income http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/8754/all en-US Yes, You Still Need an Emergency Fund in Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-still-need-an-emergency-fund-in-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/yes-you-still-need-an-emergency-fund-in-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/donation_jar_overflowing_with_american_money.jpg" alt="Donation jar overflowing with American money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You know how important it is to build an emergency fund while you're working. But here's what you might not know: You need to keep that emergency fund well-stocked with savings even after you retire.</p> <p>An emergency fund might be even <em>more</em> important once you leave the working world. You won't have a regular salary to fall back on in retirement if an unexpected expense pops up. One costly car repair or medical bill can set you back and cause a lot of financial problems.</p> <p>While you're working, you should keep anywhere from six months' to a year's worth of daily living expenses in this fund. That way, if you lose your job, you'll have money available to pay your daily living expenses while you search for a replacement. You need to do the same during your retirement.</p> <h2>How an emergency fund changes in retirement</h2> <p>Social Security payments often complicate the emergency fund equation in retirement. That's because you are guaranteed these payments each month. When you're working, there is always a danger that you'll lose your job and your paycheck will disappear. That won't happen with your Social Security benefits. An emergency fund won't ever have to replace this source of income.</p> <p>By the time you reach retirement, you should also know how much other income you can rely on each month. Most of this will probably come from the retirement savings you've built up over time. You should have created a retirement budget listing how much money you'll have available each month when factoring in withdrawals from these savings and Social Security payments. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">Here's How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks</a>)</p> <p>What you might not be as certain about are your monthly living expenses. Retirement isn't cheap, and that's where an emergency fund comes in. This liquid savings can help you cover unexpected emergencies that could otherwise break your monthly budget.</p> <p>The challenge, of course, is in estimating how much you should keep in that fund at any given time. There is no magic formula. And how much you'll need depends largely on your health and your housing situation.</p> <h2>The costs of retirement</h2> <p>The most recent Merrill Lynch <em>Finances in Retirement Survey</em> says that the average cost of retirement is $738,400.</p> <p>A good chunk of that cost can be attributed to health care. A recent report from Fidelity found that a healthy 65-year-old couple retiring in 2017 could expect to pay $275,000 throughout their retirements in health care and medical expenses. That figure is rising, with the number 6 percent higher in 2017 than it was a year earlier. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-far-1-million-will-actually-go-in-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Here's How Far $1 Million Will Actually Go in Retirement</a>)</p> <p>The challenge with health care costs is that you can't control them. You might be healthy when you hit retirement, but there's no guarantee that your health won't decline. Without an emergency fund to cover unexpected medical bills, you risk wiping out a huge chunk of your retirement savings that may be budgeted for other things.</p> <p>Then there's housing. You might have paid off your mortgage and plan to remain in your home. That's ideal &hellip; for now. As you age, you might need assisted living, which certainly isn't inexpensive. And if you enter retirement with a monthly mortgage payment, that can be a huge expense.</p> <p>Even if you do live in your current home without a mortgage payment, you can still expect to pay for property taxes, repairs, and maintenance. And if your home has aged along with you, chances are it may take some extra TLC (and cost) to be maintained. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-expenses-for-retirees-and-how-to-manage-them?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Unexpected Expenses for Retirees &mdash; And How to Manage Them</a>)</p> <p>This is why it's so important to maintain an emergency fund in retirement. Much like when you were working, your goal should still be to keep that fund stocked with enough to cover six months' to a year's worth of daily living expenses in case the worst should happen.