will be eager to dive in and get things done.</p> <h2>3. Vacation is just as much of a right as a bathroom or lunch break</h2> <p>Would you shame a coworker for daring to leave their desk for an hour to eat a meal? Would you point out that they could be doing valuable work when they are heading to the bathroom? Well, of course not. These are needs, and vacation is just as important as either of those.</p> <p>Vacation time may not be granted by U.S. law, but most employers offer paid leave as part of the benefits package. It's right there with health care and sick time (which, by the way, people also feel guilty about taking).</p> <p>The bottom line &mdash; every employee who takes paid time off has earned it, and they are simply using a benefit that comes with the position. In the case of people who don't get paid time off, which stands at around 25 percent, you have even less reason to shame them. They are losing money by taking this time, and that is a difficult financial decision for anyone to make.</p> <h2>4. Vacation keeps good employees at the company</h2> <p>An unhappy employee is one that is looking for another job. A 2015 Talent Trends survey found that one out of every three employees is actively looking for a new job. That's almost a third of the people at your company, right now, that wants out.</p> <p>It is a fact that it costs a company a lot more money to replace employees than it does to retain them. For entry level employees, it's between 30 percent and 50 percent of average annual salary. That figure increases to 150 percent for midlevel employees, and a <a href="https://www.eremedia.com/tlnt/what-was-leadership-thinking-the-shockingly-high-cost-of-employee-turnover/" target="_blank">whopping 400 percent</a> for high-level or specialized talent. And guess what? One of the big reasons people move on is the lack of a good work-life balance. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-your-work-life-balance-is-off?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Signs Your Work-Life Balance Is Off</a>)</p> <p>It is in the best interests of your company to keep people around, because it will not be spending excessive amounts of money retraining staff. Want a raise? More travel? A promotion? It's more likely to happen if people aren't quitting due to lack of time off.</p> <h2>5. Vacation broadens the mind</h2> <p>Well, to be more accurate, travel broadens the mind. But it's a little hard to travel if you don't take a vacation.</p> <p>In some careers, especially ones that require creative or lateral thinking, this can be a great asset to the company. A well-furnished mind is one that can draw from many life experiences. This can translate to new, innovative ideas and suggestions, and lead to positive changes at the company. This, in turn, can boost productivity and profits, and even lead to expansion.</p> <p>Someone who is staring at the same four walls day after day, month after month, is not going to be as valuable to the company as someone who has gone out into the world and done something new. Your company needs people who are well-traveled, not overworked.</p> <h2>6. Vacation boosts organizational morale</h2> <p>Who wants to work in a company filled with miserable, exhausted, irritable employees? That's what you get if you work in an environment that vacation-shames people.</p> <p>When you have very little to look forward to, coupled with a hectic work schedule and poor work-life balance, you're not going to be much fun to be around. Compare that to someone who is planning to go on vacation. They are recognizably happier and more enthusiastic, because they're looking forward to doing something fun. For those weeks, or months, they bring a sunny disposition with them to work. Then, they go on vacation and come back rested, refreshed, and ready to help.</p> <p>This is all good for the company, and good for you. You will get a lift from their energy, instead of being dragged down by morale that's in the gutter.</p> <h2>7. Vacation leads to better performance reviews and higher salaries</h2> <p>Put this in the &quot;strange but true&quot; category if you like, but a 2006 study by Ernst &amp; Young found that each additional 10 hours of vacation an employee took led to performance reviews that were 8 percent higher the following year. And, of course, higher performance reviews lead to increased salary bumps, promotions, and greater opportunities within the company.</p> <p>Why would this be? Well, look back at all the reasons given in this article for taking a vacation, and the answer becomes obvious. Employees that take vacation are sharper, happier, healthier, and more productive than coworkers who do not take time off. Naturally, this translates to better performance at work, a better attitude, and a better review.</p> <p>So, even if you're not vacation-shaming anyone (and hopefully that's the case), you should look at your own vacation plan and increase your days off. It will positively impact your career.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-reasons-you-shouldnt-vacation-shame-your-coworkers&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Reasons%2520You%2520Shouldnt%2520Vacation%2520Shame%2520Your%2520Coworkers.jpg&amp;description=7%20Reasons%20You%20Shouldn't%20%22Vacation%20Shame%22%20Your%20Coworkers"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Reasons%20You%20Shouldnt%20Vacation%20Shame%20Your%20Coworkers.jpg" alt="7 Reasons You Shouldn't &quot;Vacation Shame&quot; Your Coworkers" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-you-shouldnt-vacation-shame-your-coworkers">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-your-work-life-balance-is-off">9 Signs Your Work-Life Balance Is Off</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-live-a-retired-life-before-retirement">How to Live a Retired Life Before Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-jobs-you-may-not-have-considered-but-should">9 Jobs You May Not Have Considered (But Should)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-ways-to-leave-your-job">10 Fun Ways to Leave Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income employment health benefits promotions shaming sick days time off vacation days vacation time working Wed, 05 Jul 2017 08:00:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1977385 at http://www.wisebread.com The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/skeptical_interviewer_looking_at_interviewee.jpg" alt="Skeptical interviewer looking at interviewee" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Asking for a raise is not easy. You don't want to come across as greedy, or antagonize your employer. But at the same time, you've done your research, know what you deserve, and believe you are an asset that should be compensated accordingly.</p> <p>Before you talk to your boss, make sure you avoid the following traps. They could sink any chance of a bump in pay. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise?rerf=seealso" target="_blank">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a>)</p> <h2>1. Saying you're having trouble making ends meet</h2> <p>There are a few truths that you must accept, and one of them is this &mdash; your personal money problems are your problems. You took the job, and you accepted the salary. Scraping by or falling behind on your bills is a reason to ask for a raise, but it's not the reason your employer ever needs to hear.</p> <p>You need to justify your raise for reasons that a boss can comfortably take to the payroll department, and the people he or she reports to. Saying &quot;Well, Jane's rent was just raised and she also owes on her taxes&quot; won't cut it. Instead, present your case in a well-researched and thought-out manner, explaining why you deserve a pay bump based on merit and hard work.</p> <h2>2. Criticizing any of your coworkers</h2> <p>There is a time and a place for pointing out problems with the team, and it is not when you want to get more money. If your boss is any good, he or she will already know the big problems with underperforming staff. Other issues can be brought up during your usual one-on-one sessions, or team meetings. If you use your coworkers' poor performance as a reason to get more money, you will come across as mercenary.</p> <p>Sure, you may have been picking up the slack for lazy coworkers, or correcting mistakes, but there is a way to mention this without throwing anyone under the bus. By all means, say that you have been taking on more responsibility, working longer hours, and saving the company money by catching errors. But do it without saying, &quot;John sucks at his job, he's always late, and I have to do everything!