teamwork http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/8640/all en-US 10 Ways to Act Like a Leader -- And Get Ahead at Work http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/teamwork_000020741550.jpg" alt="Two people working as a team at the office" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I have worked for organizations with as few as four employees, and others with as many as a couple of thousand. In each of those companies, employees who were good &quot;team players&quot; were valued and rose quickly into leadership roles. If you want to move ahead in your workplace, here are 10 ways to become a better team player.</p> <h2>1. Get to Know Your Team</h2> <p>You may not think this is job #1, but it's really important. In order to accomplish your company's directives, it is helpful to better know and understand your coworkers. For example, employee &quot;A&quot; may love all things data-driven, but &quot;B&quot; might excel in social media and marketing, and hate crunching numbers. Meanwhile, &quot;C&quot; might be the organizer of the group, who will keep everyone on track. If you don't already know your team, you might ask them to take an <a href="http://www.tracomcorp.com/solutions/by-element/social-style/model/">interpersonal self-assessment</a> such as Social Style. If you are out to accomplish a common goal, understanding personalities is very helpful.</p> <h2>2. Share a Vision</h2> <p>What is it that you are all trying to accomplish? Has management shared its mission? A good team leader will map out and share goals and a timeline. Communicate! Weekly huddles, monthly meetings, emails, and texts keep the flow of information going. Be patient and do your best to be friendly. Keeping a positive outlook and sharing your enthusiasm will keep your team moving in the same direction.</p> <h2>3. Be Ready to Pitch In</h2> <p>This is one of my favorite &quot;teamwork&quot; quotes: &quot;Sympathizers are spectators; empathizers wear game shoes.&quot; &mdash; John Eyberg</p> <p>If you aren't pitching in on a project, this is going to be noted by your team, and it will result in gossip, resentment, and a &quot;Why should I?&quot; attitude. You will lose respect. So what if you're the big cheese? Get your hands dirty. File, copy, crunch numbers, make phone calls &mdash; whatever it takes.</p> <h2>4. Motivate the Team</h2> <p>If you are the team's leader, or eventually want to be that person, you need to motivate the team. What you need to do is to <em>figure out what motivates your team members.</em> Don't you have your own &quot;carrots?&quot; To motivate, you need to get to know them. Personally, I would rather have a bonus than a pizza party. Some team members will love being recognized at a meeting, but shy ones will be embarrassed. The point is, one size does not fit all. A strong team player knows their team, and knows what motivates them.</p> <h2>5. Take the Initiative</h2> <p>Somebody has to do it: Whether the project is cleaning out the office refrigerator, auditing the I-9's, changing the toner, or working on Saturday, there are going to be those take-one-for-the-team projects. Once in a while, that person needs to be you. Put your hand up. Everyone will be grateful.</p> <h2>6. Say Thanks</h2> <p>Don't just say it during reviews, or when something gets done. Unexpected thank-yous are a great morale-booster. Writing someone a heartfelt note is very meaningful. Pick up Starbucks coffees, grab McBreakfast for everyone, or thank your team publicly in a staff meeting. Say it, write it, or find creative ways to show that gratitude.</p> <h2>7. Make it FUN</h2> <p>By fun, I don't mean &quot;Let's go outside for team-building and build a team pyramid!&quot; I personally abhor team-building exercises, both physical and mental (remember the stranded plane exercise of the '80s?). Most people like potlucks, office &quot;pools,&quot; or silly games in the breakroom. You might join together on a food drive, or a fundraising walk to better the community. Several departments in my workplace have special t-shirts they wear on casual Fridays. Mix it up &mdash; while some will love Zumba in the conference room, others would rather do a craft.</p> <h2>8. Help Each Other</h2> <p>Isn't helping each other a huge part of teamwork? I really like knowing I can go to certain team members for IT assistance, navigating new software, or ordering a particular office supply. Everyone has their area of expertise and your work life is greatly simplified by knowing who can help you. Be the person that people can go to. Are you approachable and helpful? If not, then get to it.</p> <h2>9. Brainstorm</h2> <p>Stuck on a problem? Get together with the team, a lot of paper, and start throwing out possible solutions. The trick with this is to make sure everyone's voice is heard. A good leader will ask the quiet staff members, if they have not contributed, for their input. Be respectful of everyone's ideas. Type them up, prioritize, and move ahead.</p> <h2>10. Reward!</h2> <p>Most companies, no matter their size, have some sort of recognition. Some offer bonuses; many larger ones throw ceremonies. If your team member, or entire team, has done great work, make sure that information gets in front of management. Successes need to be celebrated. Everyone wants their efforts to be recognized and praised.