workplace success http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/8296/all en-US Honesty Really Is the Best Policy, Especially at Work http://www.wisebread.com/honesty-really-is-the-best-policy-especially-at-work <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/honesty-really-is-the-best-policy-especially-at-work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/7515507684_c965a223cb_z.jpg" alt="talking" title="talking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Admit it &mdash; sometimes you&rsquo;re a little bit jealous of the super-rich. You know who we&rsquo;re talking about &mdash; those guys with jets and luxury yachts and villas in the Mediterranean; who (we imagine) fiendishly rub their hands together as they hang $6,000 shower curtains, wash themselves with liquid gold, and pat themselves dry with crisp $100 bills. Sure, we all scoff at just how <em>unnecessary </em>billions of dollars are; we cringe at the excess. But there&rsquo;s something else, too. A little bit of jealousy?</p> <p>Sure, many of us wouldn&rsquo;t turn away a fortune, but sometimes what we hear in the news makes it seem like it just isn&rsquo;t possible to get there &mdash; at least not honestly. And to be perfectly frank, for most of us, it isn&rsquo;t possible. Fortunately, that doesn&rsquo;t mean that being dishonest is the way to the top. In fact, honesty is still the best policy &mdash; even in business. Here&rsquo;s why. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-and-give-honest-feedback">How to Get and Give Honest Feedback</a>)</p> <h3>Honesty Means Credibility</h3> <p>If there&rsquo;s one thing that can help you build a solid reputation, it&rsquo;s being honest. If there&rsquo;s one thing that can destroy it, it&rsquo;s being caught in a lie. Whether you&rsquo;re running a business or working for one, credibility is a major asset. When the truth is bad news (i.e. next year&rsquo;s sales projections are looking bad), people don&rsquo;t always want to hear it. But if you get a reputation for candor, even when the truth is crummy, people will tend to look to you for advice and believe what you say. Over time, that can make you a major source of power and influence among your colleagues and coworkers.</p> <h3>Being Straightforward Makes You a Better People Person&nbsp;</h3> <p>No one likes to make mistakes, but what often happens is that in an effort to save face, you go around pretending that you&rsquo;ve never made one in your life. And that makes you look like a jerk. The truth is, everyone makes mistakes, and admitting that you&rsquo;re as flawed as everyone else is a way to earn the respect of others and form real connections with the people you work with. That&rsquo;s something money can&rsquo;t buy, and those relationships are investments that can pay off again and again, often years down the road. If something&rsquo;s your fault, own up to it, face the music, and offer to make it right. You&rsquo;ll look a lot more professional than you would getting caught in the act of covering it up. Plus, once it&rsquo;s out in the open, you won&rsquo;t have to spend time worrying about whether anyone will find out. (Now <em>there&rsquo;s</em> something a lot of high-profile cheats learned the hard way.)</p> <h3>Being Authentic Makes You Accountable</h3> <p>The thing about lies is that they have a tendency to get out of control. The worst of it is, we don&rsquo;t just lie to others, we also lie to ourselves. Lost money in the stock market? Blame the economy. That demotion at work? Someone else&rsquo;s fault.</p> <p>Fate does play a hand in the cards we&rsquo;re dealt, but life doesn&rsquo;t just happen <i>to</i> you; you&rsquo;re an active and influential player. Excuses are like...well, you know. But the reason they&rsquo;re so common is that we all make mistakes. Then we make excuses to cover them up. That&rsquo;s pretty lame when you think about. Instead, be honest about who you are and how your actions impact your life and your career.</p> <h3>Honesty Is a Culture</h3> <p>Whether you&rsquo;re the CEO or on the absolute lowest step of the corporate ladder, your success will always depend on others to some degree. If you lie, cheat, gossip about other people, or steal credit for things you haven&rsquo;t done, you won&rsquo;t find yourself with a lot of allies. This is why pariahs &mdash; even powerful ones &mdash; don&rsquo;t tend to stick around for long. Rather than stepping on others to work your way to the top, collaborate with them to build something better. That means listening to other people, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-ways-to-say-thanks">acknowledging their achievements</a>, and giving credit where it&rsquo;s due, rather than hogging the limelight. Will it get you to the executive suite? Maybe, maybe not. What it will do is leave you with a body of work you can proud of.</p> <h3>You&rsquo;ll Find Your Boundaries at the Edge of the Truth</h3> <p>Telling the truth is hard because it often involves making ourselves vulnerable. If you ask for a promotion, you might be turned down. If you turn in a coworker for breaking the rules, you might be labeled a snitch. If you speak your mind, everyone else might disagree. The trouble is, if you choose not to speak up, you&rsquo;ll never know how these things would play out, in which case the truth becomes a boundary in your career, your personal development, and your life. If you&rsquo;ve ever withheld something you<em> really</em> needed to say, you know that just like telling a lie, withholding the truth can drag you down like a lead weight.