&quot;</p> <h2>3. Asking when the boss, and everyone else, is insanely busy</h2> <p>Timing is everything, and perhaps the worst time to bring this up is when everyone is scrambling to meet a deadline and deliver the goods. Whether it's behind the counter of a fast-food restaurant, or during a huge pitch for new business, asking for more money at this time will hurt you in several ways.</p> <p>First, it makes you look selfish; everyone is rushing around, and you want the boss to stop and focus on you. Second, it makes you look inconsiderate; now is not the time, can you not see how busy everyone is? Third, it makes you look like you're trying to take advantage of the situation. The boss is not going to appreciate you trying to hurriedly negotiate a raise during a crisis. So, back off, and bide your time. Things will calm down, and then you can strike.</p> <h2>4. Catching the boss off-guard</h2> <p>When you are initiating the subject of a raise and/or promotion, you are making a request that has consequences. Your boss has to examine the numbers, look at performance and salary averages, and consider the budget for the department. And the boss usually has to get the approval from other people in the company. This is all very official.</p> <p>So, casually having a one-on-one in the elevator, out of nowhere, is a huge mistake. Your boss will be taken by surprise, and may even feel threatened or trapped. They won't be able to give you an answer anyway. Schedule a time for a meeting, at least 30 minutes, and warn the boss in advance that you want to talk about your future at the company. You don't have to outright say &quot;I want to talk about a raise&quot; &mdash; if the boss is intuitive he or she will know just what this meeting is about.</p> <h2>5. Beating around the bush</h2> <p>A little friendly banter before you bring up the subject of your raise is OK. In fact, it's courteous and expected, and sets a friendly tone. However, if you meander off for 15 minutes on topics that are completely unrelated, you're only going to frustrate your boss. He or she has a pretty good idea of why you're in the room, and wants to start the conversation.</p> <p>Most likely, after five minutes of talk about the weather, the ballgame, the family, and plans for the weekend, you'll be asked to spit it out. But by that time, you've already shown yourself to be less than efficient, and that puts you in a position of weakness.</p> <h2>6. Storming in with ultimatums</h2> <p>&quot;If I don't get a raise, I'm quitting. Simple as that.&quot; How many times have people told you they are going to say that to the boss? How many times have you thought it yourself? Sure, it's human nature to want fair compensation, and we all hope to be so valued that people will do anything not to lose us. Sadly, life isn't like that.</p> <p>Ultimatums are not the answer, because one of three things will happen. First, you will get your raise, but you will be tarnished as difficult, selfish, and egotistic. Second, you will be told no, and realize you can't quit after all. Your bluff will have been called, and now they know you aren't going to quit if you don't get what you want. Third, you are told no, and have to quit to save face. Are you ready for that?</p> <p>One way to get around the ultimatum is to come to the boss with a higher paying job offer from another firm. Then, it's a business negotiation. You can say that you would much rather stay, but this offer gives you more money, and you may have to take it. In this case, most employers, if they value you, will match the offer. They see you as in demand, and that puts you in a positive light.</p> <h2>7. Getting way too emotional</h2> <p>Anger. Tears. Jealousy. Disbelief. The emotions can run high when you believe you are getting the short end of the stick. However, it's unprofessional to unload your emotional state onto your employer. You may feel you are not being recognized for all you've done for the company. Or you may be behind on your bills, with new expenses coming up in the future.</p> <p>It can be hard to mask these emotions when you are stressed. But it's important to get these under control before you ask for a raise. Get the emotions out first before coming to work. If you need to cry, do it. If you are angry, find a way to release the tension. You need to have a calm, clear head before you can talk money.</p> <h2>8. Acting entitled</h2> <p>Arms crossed. Eyebrows furrowed. Breathing hard through your nose. You're in the boss's office because enough is enough, and you should have had that raise months ago! From the moment you open your mouth, you are incredulous that you even had to call this meeting.</p> <p>Acting this way does you no favors. You'll come across as a spoiled brat, and unless you can back all of your claims up, you'll also look foolish. Don't go into the room feeling angry and cheated. Instead, calm down, and prepare. Write down all of the quantifiable reasons you deserve a raise, and give the boss the ammunition he or she needs to get that extra money for you. Be polite. Be yourself. And don't expect anything.</p> <h2>9. Making demands when the company is in trouble</h2> <p>There's an argument to be made that it's OK to ask for a raise if your company is facing some light financial difficulties (maybe they've laid a few people off), or if you know your specific department is still doing well. But that's about where you'll need to draw the line.</p> <p>If the business has fallen on <em>really</em> hard financial times, it's another story. Maybe executives have had to make significant cutbacks, or it's even possible that the company could be filing for bankruptcy. If you decide that this is the best time to ask for a raise, you are only showing upper management that you are utterly tone deaf. If you survived the cuts, you should probably be thankful you're still on the payroll at all.</p> <p>A company can encounter nonfinancial trouble, too &mdash; and you should also back away from any kind of salary negotiation until these stormy waters have calmed. A public relations scandal, for example, will have the company in a panic. No one will give your salary concerns a second thought when there are much bigger fish to fry. Or, maybe several key workers have left to form another company, or work for a rival. Again, the only thing management will be concerned about is keeping the ship afloat.</p> <p>You know when the company is not doing well. Do what you can to help, and do it with vigor. Then, when it's all worked out, you'll have more ammo for your salary discussion.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-your-employer-wont-pay-you">What to Do If Your Employer Won&#039;t Pay You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">8 Career Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-skills-that-helped-your-boss-get-ahead">6 Skills That Helped Your Boss Get Ahead</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building asking for raise boss employer job manager promotions salary strategies working Fri, 02 Jun 2017 09:00:10 +0000 Paul Michael 1957904 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Biggest Ways Procrastination Hurts Your Finances http://www.wisebread.com/7-biggest-ways-procrastination-hurts-your-finances <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-biggest-ways-procrastination-hurts-your-finances" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-621987808.jpg" alt="Woman learning biggest ways procrastination hurts her finances" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Remember those days in college when you'd put off studying until the night before a big exam? You'd stay up all night, desperately trying to cram everything in at the last minute. If only you'd taken the time earlier, you'd have walked into your test rested, calm, and most importantly, prepared.</p> <p>Those bad habits can cost you a lot more in real life if you carry them into the way you handle money. Here are seven situations when procrastination really hurts your bottom line.</p> <h2>1. Investing: Your money has less time to grow</h2> <p>It's one of the basic rules of smart investing: Invest as early as you can and for as long as you can. Some of the most successful investors are those who had relatively modest incomes, but started investing young and stayed in the markets for decades. Compounding interest worked in their favor, and they enjoyed a sizable nest egg later in life. Even a delay of five to 10 years can make a significant difference in how much money you have by retirement. Quite simply, the more you procrastinate, the less money you'll have.