frugal websites http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/8047/all en-US Building A Business Website Is Cheaper And Easier Than Ever http://www.wisebread.com/small-business/building-a-business-website-is-cheaper-and-easier-than-ever <div class="field field-type-link field-field-url"> <div class="field-label">Link:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="http://www.openforum.com/articles/building-a-business-website-is-cheaper-and-easier-than-ever" target="_blank">http://www.openforum.com/articles/building-a-business-website-is-cheaper-and-eas...</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/small-business/building-a-business-website-is-cheaper-and-easier-than-ever" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000004591261Small.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>According to a <a target="_blank" href="http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article/20111018/FREE/111019886/google-goes-searching-for-michigan-small-businesses">recent study</a>, 63 percent of small businesses don't have a website. If yours is one of them, you're missing out on one of the easiest, cheapest, and most effective ways to expand your business and increase your income.</p> <p>I built my first business <a target="_blank" href="http://web.archive.org/web/19980710071601/http:/www.barnstorming.com/">website in 1997</a>. Over the next 10 years, it went from generating a few hundred dollars a month to hundreds of thousands a year. I also built a website to sell a database of venture capital sources &mdash; a companion site to a book I co-authored on the topic. That site produced $40,000 a year in sales with no action required on my part except to answer an occasional email.</p> <p><strong>It's Not As Difficult or As Expensive As You May Think</strong></p> <p>You may be more familiar with traditional Yellow Pages or newspaper marketing, and consider an online presence a huge unknown. Or perhaps you recognize the value of a website but worry it will be too expensive or too hard to maintain?</p> <p>Twenty years after the Internet opened for business, what works and what doesn't is no longer a mystery. And the skills and technology required to develop a site are widely available and cost less than you might think.</p> <p><strong>What Does it Take to Get Online?</strong></p> <p>One-stop shops, such as <a target="_blank" href="http://bordesdesign.com/index.html">Bordes Design</a>, can quickly set you up to do business online. Or you can do it yourself if you have the time and skill. Either way, you need a few basics.</p> <p><b>1. A Web Address or URL</b></p> <p>Just as every company has a name, every website has a domain name &mdash; a web address or URL. Usually your URL will be the same as your company name, or a variation, but you might decide to use something descriptive for your online presence. Or you might discover your name is already in use by someone else and have to find another.</p> <p>Wile E. Coyote's favorite mail order supplier, Acme Corporation, might want to use something more descriptive such as jetpoweredrollerskates.com. On the other hand, Acme is so famous anyone looking for dehydrated boulders or earthquake pills would think first of acme.com so they might do best to stick with that. Or they could have both and make one forward to the other.</p> <p>Whatever you do, use a name that ends with .com. If you use something like wizbang.<i>biz</i>, people will assume you're wizbang.<i>com</i> and end up at your competitor's site most of the time. You can check on the availability of a URL at places like <a target="_blank" href="http://www.networksolutions.com/whois/index.jsp">Network Solutions</a>.</p> <p><b>2. A Web Host or ISP</b></p> <p>The collection of programs, files, and pictures that are used to create your website have to &quot;live&quot; in a computer someplace. That means once you have a URL you need an Internet Service Provider (ISP). Such companies have rooms full of computers, called server farms, where they host websites.</p> <p>These days ISPs are eager to find anything that will differentiate themselves from their competition. So most offer a web address registration service along with web hosting, and a surprising array of free software to help you make your site a success.</p> <p>While all that's convenient, what you want in a web host is reliability and good customer support. It can be hugely in expensive If your server goes down, say, right in the middle of holiday buying rush and you can't reach anyone to fix it.</p> <p><b>3. A Website</b></p> <p>If you know something about computers and enjoy tinkering, you can build a website on your own. <a target="_blank" href="http://wordpress.org/">Wordpress</a>, for example, can be installed by your ISP for free and then you simply configure the site using the built in templates. Or you could develop a site from scratch with a program such as <a target="_blank" href="http://www.adobe.com/products/dreamweaver.html">DreamWeaver</a> from Adobe.</p> <p>If you don't have the computer knowledge, the inclination, or the time to build a site yourself, you can hire a developer to do it for you. We did this when we recently renovated our web sites. But buyer beware. Website development is a combination of art and science. There are good artists and there are bad ones. There are good computer scientists and there are bad ones. And there are outright scammers who are neither artists or scientists, just thieves.