</p> <p><em>How does your company promote and inspire teamwork?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building coworkers job office morale team building teamwork Thu, 26 Mar 2015 09:00:03 +0000 Marla Walters 1354183 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Delegate at Work and at Home in 4 Easy Steps http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-delegate-at-work-and-at-home-in-4-easy-steps <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-delegate-at-work-and-at-home-in-4-easy-steps" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/office-5322514-small.jpg" alt="office team" title="office team" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You know you could delegate, and you know you <em>should</em> delegate. You agree that the ability to delegate effectively determines your ability to accomplish more &mdash; at home and at work &mdash; but how do you let go? How do you trust others to accomplish the tasks you assign? And how do you manage it all without actually creating more work for yourself? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-clean-your-house-in-one-day">How to Clean Your House in One Day</a>)</p> <p>If you want to manage time, resources, and people in a way that frees you up to focus on things that are truly important for your professional success or personal fulfillment, you need to delegate. Why not start delegating right now? Here's how.</p> <h2>Step 1: Choose the Right Resources</h2> <p>Find people who can do the tasks just as well as you could, or if you're a perfectionist, maybe not quite as well. (Thinking household chores and family members here. So what if the laundry isn't folded just right? It's done.) Think like a celebrity to come up with ways to outsource daily tasks. Would Beyonce really pick up her own dry cleaning? Pay the delivery fee and transfer that task to someone else's calendar. Or hire a college kid or work-at-home mom to run errands. They need the cash, and you need the time. Be picky at work. Ask your boss for the help of someone in particular instead of whoever happens to have free time. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-things-to-never-pay-full-price-for">25 Things to Never Pay Full Price For</a>)</p> <h2>Step 2: Delegate the Right Things</h2> <p>Never delegate responsibilities just because you don't want to do them. That's not efficient; it's just rude and fosters resentment. Delegate the tasks that free up your time for the things that you alone are uniquely qualified to do, or that directly contribute to your Big Plans.</p> <p>Leverage technology, especially when organizing a lot of people. Staffing the community food pantry, running the school book fair, or heading up the charity race? Keep your eyes on big picture planning and let others choose to contribute the way they want with <a href="http://www.volunteerspot.com/?utm_source=Wisebread&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=LDdelegation">VolunteerSpot</a>, a free sign-up tool that anyone can access 24/7 from any smart phone or computer.</p> <h2>Step 3: Communicate Standards</h2> <p>Let people know why you think they're great for the job. Compliment their talents and the potential you see in them to really rock the task and then take the time to provide clear guidance. Don't expect others to have the same depth of understanding for what is required for a particular task. That big project you've been conceiving and nurturing for months is just another to-do for the new intern. You might be surprised to out how many steps really go into something you have been doing for a long time. Besides, when you force yourself to really explain something to someone else, you can gain valuable insights about how to do things better. (Se also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-power-of-mentorship">The Power of Mentorship</a>)</p> <h2>Step 4: Let It Go, and Reinforce the Positive</h2> <p>The only thing worse than never delegating is micro-managing. Once you delegate a responsibility, you need to trust that it will get done satisfactorily. Allow freedom for how to arrive at the end result. While you may have an idea about the best way to accomplish a task, the person you're delegating to may have a better idea. Good leaders understand they have a lot to learn from their subordinates.</p> <p>Whenever you delegate, there is going to be a learning curve. You have to accept that things aren't going to go smoothly every time. But more often they will, and when they do, share in the rewards and give credit to those who helped you accomplish your goals. Praise them for a job well done and they will want to do it again.</p> <p>Delegating &mdash; it's not so hard when you break it down. And once you get the hang of it, you're going to want to delegate more and more.</p> <p><em>What are some things you delegate, and what is your best advice for getting started?