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-still-need-an-emergency-fund-in-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks">Here&#039;s How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world">Why Retiring With Debt Isn&#039;t the End of the World</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-buying-a-second-home-in-retirement">5 Questions to Ask Before Buying a Second Home in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-crucial-social-security-terms-everyone-needs-to-know">13 Crucial Social Security Terms Everyone Needs to Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-reasons-to-claim-social-security-before-your-retirement-age">3 Reasons to Claim Social Security Before Your Retirement Age</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement emergency funds health care housing costs income maintenance medical bills mortgages social security Wed, 17 Jan 2018 09:00:06 +0000 Dan Rafter 2085674 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 False Assumptions That Could Threaten Your Retirement Years http://www.wisebread.com/4-false-assumptions-that-could-threaten-your-retirement-years <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-false-assumptions-that-could-threaten-your-retirement-years" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i_need_you_signature_here.jpg" alt="I need your signature here" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I'm sure it isn't news to you that many people are not saving enough for retirement. For some, there just doesn't seem to be enough money to pay the bills <em>and </em>save. However, for others, faulty assumptions may be to blame.</p> <p>Consider the statements below. Have you ever thought or said such things? If so, they might be keeping you from saving as much as you should for your later years.</p> <h2>1. &quot;I'll be able to earn income as long as I'd like to.&quot;</h2> <p>A growing number of today's workers are planning to keep working past the typical retirement age. However, their plans don't square with the experiences of today's actual retirees.</p> <p>According to the latest Retirement Confidence Survey from the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI), 38 percent of today's workers expect to retire at age 70 or later, or never retire. How does that compare with today's retirees? Just 4 percent actually left the workforce that late.</p> <p>Among retirees who left the workforce earlier than planned, EBRI says many did so &quot;because of a hardship, such as a health problem or disability.&quot; Others retired early because of &quot;changes at their company.&quot;</p> <p>This same expectation/reality gap can be seen in the number of workers who plan to work for pay <em>after</em> they retire. Some 79 percent say that's their intention whereas just 29 percent of current retirees have <em>actually</em> worked for pay.</p> <p>What should you do? Instead of counting on paid work in your later years, plan financially to retire at the typical retirement age. At the same time, keep your vocational skills current so you <em>could</em> keep working if you'd like to and are able to.</p> <h2>2. &quot;Inflation will always be low.&quot;</h2> <p>If you want to do a checkup on your retirement savings, you may be tempted to take your total nest egg and divide it by the number of years you think you might live. This will give you an idea of how much money you'll have each year to cover your annual costs. When you have enough to get by, you might assume you're &quot;set.&quot;</p> <p>There's just one problem with that approach, which people often forget about: inflation. While the cost of living has only been increasing at a relatively moderate rate in recent years, even a 2 percent rise means $500 worth of groceries today will cost about $600 in 10 years. And who knows how long inflation will stay low?</p> <p>That's why keeping your entire nest egg in an account that today pays a fraction of 1 percent is ill advised. Given our longer life spans, it's generally best to invest a portion of your nest egg in stocks. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Signs You Aren't Saving Enough for Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>3. &quot;I'll always be healthy.&quot;</h2> <p>When you're in good health, it's hard to imagine ever becoming seriously ill. Heart attacks, strokes, cancer, and dementia only happen to other people, right?</p> <p>That assumption may explain why so many people are ignoring resources that could be used to help pay health care expenses later in life. EBRI found that only 13 percent of account holders contributed the full allowable annual amount to their health savings account in 2016. Meanwhile, according to The LTC Financing Strategy Group, only 16 percent of eligible people over age 65 have a long-term care insurance (LTCI) policy. Cost certainly is a factor in these decisions, but an assumption of continued good health may play a role as well.</p> <p>What to do? Face the facts. You probably won't always be as healthy as you are today. According to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, over half the people turning 65 are expected to need long-term care at some point in their remaining years.</p> <p>If you are using a health savings account in conjunction with a high-deductible health insurance policy, consider boosting your contributions with the intent to carry a large balance into retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-an-hsa-could-help-your-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How an HSA Could Help Your Retirement</a>)</p> <p>Also, think about your family history. Did your parents or grandparents have any significant health issues at a relatively young age? If you experience a similar problem, how would you handle the cost? Especially if there's a history of dementia in your family, consider picking up some long-term care insurance. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-long-term-care-insurance-worth-it?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">Is Long Term Care Insurance Worth It?