Roth IRA http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/8408/all en-US Yes, You Can Pay for Education With an IRA http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/yes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/education_fund_coins_652348714.jpg" alt="Education fund in jar" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When most people think of saving for a college education, they usually think of 529 savings plans or Coverdell Education Savings Accounts (ESA). These accounts allow you to grow your money by investing in select mutual funds, much like a typical retirement account does. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Smart Places to Stash Your Kid's College Savings</a>)</p> <p>While both of these accounts are great investment tools to pay for a college education, there's another option you may not have considered. A Roth IRA can also be used for educational expenses. There are pros and cons for each way to save for college. Here's a brief rundown:</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><strong>Coverdell ESA</strong></p> </td> <td> <p><strong>529 savings plans</strong></p> </td> <td> <p><strong>Roth IRA</strong></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>No tax deduction from contributions.</p> </td> <td> <p>No tax deduction from contributions.</p> </td> <td> <p>No tax deduction from contributions.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>Withdraw your contributions tax free.</p> </td> <td> <p>Withdraw your contributions tax free.</p> </td> <td> <p>Withdraw your contributions tax free. (If you withdraw interest, it will be taxed.)</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>Annual contribution limit: $2,000 per beneficiary.</p> </td> <td> <p>No annual contribution limit but most states limit total contributions to $300,000.</p> </td> <td> <p>Annual contribution limit: $5,500, or $6,500 if age 50 or over.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>Anyone can contribute but the amount they can contribute is limited by their modified adjusted gross income. Ability to contribute phases out once modified AGI reaches $220,000.</p> </td> <td> <p>&nbsp; Anyone can&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; contribute.</p> </td> <td> <p>Must have income in order to contribute. People with high incomes ($181,000 for married couple) are prohibited from contributing.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>Can be used for higher education and qualified K-12 expenses. Beneficiary must use account by age 30.</p> </td> <td> <p>Can only be used for higher education expenses.</p> </td> <td> <p>Can be used for higher education, first home purchase, qualified medical expenses, and retirement.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>Account under guardian's name won't impact beneficiary's FAFSA.</p> </td> <td> <p>Account under guardian's name won't impact beneficiary's FAFSA.</p> </td> <td> <p>Withdrawals will increase your earned income and can affect beneficiary's FAFSA.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>Roth IRAs</h2> <p>A Roth IRA differs from a traditional IRA in that the income you contribute is already taxed. The beauty of a Roth IRA is that the distribution you take from your contributions is <em>not </em>taxable (as long as the use is approved).</p> <p>Let's say your child is a college freshman. You withdraw $15,000 from your Roth IRA for their first year of school. None of this money will be taxed, as long as it is from your own contributions and not from the interest earned. Withdrawals are considered returns of contributions initially, for tax purposes. They are considered interest earnings second.</p> <p>Now, you are likely thinking, &quot;But aren't IRA withdrawals subject to penalties if you withdraw them early?&quot; Generally, yes. Normally, you must be age 59 &frac12; or older, and have had the account for at least five years to withdraw without incurring a 10 percent tax penalty. Why? Well, all IRAs are retirement funds, primarily. They are designed to be withdrawn only as folks approach retirement.</p> <p>But no penalty applies if the withdrawal is for qualified educational purposes (or a first home purchase, or qualified medical bills). Even if your child or grandchild has a scholarship for full tuition, it's no problem. Roth IRAs can be used for any qualified educational expense, including room, board, books, and supplies.</p> <p>If your child or grandchild ends up not going to college, or not needing all the money, you can simply keep the money to continue funding your retirement. Note that to place money back into a Roth IRA, it will be subject to annual contribution limits ($5,500 if under age 50, and $6,500 if age 50 or older).</p> <h2>Traditional IRAs</h2> <p>You can also use traditional IRAs to pay for college. Essentially, traditional IRAs reverse the tax advantage of a Roth. You get a tax deduction upfront for all money contributed to a traditional IRA &mdash; but all withdrawals will be taxed at the federal and state level.</p> <p>As with a Roth IRA, if traditional IRA distributions before age 59 &frac12; are used for qualified educational expenses, they are not subject to the 10 percent penalty. However, they will be subject to tax. The IRS will get its money whenever you withdraw from a traditional IRA, regardless of what you withdraw it for.</p> <p>Because of the tax implications, while it is <em>possible </em>to use a traditional IRA for educational expenses, it may not be the most prudent move. If you want to tap into IRAs for college expenses, a Roth IRA is the better bet financially.</p> <h2>An important caveat</h2> <p>Realistically, tapping your IRA to pay for your child's education should rarely be your first choice. It can be a smart move if you have a considerable amount saved and a lot of time left before retirement to pay it back. Otherwise, you'll be draining the account of funds you very much need. It may be wiser to use an educational savings account to save for your child's education instead. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-too-much-money-for-a-college-fund-is-a-bad-idea?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Why Saving Too Much Money for a College Fund Is a Bad Idea</a>)</p> <p>However, there are still benefits of using an IRA over an educational savings account if you know your retirement will still be secure. For example, by combining the funds into one account, you will have more flexibility in choosing whether to spend your savings on education &mdash; and how much &mdash; or to continue to hold it for your retirement.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fyes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520To%2520Pay%2520For%2520Your%2520College%2520Education.png&amp;description=Yes%2C%20You%20Can%20Pay%20for%20Education%20With%20an%20IRA"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20To%20Pay%20For%20Your%20College%20Education.png" alt="Yes, You Can Pay for Education With an IRA" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/anum-yoon">Anum Yoon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-save-for-college-using-a-529-prepaid-tuition-plan">Should You Save for College Using a 529 Prepaid Tuition Plan?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings">5 Smart Places to Stash Your Kid&#039;s College Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/which-retirement-account-is-right-for-you">Which Retirement Account Is Right for You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-moves-for-retirement">8 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Moves for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Retirement college contributions distributions higher education qualified expenses Roth IRA saving money traditional ira Wed, 04 Oct 2017 08:00:07 +0000 Anum Yoon 2029157 at http://www.wisebread.com Money a Mess? Try This Personal Finance Starter Kit http://www.wisebread.com/money-a-mess-try-this-personal-finance-starter-kit <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/money-a-mess-try-this-personal-finance-starter-kit" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessman_getting_ready_for_race_on_the_track.jpg" alt="Businessman getting ready for race on the track" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I recently joined a meal delivery kit service, which has completely changed my cooking game. Every week, I receive a couple of boxes of pre-chopped and presorted fresh ingredients, along with a step-by-step recipe that helps me get a meal on the table in under 30 minutes. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-meal-prep-subscription-boxes-worth-it?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are Meal Prep Subscription Boxes Worth It?</a>)</p> <p>As I put together one of these meals last week, I started wondering why we haven't applied this concept to money yet. Where is the deliverable personal finance starter kit that will make handling your finances as easy as putting a quick and delicious meal on the table?</p> <p>Since we probably won't be seeing any &quot;Hello Cash&quot; or &quot;Green Apron&quot; boxes arriving in our homes anytime soon, I figured I could take matters into my own hands and create such a starter kit for adult-level finances. Here are the specific &quot;ingredients&quot; you need to go from broke to bank.</p> <h2>What you need: A checking account</h2> <p>Opening a checking account is the first step to conquering your adult-level finances. That's because having a bank hold onto your money is the safest and least expensive way for you to access and spend it. Putting your money in a checking account gives you several benefits:</p> <ul> <ul> <li> <p>Security and protection of your money: Up to $250,000 of your money is <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-fdic" target="_blank">FDIC insured</a> by banks and NCUA insured by federal credit unions, meaning you do not have to worry that your money will be wiped out if the banking institution fails. State-chartered credit unions are backed by private insurers. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-the-difference-between-a-federal-and-non-federal-credit-union?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Here's the Difference Between a Federal and Non-Federal Credit Union</a>)</p> </li> </ul> </ul> <ul> <li> <p>Free check cashing: Without a checking account, it is nearly impossible to cash a check without having to pay a fee, and those fees can take up to 3 percent of the value of the check. It's tough to get ahead financially if you have to pay to access your own money.</p> </li> </ul> <ul> <li> <p>Free bill pay: A checking account gives you access to paper checks and online bill pay. Without such an account, you will have to pay your bills with money orders, which also cost as much as $1 per money order. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-paper-checks-are-still-relevant?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Reasons Paper Checks Are Still Relevant</a>)</p> </li> </ul> <ul> <li> <p>Access to a debit card: We live in a digital world, and it can be very difficult to handle your finances without a debit card or credit card. The majority of checking accounts these days come with a check card, which allows you to use your debit card like a credit card. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/debit-or-credit-which-one-should-you-choose-at-the-checkout?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Debit or Credit? Which One Should You Choose at the Checkout?</a>)</p> </li> </ul> <p>To find the best checking account for you, consider your needs ― do you need an account with a low minimum balance, or do you plan to keep a high balance and want to earn some interest? Will an online bank cover all of your needs, or do you need a local branch? How often will you need to access the ATM? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-make-sure-you-never-pay-an-atm-fee?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Ways to Make Sure You Never Pay an ATM Fee</a>)</p> <p>Taking the time to find a checking account and bank that will fit your financial needs will help you keep more money where it belongs ― in your account and in your wallet.</p> <h2>What you need: A savings account</h2> <p>The next financial ingredient you need is a savings account. While the interest rates on savings accounts are still depressingly low, that does not change the fact that an FDIC or NCUA-insured savings account serves as the foundation for financial planning for the future. Here's why.</p> <ul> <li> <p>It makes it easier to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-you-really-need-to-pay-yourself-first-seriously" target="_blank">pay yourself first</a>: It's very hard to save money without a place to put it that is separate from your checking account. Opening a savings account gives you a more difficult-to-access spot for your money to grow. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-easy-to-fix-reasons-your-savings-account-isnt-growing?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Easy-to-Fix Reasons Your Savings Account Isn't Growing</a>)</p> </li> <li> <p>It can serve as your emergency fund: Financial hiccups, mistakes, and emergencies can hit anyone at any time. The difference between a financial emergency just being a nuisance and it becoming a catastrophe comes down to whether or not you have <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-step-by-step-guide-to-creating-your-emergency-fund" target="_blank">an emergency fund</a>. Without one, you will be left scrambling to find money. With one, your emergency fund can simply absorb the cost of the emergency without affecting your usual spending. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/where-to-turn-for-help-when-you-dont-have-an-emergency-fund?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Where to Turn for Help When You Don't Have an Emergency Fund</a>)</p> </li> </ul> <p>While it may be easy to open a savings account with the same bank where you already have a checking account, you might want to consider an account at a different bank. This can help keep the money out of your reach if you're likely to spend it, and could possibly get you a better interest rate, especially if you're willing to put your savings into an online bank. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-pros-and-cons-of-keeping-all-your-accounts-in-one-bank?