</p> <p>One caveat though &mdash; use honesty to a point and with tact; it should never be a cover for hostility, passive-aggressiveness, and hurtful behavior. Being honest can open many doors, but only if you use it with good intentions. It&rsquo;ll also allow you to spend a lot less time wondering &ldquo;what if?&rdquo;</p> <h3>You Never Get Caught</h3> <p>Mark Twain once said that if you tell the truth, you won&rsquo;t have to remember anything. Telling the truth leaves you with nothing to run from; it gives you longevity. In the business world, that&rsquo;s worth a lot. And while being the good guy might seem like the long path to success, the difference is that you&rsquo;ll be able to enjoy whatever spoils you get fully, without fear or guilt. Honesty, then, is a bit like an investment that compounds over time. It may take longer to see the payout, but you&rsquo;ll be able to feel good about being on the right track.</p> <p>So here&rsquo;s the truth &mdash; being dishonest often does pay...at least until it doesn&rsquo;t. But despite all the riches that lying has wrought, for most of us, it just isn&rsquo;t a risk worth taking. Especially when honesty pays all the time, even if it&rsquo;s only to yourself.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tara-struyk">Tara Struyk</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/honesty-really-is-the-best-policy-especially-at-work">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/feeling-stuck-100-ways-to-change-your-life">Feeling Stuck? 100 Ways to Change Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-ways-to-feel-better-fast">25 Ways to Feel Better Fast</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-apps-that-pay-you-to-exercise">5 Apps That Pay You To Exercise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-regular-budget-meetings-might-save-your-marriage">6 Ways Regular Budget Meetings Might Save Your Marriage</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-maintain-motivation-when-the-going-gets-tough">9 Ways to Maintain Motivation When the Going Gets Tough</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Development being honest getting ahead workplace success Tue, 06 Nov 2012 10:36:46 +0000 Tara Struyk 954798 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Sing Your Own Praises at Work (Without Bragging) http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-sing-your-own-praises-at-work-without-bragging <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-sing-your-own-praises-at-work-without-bragging" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/4533104625_6ae7a7e2cd_z.jpg" alt="businessman playing guitar" title="businessman playing guitar" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Confidence is key to getting ahead in your career, but how can you communicate your expertise without sounding boastful? To help you assert your talents in a polished, professional way, we've come up with some key suggestions that make tooting your own horn a cinch. Whether you're planning for an upcoming review or seeking out your next promotion, here are four smart, savvy tips to follow.</p> <p><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/How-Convey-Authority-21277769">RELATED: How to Convey Authority</a></p> <h2>Be Prepared</h2> <p>In order to properly and thoughtfully sing your own praises, it's best to prepare for those moments year-round. First, keep an email folder where you can save all the positive feedback you receive, and then use specific quotes as a reference during your reviews. Next, make sure to monitor and note all the important statistics for your position, like major sales, new clients, and year-over-year improvements. Managers can't remember each and every assignment you've ever completed, either, so maintain a running list of your major projects and the goals that you achieved.</p> <h2>Be Humble</h2> <p>Modesty and positivity are crucial. There's a fine line between expressing your potential and conveying arrogance, so try to tread carefully. For one thing, you need to make sure that the accomplishments you're highlighting are your own. If others contributed to your success, then give your colleagues credit too. That won't take away from your efforts; in fact, it shows both leadership and intelligence. Likewise, it's best to acknowledge any mistakes or shortcomings that arise &mdash; just be sure to end on a positive note by calling attention to any lessons that followed.</p> <h2>Be Timely</h2> <p>You can toot your own horn all you want, but if you disrupt or annoy your manager, then she's not going to listen to your points. Don't ambush your manager when it's convenient for you. Instead, schedule a meeting dedicated to your review or wait until the appropriate time presents itself. Location is important too, so be sure to reserve a conference room or another private location for your appointment.</p> <h2>Be Professional</h2> <p>A good rule of thumb: to maintain healthy relationships and a favorable reputation, you should brag to your manager, not your coworkers. There's no reason to discuss your career status with anyone other than your supervisor or the HR department. That being said, you should work with your manager to refine your job description and professional goals during review sessions. Then, when tracking your accomplishments, you can refer to those specific, mutually defined responsibilities.