memories http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/8510/all en-US Stop Losing Your Stuff With These 6 Simple Tricks http://www.wisebread.com/stop-losing-your-stuff-with-these-6-simple-tricks <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stop-losing-your-stuff-with-these-6-simple-tricks" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-504244368.jpg" alt="stop losing stuff with these tricks" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>People who constantly lose stuff live in a cycle of frustration, lost time, and wasted money. Time that could be otherwise productive is dedicated to frantically <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-easy-memory-hacks?ref=internal" target="_blank">seeking misplaced items</a>. Money that could be saved or invested is instead used to replace missing items. It's frustrating and often embarrassing.</p> <p>However, not all is lost. Absentmindedness is not an inescapable curse. You can decrease the frequency of losing things and increase the chances of finding them. Alleviate item loss with some simple tricks.</p> <h2>1. Increase Organization</h2> <p>The simplest, cheapest way to decrease the chances of losing items is to get more organized. Don't simply throw your keys, wallet, cards, or phones onto the nearest flat surface. Try to nail down an area to store each item. Always place the items there when you return home every day.</p> <h2>2. Don't Silence Your Cell Phone</h2> <p>Vibrate or silence should not be the default setting on your phone. Yes, you might need to silence your phone occasionally, but you should change the device to a setting that makes noise as often as you can. If you lose it, you can have a family member or friend call the phone.</p> <p>If you live alone and you own a smartphone, you should download Skype or FaceTime. Both are free communication apps you can use to call the smartphone from your computer or tablet. Just make sure you set the communication app to notify you when it receives a call.</p> <h2>3. &quot;Freeze It&quot; Credit Card</h2> <p>Losing a credit card can be a huge hassle. You need to cancel the card and then wait about a week for a replacement card or pay a small fee for rush shipping.</p> <p>It's a pain &mdash; especially if you're 75% sure you misplaced it somewhere around the house. You might find it if you spend a few hours looking, but every second you spend searching, someone might be gleefully embarking on a shopping spree. The end result is canceling cards that might not be lost.</p> <p>If you switch to a credit card that has the ability to temporarily freeze, you could decrease the chance of fraud and prevent the need to prematurely cancel cards. That can be a huge boon for people who lose track of their cards constantly.</p> <p>Right now the only company that offers that feature is Discover, but I anticipate in the next few years, more credit card and debit cards will begin to offer it as well. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-questions-to-ask-before-accepting-a-credit-card-offer?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Questions to Ask Before Accepting a Credit Card Offer</a>)</p> <h2>4. iPod or Smartphone Wallet Case</h2> <p>If you can't (or won't) carry a wallet or purse around, you should look into purchasing an iPod or smartphone card storage device. The storage devices are either covers or attachments that stick to your phone.</p> <p>This is a great option for people who can't always carry a wallet or purse, especially if they have a history of losing track of their credit or debit cards. The fact that the devices only cost around $5&ndash;$25 dollars makes it a fairly cheap solution.</p> <h2>5. Add Device Trackers</h2> <p>There are a variety of key, wallet, or phone finder devices. The devices typically offer the following functions:</p> <ul> <li>An audio alarm to help individuals locate the item;</li> <li>GPS tracker to find objects that are potentially out of audio range;</li> <li>The ability to ring the phone, even if it's on silent;</li> <li>Alerts when you are separated from an item;</li> </ul> <p>The devices hook onto keyrings, slip into wallet pockets, or are adhesively attached to an object. It's definitely an investment, but it could prevent the loss of an expensive item.</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-bluetooth-trackers?ref=seealso2" target="_blank">Best Trackers for Easily Lost Items</a></p> <h2>6. Wear Clothing With Secure Pockets</h2> <p>Most women's pants either have ridiculously small pockets or no pockets at all. That can make carrying important objects from place to place difficult. And if you prefer not to carry a purse, it could mean that you need to either squash all of your objects into teeny, tiny pockets, or carry them. That can increase the chances of objects falling out of your pockets or placing objects down and forgetting to pick them up. (I've done both multiple times.)</p> <p>Consider adding clothing into your wardrobe that includes larger and secure pockets (ones that zip, for example). This could be a jacket, cargo pants, or utility shirts with hidden pockets. And then there's always the fanny back.&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-losing-your-stuff-with-these-6-simple-tricks">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/maintaining-memories-how-to-save-old-photographs">Maintaining Memories: How to Save Old Photographs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-smart-ways-to-organize-old-photos">12 Smart Ways to Organize Old Photos</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-a-mindfulness-journal-can-fix-your-life">7 Ways a Mindfulness Journal Can Fix Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/reach-your-money-goals-faster-with-a-simple-naming-trick">Reach Your Money Goals Faster With a Simple Naming Trick</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fifteen-minutes-of">Fifteen Minutes of ...