</p> <p>One way to find someone to develop a site for you is to use a freelancer from <a target="_blank" href="http://upwork.com/">upwork.com</a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://vworker.com/">vworker.com</a>, or similar sites. You describe what you want, people bid on the job, and you <a target="_blank" href="http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/managing/article/10-tips-for-landing-the-right-freelancer-1">select the provider you feel will do the best job</a> for you at the right price.</p> <p>The best part of using one of the freelance job boards is you can see how other people have graded the work of the providers, so you aren&rsquo;t hiring the proverbial pig in a poke. Plus the job boards help you properly document the contractor relationship and ensure that you get what you pay for.</p> <p><b>4. Content</b></p> <p>A website can be made up of static pages with fixed content that you rarely change. It can be blog that continually offers new content. Or it can be both.</p> <p>If you have a good website structure to begin with, keeping your website fresh and making minor changes is easy. So, unlike Yellow Pages ads or brochures, you can change product offerings, phone numbers, special offers, and other content as frequently as you like.</p> <p>Obviously, a website developer won&rsquo;t know anything about your business, your brand, your message, or your personal preferences, so you&rsquo;ll have to provide that. However, you can use print ads, brochures, speeches, and even personal photographs to give them what they need.</p> <p><strong>OK Already, How Much and How Long?</strong></p> <p>We recently had two sites built for us by <a target="_blank" href="https://www.elance.com/s/hivista/">HivistaSoft</a> through Upwork.com: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.google.com/ig?hl=en">Undress4Success.com</a> and <a target="_blank" href="http://teleworkresearchnetwork.com/">TeleworkResearchNetwork.com</a>. The work cost us $600 for each site, they were up and running in a couple of weeks, and we can easily maintain them ourselves. To host them, we pay $7.95 a month to <a target="_blank" href="http://dreamhost.com/">DreamHost</a> (for as many sites as we care to put online), plus $9.95 a year for each web address.</p> <p>If you&rsquo;re computer savvy and decide to got it on your own, sign up for a web address and hosting, install Wordpress, pick a template, and start adding pages, pictures, and blog posts. You can probably be online in a couple hours and fully functioning in a week of spare time. Another of our websites, <a target="_blank" href="http://findingmoneyadvice.com/">FindingMoneyAdvice.com</a>, is an example of a home-built Wordpress site. It doesn&rsquo;t have the glitz of our new sites, but it does have solid content and a built in shopping cart. It took me two days to do it, mostly editing all the text.</p> <p>But keep in mind that having a website is just the first step in creating an online business. If you build it, they won&rsquo;t necessarily come&mdash;there are millions of websites. So marketing your site is important. Here are some tips on how to do that:</p> <ul> <li><a target="_blank" href="http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/marketing/article/7-deadly-assumptions-of-online-marketing-success-1">7 Deadly Assumptions of Online Marketing Success</a></li> <li><a target="_blank" href="http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/technology/article/10-free-tools-that-can-help-your-site-rank-above-the-rest-1">10 Free Tools that Can Help Your Site Rank Above the Rest</a></li> <li><a target="_blank" href="http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/marketing/article/5-step-process-for-dominating-your-local-search-landscape--1-2">5 Step Process for Dominating Your Local Search Landscape</a></li> <li><a target="_blank" href="http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/marketing/article/5-search-engine-marketing-trends-that-impact-your-business-1">5 Search Engine Marketing Trends That Impact Your Business</a></li> <li><a target="_blank" href="http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/marketing/article/3-not-so-obvious-things-your-blog-needs-1">3 Not-So-Obvious Things Your Blog Needs</a></li> </ul> <p>So are you going to build a site? If you aren&rsquo;t, why not? Let us know in comments!</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tom-harnish">Tom Harnish</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/small-business/building-a-business-website-is-cheaper-and-easier-than-ever">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/250-tips-for-small-business-owners">250+ Tips for Small Business Owners</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-find-freelance-clients-part-two">How to Find Freelance Clients: Part Two</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-credit-cards-for-small-businesses">Best Credit Cards for Small Businesses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-products-you-think-you-need-but-really-don-t">25 Products You Think You Need, but Really Don’t</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-a-personal-website-can-improve-your-life">8 Surprising Ways a Personal Website Can Improve Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Small Business Resource Center business website frugal websites marketing online advertising small business web designers website Sun, 13 Nov 2011 01:11:48 +0000 Tom Harnish 781130 at http://www.wisebread.com The Dropping Cost of Entrepreneurship http://www.wisebread.com/small-business/the-dropping-cost-of-entrepreneurship <div class="field field-type-link field-field-url"> <div class="field-label">Link:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/money/article/the-dropping-cost-of-entrepreneurship-thursday-bram" target="_blank">http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/money/article/the-dropping-cost-of-entr...