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-blog-teaser"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Workplace success can hinge on self-promotion...as long as you don&#039;t cross over into bragging. Here&#039;s how to walk that oh-so-fine line. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p style="text-align:center;"><a style="border:none;" href="http://www.savvysugar.com"><img alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u4/savvysugar-300-small.jpg" /></a></p> <p><em>This is a guest contribution from our friends at </em><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/"><em>SavvySugar</em></a><em>. Check out more useful articles from this partner:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Things-Discuss-Co-Workers-21169522">4 Things Not to Discuss With&nbsp;Coworkers</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/How-Get-Most-Out-Performance-Reviews-2496892">How to&nbsp;Get the Most Out of Performance Reviews</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/What-Do-You-Dislike-Your-Boss-21242914">What to&nbsp;Do If You Don't Like Your Boss</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/popsugar-smart-living">POPSUGAR Smart Living</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-sing-your-own-praises-at-work-without-bragging">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-behaviors-and-attitudes-that-can-drive-workplace-success">14 Behaviors and Attitudes That Can Drive Workplace Success</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-lessons-from-moneyball-can-help-your-career">How Lessons From Moneyball Can Help Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/making-progress-the-missing-link-between-management-and-employees">Making Progress: The Missing Link Between Management and Employees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/become-a-star-employee-by-thinking-like-an-entrepreneur">Become a Star Employee by Thinking Like an Entrepreneur</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-turn-your-stress-into-money">8 Ways to Turn Your Stress Into Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building getting promoted self-promotion workplace success Mon, 11 Jun 2012 09:48:08 +0000 POPSUGAR Smart Living 934374 at http://www.wisebread.com How Lessons From Moneyball Can Help Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/how-lessons-from-moneyball-can-help-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-lessons-from-moneyball-can-help-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/as_pitching.jpg" alt="Athletics&#039; pitcher " title="Athletics&#039; pitcher " class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Moneyball </em>started out as a book about the inner workings of the Oakland Athletics baseball team and how general manager Billy Beane found success without spending tons of money like the Yankees and Red Sox.</p> <p>Now they've made the book into a movie starring Brad Pitt and Philip Seymour Hoffman, which so far has made $50 million. That's how much it cost to make the movie, so it's officially going to turn a profit.</p> <p>But are Beane's &quot;unusual&quot; methods of running a baseball team still profitable? Were they really as effective as they're made out to be?</p> <p>Honestly? It doesn't matter &mdash; the book kicked off a revolution in the baseball world that we can all put to good use in our careers. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/small-business/5-quick-ways-to-become-a-better-networker-today">5 Quick Ways to Become a Better Networker Today</a>)</p> <h3>The A's Method</h3> <p>The Athletics relied on statistical analysis rather just the subjective opinions of their scouts. So instead of drafting a player because Don Diamond (how's that for a fake scout name?) said he was &quot;gonna be great,&quot; they focused their energy on what their statistical algorithms told them about the players.</p> <p>And because they didn't have the budget to afford all the obvious players that the other teams wanted, they focused on one specific metric that &mdash; at the time &mdash; no one else really cared about &mdash; on base percentage.</p> <h3>The Secret Sauce</h3> <p>A lot of reviewers and baseball people have focused on that one metric and called it &quot;the Moneyball way,&quot; but that's not what made the A's successful. A formula does not success make.</p> <p>What made them successful was looking for inefficiencies in the market and exploiting them. In other words, they found something valuable that no one else was paying attention to. And that's a strategy we can all use to help us out in our careers.</p> <h3>Focus on the Undervalued</h3> <p>Find something in your company or in your industry that no one else is worried about, and find a way to make it work for you. What you're looking for is inefficiencies or chinks in the armor &mdash; something that no one else is trying to fix that could make a big impact for your company.</p> <p>Let's take a look at a few examples.</p> <h4>Training New Hires</h4> <p>If you work at a small company, you may not have a whole lot of material dedicated to helping <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/starting-a-new-job-3-rules-to-live-by">new hires</a> learn the ropes. But if you really dig in, you'll find that companies <a target="_blank" href="http://www.uwex.edu/ces/cced/economies/turn.cfm">lose a lot of money</a> when replacing a hire or making a new one.