</a>)</p> <h2>4. &quot;If I ever do become seriously ill, my kids will be there for me.&quot;</h2> <p>What if you <em>do </em>experience a debilitating illness &mdash; one that leaves you needing help with some of the activities of daily living? If you're like most people, you'll probably prefer to avoid living in a nursing home, but what other options would you have?</p> <p>Think about your children. How old will they be when you are 80 or 90? Will they be available, or will they be busy building their careers, raising their own kids, or both? Are they likely to live near you?</p> <p>Counting on your adult kids to help care for you may be counting on too much. Here again, a long-term care policy may be in order. Most of today's LTCI policies will help cover the cost of a nursing home <em>and </em>in-home care.</p> <p>Among the many threats to a financially secure retirement, the difficulty many of us have envisioning the circumstances we'll face in the future is one of the most significant. It can lead to faulty assumptions that, in turn, can leave us unprepared for our later years. The good news is, if we realize early enough that we hold these false assumptions, we can change them and correct course so that we are financially secure in our later years.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-false-assumptions-that-could-threaten-your-retirement-years">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation">4 Ways to Protect Your Retirement From Inflation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-plan-for-a-forced-early-retirement">How to Plan for a Forced Early Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-couples-are-shortchanging-their-retirement-savings">4 Ways Couples Are Shortchanging Their Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-you-start-claiming-your-social-security-benefits">5 Questions to Ask Before You Start Claiming Your Social Security Benefits</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement adult children caregivers early retirement family health problems health savings accounts income inflation long term care insurance Wed, 10 Jan 2018 09:00:08 +0000 Matt Bell 2080478 at http://www.wisebread.com Why Saving Money Is Harder Today http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-money-is-harder-today <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/why-saving-money-is-harder-today" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/sad_young_woman_counting_bills.jpg" alt="Sad young woman counting bills" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>With a low overall inflation rate, and declining inflation-adjusted prices on goods such as technology and groceries, you might think that saving money today should be easier than ever. But sadly, that isn't the case. Prices of some of the biggest items in most household budgets have actually gone up faster than income has grown. Skyrocketing costs for key expenses, along with slow income growth, are making it much harder for people to save money now compared to past decades.</p> <p>According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U. S. Census Bureau, and the College Board, here are some of the biggest budget-wrecking expenses that are growing faster than your income.</p> <h2>Education</h2> <p>For many families, saving for college is a huge financial challenge &mdash; especially with the rapidly increasing price tag. Building a college savings fund to cover all of the costs is more and more difficult. As a result, more students and families are turning to student loans to make college possible. The average cost for tuition, fees, room, and board at a public four-year university grew 80 percent from 1997&ndash;2016, jumping from $11,390 to $20,500.</p> <h2>Health care</h2> <p>The cost of health care and health insurance has shot up in recent years. In some cases, a big medical expense can spell financial trouble: If an illness or injury keeps you out of work, the loss in income can make it even harder to bounce back from a large medical bill. Health care costs spiked 123 percent between 2000 and 2016, growing from an average $2,066 per year to $4,612.</p> <h2>Housing</h2> <p>Purchasing a place to live has gotten much more expensive, with median new home prices growing from $169,000 in 2000, to $307,800 in 2016 &mdash; an increase of 82 percent. Expensive housing can result in a budget crunch in several ways. It requires a bigger down payment, which takes a lot of money away from savings at the time of purchase. Monthly mortgage payments are higher, and higher home values also result in higher property tax and homeowners insurance premiums. Higher house prices may drive people to consider renting instead of buying, but the price of renting has also gone up rapidly.</p> <h2>Food</h2> <p>The inflation-adjusted price for food has stayed flat or even gone down over the past 16 years. On average, income growth has kept up with food costs. Yet, <em>spending</em> on food has gone up in many households in recent years. People may be electing for more convenient &mdash; and more expensive &mdash; food choices as a consequence of working more hours to boost their income. Average food expenditures grew around 40 percent from 2000 to 2016, rising from $5,158 per year to $7,203.