Dumpster diving http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/8085/all en-US From Dumpster Diving to Garage Sales, Turning Trash Into Cash http://www.wisebread.com/from-dumpster-diving-to-garage-sales-turning-trash-into-cash <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/from-dumpster-diving-to-garage-sales-turning-trash-into-cash" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/1357082362_f34c658249_z.jpg" alt="yard sale" title="yard sale" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last year I made over $1,200 off of other people&rsquo;s garbage. But then, I'm serious about reusing and recycling. I'm not afraid to yell, &quot;Stop the car! That's good garbage!&quot; in a crowded intersection. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-compact-mindfullness-and-frugality-through-buying-used">The Compact: Mindfullness and Frugality Through Buying Used</a>)</p> <p>Some of the garbage I find is actual money. Every year I manage to pick up around $20 in change off the ground. My favorite places to find lost change are in front of the counter at the post office and under the CoinStar machine at the grocery store. Last year I got lucky and actually found a $20 bill on the street, so my found money total rose to $44.03.</p> <p>I don&rsquo;t know what makes pennies not real currency in the eyes of so many people. A penny saved really is a penny earned, but a penny found is a penny that isn&rsquo;t taxed. Do I even spend ten minutes a year bending over to pick up an average of $20 in small change? You would think that most Americans, especially in this economy, would be stoked to do an activity that pays $120 an hour. But no. Even total strangers laugh at me when I lean down to pick up coins off the ground. Yep, I am <em>so</em> embarrassed that the $44.03 I found bought a very nice dinner for my husband and me.</p> <h2>Bottles and Cans Are as Good as Cash</h2> <p>Although Los Angeles has the largest recycling program in the nation, and <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-money-recycling">bottles and cans are redeemable for cash</a>, I was still able to recycle $340 worth of glass and plastic bottles and aluminum cans that I picked up off the street. $120 of that $340 came from one alcoholic neighbor who decided that throwing her wine bottles onto the parkway from her window was easier than walking them to her recycling bin. Sadly, I don&rsquo;t think that <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ultimate-recycler-utah-man-saves-70-000-beer-cans">my neighbors are particularly terrible litterbugs</a>. Many students at my local universities appear to have problems putting their recyclables into a recycling container, even when the container is right next to the trash. Classroom trashcans are full of plastic water bottles and Red Bull cans.</p> <p>For me, $340 seems like big money for bringing a box of recyclables to the grocery store every week, but I am not even Junior Varsity when it comes to recycling income. There&rsquo;s a family in Los Angeles who put <a target="_blank" href="http://abcnews.go.com/2020/story?id=1787254&amp;page=1#.UU6Z1I73BdQ">three of their kids through college with the money</a> they earned collecting cans.</p> <h2>Found Textbooks Are Educational (and Redeemable)</h2> <p>Speaking of college, I live within walking distance of one university, work at another one night a week, and am a student at a third. Last year, I earned $468 from selling back textbooks I&rsquo;d pulled out of the dumpsters at school. This paid for my tuition and my textbooks for my Italian classes. My education was paid for with garbage.</p> <h2>Found Objects Are Garage Sale Inventory</h2> <p>Last year I made over $400 selling things I&rsquo;d found on the street on Craigslist and at <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-have-a-successful-garage-sale">garage sales</a>. I paid for my wedding ($159) with the earnings of one garage sale. This is hardly my greatest feat of trash picking. I <a target="_blank" href="http://www.myromanapartment.com/alternative-lifestyle-hand-life-featured-jeff-probst-show/">paid for two entire years of my life by collecting stuff</a> that my neighbors had curbed on trash day &mdash; and selling the stuff back to them at monthly garage sales. While my monthly expenses during 1996 and 1997 were only $1,000 a month, that&rsquo;s still $24,000 I made at my part-time trash picking &ldquo;job.&rdquo;</p> <p>Depending on the laws regarding trash pickup and garage sales in your area, my success may or may not be achievable everywhere. Some cities like West Hollywood, California cap the number of garage sales a household can have each year, while other municipalities prohibit &ldquo;dumping&rdquo; usable items on the curb. Check the laws in your area so you don't get saddled with a hefty fine.</p> <h2>Keeping What You Find</h2> <p>In addition to making money from the cast-offs of others, I also save around $1,000 a year by reusing items that are destined for the dump.