</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks Organization improve memory losing stuff lost and found memories memory tricks Wed, 18 Jan 2017 11:00:09 +0000 Samantha Stauf 1876057 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Reasons You Should Splurge on Experiences, Not Things http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-you-should-splurge-on-experiences-not-things <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-reasons-you-should-splurge-on-experiences-not-things" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000078212251_Large.jpg" alt="spending money on an experience" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 1980s might feel like ancient history, but whether or not you lived through the days of big hair, denim, and constantly winding your cassette tapes back with a ballpoint pen, the 1980s staple of excess was pretty much universal. And has been ever since. Accumulating stuff has never been hotter. Think <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003F29D44/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B003F29D44&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=EI2KTCZ32FOCDE3F">Wall Street</a>, and Gordon Gekko's motto, &quot;Greed is good.&quot;</p> <p>Excessive consumption seemed cool in the '80s, but so did mullet haircuts and shoulder pads. Like the mullet, this relentless consumerism should be consigned to history. Because we have evolved, and we now have a better understanding of what makes us happy, and why. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-stop-your-mindless-spending?ref=seealso">5 Ways to Stop Your Mindless Spending</a>)</p> <p>Don't chase stuff, chase experience. It'll make you happier. Here are four reasons why.</p> <h2>Money Doesn't Make You Happy</h2> <p>Song writers have long known that money can't buy you love, and also, that the best things in life are free. And while it's true that there are some ways in which money can&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-money-does-buy-happiness">positively influence our outlook</a> and prospects, this only works up to a certain point.</p> <p>The <a href="http://www-bcf.usc.edu/~easterl/papers/Happiness.pdf">Easterlin Paradox</a> is the classic research into the topic, named after a 1974 book chapter, penned by economist Richard Easterlin. Although the 40 years since then has provided plenty of time for other research to debate the merits of this theory, Easterlin surmised that money makes you happy only to a certain extent. Once basic needs are met, the impact of money on happiness diminishes, and ultimately, an excess of cash can cause stress, too.</p> <p>Views on this idea will vary based on personal experience, and some subsequent research has heartily <a href="http://www.pewglobal.org/2014/10/30/people-in-emerging-markets-catch-up-to-advanced-economies-in-life-satisfaction/">agreed with the original premise</a>, while other researchers have set out to disprove the hypothesis. A 2010 research paper found that <a href="http://www.pnas.org/content/107/38/16489.abstract">$75k is the magic number</a>, after which, income does not directly correlate with happiness. Although we are schooled to equate material things with reaching success, these same items do not lead to emotional wellbeing. All the more reason to use any spare cash to buy experiences, not things.</p> <h2>Stuff Loses Its Appeal &mdash; Memories Do Not</h2> <p>In a 2014 journal article, wonderfully named, &quot;<a href="http://static1.squarespace.com/static/5394dfa6e4b0d7fc44700a04/t/547d571fe4b094d782c0e634/1417500738967/Gilovich+Kumar+%28in+press%29+Always+Have+Paris+Advances.pdf">We'll always have Paris</a>,&quot; psychologists Thomas Gilovich and Amit Kumar explore the longer term impact on happiness from experiences compared to material purchases. Their research found firmly in favor of spending money on experience rather than things.</p> <p>The scientific key to their research is &quot;hedonic adaptation,&quot; meaning that we get used to things we have, and therefore the pleasure we associate with them fades away. If you buy a new tech gadget, for example, you might experience some initial high, but this can be eaten away as the product degrades, as your friends parade their newer versions, and as warranties or repairs add onto the initial cost. After a relatively short time, you're used to having your new toy. The novelty has worn off, and you no longer derive pleasure from it. Hedonic adaptation has set in.</p> <p>On the other hand, that skydive, dream vacation, or meal out with friends lives forever in your memory &mdash; often getting better over time, rather than worse, aided by our natural inclination to remember things fondly with rose-tinted flashbacks.</p> <h2>Experience Is Social</h2> <p>A strong argument in favor of spending money on experiences rather than things is not about the experiences at all. It's about the people we share them with.</p> <p>Experiences are often naturally social events, and they strengthen the bonds with others who make us happy. Also, experiences are better shared than the act of buying stuff. The tales that you share over the dinner table with friends in years to come are much more likely to be about the time Uncle John got sunburnt on vacation, rather than the awesome SUV you drove there in.</p> <h2>Material Success Can Be Transient</h2> <p>Even the very oldest of Millennials joined the workforce only a few years before the Great Recession rocked the world, and for those graduating after, life has been even tougher. It's hardly surprising that Millennials are driving the sharing/gig economy more than any other generation. Research shows that they will value <a href="http://www.goldmansachs.com/our-thinking/pages/millennials/">access to, not ownership</a> of material things, shifting the emphasis away from actual consumption.</p> <p>Growing environmental awareness has its part to play in this shift, but having experienced the struggle of recession firsthand, Millennials are also conscious of the fact that material goods are transient and could be taken from you in an instant. Memories, on the other hand, can not be taken away &mdash; making spending on experiences, rather than things, the natural choice for this generation.</p> <p><em>What do you think? Tell us in the comments.