</em></p> <p><em>This is a guest post by Lela Davidson, the author of &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1936214431/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=1936214431&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Blacklisted From the PTA</a>&quot; and &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1936214962/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=1936214962&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Who Peed on My Yoga Mat?</a>&quot; and a proud member of Team VolunteerSpot. VolunteerSpot's free volunteer scheduling software lets organizers quickly set up volunteer needs in an online calendar and invite volunteers to sign up from their computer or smartphone. Learn more at <a href="http://www.volunteerspot.com/">their website</a>.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lela-davidson">Lela Davidson</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-delegate-at-work-and-at-home-in-4-easy-steps">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-benefits-of-a-task-management-system">5 Benefits of a Task Management System</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-improve-your-decision-making-skills">10 Ways to Improve Your Decision-Making Skills</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-ways-to-exercise-in-under-5-minutes">15 Ways to Exercise in Under 5 Minutes</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-self-improvement-apps-to-make-you-smarter-stronger-and-happier">10 Self-Improvement Apps to Make You Smarter, Stronger, and Happier</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-have-energy-after-work">7 Easy Ways to Have Energy After Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Productivity delegating task management teamwork Tue, 27 Aug 2013 09:36:52 +0000 Lela Davidson 981435 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways to Improve Your Creativity Today http://www.wisebread.com/small-business/5-ways-to-improve-your-creativity-today <div class="field field-type-link field-field-url"> <div class="field-label">Link:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="http://www.openforum.com/articles/5-ways-to-improve-your-creativity-today" target="_blank">http://www.openforum.com/articles/5-ways-to-improve-your-creativity-today</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/small-business/5-ways-to-improve-your-creativity-today" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000015056800Small.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>One of the greatest skills that a business person can have is the ability to be creative.</p> <p>It's common to think that creativity is only something that &quot;artsy&quot; people need, but the need to be creative extends far beyond an art studio. Creativity is about solving problems, whether they be artistic, mathematical, or anything in between. And that is precisely why creativity is such a useful tool in business.</p> <p>But what if you're not creative? Do you have to be born with the creative gene? Not exactly. In fact, these fives suggestions should help anyone improve their creativity today.</p> <p><strong>1. Approach Creativity Like a Professional</strong></p> <p>Usually, when business people want to improve a skill&mdash;like public speaking, for example&mdash;they practice it. Guess what? Creativity is no different.</p> <p>They only way to become more creative is to practice being creative. Throw out suggestions in team meetings. Draw up a diagram or a flow chart that show the different possibilities. Try to think of a solution that no one else has thought of yet&mdash;even if it's bad. Stretch yourself.</p> <p>By taking these actions, you're giving your brain a chance to train itself to see other options and find creative solutions.</p> <p><strong>2. Limit the Possibilities</strong></p> <p>Sometimes, we when try to &quot;think outside the box&quot; or &quot;imagine every possibility&quot; we can overwhelm ourselves with options. It's like we're standing in an open field and the answer could be in any direction. Without any sense of where to go, we often end up staying put and making no progress at all.</p> <p>Instead, give yourself some boundaries. For example, telling an engineer to &quot;build a bridge&quot; is very different from her to &quot;build a bridge out of steel.&quot; You can develop creative solutions for either problem, but the limitation gives the engineer a place to start, which is the most critical part of any creative problem solving session.</p> <p><strong>3. Partner with Someone</strong></p> <p>Creative solutions often arise from a string of ideas. One thought leads to the next, which leads to the next, and so on until the final solution is discovered. Any easy way to string more thoughts together, and thus improve the creativity of your solutions, is to partner with someone. Talk through a problem. Brainstorm with each other. Build upon one another's ideas.</p> <p>As a bonus? Partner teams are found to be among the most effective because they hold each other accountable. If you're working with someone, you're less likely to get distracted than if you were working alone, yet the group is still small enough to be flexible.</p> <p><strong>4. Don't Make Creative Comparisons</strong></p> <p>Here is a common reason we don't attack creative problems: we look at previous solutions, either our own or someone else's, and we think, &quot;I can't come up with something that good&quot; or &quot;I don't have time to do this as well as I did before.