</p> <h2>Child care</h2> <p>This cost varies significantly based on location and the type of care, but many families with young children are struggling to find affordable child care. According to a 2016 Care.com and New America report, the average cost of a full-time child care center for a child up to age four is $9,589 per year, which is more than the average cost of in-state college tuition ($9,410). Even in a dual-income household, child care can be an overwhelming expense.</p> <h2>Debt payments</h2> <p>As budgets continue to get squeezed by growing expenses, debt levels have also increased. This can set up a vicious cycle where you have even less money available, which leads to more borrowing to make ends meet.</p> <p>For example, car prices have been relatively stable when adjusted for inflation, but the amount consumers are borrowing to buy cars has gone up. According to Experian, the average car loan as of 2016 stood at $30,032 with an average monthly payment of $503. Credit card balances and student loan balances are also trending upward, which means bigger payments are due every month, resulting in less money that could go toward savings or other bills.</p> <p>The overall economic trend is that some of the biggest expenses in many household budgets are growing much faster than income is growing, creating a squeeze that is making it harder and harder to save money.</p> <h2>How to save money anyway</h2> <p>There are two basic approaches to dealing with the financial squeeze of higher expenses and limited income growth: reduce expenses or boost income (or both).</p> <p>Housing expenses can be reduced by choosing a smaller, less expensive home. Renting a place to live can also be a less expensive option to owning a house. If you are not looking to move, consider <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-believing-these-5-home-refinance-myths?ref=internal" target="_blank">refinancing your mortgage</a> to a lower interest rate to reduce your monthly payment. If you rent, you may be able to offer to do some maintenance and upkeep on the property in exchange for a rent reduction. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/watch-out-for-these-5-last-minute-home-buying-costs?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Watch Out for These 5 Last Minute Home Buying Costs</a>)</p> <p>One way to reduce health care expenses is to stay as healthy as possible. But you can&rsquo;t avoid medical expenses forever, so consider using a high deductible health insurance policy with a tax-advantaged health savings account (HSA) to minimize your out-of-pocket health care costs. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-reasons-an-hsa-is-actually-worth-having?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Reasons an HSA Is Actually Worth Having</a>)</p> <p>Meal prep at home is key to keeping your food expenses low. Plan out meals ahead of time so you'll have groceries on hand to cook dinner with instead of going out to eat or ordering takeout. Get in the habit of packing your own lunch instead of going out to eat during the workweek. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/31-foolproof-ways-to-lower-your-grocery-bill?ref=seealso" target="_blank">31 Foolproof Ways to Lower Your Grocery Bill</a>)</p> <p>Minimize debt payments by using balance transfers or debt consolidation loans to reduce your interest payments, allowing more of your payment to be applied to the principal. This will allow you to pay off debts faster for less money. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-0-balance-transfer-credit-cards?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Best 0% Balance Transfer Credit Cards</a>)</p> <p>Finally, cutting expenses may not be enough to tune up your budget to the point where you can save as much money as you would like. Consider boosting your income with a side hustle to bring in some extra money to help keep up with growing expenses. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-best-side-jobs-for-fast-cash?ref=seealso" target="_blank">14 Best Side Jobs For Fast Cash</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fwhy-saving-money-is-harder-today&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FWhy%2520Saving%2520Money%2520Is%2520Harder%2520Today.jpg&amp;description=Why%20Saving%20Money%20Is%20Harder%20Today"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Why%20Saving%20Money%20Is%20Harder%20Today.jpg" alt="Why Saving Money Is Harder Today" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dr-penny-pincher">Dr Penny Pincher</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-money-is-harder-today">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-unexpected-expenses-of-a-new-baby">15 Unexpected Expenses of a New Baby</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-far-1-million-will-actually-go-in-retirement">Here&#039;s How Far $1 Million Will Actually Go in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-new-reasons-you-need-an-emergency-fund">4 New Reasons You Need an Emergency Fund</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/another-path-to-recovery-higher-incomes">Another path to recovery: higher incomes</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Frugal Living child care costs debt education expenses Food health care housing income inflation saving money Thu, 28 Dec 2017 09:00:07 +0000 Dr Penny Pincher 2076921 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Things You Need to Do if You're Retiring in 2018 http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-need-to-do-if-youre-retiring-in-2018 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-things-you-need-to-do-if-youre-retiring-in-2018" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/happy_retirement_celebration_party_cupcakes_with_candles.jpg" alt="Happy Retirement Celebration Party Cupcakes with Candles" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You&rsquo;re ready to retire in 2018. A long career is behind you, and you're finally ready to enjoy your golden years after decades of hard work and saving.