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Pros and Cons of Keeping All Your Accounts in One Bank</a>)</p> <p>Of course, opening a savings account is not enough. You need to actually use it regularly. The trick to getting the most out of your savings account is to set up regular, automatic transfers into it, so that your savings will grow without you having to think about it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/earn-more-interest-by-reducing-savings-friction?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Earn More Interest by Reducing Savings Friction</a>)</p> <h2>What you need: A simple budget</h2> <p>Once you have a checking account, a savings account, and automatic transfers into savings, then you are ready for the next ingredient: your budget.</p> <p>This is often the portion of financial adulting that makes the fainthearted run screaming into the distance. But budgeting is really about organizing your money so that you can spend it on the things that matter and scrimp on the things that don't.</p> <p>The basis of budgeting is keeping track of your income and expenses. There are several ways to do this without having to break out a spreadsheet. You can use sites like Mint.com to track your spending for you and declutter the financial information coming in to you so that it's easier to track. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-your-first-budget-in-5-easy-steps?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Build Your First Budget in 5 Easy Steps</a>)</p> <p>When you have a decent idea of what you bring in and what you spend, then it's time to start managing your funds so that you spend less than you earn. How you manage your money is up to you, but the main idea is to save your splurges for the things you really value, and cut back your spending everywhere else. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-manage-your-money-no-budgeting-required?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Manage Your Money &mdash; No Budgeting Required</a>)</p> <h2>What you need: A Roth IRA</h2> <p>Your financial life is really starting to look good at this point, so it's time to add the next ingredient: a Roth IRA. This tax-advantaged retirement account is a great way to save for your future.</p> <p>Roth IRAs are funded with post-tax dollars, which means you will not get a tax break when you make a contribution ― but any investment gains can be withdrawn tax-free anytime after age 59&frac12;. Since it's very likely that you'll be in a higher tax bracket by then, this makes the Roth IRA a great deal for newly-minted financial adults. You may contribute up to $5,500 per year to your Roth IRA, and there is no age limit on contributions since you will never be forced to take minimum required distributions on this account, unlike traditional IRAs and 401(k)s. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/which-retirement-account-is-right-for-you?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Which Retirement Account Is Right for You?</a>)</p> <p>In addition, you can access up to $10,000 of your earnings penalty-free from your Roth IRA to put toward buying your first home. You may also access your principal at any time without having to pay a penalty, which is not possible with traditional IRAs and 401(k)s.</p> <p>That being said, if you do have access to a 401(k) retirement savings account at work and there is an employer match for your contributions, you will want to make sure you contribute up to the full employer match before funding your Roth IRA. The employer match is free money, after all. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a>)</p> <p>The best way to make sure you max out your Roth IRA contributions is to make them completely automated, just like your savings.</p> <h2>The optional garnish: A rewards credit card</h2> <p>At this point, your adult-level finances should be working well and taking good care of you. The next level of financial expertise is to start using your regular spending to help you achieve more of your financial goals. You can do this with a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-rewards-credit-cards-for-newbies" target="_blank">rewards credit card</a> that rewards you for your regular spending. With savvy use of such cards, you can earn anything from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-steps-to-picking-the-best-airline-credit-card-for-the-most-rewards-value" target="_blank">flights</a> to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-credit-cards-for-hotel-deals-and-rewards" target="_blank">hotel stays</a> to plain old <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-cash-back-credit-cards" target="_blank">cash back</a>.</p> <p>But, there is a reason why this is an optional garnish, rather than one of the main ingredients of financial adulthood. Banks and credit card companies don't offer rewards cards to be nice to their customers ― credit card rewards can make even the most frugal financial grown-up forget their budget limitations. If you are able to pay off your credit card in full each month and just reap the free rewards, then a rewards credit card can be a delicious topper to your financial adulthood. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-escape-reward-card-spending-traps?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Escape Reward Card Spending Traps</a>)</p> <p>If, on the other hand, you know that you will struggle to pay off your balance every month, then feel free to enjoy your financial adulthood sans rewards credit card. It's not a necessary part of your financial starter kit ― it just makes for a nice addition. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-reasons-to-pay-your-credit-card-bill-before-its-due?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Smart Reasons to Pay Your Credit Card Bill Before It's Due</a>)</p> <h2>Whipping up a financial adulthood</h2> <p>While it would be convenient if you could order a financial adulthood starter kit to show up at your doorstep, it's actually pretty simple to put together one of your own. Just know the basic ingredients you need, find the ones that work best for you, be consistent ― and, voilà! You'll go from broke to bank before you know it.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fmoney-a-mess-try-this-personal-finance-starter-kit&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FMoney%2520a%2520Mess-%2520Try%2520This%2520Personal%2520Finance%2520Starter%2520Kit.jpg&amp;description=Money%20a%20Mess%3F%20Try%20This%20Personal%20Finance%20Starter%20Kit"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Money%20a%20Mess-%20Try%20This%20Personal%20Finance%20Starter%20Kit.jpg" alt="Money a Mess? Try This Personal Finance Starter Kit" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/money-a-mess-try-this-personal-finance-starter-kit">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-start-a-family-before-reaching-these-5-money-goals">Don&#039;t Start a Family Before Reaching These 5 Money Goals</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-to-prepare-for-your-best-black-friday">11 Ways to Prepare for Your Best Black Friday</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-financial-resolutions-you-can-conquer-before-new-years">10 Financial Resolutions You Can Conquer Before New Year&#039;s</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/reach-your-money-goals-faster-with-a-simple-naming-trick">Reach Your Money Goals Faster With a Simple Naming Trick</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance banking budgeting cash back checking account emergency funds money moves retirement rewards Roth IRA saving money savings account starter kit Tue, 22 Aug 2017 09:00:05 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 2006372 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/latin_american_woman_saving_in_a_piggybank.jpg" alt="Latin American woman saving in a piggy bank" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you're unemployed, saving for retirement may be the last thing on your mind. It may seem impossible to save for the future when you have no steady income to even pay basic bills.</p> <p>But depending on your situation, it may still be possible to build your nest egg even if you're not working full-time. Here are some tools and suggestions for keeping an eye on the future during a period of joblessness.</p> <h2>Familiarize yourself with IRAs</h2> <p>Individual retirement accounts (IRAs) are great for people who don't have access to employer-sponsored retirement plans like 401(k) accounts. A traditional IRA is similar to a 401(k), in that any contributions are deducted from whatever taxable income you have. With a Roth IRA, on the other hand, earnings are taxed up front, but any gains you have won't be taxed when you withdraw money at retirement age.</p> <p>IRAs are useful for people who are self-employed, or who earn money inconsistently through part-time or freelance work. So if you're not employed full-time but still have some earned income, these accounts can help you save.</p> <h2>Think of retirement savings as a necessary expense</h2> <p>When you're unemployed, it's important to get a handle on all of your expenses so that you know where you need to cut. You may find that there are a lot of costs (luxury purchases, eating out, cable TV) that can be taken out of your household budget, while other expenses (food, electricity, debt payments) are more necessary. If you think of retirement savings as a necessity, you will be forced to cut spending elsewhere.</p> <h2>Roll over your old 401(k)</h2> <p>If you've been laid off from a job, you will no longer be able to contribute to the 401(k) you may have had from your employer. But the account will still exist and the money is still yours. You can let the old 401(k) account sit, but it's better to roll it into a traditional individual retirement account (IRA). The IRA will give you more flexibility and investment options, and may also have lower fees. And you can begin contributing to it once you have any earned income at all.</p> <h2>Focus on rebalancing</h2> <p>You may not be able to add much to your retirement accounts, but you can work to make sure they are optimized. This means making sure you have the right mix of investments based on your retirement date, and getting the optimal blend of stocks in various industries and asset classes. It's always smart to examine your portfolio to ensure you are not over- or underinvested in any one area.</p> <h2>Look for higher bank interest rates</h2> <p>If you're not taking in much income for the time being, you need to have your cash savings working for you. That means any cash savings you have should generate as much income as possible. Interest rates are still quite low, but many online banks offer interest rates on CDs and savings accounts that are higher than average.</p> <h2>Avoid the temptation to cash out</h2> <p>It may be tempting to take money out of your retirement funds, but you should avoid it if at all possible. One of the best ways to see your retirement savings grow is to let your investments do their thing. You can see a meaningful increase in your retirement savings just from market gains, even if you're not contributing for the time being.</p> <p>Withdrawing from retirement accounts, however, has consequences. First, any money you take out has no chance to grow and help you expand your overall retirement savings. Second, there are penalties and taxes associated with taking money out of retirement accounts early. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-you-borrow-from-your-retirement-account?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Questions to Ask Before You Borrow From Your Retirement Account</a>)</p> <h2>Continue to focus on growth, if you can</h2> <p>If you are unemployed and have some investments in a taxable brokerage account, you may be tempted to shift them to dividend stocks or other income-producing investments. This can give you extra income at a time when you may need it. But making this kind of adjustment could have a long-term negative impact on the overall growth of your portfolio. If dividends, bonds, or other income-focused investments will help you keep the lights on, fine. But it's best to focus on finding other sources of income, or reduce your spending first before going this route.</p> <h2>Reinvest dividends, if you can</h2> <p>If you do have dividend stocks already, you can still contribute to your retirement portfolio by reinvesting any dividend income you get from stocks. You may be tempted to use that investment income to pay bills and help get through your unemployed period, but if you can get by without it, direct the dividends to buy more stocks and other investments instead. Even small contributions added to your retirement accounts can add up to considerable savings over time.</p> <h2>Get your spouse involved</h2> <p>Perhaps you never thought to include your spouse in retirement planning because you felt it wasn't necessary while you were working. Now his or her income can be directed to help you save. This may be a challenge, since they are now also working to help pay more of the bills. But there are some ways to use your spouse's income for your own retirement accounts. If you have a traditional or Roth IRA, your spouse's earned income can go toward your account. (Note: This is only allowed if you file your taxes jointly.)</p> <h2>Plan to pay into accounts later</h2> <p>If you are unemployed but expect to be working in short order, you can postpone contributions to your IRA and add money later, even if it's after the end of the year. In fact, you can contribute to an IRA all the way up until April 15 of the following year. So for example, let's say you planned to max out your IRA by making monthly payments. (This would be about $458 monthly for a total of $5,500 for the year &mdash; the maximum amount allowed by the IRS for people under 50.) But let's say you are out of work from August through October of that year. You can hold off on contributing during that time and make up the difference in later months, even the first few months of the following year, if necessary.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Save%2520for%2520Retirement%2520When%2520You%2520Are%2520Unemployed.