</p> <h2>2. Saving: You continue to spend more than you earn</h2> <p>You're aware that you're spending more money than you're bringing in, but you tell yourself that you'll start cutting back after the holidays. The holidays come and go, so then you tell yourself you'll start saving after your big spring break trip. After spring break, you promise you'll start after your cousin's wedding in July. There's always some reason to put off saving, but the best time to start tightening your belt is right away. Devising an arbitrary future start date for financial prudence only means you're spending money you shouldn't in the interim.</p> <h2>3. Debt payoff: Your balances balloon</h2> <p>That credit card bill keeps getting bigger, and it comes on top of your student loans and car payments. You're getting crushed by debt, but it's so overwhelming you can't bring yourself to come up with a plan to tackle it. Every moment you wait to address your debt problem is a moment that allows that debt to grow. Devise a repayment strategy now, before your debt ruins you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-pay-off-high-interest-credit-card-debt?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Ways to Pay Off High Interest Credit Card Debt</a>)</p> <h2>4. Taxes: You might make a costly mistake</h2> <p>Tax Day seems so far away, but before you know it, it's the middle of April and you haven't even gotten started. You may think your taxes are simple, but rushing through the process increases your chances of forgetting income, missing out on deductions, or making a silly error.</p> <p>No one says you have to file your taxes immediately at the beginning of the year, but at least give yourself a few weeks to file your return carefully. A rush job could mean you pay too much, or you may end up with penalties due to mistakes.</p> <h2>5. Bills: You miss payment deadlines</h2> <p>There are consequences to paying bills late, usually in the form of fees and interest charges. If you're the type of person who doesn't even open a bill until it's nearly due, you're putting yourself at risk of extra expenses.</p> <p>Late fees and interest aren't merely one-time charges. Miss your payments by enough days and it can hurt your credit score, impacting your ability to borrow. It's best to pay bills right away when you get them &mdash; or put them on autopay &mdash; so they don't threaten your finances further. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-simple-ways-to-never-make-a-late-credit-card-payment?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Simple Ways to Never Make a Late Credit Card Payment</a>)</p> <h2>6. Job applications: You don't get that better-paying position</h2> <p>You found a job that you think you'll like, and it pays considerably more than your current one. But instead of applying right away, you wait. And wait. And wait. Before you know it, the position is filled. This is a total wasted opportunity.</p> <p>Yes, applying for a job, reworking your resume, writing cover letters, and going through interviews are all tedious and time-consuming. But when you're stuck sitting at your current gig, underpaid and unhappy, you'll really be kicking yourself for not putting in the work to get yourself unstuck.</p> <h2>7. Raises and promotions: You miss out for another year</h2> <p>It's hard to know the precise time to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise" target="_blank">ask for a promotion or a raise</a>. Often, we wait until annual review season, but by then, personnel decisions may already have been made. The best thing is to approach the subject sooner rather than later. Your boss may not be in a position to respond right away, but you've planted the seed so they know your wishes.</p> <p>Besides, simply asking for a raise or promotion may force your employer to look more closely at your work, and hopefully recognize what you bring to the table each day. If you wait too long to ask, you may have to wait for an entire budget cycle to get another shot.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-biggest-ways-procrastination-hurts-your-finances">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-liabilities-that-will-ruin-your-net-worth">7 Liabilities That Will Ruin Your Net Worth</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-putting-off-these-9-adult-money-moves">Are You Putting Off These 9 Adult Money Moves?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-biggest-lies-we-tell-ourselves-about-money">The 10 Biggest Lies We Tell Ourselves About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-get-a-promotion">8 Money Moves to Make the Moment You Get a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-profit-off-your-cabin-fever">8 Ways to Profit Off Your Cabin Fever</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance asking for raise bills debt investing jobs last minute procrastination promotions saving taxes Tue, 23 May 2017 08:00:09 +0000 Tim Lemke 1949205 at http://www.wisebread.com 15 Rookie Mistakes New Bosses Make http://www.wisebread.com/15-rookie-mistakes-new-bosses-make <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/15-rookie-mistakes-new-bosses-make" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-624568564.jpg" alt="Woman making rookie mistakes after becoming the boss" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Sooner or later in your career (and most likely later, for obvious reasons), you're going to become the boss. Whether it's through a promotion, or a new hire, you will suddenly be in the top spot. Now, the buck really does stop with you. And while it's fantastic to have those new powers and responsibilities, it can also be very difficult to adapt to the new role. Here are 15 rookie mistakes you should avoid when you become the big cheese.</p> <h2>1. Playing favorites with friends</h2> <p>You may be promoted into a leadership role, or hired from the outside, but one thing is certain; either you'll already have friends around you, or you'll make new friends quickly. In either case, be careful with these friendships. It's difficult, and sometimes almost impossible, to separate a great friendship from a working relationship.</p> <p>If a good friend does something at work that is bad for the company, you have to come down just as hard on that person as any other employee. If they don't deserve a promotion, don't give them one. And remember, friendships will be scrutinized. So if the colleague you play golf with every weekend genuinely deserves that raise or promotion, you better make sure you have everything documented.</p> <h2>2. Trying too hard to be liked</h2> <p>New bosses are sometimes like puppies: They run around the office, happy all the time, desperately trying to get a smile out of everyone. It's not going to work. In fact, it will most likely become annoying after a while, and if you keep going, downright disruptive.</p> <p>You do not have to be liked, or loved, by your staff. If you do the job well, and treat them as valuable employees, that will come naturally without buying breakfast every morning and telling jokes at the water cooler. Let your skills speak for themselves. You are not there to win a popularity contest.</p> <h2>3. Trying too hard to be feared or respected</h2> <p>On the other side of the coin is desperately trying to be feared or respected. Now, trying to be feared is just not a good idea. Sure, some people love the thought of being the most terrifying person at the board meeting, but does that make that person a good boss?</p> <p>Respect, on the other hand, is something every good boss should get from the staff. However, it cannot be taken. It has to be earned. Your deeds, decisions, and performance will dictate the kind of respect you get. No one is going to just give you great respect out of the gate (unless they are looking for a quick promotion).</p> <h2>4. Changing everything &mdash; even things that work</h2> <p>In sports, when a new manager joins the team, a lot of changes are made. Often, these are unnecessary changes, including axing players who are great simply because they are part of the old regime. The same can happen in a business environment.</p> <p>As a new boss, you have to look at what is working, and what isn't. There will be systems in place that have taken years to perfect. If they aren't working, fix them. If they are, concentrate on something else. The same goes for people. Know who the bad apples are &mdash; don't throw the good ones out as well.</p> <h2>5. Making impossible promises</h2> <p>Presidential candidates who get elected fall afoul of this one all the time. &quot;Elect me, and I'll do X, Y, and Z.&quot; Then they get the job and find out there's a lot more involved than they ever considered. The same goes when you become the new boss.