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-you-should-splurge-on-experiences-not-things">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/50-great-things-to-do-with-50">50 Great Things to Do With $50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lower-your-credit-card-interest-rate-and-reduce-your-phone-bill-immediately-and-easily">Lower Your Credit Card Interest Rate and Reduce Your Phone Bill, Immediately and Easily</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/chinese-money-habits-how-my-culture-influences-my-attitudes-toward-money">Chinese Money Habits - How My Culture Influences My Attitudes Toward Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/double-coupons-they-could-cost-you">Double Coupons – They Could Cost You!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sometimes-i-wish-i-had-beautiful-long-blonde-hair-and-ample-cleavage">Sometimes I wish I had beautiful long blonde hair and ample cleavage.</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Shopping events experiences memories special occasions Splurge Thu, 21 Apr 2016 10:01:03 +0000 Claire Millard 1694626 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Ways to Lose the Clutter and Keep the Memories http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-lose-the-clutter-and-keep-the-memories <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-ways-to-lose-the-clutter-and-keep-the-memories" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/couple-digital-tablet-picture-509234135-small.jpg" alt="couple digital photo" title="couple digital photo" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I have a hard time parting with things that hold significant sentimental value. Yeah, they're just sitting around my house, collecting dust, but these things are part of my life, memories of good times, and I don't want to get rid of them. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/toss-it-or-not-5-organizational-tips-from-a-chronic-clutter-bug">Toss It or Not? 5 Organizational Tricks From a Chronic Clutter Bug</a>)</p> <p>Luckily, in the age of technology and how-to articles, there are brilliant compromises to be made that ensure that you're preserving some of the touchstones of your existence without tripping on them all over the place.</p> <p>Take a look at these nine clutter-free ways to preserve your memories, and see if you can't preserve who you are while getting rid of all that stuff.</p> <h2>1. Snap Photos With Stuff You're Tossing</h2> <p>For tangible items that you're sending into the afterlife, a great way to remember the good times you had with it is to take a photo with that item in it. Perhaps it's a favorite piece of clothing that you once cherished, board games that made many memorable nights, or musical instruments that helped cultivate your love of culture. Set up a nice photo up &mdash; perhaps a snapshot with friends with the discarded item as the centerpiece &mdash; so you can look back on it with fondness whenever you want.</p> <h2>2. Scan Pictures, Letters, and Cards Into Your Computer</h2> <p>Reduce that pile (or massive box, as they case may be) of beloved photos, letters, and cards that you've accumulated throughout your life by scanning them into your computer. You might find it hard to part with the original hardcopy documents, but try to remember that it's only paper that you're tossing out. By scanning these items, you're preserving the thought that went into them when they were originally given to you &mdash; and that's what counts. Plus, this way they can never be destroyed, whereas the original versions will eventually deteriorate over time and are at the mercy of fire, water, and other elements that can destroy them completely.</p> <h2>3. Transition to Digital Picture Frames to Eliminate Paper Photos</h2> <p>If you're anything like me, each of your single picture frames is home to about half a dozen photos. I keep the old photos in the frames when I update a picture by simply laying the replaced images behind the new one. While this method reduces the clutter I see, it only allows me to enjoy one of the photos opposed to all of them (even though rediscovering the old ones during the swapping process is a welcome surprise). Nowadays you can enjoy many photos without fussing with any paper by digitizing them and adding them to a digital frame. These frames rotate images automatically so you see multiple pics &mdash; and relive the memories &mdash; on a regular basis.</p> <h2>4. Transfers Old VHS Tapes and DVDs to Computer Files</h2> <p>My husband has a huge cabinet full of VHS tapes from his wrestling days that &mdash; mark my words &mdash; he will never do anything with until they're so old they've deteriorated beyond repair. I even bought him one of those VHS-to-DVD thingamajigs a few years ago that I recently sold on Amazon new, in-the-box. Hey, I tried. In any case, if you want to ensure that your old VHS tapes and DVDs stand the test of time, consider transferring them to computer files that you can save in your cloud. There are plenty of companies that specialize in this service, but you also can <a href="http://www.cnet.com/how-to/transfer-vhs-tapes-to-your-computer/">DIY it if you're fairly tech-savvy</a>.</p> <h2>5. Repurpose Useless Little Things Into One Useful Big Thing</h2> <p>Before you donate all that extra clothing, think of ways you might be able to use the fabric to make something new &mdash; like a blanket, tablecloth, or shower curtain. For instance, you can turn a bunch of old T-shirts into a rad quilt if you've got sewing skills (or, ya know, send away for it if you don't). You may not think about it a lot, but many items in your closet &mdash; especially the really old, ratty stuff &mdash; hold a special place in your heart; repurposing these thrift-shop-ready beauties lets you keep them a bit longer without becoming a hoarder. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-new-things-you-can-make-with-old-denim-jeans">20 New Things You Can Make With Old Denim</a>)</p> <h2>6. Turn a Special Moment Into a Beautiful Tattoo</h2> <p>One of my buddies gave me this idea, and I thought it was very interesting. Computers &mdash; and especially the cloud &mdash; help us preserve many of our tangible memories while cutting the clutter, but what about adding those memories to our own bodies? Thus, a tattoo is an awesome way to recognize an important event or time in your life. The result is a permanent reminder of that particular memory, and you're bound to be asked about it over and over again, allowing you to tell the story many times over.