</p> <p>But just because retirement is at your doorstep doesn&rsquo;t mean you don&rsquo;t still have a few important steps to take. Here are six things you need to do right now to start your 2018 retirement off on the right foot.</p> <h2>1. Calculate your retirement budget</h2> <p>Creating any sort of budget rarely sounds like fun, but when you&rsquo;re ready to retire, it&rsquo;s a necessity. Remember, that paycheck you&rsquo;ve counted on for so long is disappearing. You need to make sure you have enough money coming in each month to support yourself.</p> <p>First, calculate how much money you&rsquo;ll have available each month. Include all sources of income, including Social Security benefits, money from the savings you&rsquo;ve built up, royalties, rents, disability payments, and annuity payments. Then, calculate your fixed expenses that remain the same each month. These would include rent or mortgage payments, car payments, and insurance costs &mdash; everything from life and health, to homeowners and auto.</p> <p>Create reasonable estimates for expenses that might fluctuate each month. This includes costs such as utility bills, the money you spend on groceries, transportation costs, and, always important, the estimated amount of dollars you&rsquo;ll spend on entertainment, traveling, and eating out.</p> <p>Once you have these figures, you&rsquo;ll know if you have enough money to support the retirement lifestyle you want.</p> <h2>2. Make some tweaks</h2> <p>Maybe, after creating this budget, you discover that you don&rsquo;t have enough incoming dollars to cover all your expenses. This means it&rsquo;s time to make some changes. If money is tight, you might have to cut back on discretionary expenses like going out to dinner or the movies. You might not be able to take a road trip every month. You might have to put off that cruise.</p> <p>If you need more dramatic savings, it might be time to consider putting your home on the market. If you sell it and downsize into a smaller residence &mdash; maybe a condo or apartment &mdash; you might be able to generate enough money, and save enough in monthly mortgage expenses, to afford a more luxurious retirement lifestyle.</p> <p>You might also consider selling your car, if you&rsquo;re still making payments on it, and purchasing a more affordable vehicle that might cost hundreds of dollars less each month. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2>3. Talk to your partner about your retirement hopes</h2> <p>You don&rsquo;t want to hit retirement only to discover that you&rsquo;re happy puttering around the house and reading while your partner is looking forward to traveling the country in an RV.</p> <p>Partners need to talk about their retirement goals long before they leave the working world. If you haven&rsquo;t done this yet, and you&rsquo;re ready to retire in 2018, it&rsquo;s time to have this conversation.</p> <p>Retirement brings with it plenty of free time &mdash; maybe more than you expected. You might get tired of reading or fishing pretty quickly. It&rsquo;s best to discuss how you&rsquo;ll fill these extra hours with your partner or spouse before retirement hits. Doing so will increase the odds that both of you will enjoy a happy retirement together. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Money Conversations Couples Should Have Before Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>4. Consider whether you still want to work</h2> <p>Many retirees take on part-time work after they leave their full-time jobs. Some do this for financial reasons, while others simply enjoy the act of going to work and staying productive.</p> <p>Take a long look at yourself. If you enjoy the routine of going to work, and find working satisfying, taking a part-time job might be the right decision for you. Or maybe you&rsquo;ll want to use your retirement years to set up a consulting business or pursue a dream job in the arts.</p> <p>Just make sure to plan for this move. Share your goals with your partner, so that he or she isn&rsquo;t blindsided when you announce that you&rsquo;re going back to work. And if you&rsquo;re retiring next year, take the time now to make the connections and prep your resume so that you can transition as smoothly as possible to your new job. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-creative-remote-jobs-that-can-supplement-your-retirement-income?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Creative Remote Jobs That Can Supplement Your Retirement Income</a>)</p> <h2>5. Explore your community</h2> <p>Again, retirement comes with plenty of free time. If you don&rsquo;t want to work, maybe you&rsquo;ll want to volunteer to fill in those hours. Now is the time to explore volunteer opportunities in your community. That way, when you do retire, you&rsquo;ll already have a plan for how you&rsquo;ll occupy those long post-work days. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-find-your-new-identity-after-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Find Your New Identity After Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>6. Get conservative with your investments</h2> <p>If you haven&rsquo;t already, move your retirement savings out of stocks and into less volatile savings vehicles such as bonds. It&rsquo;s true that bonds don&rsquo;t have the same ceiling when it comes to big gains, but you don&rsquo;t want a dip in the stock market six months before you retire to eat up a big chunk of your retirement savings. Instead, play it safe by moving your savings to retirement vehicles that aren&rsquo;t as likely to hit a big dip.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-things-you-need-to-do-if-youre-retiring-in-2018&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Things%2520You%2520Need%2520to%2520Do%2520if%2520You%2527re%2520Retiring%2520in%25202018.jpg&amp;description=6%20Things%20You%20Need%20to%20Do%20if%20You're%20Retiring%20in%202018"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Things%20You%20Need%20to%20Do%20if%20You%27re%20Retiring%20in%202018.jpg" alt="6 Things You Need to Do if You're Retiring in 2018" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-need-to-do-if-youre-retiring-in-2018">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world">Why Retiring With Debt Isn&#039;t the End of the World</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-youre-laid-off-before-you-retire">What to Do if You&#039;re Laid Off Before You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-retirement-struggles-nobody-talks-about-and-how-to-beat-them">5 Retirement Struggles Nobody Talks About — And How to Beat Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-far-1-million-will-actually-go-in-retirement">Here&#039;s How Far $1 Million Will Actually Go in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement about to retire budgeting cutting costs employment expenses free time income investments part-time jobs planning Wed, 20 Dec 2017 09:30:10 +0000 Dan Rafter 2073561 at http://www.wisebread.com Highest Paying Jobs for People Who Love Kids http://www.wisebread.com/highest-paying-jobs-for-people-who-love-kids <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/highest-paying-jobs-for-people-who-love-kids" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/smiling_little_girl_with_a_doctor.jpg" alt="Smiling little girl with a doctor" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>People who love kids are a special breed with lots of patience and huge hearts. If you love children, you may even decide to pursue a career that caters to them. The problem is, it can be difficult to find positions that pay well when dealing with children. But, that does not necessarily mean you are confined to low-wage work.</p> <p>According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS,) there are a number of moderate- to high-paying jobs for people who love working with kids. If you think you&rsquo;re one of those kindhearted, patient folks, check out some of these lucrative job options.</p> <h2>Pediatric registered nurse</h2> <p>A bachelor's degree in nursing is required to become a licensed pediatric registered nurse, or RN. Job duties include providing and coordinating patient care along with education and information about health, wellness, and disease management. Pediatric nurses also provide physical care and emotional support for their young patients during their medical treatment.</p> <p>Pediatric nurses can work for hospitals, physicians&rsquo; offices, or home health care services. They can also work in schools, clinics, or within the military. Pediatric nurses may work in different disciplines like oncology, cardiology, or neurology, but will focus on administering services to children. According to the BLS, 2016 median pay for registered nurses stood at $68,450.</p> <h2>Pediatric dental hygienist</h2> <p>Pediatric dental hygienists work alongside dentists and perform duties like teeth cleaning, exams, and providing patient education on oral health. A hygienist must have an associate degree and be licensed to practice. Typical dental hygienist programs take up to three years to complete.</p> <p>As a pediatric dental hygienist, you&rsquo;ll work with dentists who specialize in caring for patients under 18 years of age. At times, children can be anxious when it comes to visiting the dentist&rsquo;s office, so you should be prepared to soothe their fears and provide a pleasant experience for them. In 2016, dental hygienists earned a median salary of $72,910.</p> <h2>Speech language pathologist</h2> <p>A speech language-pathologist, also known as a speech therapist, evaluates and diagnoses people with speech issues while also providing and carrying out a plan to resolve these issues. This career lends itself to early intervention around speech and communication deficiencies.</p> <p>Because it&rsquo;s best to start treatment as soon as a speech problem is noticed, these professionals often work with kids in their formative years. There <em>are</em> adult-onset speech deficiencies, but the BLS reports that as many as two of every five speech therapists work in schools.</p> <p>Most speech pathologists have master&rsquo;s degrees, and some states require therapists to be licensed to perform speech therapy services. The 2016 median pay for this profession was $74,680 per year.