</p> <p>So if you created something (a manual, a checklist, a presentation) that made this onboarding process faster, smoother, and more effective, then you've just created some value.</p> <h4>Process Improvement</h4> <p>When you start a new job, you'll hear &quot;that's how we do things here&quot; a lot. And the tendency is to nod your head, be quiet, and not ruffle any feathers. But that's the best time to try to change things because you have a fresh perspective.</p> <p>When I worked at a publishing company, we had some buggy software, so we had to manually do a lot of checking and editing before we could start laying out the catalogs we made. Instead of complaining about the technology and convincing the bosses to pay someone to fix it (that wasn't gonna happen), I created a simple search-and-replace cheat sheet.</p> <p>Once you ran through the steps in the sheet, you were ready to start laying out, and all those problems were essentially fixed in 15 minutes instead of two grueling hours. I passed the sheet around and boom &mdash; just like that, our group became way more efficient.</p> <h4>Finding Your Niche</h4> <p>Specialize in one very specific thing and make it your own. Maybe you work for a company that has a website, and you decide to focus on making it a great <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/buying-a-new-smartphone-without-extending-your-contract">smartphone</a> experience since so many people browse the web that way.</p> <p>There are things you can do to make it better for them and to bring in some business from that channel. In the future, maybe you look into creating an app for your company (if it's a good fit).</p> <p>The goal is to dig deep and find something you can &quot;own&quot; that's also going to be good for business. When you do, you'll be the hero.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carlos-portocarrero">Carlos Portocarrero</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-lessons-from-moneyball-can-help-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-17"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/16-ways-to-get-money-for-your-business">16 Ways To Get Money For Your Business</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-behaviors-and-attitudes-that-can-drive-workplace-success">14 Behaviors and Attitudes That Can Drive Workplace Success</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-three-f-rule-can-lead-you-to-happiness">The Three F Rule Can Lead You to Happiness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-ways-to-use-social-media-in-business">13 Ways to Use Social Media in Business</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-i-learned-about-money-after-i-went-freelance">7 Things I Learned About Money After I Went Freelance</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Entrepreneurship business personality niche workplace success Mon, 24 Oct 2011 09:48:10 +0000 Carlos Portocarrero 748062 at http://www.wisebread.com Making Progress: The Missing Link Between Management and Employees http://www.wisebread.com/making-progress-the-missing-link-between-management-and-employees <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/making-progress-the-missing-link-between-management-and-employees" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/5277574270_8f52d2ed73.jpg" alt="happy worker" title="happy worker" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I'm always looking for what motivates people to do good work, because I think that it can make us all happier in the workplace. A recent <em>Harvard Business Review</em> <a href="http://hbr.org/2010/01/the-hbr-list-breakthrough-ideas-for-2010/ar/1">worker-motivation survey</a> came up with some great insights.</p> <p>The study asked 600 managers from varying industries what they thought motivated their workers the most. They were given five options:</p> <ol> <li>recognition</li> <li>incentives</li> <li>interpersonal support</li> <li>support for making progress</li> <li>clear goals</li> </ol> <p>Their #1 answer was &quot;recognition.&quot; Before I tell you the results on the worker side, take your pick on what makes &quot;a great workday&quot; for you.</p> <p>Researches analyzed more than 12,000 worker diary entries and there was a clear winner: <strong>making progress</strong>. On over 76% of &quot;great work days,&quot; employees made a reference to making progress &mdash; far more than any other factor. Does the answer surprise you a bit?</p> <h3>The Lazy Worker Stereotype</h3> <p>The &quot;progress&quot; finding might prove a bit surprising because a perception exists that many workers, given the opportunity to slack off, will do so. This common misconception often lead to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/incentive-plans-always-go-awry">misguided incentive plans</a>.</p> <p>Americans aren't lazy. We want to earn our keep. And management wants us to earn our keep as well (so they can earn theirs). It's the common ground &mdash; the missing link, if you will &mdash; to a super productive workplace.</p> <p>If an organization can work with its employees to remove roadblocks instead of creating new ones and help employees outline and achieve clear objectives, then they are likely to have a very inspired work environment.</p> <p>The <em>Business Review</em> rated the &quot;progress&quot; finding as a &quot;Breakthrough Idea of 2010.