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Save%20for%20Retirement%20When%20You%20Are%20Unemployed"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Save%20for%20Retirement%20When%20You%20Are%20Unemployed.jpg" alt="How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira">Yes, You Can Pay for Education With an IRA</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-moves-for-retirement">8 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Moves for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-roadblocks-to-retirement-and-how-to-clear-them">7 Roadblocks to Retirement (And How to Clear Them)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-sure-you-dont-run-out-of-money-in-retirement">How to Make Sure You Don&#039;t Run Out of Money in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement 401(k) contributions dividends interest rates job loss loss of income rebalancing Roth IRA saving money stocks traditional ira unemployment Wed, 12 Jul 2017 09:00:14 +0000 Tim Lemke 1979037 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Reasons Every Millennial Needs a Roth IRA http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-every-millennial-needs-a-roth-ira <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-reasons-every-millennial-needs-a-roth-ira" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/her_company_and_savings_are_growing.jpg" alt="Her company and savings are growing" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You're young. You're earning a bit of money. You know you need to start saving for retirement. So what's the easiest way to get started?</p> <p>One of the best vehicles for retirement savings for millennials is a Roth IRA, which is a type of account that offers a great selection of investment options and tax advantages. You contribute to a Roth with money that's <em>already </em>been subject to income tax, but when you withdraw it in retirement, everything you've earned in the fund is tax-free. In comparison, you don't pay tax on 401(k) or traditional IRA contributions until you take out the money in your later years. Both have benefits, but there are reasons you might particularly want to consider a Roth while you're young.</p> <p>It's easy to open a Roth IRA through most popular online brokerage firms, and you don't need a lot of money to get started. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-retirement-accounts-you-dont-need-a-ton-of-money-to-open?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Retirement Accounts You Don't Need a Ton of Money to Open</a>)</p> <p>Here are some reasons why a Roth IRA is an essential part of any millennial's investment plan.</p> <h2>1. You may not have a 401(k)</h2> <p>If you work for a company, you may be offered a 401(k) plan, which allows you to invest in a variety of mutual funds and deduct any contributions from your taxable income. In many cases, your company will match a portion of any contributions you make.</p> <p>But these days, an increasing number of millennials are performing a variety of contract or &quot;gig&quot; jobs, rather than working full-time with a single company. A Roth IRA is not tied to an employer, so anyone can invest as long as they have earned income. If you are earning income but don't have access to a 401(k) plan, a Roth IRA may be your next best option.</p> <h2>2. You have a 401(k), but it's lousy</h2> <p>If you have a 401(k), it's wise to take advantage of it, especially if your company offers a match. But be aware that your 401(k) plan may not offer a wide range of things to invest in, and there may be high fees. This is why many financial planners suggest contributing to a 401(k) up to the company match, and then placing any additional savings in a Roth IRA, which may offer lower costs and more investment choices.</p> <h2>3. There are some tax advantages over a 401(k)</h2> <p>The key feature of a Roth IRA is that any investment gains can be withdrawn tax-free anytime after age 59&frac12;. If you are a millennial, this is a big deal &mdash; because unless you're making big bucks already, there's a good chance you will be in a higher tax bracket when you are older. This tax advantage is in contrast to a traditional IRA or a 401(k) plan, in which the tax advantages come upfront.</p> <h2>4. You can use it to pay for education</h2> <p>Typically, if you withdraw from an IRA before age 59 &frac12;, you must pay a 10 percent penalty on the withdrawal, plus any income tax. But the one big exception involves qualified higher education expenses.</p> <p>If you use a Roth IRA to pay for education, and limit your withdrawal to your contributions but not your earnings, there are no penalties or taxes. If you do decide to include Roth earnings in your withdrawal, those funds will be subject to income tax. This is a helpful feature for millennials, who may consider going back to school. Parents can also use a Roth IRA to pay for educational expenses for their children. Keep in mind that money from a Roth IRA could impact financial aid calculations. And of course, any money taken out for college means less money in the account for retirement.</p> <h2>5. You can get cash quickly in an emergency</h2> <p>It's not the best idea to withdraw money from a retirement account, because you'll lose out on the potential investment gains from the cash you take out. But, you are permitted to take out <em>your contributions</em> from a Roth IRA without penalty at any time. This makes them potentially useful as emergency savings accounts.</p> <p>Just remember it's only the money you put into the account, not the gains, that can be taken out penalty-free. When you're young and not earning much, it helps to have funds that you can tap whenever a crisis arises. Just don't get in the habit of using a Roth IRA this way too often; the account is meant for long-term investment gains and will benefit you the most if you leave your money alone to grow. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-your-roth-ira-as-an-emergency-fund-ever-a-good-idea?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Using Your Roth IRA as an Emergency Fund &mdash; Ever a Good Idea?</a>)</p> <h2>6. You can keep contributing for as long as you want</h2> <p>If you are a millennial, it's impossible to know when you will retire. You may choose to retire at age 60, or keep working until you're 100. Thus, it makes sense to have an investment account that will let you contribute for as long as you want.</p> <p>One of the nice things about a Roth IRA is that you will not be forced to make withdrawals at any time. This is in contrast to traditional IRAs, which require you to begin pulling out money by age 70&frac12;. (This assumes, of course, that rules don't change between now and then.)</p> <p><em>(Editor's note: An eagle-eyed reader pointed out that any Roth earnings used to pay for education would be subject to income taxes. We've corrected the text to reflect that.)</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-every-millennial-needs-a-roth-ira">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-your-roth-ira-as-an-emergency-fund-ever-a-good-idea">Using Your Roth IRA as an Emergency Fund — Ever a Good Idea?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-your-retirement-is-on-track">8 Signs Your Retirement Is on Track</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-thing-will-get-you-to-1-million-tax-free">This One Thing Will Get You to $1 Million (Tax-Free!)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-moves-for-retirement">8 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Moves for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) contributions emergency funds investing millennials Roth IRA self employed tax advantaged withdrawals Thu, 01 Jun 2017 09:00:11 +0000 Tim Lemke 1957901 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Retirement Accounts You Don't Need a Ton of Money to Open http://www.wisebread.com/5-retirement-accounts-you-dont-need-a-ton-of-money-to-open <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-retirement-accounts-you-dont-need-a-ton-of-money-to-open" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-614527864.jpg" alt="Finding retirement accounts you don&#039;t need a ton of money to open" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When I graduated from school and started working, my parents and friends told me repeatedly how important it was to start saving for retirement. But when I looked into opening an account, most institutions required $1,000 or more to get started. I didn't have that much money to set aside, and it seemed so overwhelming. So I didn't open an account until years later.</p> <p>I'm kicking myself for it. The earlier you start saving for retirement, the more compound interest it builds and the less you need to invest to retire comfortably. I missed out on years of interest because I was too intimidated by account minimums, and didn't think of alternatives. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Signs You Aren't Saving Enough for Retirement</a>)</p> <p>Instead of making my same mistakes, you can start saving for retirement today by opening a Roth IRA. Below, find out why Roth IRAs are such a useful option and where you can open one without a lot of startup cash. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-a-roth-ira-may-be-better-than-your-401k?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Reasons Why a Roth IRA May be Better Than Your 401(k)</a>)</p> <h2>What is a Roth IRA?</h2> <p>If you're just starting out, don't have access to a 401(k), or want to supplement your retirement nest egg, a Roth IRA is a fantastic savings vehicle.</p> <p>Unlike a 401(k), where you make your retirement contributions with pretax dollars, with a Roth you contribute your after-tax income. While that means you don't get an upfront tax break, you won't owe money on account withdrawals once you retire. You already paid taxes, so you can take out the money free and clear.</p> <p>A Roth IRA is a perfect tool for young people just starting out. Because your contributions are made after taxes, you can take out the principal from the Roth IRA in the case of an emergency without owing any penalties or fees. While you should never touch your retirement savings except in the most dire of circumstances, having money in a Roth IRA can give you additional peace of mind. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-your-roth-ira-as-an-emergency-fund-ever-a-good-idea?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Using Your Roth IRA as an Emergency Fund &mdash; Ever a Good Idea?</a>)</p> <h2>Roth IRAs with low minimums</h2> <p>While many institutions require a minimum investment of $1,000 or more to open an account, there are several reputable firms where you can open a Roth IRA without a minimum investment.</p> <h3>1. TD Ameritrade</h3> <p><a href="http://www.dpbolvw.net/click-2822544-12012738" target="_blank">TD Ameritrade</a> does not charge any setup, low-balance, or annual fees for Roth IRAs, and they do not have a minimum startup investment. You can open an account with just a few dollars. There are commission and brokerage fees, but TD AmeriTrade's fees are low compared to other big-name banks and brokerage firms.</p> <h3>2. Capital One</h3> <p><a href="https://www.capitaloneinvesting.com/main/retirement/individual-retirement/choose-investments-SB-360.aspx?intcmp=10001038" target="_blank">Capital One</a> is one of the oldest online brokerage firms around, and they offer low fees and automatic contribution and investment options. There are no minimums to open a Roth IRA and they do not charge inactivity fees, but you do need to be a Capital One 360 customer. If you have a checking or savings account with Capital One, you can sync your account so you can view them all at once and make contributions or withdrawals between them.</p> <h3>3. Scottrade</h3> <p>With <a href="https://www.scottrade.com/investment-products/ira/roth-ira.html" target="_blank">Scottrade</a>, you can open a Roth IRA with no minimum investment, zero account maintenance fees, and trades for as little as $7 each. You can invest in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and exchange-traded funds (ETFs).</p> <h3>4. Merrill Edge</h3> <p><a href="https://www.merrilledge.com/retirement/ira" target="_blank">Merrill Edge</a> offers Roth IRAs with no minimum investment. Ranked #1 in Kiplinger's Best Online Brokers list in 2016, the company charges just $6.95 a trade. And right now, they're offering up to $600 in cash bonuses to new investors who open an account.</p> <h3>5. Betterment</h3> <p>If you are a hands-off investor and would like help choosing and managing your investments, <a href="https://track.flexlinkspro.com/a.ashx?foid=1029882.2101559&amp;foc=1&amp;fot=9999&amp;fos=1" target="_blank">Betterment</a> may be for you. It's a robo-adviser company that assesses your financial situation, goals, and risk tolerance and calculates an investing strategy for you. There is no account minimum, and the management fee ranges from 0.25&ndash;0.50 percent.</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-trust-your-money-with-these-4-popular-financial-robo-advisers?ref=seealso2" target="_blank">Should You Trust Your Money With These 4 Popular Financial Robo-Advisers?</a></p> <h2>Start investing</h2> <p>If you've been putting off opening up a retirement account because you thought you didn't have enough money, know that there are plenty of options, and a Roth IRA is a great place to start. Opening an account and starting the saving habit now &mdash; even just a little at a time &mdash; will pay off over the long-term.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kat-tretina">Kat Tretina</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-retirement-accounts-you-dont-need-a-ton-of-money-to-open">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-warning-signs-youre-sabotaging-your-nest-egg">6 Warning Signs You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Nest Egg</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-moves-for-retirement">8 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Moves for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation">4 Ways to Protect Your Retirement From Inflation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-roadblocks-to-retirement-and-how-to-clear-them">7 Roadblocks to Retirement (And How to Clear Them)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement">10 Signs You Aren&#039;t Saving Enough for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement accounts after-tax dollars low minimums nest egg Roth IRA savings goals Mon, 24 Apr 2017 08:00:10 +0000 Kat Tretina 1930983 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Stocks Your Kids Would Love to Own http://www.wisebread.com/5-stocks-your-kids-would-love-to-own <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-stocks-your-kids-would-love-to-own" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-525331477.jpg" alt="Learning which stocks your kids would love to own" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When taking a look at your 401(k) or investment accounts, you may often daydream about how cool it would have been if you started investing earlier. That way, maybe you could have jumped on investments that turned out to be home runs, such as Apple [Nasdaq: APPL] and Berkshire-Hathaway [NYSE: BRK].