</p> <p>Do not make promises that are impossible to keep. You may think you really can fix the unfixable, or from an outsider's perspective, the very easily fixable &mdash; but sometimes there are forces at play that you cannot beat. Get the lay of the land first. Ask around. Find out what the employees want fixed, and then dig into the systems that can make it happen. Then, and only then, can you make promises you have a good chance of keeping. Doing it blindly in your first week will not bode well. You'll be the boss who couldn't get things done.</p> <h2>6. Taking on way too much</h2> <p>Take on too much, too soon, and you could jeopardize the position you just landed. It's better to take on a few tasks and do them well than to say yes to everything and do a mediocre job. What's worse, the employees will think you don't trust them to do the jobs they have been doing for years if you start interfering in their work. So, analyze the tasks available to you, and delegate the jobs you don't need to be involved with. You'll have a lot less stress, and the staff will trust you more.</p> <h2>7. Focusing on short term benefits</h2> <p>In this case, benefits are not health, vision, and dental. Rather, these are immediate benefits to the company and staff. Perhaps you see a few easy fixes, and get them done. However, you may well be throwing duct tape on a much bigger problem. In the short term, yes, people are happy. But if you have simply kicked the can down the road, you will have to pick that up at some point. And by then, the problems will have only grown larger.</p> <p>Look at the bigger picture. Yes, it may be easy to fix the poor cafeteria choices, or unsightly wallpaper in the break room, but you may be using money that could help a bigger problem; one that will have a much greater impact when it's solved.</p> <h2>8. Refusing to ask for help</h2> <p>You are the boss. You are in charge. But you're not infallible. You don't know everything. And let's be honest, if this is your first week on the job, how could you?</p> <p>Many managers consider it a sign of weakness to ask for help, but that couldn't be further from the truth. Ask for help when you need it, providing it's something you shouldn't already know (you don't want to ask how to use a spreadsheet if you've just been taken on as head of accounting). If you don't know where a department is, ask for directions. If you don't know how a particular system or process works, call a meeting with the people who do. Then, bring your expertise to the table.</p> <h2>9. Firing and hiring the wrong people</h2> <p>It happens all too often, and it's a blight on corporate culture. A new manager is brought in, and immediately they begin firing people that rub them the wrong way, and hiring people they worked with at other firms. While it's fine to bring in people you know can do the job well, give people a chance to show you what they can do. It should take months to really figure out who is a good employee, and who is treading water. Some people may be excellent, but in the wrong department. Others may have been given inadequate training, or have been buried with enough work for three people. Scope things out before pulling out the pink slips.</p> <h2>10. Micromanaging every single operation</h2> <p>One of the biggest bottlenecks that a manager can create is to insert him or herself into every single transaction. A boss is not supposed to get into the weeds in that way. Rather, a boss sees things from a much greater height, and lets trusted employees get their hands dirty on smaller operations. If you insist on seeing every part of every process, and ask to be CC'd on every email, you will create tremendous animosity. And you'll slow everything to a crawl.</p> <h2>11. Being the center of attention</h2> <p>As far as you're concerned, you did it. You got the job. You got the big promotion. You are the star of your show, your family is proud, and your friends are buying drinks at the bar. Enjoy it, but leave that at the office door. You do not want to have meetings telling everyone all about you, your likes, dislikes, favorite TV shows, preferred color of socks, and all the industry awards you've won. Think of this as a date. You want to spend the first few weeks being insanely interested in your staff. They are your first priority. You want to be fascinated by their issues, and their hopes and dreams. This is not your show.</p> <h2>12. Fearing failure</h2> <p>Failure is essential in every business. You cannot learn how to do something right until you've done it wrong &mdash; usually, several times. But managers who are new to the company or the role fear failure. They believe that mistakes are weaknesses, and that can quickly lead to dismissal. Don't fall into that trap.</p> <p>You have to reach for the stars, and to do so, you must risk falling flat on your face in the dirt. However, you will succeed far more often than you fail, you'll gain the respect of your staff, and you will make great strides for the company.</p> <h2>13. Stalling on big decisions</h2> <p>Your staff knows the big problems that you're facing. They probably know them so well, they're just waiting for you to fix them. But don't lead them on. If you know that someone has to be fired because they are awful at their job, don't stall for months because it's hard to do. If you need to upgrade the equipment, but know it will cost a fortune, address it head on. Let people know you're working on it. By making excuses and stalling, you will lose the respect of your employees, and will become known as all talk, and no action.</p> <h2>14. Ignoring small issues that can make a big difference</h2> <p>You know what they say about a stitch in time. It is just as applicable in the workplace. When you find out about small problems or issues, deal with them. For instance, you may discover that there is animosity between two members of staff. If you ignore it, it grows into a much bigger problem. Perhaps one that can only be solved by letting one of them go. But, by addressing it early, and clearing the air, you can stop that small issue from becoming a big one. Whether it's a system or process, personnel, equipment, or anything else related to the day-to-day operations, don't ignore those small problems. Before you know it, they're enormous.</p> <h2>15. Not getting up to speed on personal issues</h2> <p>A new boss is not expected to know everything about every employee in the first week. But, a quick one-on-one with the team to find out any personal situations that are relevant to the job is essential. For instance, one employee appears to be off his game. He's not attentive in meetings. He's withdrawn from the rest of the office. It seems as if he's just not a good performer. But as it turns out, this is a great employee who just suffered a tragic loss in the family. This is an immediate paradigm shift. Now, this behavior is not only understandable, it's something you can help with. Make it a priority to know your staff, and their problems and concerns, within the first few weeks.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-rookie-mistakes-new-bosses-make">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-12"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">8 Career Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-times-youre-better-off-without-a-promotion">12 Times You&#039;re Better Off Without a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves">9 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Career Moves</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income employees hired management Mistakes new boss promotions rookies Mon, 27 Mar 2017 09:30:34 +0000 Paul Michael 1911601 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Make Public Speaking Less Terrifying http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-public-speaking-less-terrifying <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-make-public-speaking-less-terrifying" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-502920120.jpg" alt="Woman making public speaking less terrifying" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your ability to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/small-business/7-tips-to-beating-fear-and-becoming-a-stellar-public-speaker?ref=internal" target="_blank">speak in public</a> can be critical as you climb the corporate ladder. Struggling with anxieties about speaking in public can affect how your peers and other professionals view you, as well as limit your career opportunities down the line.</p> <p>Speaking with poise shows that you are confident, knowledgeable, and can handle pressure &mdash; all important qualities for a professional (especially a manager) to have. And handling questions after a speech, for example, shows how quickly you can think on your feet and how well you know the subject matter.