</p> <h2>7. Create Sentimental Artwork Out of Attic-Bound Items</h2> <p>I recently came across a Buzzfeed post that I thought was really cool. There were lots of great ideas in author Mike Spohr's <a href="http://www.buzzfeed.com/mikespohr/incredibly-meaningful-gifts-you-can-give-your-kids">26 Incredibly Meaningful Gifts You Can Give Your Kids,</a> but I thought the framed teddy bear was kind of genius. Expanding that concept a bit further then, you can basically take anything of sentimental value that's perhaps tucked away in a box and turn it into a treasured family heirloom that will serve as a reminder of a special time as well as a conversation piece. It goes without saying that it'll be super fun to go through the attic to see what resources you have to work with when creativity strikes you.</p> <h2>8. Start a Blog Dedicated to Your Memories and Treasures</h2> <p>Maybe I'm speaking for myself here, but I like to share many of my fond memories with, well, basically anyone who'll listen. I mean, who doesn't like to reminisce about the &quot;good ol' days,&quot; right? I bet we're of a similar mindset, which makes starting a blog dedicated to your memories and treasures a decent idea. You can write about fun times that you've had, post pictures of moments you never want to forget, and then share them with the world so you can bring joy to it.</p> <h2>9. Keep Your Treasures in the Family by Passing Them on to Loved Ones</h2> <p>You know that old saying &mdash; one man's trash is another man's treasure? Absolutely true, and it provides a great opportunity for you to unload some of your cherished items that are perhaps taking up too much space on family and friends who want or need it. With this tactic, the clutter is out of your way, but the things and the memories they conjure are still part of your life, which makes this easy option the perfect compromise.</p> <p><em>Have a few more clutter-free ways to preserve memories? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-lose-the-clutter-and-keep-the-memories">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-how-you-declutter-and-keep-your-stuff-too">This Is How You Declutter and Keep Your Stuff, Too</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-genius-storage-solutions-for-your-garage">12 Genius Storage Solutions for Your Garage</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/organize-a-room-for-10-with-no-extra-effort">Organize a Room for $10 with No Extra Effort</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-smart-ways-to-keep-your-entire-life-clutter-free">10 Smart Ways to Keep Your Entire Life Clutter-Free</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-things-in-your-closet-you-can-throw-out-today">15 Things in Your Closet You Can Throw Out Today</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Home Organization clutter mementos memories storage Mon, 17 Nov 2014 18:00:08 +0000 Mikey Rox 1254628 at http://www.wisebread.com Maintaining Memories: How to Save Old Photographs http://www.wisebread.com/maintaining-memories-how-to-save-old-photographs <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/maintaining-memories-how-to-save-old-photographs" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/Collage.jpg" alt="Old Photographs" title="Old Photographs" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="147" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>At the beginning of this year, my grandfather passed away. While going through his things, my family discovered photographs &mdash; amazing photographs from my grandparents' younger years, specifically the time my grandfather spent in the Korean War.</p> <p>There is some ripping and fading, but overall, they&rsquo;re in surprisingly good shape. I mean, after all, my grandfather left them in an old department store box on the top shelf of his closet for close to 40 years. They should be all but decrepit.</p> <p>And now that we&rsquo;ve pulled them down, my biggest fear is that something might happen to them. So, I volunteered to make sure all of their special memories stay intact. In a way, this article was therapeutic for me. I had no idea just how much my grandfather loved my grandmother (she passed away in 1993 from a brain tumor &mdash; I was too young to really remember) until we discovered the photographic evidence of their love. And now I&rsquo;m on a mission so that we never forget. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-photoshop-fixes-for-your-family-photos">7 Easy Photoshop Fixes for Your&nbsp;Family Photos</a>)</p> <h2>Preserving Paper Photographs</h2> <p>To start off my mission, I consulted the professionals. The first place I turned was the <a href="http://www.loc.gov/preservation/care/photo.html">Library of Congress</a> (LOC). After all, they&rsquo;re in the business of preserving paper. From there, a quick Google search lead me to the <a href="http://www.mnhs.org/preserve/conservation/reports/photoqanda.pdf">Minnesota Historical Society</a> (PDF) and the <a href="http://www.photographymuseum.com/archival.html">American Museum of Photography</a> (AMOP). As they all had similar advice, I&rsquo;m going to detail the highlights below.</p> <p>Let&rsquo;s start with environmental conditions. According to the LOC, the photos should be stored at 68&deg;F and 30-40% relative humidity. Since we don&rsquo;t all have wine fridges, let&rsquo;s say that if you keep the photos in a cooler place in your house, like a closet in the dark, you should be good. Just make sure that your closet won&rsquo;t spring a leak. The AMOP says to steer clear of basements, attics, and garages, as they are hard to keep temperature-regulated, and the humidity will make mold grow.</p> <p>As for storage, pick <a href="http://www.containerstore.com/shop/storage/storageBoxes/archival?productId=10001336">archival-quality boxes</a> (prices start at $14.99 at the Container Store). Make sure the paper is acid-free and not cardboard. Keep the negatives separate from the printed photographs. If you want to display your photos, stick with a copy and keep the originals in the appropriate conditions. The light can fade the color dye on photographs.