</p> <h2>Child psychologist</h2> <p>Child psychologists work with young individuals in many settings to diagnose, evaluate, and plan care for emotional, cognitive, and social disorders. Some child psychologists work in school settings as a counselor or have a private practice that focuses specifically on the needs of children.</p> <p>Duties for this job include observing, interviewing, and studying individuals to help modify behaviors that lower their quality of life. Licensed psychologists are typically required to earn doctoral degrees in the field. The median salary for psychologists in 2016 was $75,230 per year.</p> <h2>Juvenile justice attorney</h2> <p>Juvenile justice attorneys defend minors who&rsquo;ve been convicted of a crime. Working with kids in the legal system may require soft skills like empathy, active listening, and compassion. A juvenile justice attorney may also have to be familiar with related disciplines like social work, counseling, and mediation.</p> <p>Most juvenile justice attorneys have private practices, but some are employed by government entities and nonprofit organizations. Attorneys that work with minors have to meet the same requirements as any other lawyer: three to four years of law school, a law degree, and a passing score on the bar exam for the state they&rsquo;ll be practicing in. According to the BLS, lawyers earned an average $118,160 per year in 2016.</p> <h2>Pediatric dentist</h2> <p>The demand for dentists in general is expected to grow 17 percent over the next 10 years, which is much faster than many other occupations. If you enjoy working with children, a career as a pediatric dentist may be a good fit.</p> <p>Dentists must attend an accredited dental school and pass written exams to become licensed. Since pediatric dentists specialize in certain issues that only arise with younger patients, many of them open practices that provide services solely to children. Dentists earned an average $159,770 in 2016.</p> <h2>Pediatrician</h2> <p>Pediatricians can be family doctors who also practice pediatric and internal medicine. These doctors perform routine wellness checkups, and treat and diagnose injuries or illnesses in child patients.</p> <p>Physicians must have a bachelor's degree in some area of undergraduate study, plus another four years of medical school. Depending on their specialty, they will have to complete an additional three to seven years of internship and residency programs. Physicians earned an average $208,000 per year in 2016.</p> <p>Working with children can be a rewarding, positive experience. Being well-paid to work with them can be the icing on the cake. If you love kids, you&rsquo;d do very well to work in one of these high-paying careers.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhighest-paying-jobs-for-people-who-love-kids&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHighest%2520Paying%2520Jobs%2520for%2520People%2520Who%2520Love%2520Kids.jpg&amp;description=Highest%20Paying%20Jobs%20for%20People%20Who%20Love%20Kids"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Highest%20Paying%20Jobs%20for%20People%20Who%20Love%20Kids.jpg" alt="Highest Paying Jobs for People Who Love Kids" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/aja-mcclanahan">Aja McClanahan</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/highest-paying-jobs-for-people-who-love-kids">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-certifications-that-add-big-to-your-salary">7 Certifications That Add Big $$ to Your Salary</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-careers-you-dont-need-a-ton-of-experience-to-start">9 Careers You Don&#039;t Need a Ton of Experience to Start</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-careers-that-pay-women-more-than-men">7 Careers That Pay Women More Than Men</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/protect-future-earnings-by-negotiating-the-right-starting-salary">Protect Future Earnings by Negotiating the Right Starting Salary</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-high-paying-careers-with-low-educational-barriers">10 High-Paying Careers With Low Educational Barriers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting careers children dentists income jobs nurses pediatricians psychologists salary speech therapists working with kids Tue, 19 Dec 2017 09:30:10 +0000 Aja McClanahan 2074045 at http://www.wisebread.com Here's How Far $1 Million Will Actually Go in Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-far-1-million-will-actually-go-in-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/heres-how-far-1-million-will-actually-go-in-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/nest_made_of_american_currency_horizontal_0.jpg" alt="Nest Made of American Currency Horizontal" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For years, saving $1 million for retirement has been on my nest egg to-do list. Using the 4 percent rule, where you withdraw 4 percent of your savings each year during retirement, a million dollars would produce a hypothetical income lasting up to 33 years. That seems like a nice round number and reasonable goal, especially with the traditional retirement age holding steady at 65 and the average American living for 20 years after retiring.</p> <p>However, depending on where you live, $1 million may not last very long at all. So before you dive into your golden years, you should make sure you know exactly how far your savings will take you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-can-you-afford-to-spend-in-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Much Can You Afford to Spend in Retirement?