&quot; All managers and non-managers should take note. It might result in a happier workplace for everyone.</p> <h3>What's Next?</h3> <p>If you're not in management and you're not happy about your current work situation, does &quot;making progress&quot; resonate with you?</p> <p>If it does, what's next isn't exactly easy. First, you'll have to figure out what roadblocks keep you from more progress in the workplace. Is it something internal that you need to address? Or are there other roadblocks that you need to address with management?</p> <p>If these roadblocks are factors that are out of your hand, make a list and discuss constructive solutions with key decision-makers. If they are good managers, they should be open to ideas.</p> <p>If you're the key decision-maker, what can you do to make your employees' jobs easier? Make a list, discuss it with other managers and your employees, and then take the steps necessary to help people get things done.</p> <p>It may not solve all problems overnight, but it'll put things in motion. And that's what I call &quot;progress.&quot;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ge-miller">G.E. Miller</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/making-progress-the-missing-link-between-management-and-employees">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-behaviors-and-attitudes-that-can-drive-workplace-success">14 Behaviors and Attitudes That Can Drive Workplace Success</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-signs-that-youve-been-at-the-same-job-too-long">25 Signs That You&#039;ve Been at the Same Job Too Long</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-lessons-from-moneyball-can-help-your-career">How Lessons From Moneyball Can Help Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/become-a-star-employee-by-thinking-like-an-entrepreneur">Become a Star Employee by Thinking Like an Entrepreneur</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-sing-your-own-praises-at-work-without-bragging">How to Sing Your Own Praises at Work (Without Bragging)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building employee motivation self employment unhappy at work workplace success Thu, 07 Apr 2011 10:00:05 +0000 G.E. Miller 508475 at http://www.wisebread.com Become a Star Employee by Thinking Like an Entrepreneur http://www.wisebread.com/become-a-star-employee-by-thinking-like-an-entrepreneur <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/become-a-star-employee-by-thinking-like-an-entrepreneur" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000003760673XSmall.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="163" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you&rsquo;re wondering if there&rsquo;s a way to really make a job recession-proof, there is. Yes, a large part of it depends on your industry and whether or not it&rsquo;s expanding or shedding jobs. However, even though you might not have control over the decisions your company makes, you are in control over how you do your job.</p> <p>Years ago when I was in my first real corporate job, I remember hearing that employees should be more entrepreneurial in the workplace. It didn&rsquo;t make much sense to me then. I couldn&rsquo;t see how you could be both an entrepreneur and an employee. As far as I knew, an entrepreneur ran a business, and that was not the same thing as having a job.</p> <p>Now that I&rsquo;ve had experience in both worlds, I can understand how employees can benefit by bringing entrepreneurial thinking into their work environment. In fact, during these times, there&rsquo;s a big advantage to companies to have their employees more invested in their work. Though in some workplaces, employees may not have the impression that their efforts really matter, engaged employees are more productive. It&rsquo;s not hard to understand why. If you care about your position and the company, you&rsquo;re going to do more to make it successful. That certainly would be good news for a lot of businesses.</p> <h2>Your Attitude</h2> <p>It&rsquo;s easy to have negative feelings on the job if there have been a lot of cuts in personnel and you&rsquo;re left to pick up the slack. An attitude change may be easier said than done. So, you have to look at the big picture.</p> <p>Entrepreneurs start out with a vision of what they want to create, whether it is a product or a service. As an employee, your vision is just as important. What is your vision for your career? Do you see opportunities for advancement? If you look at the big picture, you can see that by improving the bottom line you&rsquo;re also contributing to the overall success of the company. That means that your efforts are extremely important.</p> <h2>Be Creative</h2> <p>Another trait of entrepreneurs is the ability to find creative ways to get things done. If a small business owner doesn&rsquo;t have funding or has to wear multiple hats, they have to find alternative ways to accomplish the tasks required to run their business. I&rsquo;ve worked in companies where no one wanted to change because &ldquo;we&rsquo;ve always done it this way.&rdquo; In an environment where change takes a long time to happen, you may hit resistance to new ideas. If you&rsquo;re in that type of workplace, pick your battles. If you can make a change in how you do something and be more productive in your own work, then that can go a long way. Just because there&rsquo;s been only one way to do something, it doesn&rsquo;t mean you can&rsquo;t try another way.