</p> <p>If you cannot present confidently, or maybe you even skip speaking opportunities altogether, you miss your chance to showcase your skills. That gives others the chance to shine instead. Your fear of public speaking may be putting others in line for promotions ahead of you.</p> <p>Many careers consider presentation skills part of the basic job requirements. As you grow in your career, that becomes more common. Don't let this fear threaten to derail your professional life.</p> <h2>Improving your speaking abilities</h2> <p>For millions of people, public speaking is their number one fear. If you are one of them, there are ways you can conquer your fear. Below are four strategies you can use to help master speaking in front of others.</p> <h3>1. Books</h3> <p>If you struggle with anxiety and speaking in public, self-help books may offer some relief. Many people swear by Dale Carnegie's <a href="http://amzn.to/2mDZA1X" target="_blank">The Quick and Easy Way to Effective Speaking</a><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Quick-Easy-Way-Effective-Speaking/dp/0671724002/ref=zg_bs_541648_6?_encoding=UTF8&amp;psc=1&amp;refRID=M8T0JDBET226D3E7M6XD">.</a> This book has helpful strategies on how to become more confident as a presenter and techniques on overcoming nerves before a big presentation.</p> <h3>2. Study what works</h3> <p>If you don't know where to start, study what works well for others. Look for speakers who speak well; they can be people within your workplace or <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-presentation-secrets-of-steve-jobs?ref=internal" target="_blank">professional speakers</a> who perform in front of thousands. By studying what makes them engaging, such as their body language, volume, and presentation style, you can adapt their best practices into your own speeches.</p> <p>Watching popular <a href="http://www.ted.com/talks" target="_blank">TED talks</a> on subjects that interest you can provide fantastic inspiration, too. There are a wide range of topics and speaker styles, so you're sure to find something you can learn from.</p> <h3>3. Toastmasters</h3> <p>Toastmasters is one of the most well-known professional workshops out there. By joining a Toastmasters' club, you can practice public speaking in a relaxed, safe environment. You'll get tips and constructive criticism from polished professionals and experts, helping you hone your skills and get more comfortable at the front of the room.</p> <h3>4. Virtual reality</h3> <p>I tried a range of techniques to overcome my fear, including joining Toastmasters and reading dozens of books, but the most effective technique for me was virtual reality. While there are a number of apps and platforms available now, one of the biggest and most popular is Speech Center for VR.</p> <p>Speaking in front of a large group is difficult to prepare for; practicing in front of an empty room, while helpful in ensuring you know the material, doesn't ready you for presenting in front of dozens or &mdash; gulp &mdash; hundreds.</p> <p><a href="https://speechcentervr.com/" target="_blank">Speech Center for VR</a> is an app that uses virtual reality to make it seem like you're speaking in front of hundreds of people. There are different scenarios to choose from and virtual coaches that provide feedback, such as on your movement, eye contact, or voice level.</p> <p>While I felt ridiculous wearing the headset at first, I found it really helped me get more comfortable presenting to large groups. And it gave me good feedback on using the space available to me and modulating my speaking voice. Within a few sessions, I was still nervous, but I felt prepared and able to give a speech without getting sick.</p> <h2>Tips for making a great speech</h2> <p>When it comes to actually giving a speech, here are a few tips to help you through it.</p> <h3>1. Speak louder than you think is necessary</h3> <p>When people are nervous, they tend to speak quickly or softly. This can give you the appearance of timidity or unpreparedness. If you speak one level louder than you think is a normal presentation voice, you will naturally slow your speech and sound more authoritative and confident.</p> <h3>2. Breathe</h3> <p>If you tend to rush, force yourself to take a deep breath after each sentence. This will make your words sound more purposeful, while helping keep your nerves in check. And taking a moment to take a breath will also eliminate the need for filler sounds, such as &quot;um.&quot;</p> <h3>3. Hold a prop</h3> <p>For some, one of the most challenging aspects of speaking is what to do with their hands. Having a prop, even something as simple as holding a pen, can make you feel more relaxed and natural.</p> <h3>4. Know the material inside and out</h3> <p>One of the biggest public speaking fears is forgetting what you need to say. To combat that, practice the material until you know it by heart. That's not to say you should memorize the whole thing, but you should know the key stats and progression of talking points.</p> <h3>5. Find a friendly face</h3> <p>Making eye contact can be challenging when you're nervous or intimidated. Identify two or three friendly faces in the crowd to look at during key moments of the speech. That can give the illusion of making natural eye contact, while giving you encouragement to keep going.</p> <h3>6. Keep it simple</h3> <p>When writing a speech, it can be easy to use elaborate, wordy prose. But that can make it difficult to present naturally. Instead, use simple terms and short sentences to make it more engaging and understandable.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kat-tretina">Kat Tretina</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-public-speaking-less-terrifying">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-succeed-at-work-despite-your-lousy-boss">How to Succeed at Work Despite Your Lousy Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-presentation-secrets-of-steve-jobs">The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-deal-when-you-work-with-someone-you-hate">8 Ways to Deal When You Work With Someone You Hate</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-times-youre-better-off-without-a-promotion">12 Times You&#039;re Better Off Without a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fundamentals-of-naming-a-small-business">10 Fundamentals of Naming a Small Business</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Life Hacks advice fear phobia presentations promotions public speaking speeches strategies Wed, 22 Mar 2017 09:30:32 +0000 Kat Tretina 1909974 at http://www.wisebread.com You Got a Raise! Now What? http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/you-got-a-raise-now-what" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-510329664.jpg" alt="Man got a raise, so now what?" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>So, you got a raise! Now, it's time to start putting that money to work for you. While your first thought might be <em>shopping spree</em>, consider instead these other options that will build your wealth and secure your financial freedom.</p> <h2>Have Realistic Expectations</h2> <p>Your raise may sound like a lot, but once you receive your paycheck, you may be surprised to find how little your take-home pay actually changed. Don't make plans based on a quick mental calculation. Get the actual amount from your paycheck to know how the raise will actually impact you.</p> <h2>Make a Plan</h2> <p>Of course it's okay to reward yourself <em>a bit </em>for working hard and getting a raise. But don't just pocket the extra money and add it to your fun budget. Check your savings, credit card debt, and investments to see which areas can use a boost, and put your raise there. You can decide to put three months' worth to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fastest-way-to-pay-off-10000-in-credit-card-debt?ref=internal" target="_blank">pay down your debt</a>, and then take a one month break to splurge. Consider your financial goals and how every dollar makes a difference toward reaching them.</p> <h2>Increase Your Emergency Savings</h2> <p>In an ideal world, you should have a three to six month cushion in your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-step-by-step-guide-to-creating-your-emergency-fund?ref=internal" target="_blank">emergency fund</a>. If you already have a sizable emergency fund, then you don't need to worry about saving more with your increased income. Otherwise, saving more now will mean less stress later when an unexpected event hits your wallet hard.