</p> <p>If you have children, you're blessed with the opportunity of granting them the greatest gift any investor could want: time. Let's take a look at some companies whose shares would make a great gift for your kids to not only help them learn about investing, but also get them excited about money and business in general.</p> <h2>1. Snap Inc. [NYSE: SNAP]</h2> <p>Do you know what's cooler than a million dollars? $3.4 billion, which is how much money the parent company of Snapchat raised in its March 1, 2017 initial public offering (IPO). Since it has been estimated that <a href="https://blog.hootsuite.com/snapchat-demographics/" target="_blank">60 percent of Snapchat users</a> are under age 25 and nearly one in four hasn't finished high school, there's a very good chance that your children use this popular social media app.</p> <p>Leverage their interest in the app to keep them focused on tracking a stock price and keeping abreast of the effects of company announcements, such as <a href="http://www.recode.net/2016/9/24/13039900/snapchat-spectacles-google-glass-spiegel" target="_blank">Snap's Spectacles</a>, on the valuation of a publicly-traded company. Bonus: You could use Snapchat to send them their monthly allowance, keep a digital record of when you made that money available, and check how long it lasts them. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-modern-ways-to-send-money-to-your-kid?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Modern Ways to Send Money to Your Kid</a>)</p> <h2>2. The Walt Disney Co. [NYSE: DIS]</h2> <p>&quot;Do you want to buy a stock share? Come on let's go and trade!&quot; If you started reading that in Princess Anna's voice, then you're a Disney parent and your kiddos spend a lot of time singing along to similar tunes. Keeping interested in this stock is easy because your kids will read about movie productions, toy developments, theme park construction, and other family entertainment projects.</p> <p>Disney is a great stock to hold onto for the long run, which is a maxim that you want to instill in any young investor. If you were to have held Disney stock from March 1, 2007 to March 1, 2017, you would have seen the stock price go from $34.39 to $111.04 (a 222.88 percent increase!). Plus, it's a dividend-paying stock, giving you a segue to introduce the concept of fixed income securities. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-are-income-stocks?ref=seealso" target="_blank">What Are Income Stocks?</a>)</p> <h2>3. Amazon.com, Inc. [Nasdaq: AMZN]</h2> <p>Parcel-delivering drones, robots that work in warehouses, and voice-activated speakers that can control other home devices. It'll never be dull moment chatting with your kid about recent news from the Seattle-based ecommerce giant.</p> <p>If you have the budget, Amazon.com is one of those <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-expensive-stocks-that-are-totally-worth-it" target="_blank">expensive stocks that are totally worth it</a>. Just when you think that the stock can't hit new heights, an uptick during the early November and December holiday season gives the stock price another boost. Time your gift well before the holiday season and provide immediate gratification to your kids from a stock price bump.</p> <h2>4. Foot Locker, Inc. [NYSE: FL]</h2> <p>On the other hand, here's one stock to develop in your children an appreciation for delayed gratification. If your kid is a sneakerhead or sports jock, they'll include a new pair of athletic shoes in their Christmas list. With a current stock price close to $75 per share, one share of Foot Locker goes for about the same as a brand-new, high-quality pair of athletic shoes meant to last at least one year.</p> <p>Give your child the option of the shoes or one share of Foot Locker, Inc. (Or pick another company that better matches the price of the shoes that they want, including Nike Inc. [NYSE: NKE] or Skechers USA Inc. [NYSE: SKX].) When your child chooses the stock over the shoes, they'll realize that they'll have more available after a one-year period. If they're still unconvinced, ask them to try selling a pair of old, smelly shoes after one year of (ab)use from a tween.</p> <p>Setting a strong foundation for delayed gratification will boost your child's ability to save for retirement and build an emergency fund. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-investing-lessons-you-must-teach-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Investing Lessons You Must Teach Your Kids</a>)</p> <h2>5. Tesla Inc. [Nasdaq: TSLA]</h2> <p>The concept of saving for retirement is completely foreign to most individuals under age 18, maybe even for some under age 25! Getting somebody to plan about 40 to 60 years ahead is a difficult task. One way to get your kid thinking about the future with a fun and optimistic tone is to gift them stock from Tesla, because this company is in the business of electric cars, energy storage batteries, and solar panels.</p> <p>Plus, Tesla's CEO Elon Musk is so cool as to inspire the way actor Robert Downey Jr. plays Tony Stark in all Marvel films. By following the decisions of a cool and smart CEO, your child could gain further interest in business and entrepreneurship.</p> <h2>How custodial Roth IRAs can help with investing education</h2> <p>If your kid is under age 18 and makes some money on their own, such as through a hobby or during the summer, consider opening a custodial Roth IRA for them. This is a great way to educate your child about investing and providing a &quot;sandbox&quot; in which to make real-life decisions with investments. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/does-your-kid-need-an-ira?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Does Your Kid Need an IRA?</a>)</p> <p>In 2017, your kid could contribute up to $5,500 to a custodial Roth IRA and watch those contributions grow tax-free forever. Many financial institutions require an account minimum of $100 to open a custodial Roth IRA. You could start with some stocks from this list or other stocks that your kid is interested in and eventually move on to index funds and mutual funds. To minimize fees, just keep post-contribution transactions at a minimum.</p> <p>Gifting your child stocks paired with several years of retirement savings could be one of the best gifts you could ever give them for a brighter financial future.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-stocks-your-kids-would-love-to-own">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists">Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-be-fooled-by-an-investments-rate-of-return">Don&#039;t Be Fooled by an Investment&#039;s Rate of Return</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market">How the Risk Averse Can Get Into the Stock Market</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment children fun stocks gifts kids money lessons Roth IRA stock market stocks young investors Fri, 14 Apr 2017 08:30:13 +0000 Damian Davila 1925374 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Smart Places to Stash Your Kid's College Savings http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-604338428.jpg" alt="Finding places to stash a kid&#039;s college savings" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you're hoping to save the tens of thousands of dollars needed to send your children to college, you'll need to do more than stash money in a savings account. To accumulate enough cash to stave off future student loan debt, you'll probably need to invest, and do so over a long enough time horizon.</p> <p>The good news is that there are several investment vehicles out there that can help you save money while also offering some tax advantages. Some are designed specifically for college savings, while others have different purposes but can be used to help with education costs.</p> <p>When saving for college, consider stashing your money in one (or a combination) of these places.</p> <h2>1. A 529 Plan</h2> <p>Any conversation about college savings should begin with a 529 plan. These are investment plans offered by states that allow you to invest money tax-free, as long as the funds eventually go to college expenses. You can open a 529 plan as soon as a child is born and in many cases, begin contributing as little as $25 a month. In addition to seeing investments grow without fear of paying taxes later, you can also get matching contributions and additional tax benefits from some states. In most cases, there are no restrictions on which college a beneficiary can attend. A child enrolled Maryland's college savings plan, for example, can use funds to attend school in Ohio. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-state-529-college-savings-plans?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 9 Best State 529 College Savings Plans</a>)</p> <p>Most 529 plans offer a menu of mutual funds to invest in, though you may find your options limited to target date funds with relatively high fees. And it's important to note that if you don't use the funds for college expenses, you'll pay taxes and a 10% penalty.</p> <h2>2. Coverdell ESA</h2> <p>A Coverdell Education Savings Account is similar to a 529, in that you can invest money and will not see taxes on the gains. The advantage of a Coverdell is that you can invest in just about anything, and the money can be used for any educational expenses, not just college (even tuition for private high schools or grade schools would qualify).</p> <p>There is a $2,000 annual limit on Coverdell accounts, however, so it's unlikely you'll be able to save for the full bulk of college costs. There are also income limits, as those individuals with a gross income of $110,000 (or $220,000 for parents filing jointly) can't open Coverdell accounts.</p> <h2>3. Taxable Brokerage Account</h2> <p>It's smart to look at other options before exploring a regular brokerage account to save for your kids' education. But it is one option that has some advantages over other accounts.</p> <p>The main downside is that there are no tax advantages when you try to save money in a taxable brokerage account. When you withdraw your money, you'll be stuck with capital gains taxes, and no one is offering to deduct contributions from your taxable income. But, regular brokerage accounts do offer the flexibility of investing in just about anything, so you can seek out investments that have better performance and lower fees. Moreover, there are also no restrictions on how you use the gains, so it's no big deal if your child gets a scholarship or does not attend college.</p> <h2>4. Roth IRA</h2> <p>A Roth Individual Retirement Account isn't designed for college savings, but it can be used for that purpose. Under a Roth IRA, any money can be withdrawn tax-free at age 59 &frac12;, so if you happen to have a college-aged child at that time, you can use that money for education with no penalty. Investors are also allowed to withdraw the contributions (but not the gains) without penalty at any time.</p> <p>A Roth IRA will generally offer more investment options than a 529 plan, though for people under 50, there is an annual contribution limit of $5,500. If you do use a Roth IRA for college expenses, it's important to remember that saving for retirement should remain a priority over saving for college. So it's advisable to use this account for education expenses only if you have additional plans for your retirement savings.</p> <h2>5. Municipal Bonds</h2> <p>If you're seeking some tax advantages as well as safety, municipal bonds can be a good option for college savings. You won't earn as much going this route, but you may still be able to accumulate enough for college if you start early and contribute regularly.</p> <p>Municipal bonds are nice because they are tax-free, and don't come with the volatility of stocks. Muni bonds with strong ratings can earn you a tax equivalent return of between 5% and 6%, which is quite solid. If you invest $5,000 annually into these kinds of bonds, you'll have well over $100,000 by the time the kids head off to school.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira">Yes, You Can Pay for Education With an IRA</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-save-for-college-using-a-529-prepaid-tuition-plan">Should You Save for College Using a 529 Prepaid Tuition Plan?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-state-529-college-savings-plans">The 9 Best State 529 College Savings Plans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-too-much-money-for-a-college-fund-is-a-bad-idea">Why Saving Too Much Money for a College Fund Is a Bad Idea</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/does-your-kid-need-an-ira">Does Your Kid Need an IRA?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Investment 529 plans brokerage accounts college Coverdell ESA kids municipal bonds Roth IRA saving money Wed, 15 Feb 2017 11:00:11 +0000 Tim Lemke 1887743 at http://www.wisebread.com Using Your Roth IRA as an Emergency Fund — Ever a Good Idea? http://www.wisebread.com/using-your-roth-ira-as-an-emergency-fund-ever-a-good-idea <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/using-your-roth-ira-as-an-emergency-fund-ever-a-good-idea" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_piggy_bank_73354919.jpg" alt="Woman using Roth IRA as emergency fund" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You know you need an emergency fund, that pool of savings that you can dip into to cover the costs of replacing everything from a burst water heater to your car's blown transmission. But does it ever make sense to use a Roth IRA as that emergency fund?</p> <p>The short answer? It might. If you're careful about your withdrawals.