</p> <h2>Keep an Open Mind</h2> <p>A most important trait of entrepreneurs is the ability to learn new information and to continue to adapt. The business idea you came up with in the beginning may need tweaking or a major overhaul as time goes on. You have to be ready and willing to move quickly when you see new opportunities.</p> <p>For many people, this may be the toughest thing of all. If you&rsquo;re in a job where you&rsquo;ve been for many years, it can be tempting to be comfortable in your accumulated knowledge. On the downside, many employees are finding that once they leave their jobs a lot has changed in the outside world. They may not have kept up with new skills or continued to learn. If you are current with certifications or degrees, then you&rsquo;ll not only be an asset to the company, but you&rsquo;ll be helping yourself as well. The more knowledge you have, the more attractive you&rsquo;ll be as an employee. People who stay current will be in a much better position to advance or take on other roles within the company. The more you learn, and show that you&rsquo;re willing to keep learning, the less likely you&rsquo;ll be looked on as someone who&rsquo;s stuck and unwilling to change.</p> <p>Thinking like an entrepreneur is not just for business owners; it can benefit employees as well. Your company is not just your employer, but it&rsquo;s also a place where you&rsquo;ve made a major investment of your time and energy. Being entrepreneurial in your workplace will position you as an asset, as opposed to being seen as someone who can be easily replaced.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This is a guest post by Deborah Bailey, author of <strong>Think Like an Entrepreneur: Transforming Your Career and Taking Charge of Your Life</strong>. With a background in human resources, employee and executive coaching, and hiring strategies with companies such as Lucent, AT&amp;T and Johnson and Johnson, Deborah helps clients get 'unstuck' in their professional lives by adopting the entrepreneurial mindset. Read more articles by Deborah:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://msn.careerbuilder.com/Article/MSN-2247-Workplace-Issues-Can-You-Stay-Sane-in-a-Negative-Work-Environment/?cbsid=14be5d4766594958b5034c945086e315-326161887-RF-4&amp;pf=true&amp;ArticleID=2247&amp;cbRecursionCnt=3">Can You Stay Sane in a Negative Work Environment?</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.more.com/4879/7067-how-to-choose-a-career">How to Choose a Career or Business Coach</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.more.com/2046/8725-the-people-pleasers">The People Pleasers</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/deborah-bailey">Deborah Bailey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/become-a-star-employee-by-thinking-like-an-entrepreneur">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-behaviors-and-attitudes-that-can-drive-workplace-success">14 Behaviors and Attitudes That Can Drive Workplace Success</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks">Ace Your Next Performance Review With These 7 Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-lessons-from-moneyball-can-help-your-career">How Lessons From Moneyball Can Help Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/making-progress-the-missing-link-between-management-and-employees">Making Progress: The Missing Link Between Management and Employees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-sing-your-own-praises-at-work-without-bragging">How to Sing Your Own Praises at Work (Without Bragging)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building attitude employee workplace success Tue, 04 May 2010 12:00:03 +0000 Deborah Bailey 59642 at http://www.wisebread.com 14 Behaviors and Attitudes That Can Drive Workplace Success http://www.wisebread.com/14-behaviors-and-attitudes-that-can-drive-workplace-success <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/14-behaviors-and-attitudes-that-can-drive-workplace-success" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man in suit in park vintage.jpg" alt="vintage photo of man in suit" title="vintage photo of man in suit" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="348" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I have worked with hundreds of people at all corporate rungs and have enjoyed watching many of them progress. There are, sadly, a few who seem to spin their career wheels. I thought I might discover some wisdom if I considered the behaviors and attitudes of two people, both bright and kind to me. One has had success in the business world and is currently&nbsp;a&nbsp;senior manager of a global organization while the other struggles in low-paying wage or so-so sales commission positions:</p> <ul> <li>Both are American, male, single, 40something, and fit.</li> <li>Both have an undergraduate degree only and have experienced periods of intermittent unemployment.</li> <li>Neither have high-achieving family members.</li> </ul> <p>Let&rsquo;s call the successful guy Jack and struggler Charlie, and consider their differences. I&rsquo;ve created two categories: one is for behaviors that are observable; the other, attitudes that are not so obvious. Here are 14 things that can make a big difference in workplace success.