</p> <h2>Pay Down Debt</h2> <p>Paying off debt should be a priority in your plan to gain financial freedom. It can also help improve your credit score, save on interest, and reduce stress. Consider putting your raise toward debt payments. Even a small amount that you can add to your monthly payments will significantly lower the interest paid and help you pay it off faster.</p> <h2>Increase Your Retirement Savings</h2> <p>Can you put some of that raise into your retirement accounts? Your retirement contribution might also automatically increase as it is usually based on a percentage of your gross pay. Have you at least set your 401K contributions to get the full amount of matching from your employer? If you have an another retirement account, like a Roth IRA, get your annual contribution out of the way.</p> <h2>Refinance Your Loans</h2> <p>With a higher income, you may be eligible for better rates on a personal loan, mortgage, and car loan. You can apply for better loans now or wait for your credit score to increase after you've made some positive changes (such as paying down debt and lowering your debt-to-credit ratio).</p> <h2>Start Investing</h2> <p>It's never too early to pad your wealth with smart investing. These days the startup capital required is minimal. You can start investing with a few hundred dollars. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-guide-to-online-brokers-for-investing-newbies-and-beyond?ref=internal" target="_blank">Online brokerages</a> often have a low minimum with low fees. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-trust-your-money-with-these-4-popular-financial-robo-advisers?ref=internal" target="_blank">Financial robo advisers</a> can take a lot of the work out of figuring out what to buy. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-cheap-easy-ways-to-invest-your-first-1000?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Easy Ways to Invest Your First $1,000</a>)</p> <h2>Have Fun</h2> <p>It won't hurt to reward yourself a bit for a job well done. Have a celebratory dinner or buy an affordable gadget that you've been wanting. You can also start saving toward a vacation or other large purchase.</p> <h2>Prove Your Employer Right</h2> <p>Getting a raise means you've done a good job and deserve to be rewarded for it. Prove your employer right by continuing your positive behaviors, always putting your best foot forward, and looking forward to the next raise. You may also want to write a thank you card, especially if your manager or boss worked hard to get you the raise.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-1-losing-a-job">Getting by without a job, part 1--losing a job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-little-ways-to-boost-your-savings-account-every-day">9 Little Ways to Boost Your Savings Account Every Day</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-improve-your-finances-using-social-media">How to Improve Your Finances Using Social Media</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job">5 Things You Must Do Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/turn-your-passion-into-a-living">Turn Your Passion Into A Living</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Career and Income budgeting debt repayment extra money income job paychecks promotions raise saving money work Wed, 01 Mar 2017 11:00:10 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1898693 at http://www.wisebread.com They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What? http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-525955132.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are usually two ways to get a pay bump in your career; either you move to a new job that offers more money and a better title, or you get promoted at your current company with a raise. These days though, a promotion is not always accompanied by a bigger paycheck. When this happens, you may be wondering: Is it worth it?</p> <p>Let's look at the arguments for, and against, this new trend.</p> <h2>Yes! Take the Promotion Even Without a Raise</h2> <p>If there's a title change on the table, but no extra money to accompany it, there are still plenty of positives to consider.</p> <h3>1. You Will Gain More Experience</h3> <p>Hands down, one of the best reasons to take a promotion without a raise is to take advantage of the experience you'll get. Moving into a bigger role means more responsibility, more work, and more to learn. While it would be ideal to be compensated for this, remember that experience in and of itself is a kind of compensation. Think about it: Everyone who is paying many thousands of dollars to get an education, or learn a new skill, is paying for experience. You're getting this additional experience at no cost to you, and it can only help you grow and become a better employee.</p> <h3>2. It Looks Great on Your Resume</h3> <p>A <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=internal" target="_blank">flat resume</a> is like a flat landscape; it's not very inviting. If you're looking to move jobs, you want to show your prospective employer that you have achieved things. You made waves, you made a difference, and you climbed the ladder. Promotions without pay raises do that just as effectively as those that come with extra cash. After all, how often do you put a specific salary next to each job or position you ever held? So, if you get promoted from Account Manager to Account Director, but there's no raise in pay, don't worry too much. It may not pay off now, but when you do move to a different job, you can jump right in at the higher level.</p> <h3>3. You May Get Additional Benefits Aside From the Pay</h3> <p>So you're not getting any extra money. But, what else does the promotion give you? Ask, and you may be surprised at the additional benefits that could come with the job. In some companies, that promotion can mean extra vacation days and personal days. In others, it may mean that you can work at home occasionally, or travel more. Some companies will give you extra discounts on products and services, or freebies. You may be able to get the cost of your cellphone bill reimbursed, or get a free company phone, which eliminates the need to pay for your own. Is there a company car? All these benefits, and more, add up to either saving money, or you not having to spend it, and that's a kind of pay raise.</p> <h3>4. With a Better Title Comes a Bigger Role in the Company</h3> <p>Even without the extra money, a promotion can be an excellent way to get more gravitas at work. Now, you have the title to push through ideas that might not have gone very far before. You may also have people reporting to you, which means you can delegate some of the less interesting work to them. It is rare &mdash; very rare &mdash; for a promotion to give you nothing more than a title change. Take the chance to grab those advantages. Or even better, suggest some. If the new title doesn't come with more money, can it come with something else? Get creative.</p> <h3>5. Turning a Promotion Down Can Look Bad</h3> <p>Finally in the &quot;for&quot; camp, it's the one point you cannot ignore. How is this going to look? It may be that the company is in financially unstable times, and cannot afford to give you more money right now. But, they really want you to take a bigger role, and more responsibility. They may well be counting on you. Saying &quot;Not without a raise&quot; can make you look mercenary, and while it is your right to do so, it could have implications further down the road. So, think hard before saying no. You may be saying no to a bigger promotion and actual raise down the road.</p> <h2>No! Don't Take That Promotion Without a Raise</h2> <p>More problems and no more money? Here's why you should consider declining the offer.</p> <h3>1. It's More Responsibility for the Same Money</h3> <p>Or, to put it another way, it's a pay cut. Look closely at the new title, and look at how the new job differs from your current role. Do you have to come in earlier and leave later? Are you on the road more? Are you now handling a much bigger workload, more stress, and the working lives of a lot of new people now reporting to you? Will this mean less time with your family or other relationships? Will you have to sacrifice hobbies and other personal interests? You may even have to relocate, and without more money, that could be impossible. Weigh up all these options carefully.</p> <h3>2. You Don't Want to Be a Pushover<strong> </strong></h3> <p>As an employee, you want to be respected. You do what you are required to do, and you do it well. But, you do not want to be a pushover, either. Taking a promotion without a pay raise might leave you feeling taken advantage of. Explore the reasons why this promotion comes without money. Does the company have a good excuse? It's certainly not the norm to get a promotion without extra pay, so what's the party line from HR?