</p> <p>You usually think about Roth IRAs as retirement vehicles. But with a Roth IRA, you can also withdraw from your <em>contributions </em>at any time without penalty, even if you are younger than 59 &frac12;. That's because you've already paid taxes on your contributions.</p> <h2>No Penalties From Contribution Withdrawals</h2> <p>Because of this quirk, a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-a-roth-ira-may-be-better-than-your-401k" target="_blank">Roth IRA can work as an emergency fund</a> <em>and</em> retirement fund at the same time. You make your yearly deposits &mdash; for 2016, you can contribute a maximum of $5,500 every year into a Roth IRA (unless you are 50 or older, in which case you can contribute a maximum of $6,500 a year) &mdash; and watch that money grow as you near retirement. But if an expensive emergency comes up, you can withdraw the funds you need, as long as what you are withdrawing is coming from the money you contributed to your Roth IRA, and not from the dollars that those contributions have earned.</p> <h2>You'll Pay for Earnings Withdrawals</h2> <p>In other words, withdrawing your contributions is never penalized. Withdrawing from your Roth IRA's earnings, though, will leave you with a penalty and a tax hit. If you withdraw the money that your Roth IRA has earned before you hit the age of 59 &frac12; &mdash; aside from a few special circumstances &mdash; you'll not only pay taxes on those dollars, you'll also have to pay a penalty of 10% of whatever you withdraw.</p> <p>Say you withdraw $2,000 worth of earnings on your Roth IRA before you turn 59 &frac12;. Not only will you have to pay taxes on that money, you'll also have to pay a penalty of $200.</p> <p>Fortunately, it's not easy to withdraw your earnings too early. You'll have to request the withdrawal from your brokerage, mutual fund, or bank. These financial institutions will know if your withdrawal request is high enough to cut into your earnings. If this does happen, it's best to find an alternative source of funds, unless you are not bothered by the idea of paying extra taxes or an additional penalty.</p> <h2>The Annual Cap Means You Can't Pay It Back</h2> <p>There is another disadvantage to using a Roth IRA as an emergency fund. Say you withdraw $2,500 to buy a new furnace. You can still only contribute your maximum to your Roth IRA each year.</p> <p>If you can only contribute $5,500 each year, you can't make up for that $2,500 withdrawal by contributing $7,000 instead. This could slow the pace of your retirement savings.</p> <p>You'll also need to be careful with your investments if you plan on using your Roth IRA as an emergency fund. You should place your money in safer, more conservative investment vehicles such as CDs and bonds. That way, the odds are greater that more of your money will be available in case of a financial emergency.</p> <p>Whether you use a Roth IRA, a traditional savings account, or some other savings vehicle as your emergency fund, one factor doesn't change: You need to build and maintain that fund. How much money you need in your emergency fund varies, but most financial experts recommend that you have at least six months of daily living expenses saved up. More, of course, is even better.</p> <p><em>Have you ever pulled money from a Roth IRA to cover an emergency? Would You?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-your-roth-ira-as-an-emergency-fund-ever-a-good-idea">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-every-millennial-needs-a-roth-ira">6 Reasons Every Millennial Needs a Roth IRA</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-every-new-college-student-should-make">7 Money Moves Every New College Student Should Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira">Yes, You Can Pay for Education With an IRA</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/its-so-simple-6-steps-to-a-stable-retirement">It&#039;s So Simple: 6 Steps to a Stable Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-steps-to-starting-a-retirement-plan-in-your-30s">8 Steps to Starting a Retirement Plan in Your 30s</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Retirement borrowing contributions emergency funds Roth IRA savings withdrawals Thu, 16 Jun 2016 09:30:21 +0000 Dan Rafter 1731947 at http://www.wisebread.com A Simple Guide to Rolling Over All of Your 401Ks and IRAs http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-guide-to-rolling-over-all-of-your-401ks-and-iras <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/a-simple-guide-to-rolling-over-all-of-your-401ks-and-iras" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/retirement_fund_jar_000061741674.jpg" alt="How to roll over all of your 401ks and IRAs" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The median number of years that U.S. workers <a href="http://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/tenure_09182014.htm">stick with their current employer</a> is 4.6 years, according to U.S. Department of Labor. This means that sooner or later you're bound to quit, get fired, or get laid off from your current job. To avoid steep transaction fees, early distribution taxes, or losing retirement account contributions, you need to be ready to roll over your hard-earned nest egg when the time comes.</p> <h2>Establish How Much You Really Have</h2> <p>The first step is to determine the current balance of your 401K or IRA. While you'll eventually receive a separation from employment notice from your previous employer stating your total vested account balance, you can save time by researching your vested balance, net of any 401K loan balances you may owe.</p> <h3>Take Care of Any Outstanding Loans From Your 401K</h3> <p>Unlike IRAs, many 401K plans offer the option to take loans from your retirement account. As long as you keep up with your payment schedule, you generally have up to five years to pay back your loan in full. However, when you change jobs, the unpaid loan balance becomes due within 60 days.</p> <p>Any unpaid loan monies by the deadline or transaction date of your rollover are subject to federal income tax, a 10% early distribution penalty for those age 59 1/2 and under, and state income tax or penalty, if applicable. You can't roll over unpaid 401K loans.</p> <h3>Know the Vesting Schedule</h3> <p>Your own contributions to your 401K or IRA are always fully vested. However, contributions from your employer to your retirement account may be subject to a vesting schedule. Trying to retain top talent as long as possible, employers may require a minimum period of employment before employees gain full control on part of their retirement accounts. The two most common vesting schedules are <em>cliff vesting</em> (100% vesting is only provided after a set number of years) and <em>graded vesting</em> (a vested percentage is provided every year).</p> <p>When you separate from your employer, you forgo any non-vested contributions to your retirement account.</p> <p>Once you know your outstanding loan balance and vesting schedule, you have a clear idea of how much you can rollover.</p> <h2>Choose Rollover Options</h2> <p>Under most scenarios, you have six options for your total vested account balance:</p> <ol> <li>Keep your account;</li> <li>Rollover account into a new or existing IRA;</li> <li>Rollover account into a new or existing qualified plan;</li> <li>Do an indirect rollover;</li> <li>Request a full cash-out of your account; or</li> <li>Do a mix of the above five options.</li> </ol> <p>Let's analyze each one of these scenarios, because some of them may trigger taxes.</p> <h3>1. Keep Your Account</h3> <p>All retirement accounts stipulate a minimum amount required to remain in your old employer's plan, usually ranging from $1,000 to $5,000. If you're happy with your current financial provider, you can choose to keep the account.</p> <p>Make sure to read the fine print because some providers may strip away some services (such as certain investment options or coverage of fees) and gain the right to convert your 401K into an IRA without your input. According to a Plan Sponsor Council of America survey of 613 plans with eight million participants, 57% of 401K plans transfer balances between $1,000 and $5,000 to an IRA when the participant leaves the employer.</p> <p>While such forced-transfer IRAs don't trigger early withdrawal penalties or income taxes, they are often subject to high fees and low investment returns. A November 2014 report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that forced-transfer IRAs <a href="http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/667151.pdf">have administrative fees</a>, ranging from $0 to $100 or more to open the account, and $0 to $115 annually to retain the account.</p> <h3>2. Rollover Account Into a New or Existing IRA</h3> <p>Whether you have a 401K or IRA, your current provider will provide you the option to request a rollover to an existing IRA, or open a new one through any of their partner institutions. Either option triggers no income taxes or distribution penalties. Under this scenario, keep in mind that you're not bound to the offerings from your old employer's financial institution and have the option to shop around for a new IRA with other financial institutions, as well.</p> <p>There are two types of IRAs: traditional IRA and Roth IRA. The main difference between them is that you pay taxes up front with the Roth IRA, and that you pay taxes at withdrawal with the traditional IRA. One of the advantages of owning an IRA is that there are many penalty-free ways to withdraw money from your retirement account before age 59 1/2. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-penalty-free-ways-to-withdraw-money-from-your-retirement-account?ref=seealso">7 Penalty-Free Ways to Withdraw Money From Your Retirement Account</a>)</p> <h3>3. Rollover Account Into a New or Existing Qualified Plan</h3> <p>Besides an IRA, you can also rollover your retirement account into a 401K, 403(b), 457, Federal Thrift Savings Plan, or employer qualified plan, as long as the target plan allows those funds. Rollovers into new or existing qualified plans trigger no income taxes or early distribution fees.</p> <p>The IRS provides a useful <a href="https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-tege/rollover_chart.pdf">rollover chart</a> to determine to which accounts you can rollover retirement contributions. However, the most surefire way to find out is by contacting your plan's customer service center.</p> <h3>4. Do an Indirect Rollover</h3> <p>Direct rollovers are only possible if you already have a retirement account with a previous or new employer or are able to open a new plan on your own. In the event that you think that you can find a new job offering a retirement account within 60 days, then you could try to do an indirect rollover.</p> <p>Your old employer would cut you a check, withholding the necessary 20% for income tax purposes. Once you have a qualified plan with your new employer, you would deposit the check in full and add the 20% withholding out of pocket. The IRS will return you the 20% withholding when you file your tax return. Make sure to deposit the full amount because any gap is subject to applicable income taxes and penalties for those age 59 1/2 and under.</p> <h3>5. Request a Full Cash-Out of Your Account</h3> <p>This is the least desirable of all options because not only do you pay incomes taxes and trigger early distribution fees, but also forgo investment returns. At age 20, a $600 balance on a 401K may not seem like much. However, assuming an investment return of 6% compounded annually and a target retirement age of 65, you would be saying goodbye to an extra $8,258.77 for your nest egg.</p> <p>Every year you have a ceiling on how you much contribute to your 401K or IRA. By cashing out that past contribution, you'll never be able to make it up.</p> <h3>6. Do a Mix of the Previous Options</h3> <p>Depending on your unique situation and set of rules from your old and new retirement accounts, you could use portions of your old account for different purposes. For example, you could cash out 10% of your vested account balance, subject to income taxes and early distribution penalties when age 59 1/2 and under, and rollover 90% of vested account balance to an IRA.</p> <p>Doing a mix of rollover options requires careful planning and plenty of legwork, but it may provide the solution that is better suited to your financial goals.</p> <h2>The Bottom Line</h2> <p>Knowing how to rollover your 401K or IRA is a skill that you'll use many times throughout your work years. The process is relatively simple but requires many steps. Before rolling over funds, make sure to plan ahead by minimizing loans from your 401K and maximizing total vested balance. Contact your old and new plan managers so that you are aware of all applicable rules and can make an informed decision. Keep an eye on the deadline for a rollover so that you're not forced to take a cash-out or forced to transfer to a high-fee IRA.</p> <p><em>Have you ever rolled over your 401K or IRA? How did you do it?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-guide-to-rolling-over-all-of-your-401ks-and-iras">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-a-roth-ira-may-be-better-than-your-401k">4 Reasons Why a Roth IRA May be Better Than Your 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-warning-signs-youre-sabotaging-your-nest-egg">6 Warning Signs You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Nest Egg</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-penalty-free-ways-to-withdraw-money-from-your-retirement-account">7 Penalty-Free Ways to Withdraw Money From Your Retirement Account</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement">10 Signs You Aren&#039;t Saving Enough for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401k cash out employers IRA outstanding loans rolling over Roth IRA vesting schedule Wed, 18 May 2016 09:00:08 +0000 Damian Davila 1709866 at http://www.wisebread.com Does Your Kid Need an IRA? http://www.wisebread.com/does-your-kid-need-an-ira <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/does-your-kid-need-an-ira" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/child_piggy_bank_000073782665.jpg" alt="Child needs an IRA and here&#039;s how to set one up" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's a big day when you open a savings account for your child, but opening an investment account on their behalf takes the financial conversation to a whole new level &mdash; especially when you <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-a-roth-ira-may-be-better-than-your-401k" target="_blank">invest through a Roth IRA</a>. Here are a few reasons why your kid needs one.