</p> <p>In the process of handling your photographs, use clean cotton gloves to keep fingerprints and perspiration off. This is especially important for negatives.</p> <h2>Digitizing the Photographs</h2> <p>There are two main ways to go about this: One, you can pay a company to digitize (and therefore scan and retouch) all of the photos, or two, you can do it yourself. Pretty simple right?</p> <p>It gets a little more complicated than that. Having a company do it seems practical: You mail them your pictures, they upload them to their website where you can edit and print them, and they&rsquo;ll mail back the pictures with DVDs. There are many websites dedicated to this very thing, such as <a href="http://www.imemories.com/">iMemories</a>, starting at $19.99.</p> <p>But of course, my fear is that the images will get lost in the mail, lost at the company, or ruined somehow. There might be no need to fear &mdash; after all, iMemories was just included in Entrepreneur Magazine&rsquo;s list of 100 Brilliant Ideas. Also, even after your memories are returned, you can pay $4.99/month for unlimited storage, so you never lose anything. You can also try out <a href="http://www.memoryhub.com/">Memory Hub</a>, which offers similar prices.</p> <p>The other option is more time consuming, but actually might be more rewarding, if you&rsquo;re willing to put in the effort.</p> <p>If you go this route, the first step is buying the scanner. You can buy a high quality scanner for prices starting at $99. After scouring a few <a href="http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2362752,00.asp">review sites</a>, the best ones seem to be the Canon CanoScan, Epson Perfection, and HP Scanjet. Each scanner is different in terms of quality, so shop around to get exactly what you need. Also pay attention to the photo editing functions included with the scanner, such as dust and scratch removal &mdash; they can be an added bonus.</p> <p>Now it&rsquo;s time to scan. First, ensure the photo is free from dust before scanning &mdash; and more importantly, that the scanner is. Clean the scanner off with a drive cloth. Next, make sure your scanner is set for 300 DPI and save the photo as a TIFF for editing purposes. For more advice, PC World has an excellent article on <a href="http://www.pcworld.com/article/124718/digital_focus_scanning_old_photos.html">photo scanning</a>, detailing every step.</p> <p>The last step is editing. If you don&rsquo;t want to spend any money, Windows Live Gallery is good editing software for PCs, and iPhoto is good for Macs. The best option is Adobe Photoshop, but if you don&rsquo;t know how to use it, it would be a waste of money. No matter what, you should also peruse the internet for some tips and tricks on how to digitally restore the photographs. <a href="http://www.pcworld.com/article/124720/digital_focus_restoring_faded_photos.html">PC World</a> offers some good ones, and <a href="http://www.hp.com/united-states/consumer/digital_photography/edit_restore_photos/tips/restoration_techniques.html">HP&rsquo;s website</a> is surprisingly useful (even if you decide to go with an Epson or Canon scanner).</p> <p>From there, you can burn the pictures to DVDs or use a USB drive to spread the love to family and friends.</p> <h2>Sharing the Photographs</h2> <p>Despite this being 2012, when I say &ldquo;share&rdquo; I actually don&rsquo;t mean Facebook, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/which-online-services-are-worth-paying-for"> Flickr, and Picasa</a>. I mean sharing the photographs in the printed form. Ironically, the internet can help with this.</p> <p>From <a href="http://www.shutterfly.com/home/welcome1.jsp?escFlag=1&amp;s_tnt=17895:3:0">Shutterfly</a> to <a href="http://www.snapfish.com/snapfish/welcome">Snapfish</a> to <a href="http://www.tinyprints.com/">Tiny Prints</a>, there are plenty of options for pretty much the same outcome. Each site offers the chance to play around with backgrounds, placement, captions, and more. The price is similar as well, but make sure to check out the special deals before purchasing.</p> <p>Now, if you choose to use an old fashioned photo album, don&rsquo;t forget that it must be acid-free and magnet-free. Also, the pages should be made of polypropylene plastic (plastic number 5) and not PVC (the pages with the strong plastic odor). Make sure your photo albums are stored in the same place as the archival boxes, but still accessible for visitors.</p> <p>And finally, don&rsquo;t forget scrapbooking (something my mother still particularly enjoys) &mdash; it&rsquo;s probably the best way to take a trip down memory lane while simultaneously keeping the lane in one piece.</p> <p><em>How do you save your old family photos?</em></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fmaintaining-memories-how-to-save-old-photographs&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FMaintaining%2520Memories-%2520How%2520to%2520Save%2520Old%2520Photographs.jpg&amp;description=Maintaining%20Memories%3A%20How%20to%20Save%20Old%20Photographs"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Maintaining%20Memories-%20How%20to%20Save%20Old%20Photographs.jpg" alt="Maintaining Memories: How to Save Old Photographs" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jennifer-holder">Jennifer Holder</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/maintaining-memories-how-to-save-old-photographs">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-strategies-for-controlling-toy-clutter">7 Strategies for Controlling Toy Clutter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-easy-ways-to-keep-your-family-organized">8 Easy Ways to Keep Your Family Organized</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-budget-design-ideas-for-a-kids-playroom">10 Budget Design Ideas for a Kids&#039; Playroom</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-lose-the-clutter-and-keep-the-memories">9 Ways to Lose the Clutter and Keep the Memories</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/back-to-school-time-savers">Back-to-School