</p> <p><strong>University Finds</strong></p> <p>At the end of every school year, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/college-move-out-days-the-best-time-to-dumpster-dive">university dumpsters are full of everything from textbooks to clothes to electronics</a> &mdash; items deemed too inconvenient or too expensive to ship home. While I have yet to get up early enough to nab a last generation iPod or mini fridge like my neighbors have, I rarely pay for laundry detergent and can&rsquo;t remember the last time I spent money on a spiral notebook, manila folder, mailing envelope, or three ring binder. School dumpsters are full of half used cleaning supplies and stationery products. Some schools like NYU actually have a garbage amnesty day that encourage community recycling, so if you live in a college town, check into your school&rsquo;s end of the year trash picking policy.</p> <p><strong>Hardware Store and Nursery Finds</strong></p> <p>My local hardware store is my shipping box supplier. Hardware stores carry a lot of heavy products that come in sturdy, tiny to small cardboard boxes that are the perfect size for shipping etsy sale items. Since the hardware store has to pay for trash collection and recycling per dumpster, the owner encourages people to take the boxes by stacking them neatly by the back door. I get a steady stream of cardboard boxes (one less thing that I have to hoard in my house), and the store gets a lower garbage bill.</p> <p>One of the local plant nurseries has a similar policy with their pony packs &mdash; those segmented plant containers that hold four to six seedlings. Apparently it&rsquo;s cheaper to trash the entire pony pack if just one of the plants is dead or missing, rather than going to the trouble of replanting the plants in single containers or putting the pack on sale. Unlike the big box stores, which chop up the plants before throwing them in the garbage, ensuring that everyone and the planet gets screwed, the local nursery puts the &ldquo;damaged&rdquo; pony packs by the dumpster in the back alley every Sunday night before closing. There is a dedicated group of frugal gardeners that show up at 5:05 pm every week to divvy up the plants. Since I don&rsquo;t mind growing mystery vegetable and flower varieties, this is a great way to get free landscaping and food.</p> <p>The <a target="_blank" href="http://www.myromanapartment.com/green-hack-repair-antique-furniture-trashpicked-antique-wood/">2012 trash to treasure project that I am most proud</a> of was using wood that I harvested from a damaged dresser, to make a shelf for my vintage armoire.</p> <p><em>Are you a trash picker? Why or why not? What&rsquo;s the best thing you&rsquo;ve ever found in the garbage?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/max-wong">Max Wong</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/from-dumpster-diving-to-garage-sales-turning-trash-into-cash">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-cool-ways-to-make-treasure-out-of-trash">12 Cool Ways to Make Treasure Out of Trash</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-cute-ways-to-upcycle-shoeboxes">12 Cute Ways to Upcycle Shoeboxes</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-money-recycling">Make Money Recycling: Get Paid to Recycle by 15 Websites</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-your-hobby-pay-its-way">Make Your Hobby Pay Its Way</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/18-awesome-practically-free-upcycled-craft-projects">18 Awesome, Practically Free Upcycled Craft Projects</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> DIY Extra Income Dumpster diving garage sales recycling upcycling Tue, 09 Apr 2013 10:00:35 +0000 Max Wong 971473 at http://www.wisebread.com College Move-Out Days: The Best Time to Dumpster Dive? http://www.wisebread.com/college-move-out-days-the-best-time-to-dumpster-dive <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/college-move-out-days-the-best-time-to-dumpster-dive" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/graduation_3.jpg" alt="Graduates" title="Graduates" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Ah spring, sweet spring. The flowers are opening their colorful buds, birds are chirping, and across the country, thousands of college students are throwing out working electronics, unopened containers of food, and other perfectly useful items.</p> <p>It's the same routine every year. Harried college students, rushing to pack and move out while completing finals or preparing for graduation, don't have time to sell or give away their excess stuff, or they simply don't care that it goes to waste. The result is that during finals week on through graduation, campus dumpsters and the sidewalks in college towns are rife with serviceable stuff often in excellent condition. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/waste-not-want-not-stop-throwing-away-your-food">Waste Not, Want Not: Stop&nbsp;Throwing Away Your Food!</a>)</p> <p>In other words, if you live near a college, it's a great time to go dumpster diving.&nbsp;</p> <p>When&nbsp;I was in college, I loved walking around the dorms and scoring free stuff as everyone was moving out. Some memorable finds include several almost-full bottles of cleaning products, clothing, and lots of great household-organizing equipment. I also have friends who have scored furniture, televisions, and other big-ticket items previously owned by college kids.</p> <p>If you're thinking of poking around your local college campus for freebies, here are some things to keep in mind.</p> <h3>Some Colleges Donate (or Sell) Unwanted Items</h3> <p>While you don't want to announce to a college that you'll be picking through its trash, it's good to call or do a Google search for the particular college you're planning to visit before you go over there. Over the last few years, several schools have recognized the rampant wastefulness that occurs around move-out time, and they've developed efforts to collect unwanted items and give them to charity. Thus, these schools might yield slim pickings at the dumpsters, or anything you take might've otherwise gone to help those in need.</p> <p>Some schools also sell items they collect and give the money to charity instead of the goods. Keep an eye out for these sales in your town; you can still get great stuff at a substantial discount.</p> <h3>This Stuff Belonged to&nbsp;College Students</h3> <p>There's a reason why the stereotypical college apartment contains a lumpy couch fixed with duct tape &mdash; some college students don't take great care of their stuff, and that stuff has sometimes come to them second- or third-hand already. Make sure you carefully check everything you're planning to take.</p> <h3>It Can Pay to&nbsp;Go More Than Once</h3> <p>The weekend after finals is usually the best time to look; that's when most students leave. Check the academic calendar of your local college to find out when this is. But also keep in mind that some students may leave early if their finals are concentrated in the beginning of the week, or stay late for graduation or other activities. Visiting more than once can be fruitful.</p> <h3>Colleges Are Usually Private Property</h3> <p>If you're not a student of the school, never enter buildings just to pick through items that might be inside. Your safest bet is to visit schools or areas where students live in town where trash is put out on public streets. When in doubt, err on the side of caution. For more information about the law and dumpster diving, read Kentin's great post, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dumpster-diving-101-6-strategies-for-success">Dumpster Diving 101</a>.</p> <p><em>Do you ever go dumpster diving on college campuses? Do you have any stories of particularly great finds? Share them in the comments!</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/meg-favreau">Meg Favreau</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/college-move-out-days-the-best-time-to-dumpster-dive">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-stuff-i-try-never-to-buy-new">The stuff I try never to buy new</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/new-isnt-always-better-12-used-things-to-love">New Isn&#039;t Always Better: 12 Used Things to Love</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-find-the-cheapest-college-textbooks">How to find the cheapest college textbooks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-freebies-for-college-students">20+ Freebies for College Students</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/big-list-of-student-discounts">Big List of Student Discounts</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living college Dumpster diving used Fri, 06 May 2011 10:24:07 +0000 Meg Favreau 534139 at http://www.wisebread.com Encounter With a Freegan http://www.wisebread.com/encounter-with-a-freegan <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/encounter-with-a-freegan" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/freegan.JPG" alt="man holding wine" title="This man says he got this wine and food from a Dumpster." class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Yesterday I spotted my first freegan, standing in front of the Dumpster in the parking lot of a Chicago Trader Joe&#39;s. The encounter made me think long and hard about what I would feed my children and how I should procure it.</p> <p>I&#39;ve been fascinated by freeganism since <a href="http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-freegan11sep11,0,2162976.story?coll=la-home-center">reading about it</a> and <a href="http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14982747">hearing about it</a> on the radio. So when I saw the young man by the Dumpster, I turned my head to look closely. He gave me a shrug and a smile. I rolled down my window and asked, &quot;Freegan?