</p> <h2>1. They'll Learn About Investing &mdash; And More</h2> <p>Investing is arguably the most complicated and intimidating aspect of money management, so the earlier you get your kids acclimated to the process, the better.</p> <p>You could open a plain old investment account for them, but investing through a Roth IRA provides powerful additional benefits by teaching them about (and saving them) taxes.</p> <h2>2. They Start Saving for Big Purchases &mdash; Like College or a House</h2> <p>A Roth IRA is a flexible, tax-efficient way to invest. Contributions can be withdrawn at any time without taxes or penalties. Earnings can be withdrawn on the same basis as well if the account has been open for at least five years and the money is used for qualified college expenses or a first-time home purchase (up to $10,000).</p> <p>Of course, the Roth really shines as a retirement savings vehicle. All of the money &mdash; contributions and earnings &mdash; can be withdrawn tax- and penalty-free after age 59&frac12;, and the benefit of those tax-free earnings really adds up over time. So, if your child has another way to pay for college and a house, all the better to keep adding to the account and let it build for later life. But it's nice to have the flexibility to pull money out earlier if needed for college or a house.</p> <h2>3. They'll Still Be Eligible for Financial Aid</h2> <p>Money held in an IRA, whether owned by a parent or a child, does <em>not</em> impact the financial aid calculation, at least not <em>initially. </em>By contrast, 20% of the money a student holds in a taxable investment account will reduce the financial aid they're eligible for.</p> <p>However, if money is withdrawn from an IRA to pay for college, that money <em>will </em>reduce financial aid. It's treated as income, 50% of which is considered to be available to pay for school. One workaround is to use such money only to pay for the last year of school since no aid will be required the following year.</p> <h2>How to Set Up an IRA for a Minor</h2> <p>Setting up a Roth for a kid is as straightforward as setting one up for yourself, but there are a couple of wrinkles to be aware of.</p> <h3>Qualifying for an Account</h3> <p>A child has to have earned income in order to qualify for an IRA, which can come from a job or their own self-employment efforts, such as babysitting, mowing lawns, shoveling snow, pet walking, and more.</p> <p>As long as the child meets the income qualification, they don't have to contribute their own money; parents or others could make IRA contributions on their behalf. Either way, annual deposits to the account cannot exceed the amount of income earned by the child, and is currently capped at $5,500 per year.</p> <h3>Opening an Account</h3> <p>The account must be set up as a custodial account since you need to be the &quot;age of majority&quot; (18&ndash;21, depending on your state) to have such an account in your own name. Any adult can open a custodial account on behalf of a minor &mdash; a parent, grandparent, other relative, or just a friend of the child. The assets transfer to the young person when he or she reaches the age of majority.</p> <p>Many brokers, including Fidelity, TD Ameritrade, and Schwab, offer custodial IRA accounts with no or very low minimum opening balance requirements.</p> <h3>Funding an Account</h3> <p>As for specific investments to consider after opening an account, mutual funds may not be the best choice since they often require $1,000 or higher minimum investment amounts. You might consider exchange-traded funds (ETFs) instead. They can be purchased one share at a time, offer great diversification, and many brokers, including the ones mentioned above, offer plenty of commission-free ETFs.</p> <p>Opening a Roth IRA for your child is one of the best financial moves you could make. Just be sure to involve them in the process of choosing investments and understanding the tax benefits. That combination of education and hands-on experience will set them on a path toward becoming a knowledgeable, confident, successful investor.</p> <p><em>Have you opened an IRA for a child?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/does-your-kid-need-an-ira">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings">5 Smart Places to Stash Your Kid&#039;s College Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-start-a-family-before-reaching-these-5-money-goals">Don&#039;t Start a Family Before Reaching These 5 Money Goals</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents">How to Save for Retirement While Caring for Kids and Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Investment dependents kids retirement accounts Roth IRA saving money taxes Fri, 22 Apr 2016 10:30:06 +0000 Matt Bell 1693266 at http://www.wisebread.com Which Retirement Account Is Right for You? http://www.wisebread.com/which-retirement-account-is-right-for-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/which-retirement-account-is-right-for-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/retirement_fund_money_000085578577.jpg" alt="Learning if an IRA, 401k, or 40k is right for you" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Saving for retirement is one of the most important things you can do for your future self. With so many options to choose from, how can you decide which type of account to invest your money in? There are a number of differences between an IRA, Roth IRA, and 401K. We've covered some of the most important factors below to get you started.</p> <h2>Roth IRA</h2> <p>Any contributions you make to your Roth IRA are with funds you've already paid taxes on, so your money can grow tax-free from then on. If you make more than $132,000, or $194,000 for married couples filing jointly, then you won't be eligible to contribute to a Roth IRA. There are no required minimum distributions and no age limit for contributions.</p> <p>Maximum contribution amount: $5,500 per year, $6,500 if you're age 50 or older.</p> <p>Tax advantages: Earnings grow tax-free with tax-free withdrawals in retirement.</p> <h2>Traditional IRA</h2> <p>Any contributions you make to your IRA are with funds you haven't been taxed on yet. You will be required to take a minimum distribution at age 70-&frac12;.</p> <p>Maximum contribution amount: $5,500 per year, $6,500 if you're age 50 or older; cannot contribute after age 70-&frac12;.</p> <p>Tax advantages: Contributing to your IRA can lower the amount of income you pay taxes on now. Once you retire, your withdrawals will be taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. If you make withdrawals before age 59-&frac12;, there will be an additional 10% early withdrawal penalty fee added. Certain approved purchases can be withdrawn penalty-free, such as a first home purchase and approved college expenses.</p> <h2>401K</h2> <p>A 401K is a retirement savings plan sponsored by an employer. Any contribution you make to your employer-sponsored deferred contribution retirement plan is made with funds you haven't been taxed on yet.</p> <p>Maximum contribution amount: $18,000 per year, $24,000 if you're age 50 or older.</p> <p>Tax advantages: Contributing to a 401K can lower the amount of income you pay taxes on now. Once you retire, your withdrawals will be taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. If you make withdrawals before age 59-&frac12;, there will be an additional 10% early withdrawal penalty fee added.</p> <h2>Which One Is Best?</h2> <p>If you can only open one account, or only have the funds to contribute to one retirement account, which is the one to go for? Suze Orman is a big proponent of the Roth IRA and calls it &quot;the best retirement investment you can make.&quot; There are also a number of benefits to the Roth IRA.</p> <p>For instance, you can withdraw your contributions (but not the earnings) in emergency situations, without worrying about taxes or penalties. While you don't want to ever withdraw from your retirement accounts, it can provide you with peace of mind knowing that the funds are available to you in an unexpected future emergency situation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-surprising-facts-about-roth-iras?ref=seealso">7 Surprising Facts About Roth IRAs</a>)</p> <p>If you believe you are in a lower tax bracket now than you will be in retirement (like you are just starting your career), a Roth IRA is usually the way to go. With a Roth IRA, you will be investing after-tax funds now, which means you won't be taxed later when you are in a higher tax bracket. On the other hand, if you are near your peak income now, then you will likely be at a lower tax rate in retirement, which favors a traditional IRA or 401K plan. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-roth-iras-are-ideal-for-young-professionals?ref=seealso">Why Roth IRAs Are Ideal for Young Professionals</a>)</p> <p>If your employer offers contribution matching, definitely invest towards that account until you hit the company match limit so that you can benefit from the free money. With both an IRA and 401K, whatever you invest can be deducted from consideration this tax year. This means that you will be taxed on a lower amount, resulting in tax savings now.</p> <h3>Employer-Sponsored Plans</h3> <p>If your employer offers retirement benefits (such as contribution matching), then take advantage of this free money; your future self will thank you for it. You'll want to invest at least as much as the company match.</p> <p>Ask about what sort of 401K, 403(b), 457, or pension plans your employer offers. This will allow you to take advantage of as much of the employer's contribution as possible. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-steps-to-starting-a-retirement-plan-in-your-30s?ref=seealso">8 Steps to Starting a Retirement Plan in Your 30s</a>)</p> <h3>Self-Employed Options</h3> <p>Did you know that 28% of the nearly 15 million self-employed Americans are <a href="http://www.amtd.com/English/newsroom/research-and-story-ideas/Self-Employed-Survey/">not saving for retirement</a> at all? Sure, it can be difficult to set aside money for retirement when you can barely pay your business expenses as it is. However, it is imperative that you save what you can now to take advantage of compound interest and to ensure you are prepared for retirement.</p> <p>Self-employed individuals have <a href="https://www.irs.gov/Retirement-Plans/Retirement-Plans-for-Self-Employed-People">further retirement savings options</a>, such as the SEP-IRA, SIMPLE IRA, and Individual or Solo 401K. These have higher contribution limits so that you can have a more sizable retirement savings. These accounts will allow you to save for retirement, while enjoying an up-front tax break and tax-deferred saving.</p> <h2>When in Doubt, Ask a Pro</h2> <p>If you aren't sure about which retirement account is right for you, it's time to speak with a financial adviser. They can help you make informed decisions based on your financial situation and retirement goals. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-you-need-a-financial-planner?ref=seealso">Do You Need a Financial Planner?</a>)</p> <p><em>Do you have other tips for choosing the right retirement plan? Please share your thoughts in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/which-retirement-account-is-right-for-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira">Yes, You Can Pay for Education With an IRA</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-sep-ira-is-how-the-self-employed-do-retirement-like-a-boss">The SEP-IRA Is How the Self-Employed Do Retirement Like a BOSS</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-guide-to-rolling-over-all-of-your-401ks-and-iras">A Simple Guide to Rolling Over All of Your 401Ks and IRAs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-a-roth-ira-may-be-better-than-your-401k">4 Reasons Why a Roth IRA May be Better Than Your 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401k Roth IRA saving money self-employment traditional ira Thu, 21 Apr 2016 09:30:24 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1691583 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Warning Signs You're Sabotaging Your Nest Egg http://www.wisebread.com/6-warning-signs-youre-sabotaging-your-nest-egg <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-warning-signs-youre-sabotaging-your-nest-egg" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_breaking_piggybank_000048408258.jpg" alt="Man learning signs he&#039;s sabotaging his nest egg" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Depending on how old you are, retirement may seem like a vague, distant goal. Still, <em>even if</em> it's many years off, it's important to pay attention to your retirement savings because the decisions you make now &mdash; whether good or bad &mdash; will be magnified by the power of time. Review the list below to see if you're making any of these mistakes.</p> <h2>1. You Haven't Calculated How Much You Will Need</h2> <p>If you don't know how much you'll need to retire, you probably also don't know how much you'll need to invest right now. There are many simple-to-use, free online retirement planning calculators that can help you calculate these figures easily. Fidelity's <a href="http://personal.fidelity.com/planning/retirement/content/myPlan/index.shtml">myPlan Snapshot</a>, for example, requires just five bits of information to generate a rough estimate of your retirement needs and the monthly contributions needed to achieve your goal.</p> <h2>2. You're Not Saving Enough</h2> <p>If you work for a company that matches some of your 401K plan contributions, you absolutely must take advantage of what basically amounts to free money. (In fact, it's likely the easiest money you'll ever make.) And yet, about 25% of workers who are eligible for a match do not take full advantage of the benefit.</p> <p>Many of today's large employers also use various forms of automation with their retirement plans &mdash; automatic enrollment, automatic investment selection, and more. Having to opt-<em>out </em>if you don't want to participate has proven to generate higher participation levels than opt-<em>in </em>programs. The problem is, those programs tend to use relatively low contributions to start, and most workers never increase that amount.