&quot; The result is that we quit before we ever get started.</p> <p>Comparisons are useless. Every situation is different and each problem is unique. Disregard the past, focus on where you are now, and solve today's problem to the best of your ability.</p> <p><strong>5. Stop Making Excuses and Get to Work</strong></p> <p>The primary thing holding people back from creative problem solving is simple: <a href="http://www.openforum.com/articles/what-is-procrastination-costing-you" target="_blank">procrastination</a>. Usually, we know the problems that we need to solve. We know the tasks that demand our attention. We know what the most important thing is that we need to do. But if it involves serious thought or effort, then we often find a way to avoid it.</p> <p>Smart people can make excuses all day long. Don't be a victim of your own ability to come up with a reason for not doing important work. Creativity will come if you give it a chance. Stop avoiding it and do the work.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/james-clear">James Clear</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/small-business/5-ways-to-improve-your-creativity-today">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/250-tips-for-small-business-owners">250+ Tips for Small Business Owners</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-credit-cards-for-small-businesses">The 5 Best Credit Cards for Small Businesses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-protect-your-business-during-a-divorce">5 Ways to Protect Your Business During a Divorce</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/solve-problems-study-and-brainstorm-using-mind-maps">Solve Problems, Study, and Brainstorm using Mind Maps</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-smart-ways-to-get-a-small-business-loan">10+ Smart Ways to Get a Small Business Loan</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Small Business Resource Center brainstorming creative partnerships creative process creativity innovation small business teamwork Sat, 17 Dec 2011 01:12:01 +0000 James Clear 825744 at http://www.wisebread.com Cultivating Teamwork Excellence http://www.wisebread.com/small-business/cultivating-teamwork-excellence <div class="field field-type-link field-field-url"> <div class="field-label">Link:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/managing/article/cultivating-teamwork-excellence-julie-rains" target="_blank">http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/managing/article/cultivating-teamwork-e...</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/small-business/cultivating-teamwork-excellence" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000009796463Small.jpg" alt="Happy business team" title="Happy business team" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="164" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Remember when you built and played on a team (or guild, or clan) as a child? Your efforts then may have been better orchestrated than the typical processes now among your workplace teams. The juxtaposition of childlike effectiveness and uninspired business teamwork was manifested to me in a friendly competition last fall.</p> <p>The scenario was a team-tent decorating contest at a weekend bicycle tour (my area&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.nationalmssociety.org/chapters/NCC/fundraising-events/bike-ms/index.aspx">Bike MS event</a>, one of many nationwide benefiting clinical research and providing assistance to those with Multiple Sclerosis). Tour rides started and ended in an exposition area where sponsors, vendors, and partners supplied food, beverages, sports massages, entertainment, and more. One area was designated for teams, most of which fell under the classification of &ldquo;Friends and Family&rdquo; or &ldquo;Corporation.&rdquo; These teams installed event-style tents and decorated their respective spaces with the theme of &ldquo;superheroes.&rdquo;</p> <p>My friends-and-family team (comprised of not-so-serious but accomplished professionals in education, medicine, technology, etc.) designed and constructed its rendition of what would later be recognized as an award-winning Batman&rsquo;s Batcave, complete with &ldquo;Ka Pow&rdquo; signage and a control center with flashing lights. We were enjoying each other&rsquo;s company as our next-door neighbors, a corporate team, arrived to decorate their space. For much of the day, a pile of what seemed to be rubble laid next to the tent, awaiting its transformation.</p> <p>It was then that I noted the contrast between excellent and average teamwork, between efforts that capitalize on enthusiastic participation and playfulness versus activities driven by obligation and protocol. This experience and similar ones have helped me to articulate ways to cultivate teamwork excellence:</p> <p><strong>Create Awareness of Needs</strong></p> <p>Simply letting people know of a need isn&rsquo;t enough to actually fulfill the need, but creating awareness is the first step. Certainly, there may be times that a call for assistance (or leadership) will be answered quickly. Very often, though, communicating the need lays the foundation for subsequent discussions and team member involvement.