</p> <p><strong>OBSERVABLE BEHAVIORS</strong></p> <p><strong><br /> </strong>1) Jack <strong>chooses employers and positions carefully</strong>, frequently being rejected and rejecting inappropriate offers; Charlie is not astute at discriminating between a good opportunity and bad choice, and so finds himself not progressing and continuing what one career services buddy refers to as a &ldquo;downward spiral.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>2) Jack goes into <strong>overdrive for the first 6 months of a new job</strong> (and beyond as needed), working extra hours to learn the nuances of his accountabilities, gain understanding of the company culture, figure out who the key players in the company are &ndash; all while doing his daily tasks and delivering results as quickly as possible; Charlie complains that things aren&rsquo;t what he expected or what the company promised.</p> <p>3) Jack <strong>relocates if necessary</strong>; Charlie talks about relocating but never has.</p> <p>4) Jack has <strong>developed a career specialty</strong> that offers better paying, though harder-to-find, positions; Charlie&rsquo;s skills, while valuable, don&rsquo;t differentiate him from other candidates.</p> <p>5) Jack <strong>is always looking for the next challenge</strong>, either with his current employer or another one, and doesn&rsquo;t mind taking calculated, well thought-out risks; Charlie wants to be successful but doesn&rsquo;t set goals for himself or plan how he will deliver results for&nbsp;his employer.</p> <p>6) Jack <strong>embraces mental challenges</strong> including taking professional development courses and learning new technology on his own; Charlie avoids newness and avoids using technology, making it more and more difficult for him to learn.</p> <p>7) Jack <strong>advocates for his employees</strong> at the risk of company disfavor; Charlie seems to have enough problems of his own and complains (doesn&rsquo;t offer solutions) rather than advocates (explains why he is right and makes specific requests).</p> <p>8) Jack <strong>tries to increase his income and net worth</strong> through real estate investing (home buying and selling was profitable) and running a side business (which didn&rsquo;t take off); Charlie has thought about starting a business but hasn't yet.</p> <p>9) Jack <strong>has increased his visibility and knowledge through membership in a professional association</strong>; Charlie doesn&rsquo;t have an expertise in one field and so doesn&rsquo;t have a professional association suitable for him to join.&nbsp;</p> <p>10) Jack <strong>has been mentored and has mentored others</strong>; Charlie has never found anyone to help him mature professionally.</p> <p><strong>ATTITUDES (revealed through conversation but not directly observable)</strong></p> <p>11) Jack <strong>values other people&rsquo;s points of view and motivations even if he disagrees with them</strong>; Charlie considers his perspective only and doesn&rsquo;t see how getting what he needs may jeopardize the rights of others.&nbsp;</p> <p>12) Jack <strong>categorizes corporate behaviors as normal/typical or abnormal/unacceptable</strong>, and he has learned to operate as expected but protests (or plans his escape from) unreasonable requirements; Charlie considers nearly all company behavior to be damaging to his psyche and, ultimately, his performance.</p> <p>13) Jack <strong>sees negative events as leading to positive outcomes</strong>, either directly or indirectly; Charlie feels that one bad thing leads to yet another.</p> <p>14) Jack <strong>holds himself to a high standard of ethics and performance</strong>, and isn&rsquo;t afraid to hold others (his bosses and his staff) accountable; Charlie wants to hold others accountable but many times does not live up to his employer&rsquo;s standards.&nbsp;</p> <p>Considering these divergent&nbsp;approaches and outcomes, I see that choosing the right employer (and being chosen) is critical so that your viewpoint doesn&rsquo;t become skewed and you take a downward spiral, which can be difficult to reverse.&nbsp;There may be times&nbsp;when <a href="http://Ever wondered how you can influence your workplace and long-term career success? Here are 14 behaviors and attitudes that can make a difference. " title="&quot;I Hate My Job&quot; Guide">conditions are so difficult</a> you&nbsp;can't see the way out. Going outside of the workplace -- joining professional associations, taking classes, learning something new -- combined with an ever-hopeful, goal-setting, people-savvy, hard working attitude can make a difference.&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/julie-rains">Julie Rains</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-behaviors-and-attitudes-that-can-drive-workplace-success">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-lessons-from-moneyball-can-help-your-career">How Lessons From Moneyball Can Help Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/become-a-star-employee-by-thinking-like-an-entrepreneur">Become a Star Employee by Thinking Like an Entrepreneur</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/making-progress-the-missing-link-between-management-and-employees">Making Progress: The Missing Link Between Management and Employees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-sing-your-own-praises-at-work-without-bragging">How to Sing Your Own Praises at Work (Without Bragging)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career success work ethic workplace success Sat, 08 Dec 2007 21:48:57 +0000 Julie Rains 1480 at http://www.wisebread.com