</p> <h3>3. Your Company May Be Hiding Something<strong> </strong></h3> <p>There's a scene in the movie <em>Fun With Dick and Jane</em> where Jim Carrey's character, who works for an Enron-like company, gets a big promotion only to find out he's the fall guy for his company's fall into the toilet. Sadly, this is not just something that happens in the movies. People sometimes get promoted into jobs that are dead ends, or into positions that make them immediately liable for something bad happening. You really need to do the research here. What exactly does this promotion entail? What is the state of the department? Talk to people who had that position before you. Get the scoop before you even consider saying yes, or no.</p> <h3>4. The Position May Require You to Actually Spend More Money</h3> <p>Not only will you be doing more work for the same money, but it's possible you'll have to dip into your pocket more as well. The promotion may require you to buy clothing and equipment that won't be reimbursed by the company. You may have to do a lot more driving, which means more gas and more wear and tear. You may have to organize and attend lunch meetings, which are once again not reimbursed. Ask what is required of you in the new role, and do the math.</p> <h2>What to Do?</h2> <p>As you can see, there are more reasons &quot;for&quot; taking this promotion than &quot;against&quot; it. But, that doesn't mean you should blindly take any promotion that comes without a raise. Take each situation on a case-by-case basis. Really look into it. Chances are, it's a good career move, even if it doesn't do anything for your bank account. But, there are risks, and they can be big ones. Good luck.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job">How to Deal When You Hate Your New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-types-of-bad-bosses-and-how-to-survive-them">The 8 Types of Bad Bosses — And How to Survive Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves">9 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Career Moves</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income employment job titles promotions pros and cons raises resumes work Mon, 27 Feb 2017 10:00:20 +0000 Paul Michael 1896816 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Secrets to Mastering the Debt Snowball http://www.wisebread.com/6-secrets-to-mastering-the-debt-snowball <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-secrets-to-mastering-the-debt-snowball" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-109722901.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You probably already know it makes more financial sense to pay off debts with the highest interest rates first, a payment method known as the debt avalanche.</p> <p>But here's a surprise: A study published last year in the Journal of Consumer Research found that people were more likely to actually pay off their debts if they relied on the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-comprehensive-guide-to-the-debt-snowball-method-0" target="_blank">debt snowball method</a>, instead. In this approach, you pay off your smallest debt first, followed by your next smallest, and so on &mdash; until you've paid off all of them. You take this approach without worrying about which debts have the highest interest rates.</p> <p>Why does this method seem to work better? Researchers say it's about that all-important feeling of accomplishment. You'll get a rush of good feelings when you pay off a credit card, even if the debt on that card isn't that high. Yes, you'll pay more in the long run by not targeting debt with the highest interest rates first. But if the snowball method works better, and if you've long struggled with your credit card and other debts, you might be better off taking this approach.</p> <p>So, if you're ready to give the debt snowball method a chance, here are some tricks to boost your chances of success.</p> <h2>1. Draft a Household Budget</h2> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-your-first-budget-in-5-easy-steps" target="_blank">Creating a budget</a> doesn't sound like fun, but it's critical if you're ready to get serious about paying down your debt. Your household budget should include the money that flows into your home each month and the money you spend, including estimates for such discretionary expenses as eating out and entertainment.</p> <p>Once you have a budget, you'll better know how much money you can allocate to paying down that smallest debt each month. Without a budget? You might be paying too much, putting yourself at financial risk. Or you might pay too little, dragging out the process of paying down your debts.</p> <h2>2. Don't Use the Card You're Trying to Pay Off</h2> <p>It might sound obvious, but don't add to the debt you're trying to pay off first. Don't use your credit cards to pay for anything. Follow your budget and pay cash or check for your allocated expenses. If you have a balance already on the card from the previous month, using it will immediately start interest charges on that amount. Nothing stalls your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fastest-way-to-pay-off-10000-in-credit-card-debt?ref=internal" target="_blank">debt elimination process</a> more than adding additional interest.</p> <h2>3. In Fact, Don't Purchase Anything You Can't Afford to Pay Off</h2> <p>You're going to have to get used to a different sort of lifestyle, and that means no longer buying things you can't pay off at the end of the month.</p> <h2>4. Automate It</h2> <p>When you're concentrating on paying off one debt quickly, it can be easy to overlook some of your other bills. You can avoid this, though, by turning to automated bill payment. If you find yourself overlooking your cellphone bill, create an automatic payment from your bank account to cover that bill each month. You can do the same thing with car payments, student loan payments, or utility bills. Do this, and you'll dramatically reduce the odds of paying one bill late while you're whittling down another.</p> <h2>5. Don't Waste Bonuses or Promotions</h2> <p>Are you in line for a bonus at work? Don't blow that money on a new laptop. Instead, funnel it toward the debt you are trying to pay off. There's no better feeling than lopping off a huge chunk of debt.</p> <p>Or, maybe you've earned a promotion and a nice pay raise. Don't think that this gives you more spending money each month. No &mdash; until you pay off your debts, spending extra on fun shouldn't be a consideration. Instead, take the extra money you earn each month and use it to pay down your debt even faster. And then when you eliminate a student loan, credit card bill, or car loan, keep using that extra money to help pay down your next largest debt.</p> <h2>6. Consider a Balance Transfer Carefully</h2> <p>This strategy is only for those who are diligent and committed to paying off a certain amount of debt within a specific period of time. Credit cards offer new cardholders various balance transfer offers. Some have <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-0-balance-transfer-credit-cards?ref=internal" target="_blank">longer promotional periods (18-21 months)</a>, while others will <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-credit-cards-with-no-balance-transfer-fees?ref=internal" target="_blank">waive the balance transfer fee</a> (usually 3%-5%). Using a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-to-do-a-balance-transfer-to-pay-off-credit-card-debt?ref=internal" target="_blank">balance transfer to pay down credit card debt</a> can save you a lot of money in interest. However, if instead you misuse this opportunity, by not paying off the debt during the 0% promotional period, and continuing to rack up debt on the cards you transferred balances from, you will find yourself in a crisis dealing with more accumulated debt than you started with, and at an even higher APR. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-important-things-you-should-know-about-balance-transfer-cards?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Important Things You Should Know About Balance Transfers</a>)</p> <p>Paying down debt is never easy. But if you remain committed, and you need a series of smaller, but quicker, victories, the debt snowball method can work. Just make sure to remain focused on that goal of eliminating each debt one at a time.