&quot;</p> <p>Yup. &quot;There is some amazing stuff in here!&quot; he said. Indeed, &quot;amazing&quot; was the very adjective used to describe this particular Dumpster on a <a href="http://www.freegan.info/?page=Chicago">freegan Web site</a> I&#39;d seen. On the ground were a few grocery items that looked similar to the stuff I had just paid over $200 for inside the store. A loaf of whole wheat bread, in a bread bag. A container of mini red and yellow peppers which had spilled open. A plastic-wrapped wedge of brie.</p> <p>&quot;Did all that come out of the Dumpster?&quot; I asked. In response, he held up a large backpack that was so full he could barely lift it with one hand. </p> <p>&quot;All <em>this</em> came out of there,&quot; he told me. &quot;Want some bread?&quot;</p> <p>I chuckled, and he glanced at the backseat and said, &quot;You probably don&#39;t want to feed your kids out of the garbage.&quot;</p> <p>Do I? Reading about freeganism, I have thought that it&#39;s something I wouldn&#39;t mind trying. People routinely find wrapped or packaged food, before the expiration date, from premium stores like Whole Foods and Trader Joe&#39;s.</p> <p>But now the freegan himself suggested that his spoils might not be fit for children. I thought it over on my drive home. Suddenly I could think of all kinds of reasons that feeding my family out of Dumpsters might make me nervous:</p> <p>-- I don&#39;t know why the store discarded the food. A lot of it, freegans say, is thrown out because of a small blemish or other reasons that would not affect the safety. But how am I to know that it&#39;s not being pitched because a cooler broke and the food wasn&#39;t kept cool enough overnight? Or because it was sitting under a leak from an upstairs toilet? Or because a customer returned it complaining that it tasted moldy?</p> <p>-- Much of the food is wrapped, but it is not exactly being stored in a clean place. Would I mind if a cockroach or a rat walked across that breadbag before I brought it home and set it on my counter? OK, that could happen in the food warehouse, the truck or in the store as well, I know. But it seems almost guaranteed to happen in a Dumpster, don&#39;t you think? And what if the store puts rat poison in the Dumpster to keep vermin away?</p> <p>-- What about that other garbage it&#39;s sitting next to or under? Suppose my wedge of cheese has been lightly bathed in the last drops from a bottle of Draino that was also thrown out?</p> <p>Of course, I can think of counterarguments to my squeamishness. The store always looks clean and shiny, but I know my food has not always been in pristine places throughout the production chain. And even with these risks to food purity, my kids would probably be better off eating organic food from the garbage than the conventional low-quality produce I usually buy from the grocery store nearest to me. And the waste of resources involved in all that food ending up in a landfill is probably a bigger threat to my kids&#39; long-term health than the possibility of getting a dirty banana today.</p> <p>Alas, as much as I long to be a radical mommy raising a couple of little <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=VpIY6sDR07QC&amp;dq=%22steal+this+book%22&amp;pg=PP1&amp;ots=3BOkQ9DB03&amp;sig=GnG4vYmP9Egt4eYSlMVvhZhEtLM&amp;prev=http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=%22steal+this+book%22&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=print&amp;ct=title&amp;cad=one-book-with-thumbnail">Abbie Hoffmans</a>, I guess I&#39;m more <a href="http://tvland.classictvhits.com/DonnaReed/Links.html">Donna Reed</a> in this respect: Say rat, and I&#39;m outta here. Even hypothetical rat. Anyway, if we shopped outside the Trader Joe&#39;s instead of inside, my 3-year-old would <em>not</em> get a balloon, and, let me tell you -- there would be serious repercussions.</p> <p>So -- any freegans reading out there? Tell me, do you feed your kids this way? Am I underestimating the hygenic standards of the modern Dumpster? </p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/encounter-with-a-freegan">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-sibling-discounts-that-can-save-you-big">6 Sibling Discounts That Can Save You Big</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emergency-food-supplies-for-the-lazy-skinflint">Emergency food supplies for the lazy skinflint</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/survivor-island-meal-plans-use-it-or-lose-it-in-5-easy-steps">Survivor Island Meal Plans: Use it or Lose It in 5 Easy Steps</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-122-scrumptious-super-bowl-party-snack-ideas">Flashback Friday: 122 Scrumptious Super Bowl Party Snack Ideas</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/having-a-baby-nine-financial-considerations-for-new-parents">Having