</p> <p>A first communication can be delivered via email, Facebook update, or whatever digital or traditional form is accepted among your team members or potential teammates. Reaching everyone among your circle of friends, colleagues, or employees is a priority so that no one, even those who rarely show an interest, will feel left out. Giving all an equal opportunity to accept or reject a call for service is essential.</p> <p>Follow-up communications can best be handled through face-to-face discussions. These conversations can allow in-depth explanations regarding expectations, scope, and vision. Share past or similar experiences with teams, relate current needs to possible situations that the prospective leader or team member may have encountered, and answer questions.</p> <p><strong>Set Goals</strong></p> <p>Establishing baseline goals is useful in getting the team and its leadership to feel comfortable in taking on a project. My experiences have been that the leader either struggles in the teambuilding process as a newbie and finds comfort with relatively low expectations or has a grander vision and achieves outcomes much better than you would have ever imagined. Realize that high-performing teams tend to be those comprised of people with the desire to excel plus domain knowledge.</p> <p><strong>Embrace Those with the Desire to Contribute (and Appropriate Skill Sets)</strong></p> <p>Identify the specific skills needed to be successful and emphasize these skills when you recruit, welcome, and involve people. People are naturally attracted to opportunities that showcase their strengths, and many want the chance to hone their capabilities and earn recognition.</p> <p>Anyone with the desire to contribute should be embraced. Channeling efforts to tasks aligned with team members&rsquo; skills can be tricky and should be handled diplomatically. By engaging people in thoughtful conversations about needs, rather than aggressively (and manipulatively) recruiting those who are likely to acquiesce to pressure, you should be able to build a motivated team interested in combining individual strengths for collective success.</p> <p>Similarly, be open to those who genuinely desire to lead an effort and have the skills to plan, delegate, and oversee. If you need to serve as official team leader, then commit to making the experience unforgettably fun with an eye to developing likeminded leaders for future efforts.</p> <p><strong>Assure Support</strong></p> <p>Unless you have an unusual pool of prospective team members, no one will sign on if you don&rsquo;t offer support. Forms of support will vary depending on the project but generally will include guidance in clarifying organizational nuances and defining measures of success, assistance in performing project tasks, or demonstration of confidence and appreciation of team members throughout the project&rsquo;s execution and following its completion.</p> <p>To assess your commitment, team members and leaders will likely ask about financial support for the project. Even a modest budget indicates that you value the project and are willing to allocate resources to achieve a desirable outcome.</p> <p><strong>Deliver on Your Promises</strong></p> <p>Never use a bait-and-switch method of recruitment or support (asking someone to help and putting them in charge of a project or offering guidance and assistance but failing to have time and resources available, for example). Your credibility will be decimated if you don&rsquo;t deliver as promised <em>and reasonably expected</em>.</p> <p>Though I once joined with colleagues to create a successful team after a leader shirked responsibilities, I advise not to expect some sort of teamwork miracle. Get the right people together and make sure you do your part, whatever that role may be: show up to planning sessions, give feedback on the feasibility of ideas, accept team assignments, and follow up.</p> <p>Being clear about expectations, accountability, and support &mdash; and delivering what you promised &mdash; is essential to teamwork; in fact, those behaviors define leadership for teamwork excellence.</p> <p><strong>Celebrate Success</strong></p> <p>Great team members will celebrate along the way, reveling in exercising innate skills, engaging with interesting people, and being part of an effort that accomplishes more as a team than possible alone. Have fun as the project progresses. Celebrate successful project completion and special achievements, especially those above original expectations. Show appreciation of team members with the understanding that recognition doesn&rsquo;t have to be flashy or expensive but should be obvious and heartfelt.