Time Savers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Organization memories online storage photography Tue, 31 Jul 2012 10:24:41 +0000 Jennifer Holder 945636 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Tips for Remembering Names http://www.wisebread.com/5-tips-for-remembering-names <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-tips-for-remembering-names" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/handshake.jpg" alt="Two men shaking hands" title="Two men shaking hands" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="160" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>My husband has always said that I am great at remembering many details about the people we meet. One of the most important and basic things you should remember about someone new is his or her name. Here are some of my personal tips for remembering names; hopefully they will help you avoid an awkward &quot;I know you from somewhere&quot; moment. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/remember-where-you-parked-your-car-and-more-35-practical-uses-of-a-digital-camera">Remember Where You Parked Your Car and More: 35 Practical Uses of a Digital Camera</a>)</p> <h2>Look for Distinguishing Features</h2> <p>When I meet someone, I always look for something unique in the way they look or act. The trick is to pick some feature that starts with the same letter as their name. For example, if someone has a very distinct mole and his name is Michael, then you can associate &quot;mole&quot; and &quot;Michael&quot; mentally. I have also memorized some people's names based on their left-handedness, the way they walked, or their accents. Try to find a feature that isn't easily changed.</p> <h2>Associate a Name With an Occupation</h2> <p>Usually people tell you what they do for a living. I find that it's often easier to remember occupations than names because there is always a story to that occupation. All you have to do is to weave a person's name into your mental image of that person's occupation. For example, if a person tells you that he or she is a nurse, imagine that you are at a hospital and that person has a nametag on with that name on it. You should be able store that image into your head and bring it up more easily later than just recalling a random name.</p> <h2>Repeat and Reintroduce</h2> <p>When you just meet someone new, try to say their name a few times while talking to them. Repetition always aids your memory, so introduce that person to some of your friends. You can also ask people to spell their names if you don't have nametags. If someone has an unusual name, it is especially helpful to get the pronunciation correct by repeating the name a few more times.</p> <h2>Associate Real Words With Names</h2> <p>Many names aren't real dictionary words, and that makes them harder to remember. If you see a person's name and associate it with a real word, somehow it is much easier to remember. For example, when I hear a name like Jaden, I think of the word &quot;jade,&quot; and I associate the color green with that person. When I hear &quot;Gladys,&quot; I think of gladiolas and associate that flower with the person's face.</p> <h2>Use Social Media</h2> <p>If you happen to like people you just met, you could friend them on Facebook or Twitter, where they will have pictures of themselves and links to their personal sites. At blogger meet-ups I have asked people for their Twitter handles and permission to friend them on Facebook or <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/standout-stuff-to-put-on-your-resume">LinkedIn</a>. When you have faces and names show up on your social media feed, then it is much easier to remember who they are when you see them in person. For the most part, I do prefer adding people who I have met in real life to my Facebook, and I find it to be a great tool to keep people's images and names fresh in my mind.</p> <p><em>What are your tips for remembering names of new people in your life? What do you do when you can't remember someone's name in a social situation?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/xin-lu">Xin Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tips-for-remembering-names">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-powerful-brain-hacks-you-can-do-in-under-2-minutes">8 Powerful Brain Hacks You Can Do in Under 2 Minutes</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-weird-brain-hacks-that-make-you-a-better-person-with-almost-no-effort">4 Weird Brain Hacks That Make You a Better Person With Almost No Effort</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-people-with-good-communication-skills-never-do">12 Things People With Good Communication Skills Never Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/change-your-life-by-learning-how-to-admit-youre-wrong">Change Your Life by Learning How to Admit You&#039;re Wrong</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-free-ways-to-learn-something-new">15 Free Ways to Learn Something New</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training General Tips Personal Development brain hacks communication skills meetings memories Fri, 10 Jun 2011 10:36:06 +0000 Xin Lu 570814 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Save Your Family Memories With Cloud Computing http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-your-family-memories-with-cloud-computing <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-save-your-family-memories-with-cloud-computing" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000014190509XSmall.jpg" alt="family outdoors" title="family outdoors" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="176" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When I had dinner with some friends recently, I told them about a trip I will be taking next year to attend a cousin's wedding. One friend made this observation: &quot;Wow,&quot; she said, &quot;everyone in your family is getting married.&quot; It was an exaggeration (not <em>everyone</em> is getting married), but her point was valid: many in my generation are coming into the family-making phase of our lives. We're getting married. We're having kids. You know what that means?