</p> <p>Don't be lulled into a false sense of confidence by automated contributions. Base your contributions on what you feel capable of contributing &mdash; it's likely higher than the automatic contribution amount.</p> <h2>3. You're Not Investing Wisely</h2> <p>The most common investment choice in 401K and similar plans is a target-date retirement fund (TDF). Their popularity is understandable since TDFs take care of some of the most complicated investing decisions for you. Investors simply choose a fund with the year closest to their intended retirement date as part of its name (the Fidelity Freedom 2055 fund, for example, is designed for people who plan to retire between 2053 and 2057). The fund is invested in a way the mutual fund company believes is best for someone with that much time until retirement. Another benefit of target-date funds is that they automatically alter how they invest over time, becoming more conservative as the investor nears retirement age.</p> <p>Still, not all TDFs intended for similar target retirement dates are the same. Some are more aggressive than others. During the financial crisis of 2008&ndash;2009, many people who were invested in 2010 target-date funds, those intended for people right on the cusp of retirement at the time, <a href="https://www.soundmindinvesting.com/articles/view/how-well-do-target-date-funds-perform-in-a-downturn">lost a lot of money</a>. Allocating all of your retirement contributions to a single fund can be risky. At the very least, understand how the target date fund you're considering is designed and make sure you're comfortable with its assumptions.</p> <h2>4. You Haven't Chosen the Right Tax-Advantaged Plan</h2> <p>If you're eligible to participate in a 401K plan, you may have a choice between a traditional or a Roth 401K. If you don't have access to a workplace plan, you probably qualify for an IRA. Again, you'll have your choice between a traditional or a Roth IRA.</p> <p>The key difference has to do with taxes. With a traditional 401K or IRA, the money you contribute is immediately tax-deductible. If you make $50,000 and contribute $5,000, your taxable income becomes $45,000. When you take money out of the account in retirement, you'll owe taxes.</p> <p>With a Roth, it works the other way around. Money you contribute is not tax-deductible. If you make $50,000 and contribute $5,000, your taxable income remains $50,000. However, when you take the money out in retirement, no taxes are due.</p> <p>Choosing the best approach comes down to trying to pay taxes when your income is lowest. So, if you're in the early stages of your career, your income is probably relatively low. Paying taxes on the contributions now by using a Roth would likely make the most sense. If you're at a stage in your career when you are earning a lot, gaining a tax deduction now may make the most sense, pointing you toward a traditional 401K or IRA.</p> <h2>5. You've Taken a Loan, Hardship Withdrawal, or Early Distribution</h2> <p>The main point of building a nest egg is to have to have enough money to live on when you're older. However, IRS rules make it surprisingly easy to take money out of retirement accounts well before retirement.</p> <p>Participants in a 401K plan can typically borrow against their balance or may qualify for a hardship withdrawal. Those using a Roth IRA can withdraw their contributions at any time without penalty, and they can access their earnings if their account has been open for at least five years and the money is used for certain purposes, such as a first-time home purchase or education.</p> <p>However, accessing retirement account money early can be harmful to your financial health. If you have a loan from your 401K and you leave your employer &mdash; whether by your choice or your employer's &mdash; you'll have to repay the full amount of the loan very quickly. And taking money out of any retirement account for any reason other than retirement means that's less money that can avail itself of the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/2-investing-concepts-everyone-should-know">power of compound interest</a>.</p> <h2>6. You Haven't Named Beneficiaries</h2> <p>Failing to name a beneficiary for your 401K account or IRA means that money will become part of your estate upon your death, costing your heirs needless time and money. Simply naming a beneficiary will get the proceeds where you want them to go without the need for probate. Name your beneficiaries properly and your heirs could even turn your account into <em>a </em><a href="https://www.soundmindinvesting.com/articles/view/stretching-your-iras-benefits"><em>stretch IRA</em></a> or 401K, which can greatly maximize the value of your account while minimizing taxes.</p> <p>Even if you're young and retirement is set somewhere in the distant future, when that day comes, you will be glad to have taken care of these details <em>way back when.</em></p> <p><em>Are you making any of these retirement investing mistakes?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-warning-signs-youre-sabotaging-your-nest-egg">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement">10 Signs You Aren&#039;t Saving Enough for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-guide-to-rolling-over-all-of-your-401ks-and-iras">A Simple Guide to Rolling Over All of Your 401Ks and IRAs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-a-roth-ira-may-be-better-than-your-401k">4 Reasons Why a Roth IRA May be Better Than Your 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-moves-that-guarantee-a-great-retirement">4 Moves That Guarantee a Great Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-inventor-of-the-401k-has-second-thoughts-about-your-retirement-plan-now-what">The Inventor of the 401K Has Second Thoughts About Your Retirement Plan — Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401k IRA nest egg retirement calculators Roth IRA Tue, 08 Mar 2016 11:00:13 +0000 Matt Bell 1666378 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Tax-Friendly Ways to Save Beyond Your Retirement Fund http://www.wisebread.com/9-tax-friendly-ways-to-save-beyond-your-retirement-fund <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-tax-friendly-ways-to-save-beyond-your-retirement-fund" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/piggy_bank_cash_000005176239_2.jpg" alt="Learning tax-friendly ways to save beyond retirement fund" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>So you've been taking advantage of your company's 401K plan and have also been placing money in an individual retirement account (IRA). In fact, you've been such a great saver that you've now hit the limit on what you can contribute annually to these tax-advantaged accounts. What to do now?</p> <p>Well, first off, give yourself a huge pat on the back. You've been saving a ton, and have managed to avoid paying too much tax along the way.</p> <p>If you still have money you'd like to stash away, but don't want to give too much to the tax man, there are other investment opportunities for you. Take a look at these nine options for super savers like yourself.</p> <h2>1. 529 Plans</h2> <p>If you have children who may one day attend college, it's a great idea to save for their education using a 529 college savings plans. These plans, which are offered by individual states, have a variety of tax benefits. In most cases, you can place money in an investment account and allow it to grow tax free as long as you use the funds to pay for college. You can also often get a tax deduction on contributions.</p> <h2>2. ESA Coverdell Accounts</h2> <p>These work in similar fashion to 529 plans and Roth IRAs, in that money can be invested and then withdrawn tax free. Coverdell accounts have lower account maximums than 529 plans, but often have more investment options and the money can be used for any education expense, including grade school and high school. The maximum annual contribution per beneficiary is $2,000.</p> <h2>3. Municipal Bonds</h2> <p>It's good to have some bonds in your investment portfolio, and here's a way to help out your state, city, or county raise money for its capital expenditures. &quot;Muni&quot; bonds are usually exempt from taxes, so you get to keep more of your investment. These days, you can buy bonds directly, or get a mix of bonds through a bond mutual fund or ETF.</p> <h2>4. Real Estate</h2> <p>When you buy a house or other piece of property, mortgage interest is often tax deductible. If you sell a home, there is often an exclusion on capital gains up to $500,000 if you're a married couple filing jointly.To take advantage of these breaks, the property must be used as a first or second home in most cases. Also, be sure to itemize your deductions when filing your taxes.</p> <h2>5. Annuities</h2> <p>The idea behind an annuity is that you make investments, and then the annuity makes payments to you at a later date, or a series of dates. The investments grow tax-deferred, and earnings are taxed at your regular income rate. So if you think you'll be in a lower tax bracket upon retirement, you'll save money. Unlike 401K and IRA plans, there are no contribution limits to annuities.</p> <h2>6. Master Limited Partnerships</h2> <p>More experienced investors may find some great tax savings and solid income from MLPs. An individual can buy shares of an MLP just like a stock. Most MLPs are related to energy production, and allow investors to essentially buy &quot;units&quot; of a gas pipeline, or something similar. Income from MLPs are taxed as &quot;return of capital,&quot; so taxes can be deferred. (In essence, you only pay tax when you sell your units.) The taxes on MLPs are complex, but if you are okay with the mountain of paperwork, you may save some money. It's wise to talk to an accountant to get a full understanding of the tax implications before investing in an MLP.</p> <h2>7. Whole Life Insurance</h2> <p>I am not a big fan of whole life insurance as an investment, but there can be some tax advantages to having a policy. It's also an okay option for high earners who have maxed out other accounts. Whole life policies pay a death benefit, which is not usually taxed. Many policies also offer tax-free dividends. If you're interested in whole life insurance, make sure you're capable of paying the annual premiums. And do your homework to make sure that the dividends and growth potential outweigh many common downsides, such as high fees and commissions.</p> <h2>8. Index Funds</h2> <p>If you maxed out the contributions to your retirement plans, any additional investments you want to make will probably have to go into a taxable brokerage account. But that doesn't mean you can't find ways to keep your tax burden relatively low. Index funds are mutual funds that track a specific index, such as the S&amp;P 500. Generally speaking, index fund managers don't have to do a lot of buying and selling, so they aren't passing on a lot of capital gains to you. You'll still have to pay tax when you cash out, so they aren't really &quot;tax advantaged&quot; in the classic sense. But you'll be saving money along the way.</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-steps-to-getting-started-in-the-stock-market-with-index-funds?ref=seealso">How to Get Started with Index Funds</a></p> <h2>9. ETFs</h2> <p>Exchange-traded funds are like mutual funds, in that they usually track a specific index or market sector. But they are more tax efficient than mutual funds, because investors only pay capital gains when they sell the ETF. You won't avoid tax altogether unless the ETF is part of a retirement plan, but your liability will be as low as possible. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-etfs-can-put-more-money-in-your-pocket-than-mutual-funds?ref=seealso">8 Ways ETFs Are a Smart Investment</a>)</p> <p><em>Where are you stashing your savings?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-tax-friendly-ways-to-save-beyond-your-retirement-fund">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/optimize-your-ira-and-401k">Optimize Your IRA and 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-financial-moves-you-will-always-regret">9 Financial Moves You Will Always Regret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-choose-a-financial-planner-yes-you">How To Choose A Financial Planner - Yes You!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-too-much-money-for-a-college-fund-is-a-bad-idea">Why Saving Too Much Money for a College Fund Is a Bad Idea</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance 401k 529 plans ETFs investing MLPs real estate Roth IRA taxes Tue, 03 Nov 2015 13:15:45 +0000 Tim Lemke 1603574 at http://www.wisebread.com This One Thing Will Get You to $1 Million (Tax-Free!) http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-thing-will-get-you-to-1-million-tax-free <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/this-one-thing-will-get-you-to-1-million-tax-free" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/retirement-savings-163904331-small.jpg" alt="retirement savings" title="retirement savings" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="146" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We're surrounded by financial advice, often in the form of lists containing 10 (or 25! or 50!) things you can do to help solve a particular problem. While much of this information is useful, it can also be overwhelming. Where do you begin? On what things should you focus your efforts?</p> <p>I'd suggest starting with the end in mind &mdash; with your ultimate goal &mdash; and let that guide you to the highest priority activities to help you achieve it. For most of us the end goal is financial independence, and that requires accumulating enough wealth to no longer rely on income from a job. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/just-saving-isnt-enough-how-cash-flow-allocation-helps-you-retire?ref=seealso">How Cash Flow Allocation Helps You Retire</a>)</p> <p>Okay, here's where focusing on the highest impact activities comes in. For most Americans, only two financial items generate around 80% of their wealth: real estate and retirement savings. Let's tackle one of them, retirement savings. If you get that one thing right then hundreds of other, lower impact activities won't matter much.</p> <h2>Retirement Savings</h2> <p>So let's begin. What are some typical sources of retirement savings?