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-secrets-to-mastering-the-debt-snowball&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Secrets%2520to%2520Mastering%2520the%2520Debt%2520Snowball.jpg&amp;description=6%20Secrets%20to%20Mastering%20the%20Debt%20Snowball"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Secrets%20to%20Mastering%20the%20Debt%20Snowball.jpg" alt="6 Secrets to Mastering the Debt Snowball" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-secrets-to-mastering-the-debt-snowball">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-spring-clean-your-debt">How to Spring-Clean Your Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-day-debt-reduction-plan-pay-it-off">5-Day Debt Reduction Plan: Pay It Off</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-warning-signs-youre-in-debt-denial">7 Warning Signs You&#039;re In Debt Denial</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world">Why Retiring With Debt Isn&#039;t the End of the World</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-common-debt-reduction-roadblocks-and-how-to-beat-them">6 Common Debt Reduction Roadblocks — And How to Beat Them</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Debt Management automatic payments bills bonuses budgeting promotions repayment plans snowball method strategies Tue, 31 Jan 2017 10:00:08 +0000 Dan Rafter 1877971 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Improve Your Finances Using Social Media http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-improve-your-finances-using-social-media <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-improve-your-finances-using-social-media" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_phone_text_94856801.jpg" alt="Woman learning how to improve finances using social media " title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Social media is about more than just looking at friends' baby photos, posting what you ate for dinner last night, and watching the most recent viral videos. It can actually help you improve your finances, land a new job, and reach your savings goals more efficiently. That's why we've found some of the best ways to improve your finances by getting the most out of social media. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-social-media-can-save-you-money?ref=seealso">6 Ways Social Media Can Save You Money</a>)</p> <h2>&quot;Friend&quot; Your Credit Cards and Bank</h2> <p>Add your credit card issuers and bank to your social media accounts by &quot;friending&quot; or following them. Large institutions usually offer deals to followers, so you can enjoy a lower APR, higher savings interest rate, or other money-saving promos. In fact, according to U.S. News, social media is often the first outlet that banks choose to <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/articles/2015/06/03/why-the-financial-services-industry-started-tweeting">share news about upcoming deals</a>.</p> <p>Social media is also possibly the best way to get in touch with customer service quickly, as it will allow you to get their attention more easily. Just make sure to keep your account information, address, and any other private information off the message boards and social media pages.</p> <h2>Enjoy Travel and Shopping Deals</h2> <p>There are endless travel and shopping deals available through social media. Retailers often choose social media as the first outlet to announce upcoming sales, so their friends and followers are able to take advantage of the biggest discounts first. Followers are frequently offered early deals, as well.</p> <p>You can find Twitter-specific deals that can save you on everything from rental cars and vacations to eating out and even buying gifts. Before going out to make any purchases, check Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest to make sure there aren't any deals that you're missing. You can even check social media hashtags, such as #deal, to find the best deals in your area.</p> <h2>Share Goals</h2> <p>Many financial experts recommend sharing your financial goals online. By setting your goals early and sharing them with the people you love, it can help you articulate what you really want and hold you accountable to achieve your goals. In fact, research has shown that making <a href="http://www.fastcompany.com/3047432/work-smart/why-sharing-your-progress-makes-you-more-likely-to-accomplish-your-goals">public statements about goals</a> can help you achieve them more efficiently. However, you never want to reveal anything too personal, such as private information that fraudsters can use against you.</p> <h2>Get Money-Saving Tips</h2> <p>By following your favorite finance site on social media, you can find endless free money-saving tips and updates. You can also find forums and group discussions with unique money-saving ideas and encouragement from others. You can even find good financial and investment advice online.</p> <p>Seeing these tips on a daily basis on your social media pages can also be a good reminder each and every day to protect your hard-earned income. After all, we all need a reminder once in a while that we don't really need that new top or expensive latte in the morning.</p> <h2>Find a New Job</h2> <p>LinkedIn can be an invaluable tool when you're searching for a new job. You can apply for jobs directly through LinkedIn, perfect your resume, and even reach out to potential employers and former colleagues. Contacting them through Facebook or Twitter won't be as effective or as professional as contacting them through LinkedIn.</p> <p>With LinkedIn, once you have created a professional profile, employers and recruiters can even reach out to you with potential job offers. You can also join LinkedIn groups within your field so you are the first to know about potential opportunities. You can even add examples of your work, recommendations from current or previous coworkers, and any honors you've received to better build your online portfolio.</p> <h2>Make Connections</h2> <p>Networking through social media can result in better face-to-face communication, potential job offers, and endless contacts in your field. Simply following someone or sharing their social media posts can be a great first step in networking and making connections.</p> <h2>Build Your Brand</h2> <p>Whether you're promoting your personal business or services, or just want to build your reputation as the best in your field, posting on social media can be a great start. Just make sure to stay consistent so that you can reach as many followers as possible.</p> <h2>Research More Efficiently</h2> <p>Gone are the days of asking for financial suggestions from friends and coworkers. Whether you're looking for a new financial planner or would like information on which investments to make, you can find more information quickly through social media. With a simple social media search, you can find detailed research on the investment product or financial adviser you're interested in.</p> <p>You can also find suggestions for dentists and other service providers in your area through social media. This will ensure you get what you're looking for and don't waste money.</p> <h2>Sell Your Items</h2> <p>If you create and sell items privately, such as through Etsy, social media can be a great free platform for you to advertise your products or services. This can help you bring in more revenue, reach new customers, and show off your work to a limitless audience.</p> <h2>Make Some Extra Income</h2> <p>There are even ways to make some extra income using social media. If you have a large following, you can publish sponsored tweets or sign up for affiliate accounts, where you will receive your own unique link to earn some extra income when followers make purchases using that link. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-make-extra-money-using-social-media?ref=seealso">6 Ways to Make Extra Money Using Social Media</a>)</p> <p><em>Have you followed Wise Bread on social media yet? What are your best tips for improving your finances through social media? </em><em>Please share your thoughts in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-improve-your-finances-using-social-media">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-goals-you-should-set-for-the-holidays">10 Money Goals You Should Set for the Holidays</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-a-spending-ban-can-help-and-hurt-you">Here&#039;s How a Spending Ban Can Help (and Hurt) You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-only-money-advice-youll-actually-listen-to">The Only Money Advice You&#039;ll Actually Listen To</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-social-media-tricks-you-into-spending-more">8 Ways Social Media Tricks You Into Spending More</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Technology advice blogs deals extra money Internet job hunting promotions saving money selling shopping social media travel Mon, 25 Jul 2016 09:00:11 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1753337 at http://www.wisebread.com