</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/small-business/the-dropping-cost-of-entrepreneurship" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000000671058XSmall.jpg" alt="dollar" title="dollar" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Starting a new business sounds like an expensive proposition &mdash; creating a new product, printing up business cards, and all the other nuts and bolts that go along with setting up a company &mdash; but the cost of entrepreneurship is dropping. It's not uncommon for a new business owner to pay for a website and little more; if the business offers services rather than products, there may be nothing else necessary. Depending on where you're based, you may need a business license, but you can skip renting office space, printing business cards, and many other steps in the short term. You may need all of those things down the line, but technology has made it possible to start a business without them.</p> <h3>Not Just for Service Businesses</h3> <p>The renaissance in entrepreneurship is caused by the sheer number of alternatives to starting with a big investment to manufacture your inventory before you start selling. Four years ago, Shai Atanelov started <a href="http://www.bigtimewireless.com/">Bigtime Wireless</a> with less than $1,000. He had an idea for targeting a niche within the cell phone market &mdash; unlocked phones &mdash; and launched a home business to pursue it. Now Bigtime Wireless has eight employees and has provided a base for Atanelov to launch two more businesses. &quot;My initial investment was around $900. It included the fees to open up a business in New York and depositing $100 into a business bank account. The rest of the money was used to hire a website designer and to use for Volusion's shopping cart fees, a SSL certificate fee, and a merchant account setup fee. I did not have to buy any inventory, as I made contacts in the cell phone industry in the USA and abroad that agreed to dropship cell phones for me.&quot;</p> <p>Dropshipping &mdash; arranging for a manufacturer or wholesaler to ship your product directly to buyers &mdash; is one of the simplest ways to quickly start a business focused on selling products. There are others, of course, including selling affiliate products, arranging for a limited manufacturing run, or creating and manufacturing your product yourself (most common among businesses selling information-based products). With these methods, starting your business is often reduced to building a website and putting a marketing plan into action.</p> <h3>Keeping Costs to a Minimum</h3> <p>For many entrepreneurs, there's one simple way to reduce costs: Do everything yourself. Atanelov said, &quot;I did all the product listings for about 500 cell phone models manually. It took me about two weeks to complete. That probably saved me well over $1,000, since the cell phone listings were quite technical, and a freelancer or company would have charged me at least $2 per listing.&quot;</p> <p>It's worth considering what your business will need to run and seeing where you can invest time if you're looking to cut costs. Marc Anderson, the owner of <a href="http://talktocanada.com/">Talk to Canada</a>, kept his initial investment under $200. &quot;Before I built my first website for TalktoCanada.com, I bought a book at the local book store about Macromedia Dreamweaver (now Adobe). It wasn't a book on theory but based on creating a sample website from start to finish. So I spent the next three months, when I had time, trying my best to follow the sample instructions from start to finish in order to build a website. After mastering the basics, I used this knowledge to create a very simple website for our business which has now been updated four times. The fourth time, we had enough cash flow to finally hire a professional company to make it,&quot; says Anderson.</p> <p>It was a large investment of time for Anderson, but beyond his website, he needed little else: &quot;I spent $60 for a business license here in Ontario, Canada, and another $100 or so on setting up my domain name and hosting account.&quot; As his business has grown, Anderson has also reinvested profits in the company, paying for not only ordinary operating expenses but investing money in search engine optimization, advertising, and other marketing opportunities.</p> <h3>The True Cost of Entrepreneurship</h3> <p>It's worth noting that while the cost to start a business is less than it might have once been, the costs associated with actually running a business remain. No matter how little you started your new venture with, you'll still be expected to pay taxes. Management costs, such as those associated with keeping your books or running payroll, will still be present, especially as a new business grows. The real dropping cost of entrepreneurship is what it takes to get in the game and start earning income to offset those expenses. Since Atanelov launched, he has put more than $20,000 into the business, taking a portion of his profits and investing them back into the business.</p> <p>The odds of being able to keep startup costs to a minimum while growing a business fast enough that you can afford to reinvest part of your profits and still support yourself are also improved if you have a good working knowledge of business. Anderson took on a few odd jobs after completing a business degree, then jumped into running Talk to Canada. While Atanelov was a teacher prior to starting his business, he had already been selling cell phones through eBay in 2003, which allowed him to study the market before diving to running a full business.