a baby? Nine financial considerations for new parents</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Dumpster diving Food freeganism kids Wed, 19 Dec 2007 15:53:32 +0000 Carrie Kirby 1511 at http://www.wisebread.com Finally, Frugal Rules http://www.wisebread.com/finally-frugal-rules <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/finally-frugal-rules" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/dumpsterdiving.JPG" alt="cat Dumpster dives" title="Now Dumpster Diving Is for Cool Cats" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For most of my life, I felt slightly ashamed at my frugality. You know, if I held onto a piece of furniture that wasn&#39;t showroom-new, made a meal out of leftovers, or shopped for clothes at Goodwill, I was being &quot;cheap&quot; or &quot;a packrat.&quot; I thought, this will do for now, but it&#39;s not as good as having everything brand new.</p> <p>You&#39;ve heard the comments. Most people don&#39;t brag about frugal acts, they confess them. &quot;Sometimes I save tissue paper, iron it, and use it again,&quot; my aunt once said as she opened a gift bag. &quot;Isn&#39;t that terrible?&quot; </p> <p>But glory hallelujah, in the last year or so we have this environmental surge that is bringing the sexy back to reusing stuff. Now when my husband throws out a bunch of clothes or coat hangers or whatnot and I rescue them from the trash, I can fall back on the Earth as an argument. As in, no, I&#39;m not mentally ill, I just love the Earth! Don&#39;t you? Do you want Al Gore to be mad at you?</p> <p>What used to be called being tight, a hoarder and a skinflint is now called reducing, recycling and reusing. And I love it. </p> <p>I still hope I don&#39;t end up as one of those old ladies with plastic over every piece of furniture, keeping everything forever so I can be buried with all my money. But come on, washing out a few Ziploc bags is nothing compared to the life led by <a href="http://noimpactman.typepad.com/blog/2007/02/what_you_need_t.html">No Impact Man</a>, who says he composts his own poop! And he&#39;s having a book published and a movie made about him.</p> <p>Making stock out of that chicken carcass and a bunch of the tough ends of broccoli stalks? You thought that was penny-pinchy of me? Obviously you have not heard about the <a href="http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-freegan11sep11,0,2162976.story?coll=la-home-center">freegans</a> who are out there Dumpster diving for their supper. That&#39;s right. Eating food out of the garbage is now cool in some circles. If only <a href="http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0697706/quotes">George Costanza</a> could see us now.</p> <p>Deep down in my soul, I know when I take a Little Tikes toy from my neighbors&#39; trash, I&#39;m not doing it out of true environmental concern. Yeah, that&#39;s a bonus, but I&#39;m really doing it because </p> <p>a) I&#39;m cheap -- that is, I&#39;m not willing to sink into the tar pit of consumer debt but I still want my kids to have a little fun.</p> <p>b) I just hate to see anything wasted. It offends my sensibilities the way an unkempt front yard might bother other, classier people. </p> <p>I&#39;m not above letting others believe I&#39;m garbage picking out of environmental concern. After all, hotels can do it: They&#39;re always claiming that conserving water is the reason they don&#39;t want to wash our towels and sheets every day. Maybe if I practice acting like it long enough, I&#39;ll actually grow the nobility needed to really do things to save the Earth. Or at least become more believable than those hotel bathroom signs.</p> <p>In the meantime, I&#39;m just glad I get to save a buck now and then without lurking in the shadows. Then again, staying in these shadows <em>does</em> save me money on sunscreen.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/finally-frugal-rules">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/oprah-asks-a-great-question-what-can-you-live-without">Oprah Asks A Great Question; What Can You Live Without?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/it-takes-a-frugal-spouse-to-make-a-frugal-home">It takes a frugal spouse to make a frugal home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/cheap-and-romantic-ideas-for-valentines-day-and-any-other-day-of-the-year">Cheap and Romantic Ideas for Valentine&#039;s Day (And Any Other Day of the Year)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-spectacular-uses-for-that-lone-can-of-fruit">8 Spectacular Uses for that Lone Can of Fruit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/revive-old-toys-for-extra-christmas-savings-and-sanity">Revive Old Toys for Extra Christmas Savings (and Sanity)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Dumpster diving environmentalism frugal Tue, 30 Oct 2007 21:36:17 +0000 Carrie Kirby 1338 at http://www.wisebread.com