</p> <ul> <li>Your employer (in the form of a 401(k), 403(b) or similar program, or in rare instances a pension).<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>The government (Social Security retirement payments).<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Yourself.</li> </ul> <p>Unfortunately, the first two sources are becoming increasingly uncertain, so let's narrow our focus even further, on the one retirement savings source where you have complete control: Yourself.</p> <p>IMPORTANT! Before proceeding, I would strongly suggest that if your employer offers a matching 401(k) or similar program that you contribute an amount that gets you the maximum match. What we're addressing in this article will <em>supplement</em> that 401(k) savings plan, if you're lucky enough to have one.</p> <p>Alright, so what one thing that you have control over can get you to $1 million in retirement savings, tax free? Drum roll, please&hellip;.</p> <h2>It's a Roth IRA</h2> <p>Contribute $200 per month into a Roth IRA (where earnings on the account and withdrawals after age 59&frac12; are tax-free).</p> <p>That's it! Simple, isn't it?</p> <p>Actually, yes, it is simple. That's the beauty of it. But it does require meeting a few conditions.</p> <h3>1. Invest the Money in Stocks</h3> <p>You have the option of putting your Roth IRA contributions to work in one or a combination of investments such as bonds, treasuries, CDs, money market funds, and stocks. Unlike bonds, treasuries, and especially CDs or money market funds, stock market returns have historically outpaced inflation by a comfortable margin. Over the past 50 years stock funds invested in large companies have yielded a return of 9.2%. Over the past <a href="http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/perfi/columnist/krantz/story/2011-10-17/rate-of-return-for-stocks/50807868/1">20 years it's been 7.9%</a>. For our purposes, to be conservative I will assume an average return of 7.5%.</p> <h3>2. Stick With It!</h3> <p>Religiously. Even obsessively, if that's what it takes. Make that $200 contribution without exception every month until it becomes automatic. In fact, setting it up as an automatic transfer from each paycheck is the best way to go. That way you never see the money and therefore never miss it.</p> <h3>3. Wait</h3> <p>This is where the magic occurs. After contributing long enough you'll reach a threshold, where your total saved amount starts to achieve a dramatic upward trajectory due to compounding.</p> <h2>The Power of Compounding</h2> <p>To illustrate the magical power of compounding, consider the story of the king and the court jester. Legend has it that a long, long time ago a court jester's heroic act saved his king. The king was so moved by the jester's bravery that he offered to give the jester anything he wanted. The jester asked for one cent, doubled each day for a month. &quot;That's all?&quot; said the king. The wish was granted. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-easy-ways-to-supercharge-your-retirement?ref=seealso">10 Easy Ways to Supercharge Your Retirement</a>)</p> <p>Halfway through the month the balance grew to only $164. But during the final week it started its rapid rise &mdash; it passed the threshold &mdash; and spiked upwards, ending the month at over $5.3 million.</p> <p><img width="605" height="303" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/Whelan Chart.png" alt="" /></p> <p>As you can see in graph, it took some time for the small initial amount to grow. Eventually, though, the balance grew large enough so that with each doubling it started shooting up very rapidly. That's the threshold you want to reach. But to do so you need to start early &mdash; i.e. NOW!</p> <h2>How Long Will It Take?</h2> <p>So, how long are we talking about to reach this magic threshold? If you start at age 21 and your $200 monthly Roth IRA contributions grow at 7.5%, then you will reach $1 million, tax-free, at age 67, which is the current target age for receiving full Social Security retirement benefits if you were born after 1960.</p> <p>What if you were to start saving at age 31 instead of 21? Then your total will only be $360,000. Big difference. That's because you didn't quite reach the threshold where compounding really starts to kick in. But still not bad.</p> <p>Now I'm guessing that not everyone who reads this is 21 years old, so you're probably thinking &quot;What can I do to make up for lost time?&quot; Here are some ideas:</p> <ul> <li>At $200 per month your total annual contribution will be $2,400 but for most households the maximum annual Roth contribution is $5,500, so if you can afford it double your monthly contribution until you're caught up.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If you have money in a savings account, consider transferring up to $3,100 from it to supplement your $2,400 annual amount.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>You can reach your annual contribution limit by transferring money from a tax-deductible account (such as a traditional IRA) to a Roth in the same year. (Check with a financial or tax professional to be sure you understand the rules for this kind of transfer.)<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Getting a tax refund? Put all or a portion of it into the Roth account.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Take advantage of the Roth IRA &quot;float&quot; period, which allows you to count contributions made until April 15th towards the previous year's total.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Over time, as your earnings grow and you can afford more than $200 per month, increase that monthly contribution by $50 or $100 or more. Consider having all or part of your annual raise in salary automatically added to your monthly Roth contribution.</li> </ul> <p>At a time when a slew of financial information and advice seems to be coming at us from all directions it's easy to feel overwhelmed. You don't need to be. Take back control by keeping things simple and focusing on this one activity. As you approach your golden years and reach the threshold, you'll be glad you did.</p> <p><em>Have you taken this one simple step toward putting aside money for retirement?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/keith-whelan">Keith Whelan</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-thing-will-get-you-to-1-million-tax-free">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-why-you-cant-postpone-planning-for-your-retirement-and-how-to-start">This Is Why You Can&#039;t Postpone Planning for Your Retirement (And How to Start)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-every-millennial-needs-a-roth-ira">6 Reasons Every Millennial Needs a Roth IRA</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-silly-reasons-people-dont-invest-but-should">9 Silly Reasons People Don&#039;t Invest (But Should)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-simple-ways-to-boost-an-underperforming-401k">5 Simple Ways to Boost an Underperforming 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement 401(k) compound interest investing Roth IRA saving Mon, 14 Jul 2014 09:00:05 +0000 Keith Whelan 1157120 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Reasons Why You Must Open a Roth IRA Before April 15 http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-you-must-open-a-roth-ira-before-april-15 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-reasons-why-you-must-open-a-roth-ira-before-april-15" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/cash-469987685.jpg" alt="cash" title="cash" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="164" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's that time of year again. While tax season can bring a lot of stress, there are some things you can do to make it pay off for you.</p> <p>One of them is to open a Roth IRA, which is a little <a href="http://www.irs.gov/Retirement-Plans/Traditional-and-Roth-IRAs">different than a traditional IRA</a>. The key difference is that contributions to traditional IRAs are pre-tax, while Roth IRA contributions are after tax. There are a few other differences with respect to withdrawals, but rather than focus on all of that, let's look at four reasons you should consider funding a Roth IRA this year. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-set-up-an-ira-to-build-wealth?ref=seealso">How to Set Up an IRA to Build Wealth</a>)</p> <h2>You Can Double Your Annual Contribution</h2> <p>If you open up a Roth IRA by April 15, you get a great opportunity &mdash; you're still allowed to make a contribution for the previous (2013) tax year.</p> <p>How much?</p> <p>The most you can contribute in 2013, depending on your income and filing status, is $5,500 if you're 49 years old or younger in 2013. But if you're 50 years old or older in 2013, then you're allowed to contribute an additional $1,000, bringing your total to $6,500.</p> <p>But that's just for 2013.</p> <p>In 2014, you can contribute another $5,500 if you're 49 years old or younger in 2014. Similarly, if you're 50 years old or older in 2014, then you're allowed to contribute an additional $1,000 &mdash; again bringing your total to $6,500. (Check out the<a href="http://www.irs.gov/Retirement-Plans/Plan-Participant,-Employee/Retirement-Topics-IRA-Contribution-Limits"> IRS page</a> for more details on contribution limits.)</p> <p>This means that this year, you can potentially put a total of $13,000 towards your Roth IRA to build a financially secure retirement.</p> <p>Don't think that the extra $5,500 for 2013 will make a big difference?</p> <p>If you put the $5,500 in an investment that grows 7% each year, then in 30 years it'll be worth over $41,800. Best of all, if you obey the rules in withdrawing the money, you get to keep all of it and won't have to pay any taxes.</p> <p>What could you do with an extra $41,800?</p> <h2>You'll Have Better Investment Options</h2> <p>A lot of people have employer-sponsored retirement plans, such as a 401(k). Many, however, complain that the investment fund options available to them are poor. Specifically, these funds tend to have high expense ratios, which are the fees that go toward managing the fund. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-a-roth-ira-may-be-better-than-your-401k?ref=seealso">Why a Roth IRA May Be Better Than Your 401(k)</a>)</p> <p>Even though all funds have these fees, they tend to be much higher in employer plans. With a Roth IRA, on the other hand, you can invest with a company that offers funds with much lower costs.</p> <p>For instance, it's not uncommon that funds from employer plans cost around 0.9% each year. If you open up a Roth IRA, however, you can invest with a company that offers funds that cost about 0.2% each year.</p> <p>That small amount makes a big difference over time.</p> <p>Let's say you invest $5,500 each year in a fund that grows by 7% each year. If the fund costs 0.9%, in 30 years you'll have just under $439,000. That's not bad.</p> <p>On the other hand, what if you invest in a lower-cost fund? If you invest $5,500 each year in a fund that grows by 7% each year, but that fund costs only 0.2%, then in 30 years you'll have over $499,000.</p> <p>In other words, a difference of over $60,000. How much would it hurt you to lose $60,000?</p> <h2>You'll Have Tax-Free Money</h2> <p>With a Roth IRA, you contribute money that's already been taxed. But if you follow the withdrawal rules (the main one being to wait until you're 59 &frac12; years old), then you get a huge benefit. That benefit is the pleasure of spending the money &mdash; including the money earned via investments &mdash; without paying taxes. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/one-simple-trick-to-get-the-best-tax-benefit-from-your-retirement-portfolio?ref=seealso">Get the Best Tax Benefit From Your Retirement Portfolio</a>)</p> <p>Let's say you invest $5,500 in a regular, taxable investment account each year, and your money grows by 7% each year. If you're in the 25% tax bracket, in 30 years you'll have just under $402,000.</p> <p>But if you contribute $5,500 in a Roth IRA each year, and your money grows by 7% each year, in 30 years you'll have over $555,000. (Check out<a href="http://www.retiresimply.com/roth-vs-taxable.html"> this calculator</a> to run your own numbers.)</p> <p>In other words, taxes would eat up over $154,000 of your retirement money.</p> <h2>You'll Have Emergency Access to Your Money</h2> <p>Lastly, your contributions (that is, the money that you put into your Roth) can be taken out at any time, free of taxes and penalties. This is not true, however, of earnings on your contributions, which have more complex rules. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-balance-saving-for-retirement-emergency-fund-and-paying-off-debt?ref=seealso">Balancing Retirement Savings, Emergency Fund, and Paying Off Debt</a>)</p> <p>Of course, since this a retirement account, you should only do this in the event of a true emergency. But it's nice to know that some of your money is available if you really need it. This is not the case for most other retirement investments you could put your money in.</p> <p>Remember, tax time doesn't have to be associated only with stress. With opening a Roth IRA, there's a bright side to the season.</p> <p><em>What other reasons for opening up a Roth IRA can you think of?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/darren-wu">Darren Wu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-you-must-open-a-roth-ira-before-april-15">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-meeting-the-2018-401k-contribution-limits-will-brighten-your-future">6 Ways Meeting the 2018 401(k) Contribution Limits Will Brighten Your Future</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-set-up-an-ira-to-build-wealth">How to Set Up an IRA to Build Wealth</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-a-roth-ira-may-be-better-than-your-401k">4 Reasons Why a Roth IRA May be Better Than Your 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-important-things-to-know-about-your-401k-and-ira-in-2016">5 Important Things to Know About Your 401K and IRA in 2016</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/if-you-want-your-401k-to-grow-stop-doing-these-6-things">If You Want Your 401K to Grow, Stop Doing These 6 Things</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement investment IRA Roth IRA taxes Tue, 25 Mar 2014 09:36:14 +0000 Darren Wu 1132830 at http://www.wisebread.com