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/thursday-bram">Thursday Bram</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/small-business/the-dropping-cost-of-entrepreneurship">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/250-tips-for-small-business-owners">250+ Tips for Small Business Owners</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-the-one-skill-you-need-if-you-want-to-work-for-yourself">This Is the One Skill You Need If You Want to Work for Yourself</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-credit-cards-for-small-businesses">Best Credit Cards for Small Businesses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-inspiring-stories-of-normal-people-building-a-thriving-online-store">4 Inspiring Stories of Normal People Building a Thriving Online Store</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/start-a-business-for-next-to-nothing">Start a Business for Next to Nothing</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Entrepreneurship Small Business Resource Center frugal websites small business start-up starting a business Thu, 09 Dec 2010 18:21:17 +0000 Thursday Bram 299048 at http://www.wisebread.com Getting Rich Slowly: Interview with JD Roth http://www.wisebread.com/getting-rich-slowly-interview-with-jd-roth <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/getting-rich-slowly-interview-with-jd-roth" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/fortune.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="248" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>JD Roth is a familiar face in the world of personal finance blogging. He started his site, Get Rich Slowly, in 2005, writing about his own experiences in trying to build personal wealth without gimmicks. He has since developed a loyal following readership, and has continued to build his site around personal finance. I asked JD to tell us a little about his personal transformation into a money-wise, financially-savvy blogger.</p> <p>------------------------------------------------------------------------------------&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>You write one of the most <a href="http://www.getrichslowly.org/blog/">popular personal finance blogs</a> on the internet. What do you think it is about your content that people respond to so positively?</strong></p> <p>I think there are several things at work here. First, I'm just an average guy. I'm not some financial guru. I wasn't born to wealth. My family was poor, and I made things worse by making stupid mistakes when I was a young adult. I've been where a lot of my readers are now. People can relate to my journey.</p> <p>Also, I tend to write about a variety of subjects. If I were writing about the best credit card deals and high-interest savings accounts all day, it would bore me to tears. Don't get me wrong, there's a place for sites like that, but I couldn't write one. I think people like seeing personal finance covered from a variety of angles.</p> <p>Finally, I've been fortunate to pick up a large readership, one that includes some great folks with interesting financial experiences. I'm very open to sharing reader stories on my site. If somebody makes a great comment on a post, I will sometimes work with the author to turn it into an actual article. I field reader questions. I accept guest posts. I think all of these things help foster a community of like-minded people.</p> <p>Oh yeah -- I like to think that I write well. Maybe I'm fooling myself, but I work hard to be a clear, effective communicator. That helps.</p> <p><img height="64" width="64" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u14/happyjdbw.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><strong>Are you actually rich? Do you believe that you, personally, know what it takes to accumulate wealth? In other words, what makes you so special, finance-wise?</strong></p> <p>Ha!</p> <p>Okay, maybe that's not a funny question. My first reaction is, &quot;No way! I'm not rich!&quot; But when I think about it, maybe I am. Certainly I am when compared to most of the world. But to answer the question I think you're asking:</p> <p>Before starting Get Rich Slowly, I was an average middle-class guy struggling to make ends meet. I was living paycheck-to-paycheck. As I mentioned before, I was raised in a poor family. Through hard work and good fortune, I've managed to create a firmly middle-class life for myself. I was raised poor, have lived middle-class, and am working toward becoming rich.</p> <p>Do I know what it takes to accumulate wealth? I don't know. I'm *learning* what it takes to accumulate wealth. I can see positive results in my own life that have come from following the advice I preach. I think what makes me special finance-wise is that I'm an average guy struggling to reach the same destination that my readers are trying to reach. I'm experimenting with things as I go along. I'm sharing my results.</p> <p>By the way, one thing I feel that I don't convey strongly enough at GRS is that *entrepreneurship is awesome*. If you have a talent or skill, brainstorm ways that it can produce income for you. Start a side business. This is one of the best ways to pursue wealth, yet I'd guess 95% of people completely ignore the suggestion to look into entrepreneurship. They think it's not for them. That's too bad. I think it's for everyone...</p> <p><strong>OK, OK. So being &quot;rich&quot; isn't just about being wealthy, but everyone's definition of &quot;rich&quot; is a little different. How would you define it for yourself?</strong></p> <p>This is something I've been struggling with lately. Now that I'm nearly debt free, I'm preparing to set other financial goals. But what will they be? Do I really want to be &quot;rich&quot;? And what do I mean by that?