</p> <p>Pictures. And Videos. Lots of them.</p> <p>I always liked the idea of scrapbooking to organize pictures, and making home videos to watch together when the extended family gathers for big events. But that limits the sharing to certain times of the year only, and only to the folks who can actually make it. Unfortunately, family who live across the country &mdash; or in different countries &mdash; will inevitably miss out on the memories. Sure, you can send physical copies, but that can get expensive, fast.</p> <p>Oh, who am I kidding? In this day and age, most family photos and videos are distributed online. And with the help of cloud computing, your family can even create a scrapbook or newsletter together, so everyone can keep everyone else up to date on family goings-on.</p> <p>You may ask, what is cloud computing, anyway? It's simply a fancy term for Internet-based computing, where applications, files, and resources are stored in distant servers away from your computer. You can access these resources on demand, from any computer. Any time you're using Flickr, Yahoo Mail, Google Docs, Office Live, or MobileMe, you are "on the cloud."</p> <p>Here's the kicker: You can grant other people access to the applications, files, and resources that you use on the cloud, making collaboration on a family scrapbook or newsletter easy as pie. Usually, all it takes is signing up for whatever service you decide to use &mdash; and there are many to choose from. Here are just a few.</p> <h2>LetterPop</h2> <p>With almost 300 templates to choose from, <a href="http://letterpop.com/">LetterPop</a> makes it easy to create newsletters perfect for any occasion, season, or theme. While you can't share your work on LetterPop with other users, you <em>can</em> make it a family project with your kids. Give the older ones a section to write their own blurbs and let the younger ones help you choose your favorite photos to share. You can upload image files from your computer, or drag-and-drop directly from Flickr. Since everything you need is stored on your LetterPop account, you can work on your newsletter anywhere, anytime.</p> <h2>Chattertree</h2> <p>Most of my family (the computer-using ones, at least) are on Facebook &mdash; but not all of them. So when someone shares wedding photos or baby videos, those who didn't want to deal with Facebook's ever-changing privacy issues also don't get to <em>Oooh</em> and <em>Awww</em> with the rest of us. <a href="http://chattertree.com/">Chattertree</a> is a solution to this problem. In a way, Chattertree very much like Facebook: You can message people, set birthday alerts, share photos and videos. But unlike Facebook, you get to do video chats with up to six people (or families), and it's a private family network &mdash; so anyone concerned about embarrassing photos of you wearing a Snuggie on Christmas morning can rest easy knowing that none of my friends will accidentally stumble on it. Um, I mean 'none of <em>your </em>friends.' Hypothetically, of course.</p> <h2>Google Docs and Microsoft Office</h2> <p>LetterPop and Chattertree are helpful services to sign up for, and they're super easy to use, but you do have some resources that you and other members of your family are probably already familiar with: Google Docs and Microsoft Office.</p> <p>When you sign up for Gmail &mdash; or any other Google service &mdash; you gain access to their entire suite of applications. With Google Documents, you can create a scrapbook using one of their templates &mdash; simply type in 'scrapbook' in the search field of Google's <a href="https://docs.google.com/templates">templates page</a>, and choose one that you like. While the selection is somewhat limited right now, it's fairly easy to upload your own backgrounds and graphics for a personal touch. As with most of Google's other applications, you can share your work-in-progress with other people and let them edit the scrapbook to add their own memories and highlights.</p> <p>On the newsletter front, Microsoft Office has your back. Just choose a newsletter template when you open a new document, and fill in text boxes and insert photos like you would with any Office template. Rearranging body text, photos, captions, and titles is easy &mdash; anyone who has worked with Office probably already knows how to do it. And with Windows Live <a href="http://explore.live.com/windows-live-skydrive">SkyDrive</a>, you can upload and save your newsletter in the cloud and work on it later. When you're done, simply email it out to the family, either directly in the message or as an attachment.</p> <div id="ms-banner" style="float: left; margin: -1em 1em 0 0;"> <!-- BANNER #1 --> <script type="text/javascript" src="http://thirdparty.fmpub.net/placement/377386?fleur_de_sel=[timestamp]"></script> <!-- BANNER #1 --> </div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Thanks to Windows 7 and Windows Live for sponsoring this post about how technology makes parenting so much easier. Visit <a href="http://www.microsoft.com/windows/cloud/">Windows</a> to learn more about the power of the Cloud and what it can do for you.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-your-family-memories-with-cloud-computing">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-parents-can-use-cloud-computing-to-help-with-homework">How Parents Can Use Cloud Computing to Help With Homework</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/cloud-computing-and-your-wallet">Cloud Computing and Your Wallet</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-simple-rules-of-excellent-houseguest-etiquette">11 Simple Rules of Excellent Houseguest Etiquette</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-smart-alarm-clocks">The 5 Best Smart Alarm Clocks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-surprising-ways-to-earn-money-online">7 Surprising Ways to Earn Money Online</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Technology cloud computing digital photographs family family activities memories newsletters Wed, 01 Dec 2010 13:00:07 +0000 Amy Lu 352358 at http://www.wisebread.com How much are memories worth? http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-are-memories-worth <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-much-are-memories-worth" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/me-in-glasgow.jpg" alt="Philip Brewer on the bank of the river Clyde in Glasgow, Scotland" title="Philip Brewer on the bank of the river Clyde in Glasgow, Scotland" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I get a particular negative jolt when I review a credit card bill and find a charge for something that&#39;s already over and done--a meal already eaten, a vacation already taken, a tank of gas already burned up. I&#39;m much happier paying a charge when I can pat the thing purchased and know that it&#39;ll be serving some useful purpose for years to come. Just recently, though, I&#39;ve found that I&#39;m beginning to have a little more appreciation for those purchases that are only memories before they&#39;re even paid for.