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/julie-rains">Julie Rains</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/small-business/cultivating-teamwork-excellence">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/250-tips-for-small-business-owners">250+ Tips for Small Business Owners</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-hire-employees">How to hire employees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-credit-cards-for-small-businesses">The 5 Best Credit Cards for Small Businesses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-smart-ways-to-get-a-small-business-loan">10+ Smart Ways to Get a Small Business Loan</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-protect-your-business-during-a-divorce">5 Ways to Protect Your Business During a Divorce</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Small Business Resource Center leadership management small business teamwork Sun, 13 Feb 2011 13:20:51 +0000 Julie Rains 487862 at http://www.wisebread.com How to hire employees http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-hire-employees <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-hire-employees" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/teamwork.jpg" alt="Two dogs running out of the surf carrying the same stick" title="Teamwork" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="174" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I worked one place that was much, much better than anyplace else I ever worked. The guy who ran it told me that the secret was in how to hire people. Most managers do it the wrong way: they hire people who can do the work. So, what&#39;s the right way? Hire people that you want to work with.</p> <p>With an exception here and there, &quot;people that you want to work with&quot; tends to be transitive--people that you want to work with also want to work with you and with each other. If you do it well, you produce a community of people who wake up every morning thinking, &quot;Wow! I get to go to work today! I get to go work with all my cool coworkers!&quot;</p> <p>It&#39;s possible to do this wrong. &quot;People you want to work with&quot; is not the same set as &quot;People you&#39;d like to hang out with.&quot; If you start hiring people in the latter category, you&#39;re going to end up with a bunch of people who want to hang out together, and that&#39;s not a good way to get work done.</p> <p>Much more common than that, though is the error of hiring &quot;people who can do the work.&quot; Hiring managers are prone to this, because they&#39;re worried about their projects being successful. In fact, though, that strategy just leads them astray. </p> <p>Of course you should hire someone who can do the work--who wants to work with someone who can&#39;t do their job? But if you frame the problem in those terms, you&#39;re too likely to make your decision on who you think could do the work <strong>best</strong>. But given the choice between two people who can do the work, you&#39;re way ahead of the game if you hire the one you&#39;d like to work with over the one who might be able to do the work better.</p> <p>The fact is, any bright person who has a demonstrated capability with a related skill set is likely to be able to learn to do any specific task in his or her area. And one who looks forward to coming into work every day will be highly motivated to do so.</p> <p>I think this is a general rule--I think it applies even to very highly skilled, highly specialized jobs like surgeon or baseball pitcher. The surgeons that other surgeons like to scrub up and cut with are probably the ones you want cutting you. The pitchers who gets the whole team to pull together are probably a better choice than ones that can get a few more strikeouts.</p> <p>What if you&#39;re not a hiring manager? Is there an important lesson here for you? Probably not, if you&#39;re just at the point of trying to get a job offer. Most hiring managers are looking for whoever can do the job &quot;best&quot; (whatever they think that means). Convincing them that you&#39;re the sort of person they&#39;d like to work with isn&#39;t going to hurt, but it will probably only make a difference when everything else seems pretty much equal. On the other hand, if you&#39;re trying to decide whether to take an offer, I&#39;d put a considerable amount of weight on the answer to the question, &quot;Do I want to work with these guys?&quot; That&#39;s probably even more important than whether or not you want to do the particular job you&#39;re being hired for.</p> <p>You probably can&#39;t find the person who&#39;s &quot;the best&quot; at some task anyway, and if you could, you couldn&#39;t afford them. But if you hire people you want to work with, they&#39;ll probably do a fine job--and make all your other employees more productive in the bargain.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-hire-employees">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-need-to-stop-asking-hr-for">6 Things You Need to Stop Asking HR For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-your-coworkers-think-youre-a-slacker">6 Reasons Your Coworkers Think You&#039;re a Slacker</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-pearls-of-career-wisdom-from-brian-tracy">6 Pearls of Career Wisdom From Brian Tracy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-warning-signs-that-it-is-not-the-job-for-you">6 Warning Signs that It Is Not the Job for You</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income best employee hire management teamwork work Wed, 30 Jan 2008 09:11:02 +0000 Philip Brewer 1699 at http://www.wisebread.com