</p> <p>In the past, I always thought that a person with a big house and a fancy car was rich. Now I understand that material wealth just means a person spends a lot. They may or may not be wealthy. Aside from a few things -- a MINI Cooper, for example -- I don't really covet material goods anymore. Instead, I value time, both alone and with friends. So, for me &quot;rich&quot; now means freedom to do what I want.</p> <p><strong>Do you still have a day job, or are you blogging full-time?</strong></p> <p>Ah, what a deep question. You probably thought it was innocuous, didn't you? :)</p> <p>The answer is yes and yes. That is, I do have a day job, and I do blog full time. You do the math. It's not a pretty picture. Actually, I do have a timeline to begin cutting back at the day job. Beginning 01 Jan 2008, I'm dropping to 29 hours a week. This is a scary move for me -- the day job is a Sure Thing, you know? But GRS is producing enough income now that I can cut back at the day job and not feel the pinch so sharply. And by cutting back, I'll be able to have large uninterrupted blocks of time to write. Large uninterrupted blocks of time are golden.</p> <p><strong>You mentioned being raised poor. How do you think your upbringing influenced your financial habits, if it did at all?</strong></p> <p>It had a *huge* impact. Because we didn't have much, I grew up as a hoarder. I wanted to keep everything I could get. When I got older and had access to credit, I felt like I had to buy anything I wanted. On some level, I guess I thought that if I *didn't* buy the things I wanted, I might not be able to later. Speaking with other folks who were raised poor, many have had similar reactions. Unfortunately, we don't realize we're doing this until it's too late, and we're up to our eyeballs in debt.</p> <p>Looking back, I can see that part of the reason we were poor is because my parents were spenders. It's true that my family had a low income, but my parents did nothing to keep what little money they earned. My father bought all sorts of toys -- boats, airplanes -- and then had to sell them when he couldn't afford payments.</p> <p>Being raised poor warped my concept of money, I think.</p> <p><strong>What was it that caused you to decide to make a change from the paycheck-to-paycheck existence?</strong></p> <p>The answer to this is complex.</p> <p>In 1998, it looked like my wife and I might move across the country so that she could go back to school. When I looked at my financial situation, though, I realized that this would put me in a terrible bind. I had too much debt. This prompted me to cut up my credit cards.</p> <p>I carried that debt for a long time, making minimum payments, etc. Eventually I converted the debt to a home equity loan. This reduced the payments and gave the debt a finite horizon -- in ten years it would be paid off. Though I no longer accumulated credit card debt, I still found ways to spend. I took out private loans. I spent everything in my paycheck (and sometimes more).</p> <p>Finally, about three years ago I read Your Money or Your Life, and then The Total Money Makeover. These two books were wake-up calls. I sat down and drew up a plan to get out of debt. For a year or so, I just fumbled around. I made some progress, but not as much as I'd hoped. Then, in the spring of 2006, I read a couple of other personal finance books. As PF books, they're not much, but at the time, they spurred me to action. Now, eighteen months later, I'm nearly debt free.</p> <p>So, there wasn't any one thing that made me change from a paycheck-to-paycheck existence.</p> <p><strong>What was the best financial move you made to transition from someone who was struggling to make ends meet to someone who is financially solvent?</strong></p> <p>This is a tough question. There are a couple of good answers.</p> <p>First, I began to educate myself. I read books about personal finance. I read magazines. Second, I implemented Dave Ramsey's &quot;debt snowball&quot;. Finally, I started Get Rich Slowly.</p> <p><strong>Regarding entrepreneurship, do you have a single piece of advice that you would offer people who are thinking of starting a business on the side?</strong></p> <p>Take the leap! Starting a side business is scary. You're not sure what to do. But you learn as you go. It's a risky thing, but risk brings reward. If you have something you're passionate about, begin making small steps toward turning it into a money-making venture. Do one thing every day to lead you toward that goal. Don't be scared. Ask questions. Have fun!</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-rich-slowly-interview-with-jd-roth">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-really-make-money-by-starting-a-blog">Can You Really Make Money by Starting a Blog?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-improve-your-finances-using-social-media">How to Improve Your Finances Using Social Media</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/write-for-money-online-series-part-i-bukisa">Write for money online series - Part I - Bukisa</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-only-money-advice-youll-actually-listen-to">The Only Money Advice You&#039;ll Actually Listen To</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-financial-experts-people-in-their-40s-should-follow">5 Financial Experts People in Their 40s Should Follow</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance blogger blogs frugal websites get rich slowly writer writing Thu, 25 Oct 2007 13:30:05 +0000 Andrea Karim 1320 at http://www.wisebread.com