</p> <p>Try this thought experiment: Imagine that all your property were destroyed in some disaster, but that you got a large check--replacement value for everything that was lost. How much of your property do you replace with exact duplicates?</p> <p>A lot of the most important stuff is irreplaceable: art work, antiques, mementos of things you&#39;ve done. You&#39;d replace it with an exact duplicate if you could--and might pay top-dollar to do so--but mostly they&#39;re just gone.</p> <p>A lot of the rest of it is stuff that you wouldn&#39;t bother replacing: that pair of old glasses that you could wear if you broke your current pair, those shoes that match the dress that doesn&#39;t fit anymore, that pot that you used to cook everything in before you married someone with really good pots. </p> <p>Most of the rest are just things you have to replace simply because you need something to serve the purpose: a bed, some chairs, a table. No need to duplicate what you had--maybe you&#39;d be better served by a bigger desk and a smaller car (or vice versa).</p> <p>For me, this thought experiment puts a different perspective on my preference for spending money on things that last. </p> <p>Sure, I&#39;m very pleased with the bicycle I bought in 1983 and that is still my main transportation vehicle when the weather is nice. Its cost-per-mile at this point is so low it&#39;s not worth calculating, and it&#39;s still in near-perfect condition--I fully expect it to go another 25 years. But it&#39;s an exception.</p> <p>Stuff that will last is great, but I&#39;ve tended to put too high of a premium on that category.</p> <p>Some of our best expenditures turn out to have been our vacations. We&#39;ve been to science fiction conventions in Toronto, Boston, and Glasgow. We&#39;ve been to Esperanto conventions in Berlin and New York. We spent a warm February week lazing about in Key West and a cool July week hiking around the coast of Wales. We took a cruise to Mexico.</p> <p>And it&#39;s not just vacations fall into this category: going to college, going to concerts and plays, watching movies or videos, hanging out with friends at the coffee shop or bar. These also are experiences that may cost some money, but that may well be worth far more than, for example, a really nice leather jacket that would last for years. </p> <p>For us, expenses of this sort have turned out to have provided some of the best value for the money we&#39;ve ever gotten. Further, in the little thought experiment up above--what would you replace if you lost everything--they wouldn&#39;t need to be replaced: they can&#39;t be lost.</p> <p>There are many reasons to to frugal--it&#39;s light on your wallet and light on the planet--but the most important is that it maximizes your freedom.</p> <p>One way it does that is by giving you more career options: The more frugal you are, the less pressed you are to choose the most remunerative career (and the less pressed you are to stick with a poor choice simply because change would be risky--the frugal person can bear risks that others can&#39;t).</p> <p>I was always in tune with that particular advantage of a frugal lifestyle. It&#39;s the one that motivates me most strongly.</p> <p>What I&#39;ve come to realize just recently, though, is that another advantage of a frugal lifestyle is that frugal people are free to spend the money they haven&#39;t sunk into <strong>stuff</strong> on <strong>experiences</strong> instead.</p> <p>There are plenty of things you can do cheap or for free. But don&#39;t let the fact that an experience doesn&#39;t leave you with a useful object make you feel bad about paying for it.</p> <p>Material purchases are about what you have. Experiential purchases are about who you are. After all, when people ask you about yourself, you don&#39;t tell them about your stuff; you tell them about what you&#39;ve done.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>On a personal note, I wanted to mention that this post marks my six-month anniversary of writing for Wise Bread. More by coincidence than plan, this is also my 100th post. I can&#39;t begin to tell you how much fun I&#39;ve had writing these pieces. It&#39;s high on my list of experiences worth remembering. The photo is of me on the bank of the river Clyde in Glasgow, Scotland, during WorldCon in 2005. </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-are-memories-worth">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/making-the-most-of-your-guilty-pleasures">Making the most of your guilty pleasures</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/chinese-money-habits-how-my-culture-influences-my-attitudes-toward-money">Chinese Money Habits - How My Culture Influences My Attitudes Toward Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-signs-youre-not-frugal-youre-cheap">6 Signs You&#039;re Not Frugal — You&#039;re Cheap!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-get-your-toiletries-for-cheap-or-even-free">6 Ways to Get your Toiletries for Cheap or Even Free!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/turn-off-your-air-conditioning">Turn Off Your Air Conditioning</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living esperanto experiential purchases frugality memories stuff vacation Fri, 11 Jan 2008 18:45:20 +0000 Philip Brewer 1619 at http://www.wisebread.com