</a>)</p> <h2>Where you live matters most</h2> <p>GoBankingRates compared the cost of basic living expenses in each state and found the length of time a million dollars lasts varies significantly across the country. In Hawaii, a state with the highest cost of living index, you could run out of cash in under 12 years. Unless camping out on the beach while subsisting on pineapples is your thing, Hawaii may not be the best option.</p> <p>On the other hand, there's Mississippi. That same nest egg would last 26 years in the Magnolia State. Mississippi has the lowest cost of living index in the country. A retiree could live comfortably paying just $11,000 a year for housing. You may not be able to visit the white sandy beaches of Oahu, but the Gold Coast is nothing to sneeze at.</p> <h2>Other expenses to plan for in retirement</h2> <p>In addition to housing, the cost of living index accounts for basic necessities like food, taxes, and health care. Some states, like Vermont, tax Social Security benefits. Florida residents have the lowest Social Security payout, but they don't pay state taxes on those benefits.</p> <p>Access and affordable health care options, senior transportation, and job opportunities for people over 65 are other financial aspects to keep in mind according to the Best Cities for Successful Aging index. Durham-Chapel Hill clocks in at one of the top spots in their list of best retirement cities. Retirees are attracted to the mild climate, low state and property taxes, and ample access to world-class medical facilities. Your $1 million nest egg would last nearly 24 years in this area. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-expenses-for-retirees-and-how-to-manage-them?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Unexpected Expenses for Retirees &mdash; And How to Manage Them</a>)</p> <h2>Calculating your retirement goal</h2> <p>I like my hometown. Chicago may not top the charts on any best-place-to-retire mega list, but access to my extended family, proximity to my future grandchildren, and a vibrant walkable city with great public transportation options may still be quality of life factors I value in my golden years. Staying put may be desirable even if your hometown doesn't make a &quot;where to retire&quot; hot list on the internet. Determining your retirement savings goal should start with where you plan to live and how much it will cost to live there.</p> <p>Roger Wohlner, a financial adviser with The Chicago Financial Planner, advises would-be retirees to consider a number of options. Calculating a retirement savings goal is different for everyone.</p> <p>&quot;Are you going to have a mortgage? Are you going to move somewhere else and downsize? What are you going to spend your money on? It's really no different from how you live pre-retirement,&quot; he says.</p> <p>Most of all, he suggests we factor in health care costs into any post-employment savings projections. &quot;As you get older, [medical expenses] are more pronounced in retirement,&quot; Wohlner says.</p> <p>Fidelity's annual study on health care costs found that a retired couple can expect to spend $275,000 on medical expenses during retirement, not including long-term care. And health care costs are rising well beyond the rate of inflation: The increase in medical spending from 2016 to 2017 alone was $15,000.</p> <p>With your basic living expenses in mind, estimated health care projections, and a few dollars thrown in for hobbies &mdash; like traveling or spoiling the <em>grands</em> &mdash; head to your nearest online retirement calculator.</p> <p>Experts suggest that a comfortable retirement lifestyle will require 70 to 80 percent of your current annual salary. Using a simple <a href="https://www.calcxml.com/calculators/retirement-calculator" target="_blank">retirement calculator</a>, you can figure out what your savings goal should be based on your savings starting point and estimated withdrawal needs. With a custom retirement savings goal in hand, you can start to determine if $1 million is still a workable goal, relocation is in your retirement future, or you need to revise your current savings strategy. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-should-you-have-saved-for-retirement-by-30-40-50?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Much Should You Have Saved for Retirement by 30? 40? 50?</a>)</p> <p>In either case, determining your retirement goal should be an annual exercise, according to financial experts like Roger Wohlner. &quot;This is not something you just do once. Circumstances change. People should really be updating this calculation every year,&quot; he says.</p> <p>If entering your golden years with $1 million in savings doesn't work out in a desirable U.S. location, consider retiring abroad to one of many affordable countries where your savings will stretch even further. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-countries-where-you-can-retire-for-1000-a-month?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Countries Where You Can Retire for $1,000 a Month</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fheres-how-far-1-million-will-actually-go-in-retirement&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHeres%2520How%2520Far%2520%25241%2520Million%2520Will%2520Actually%2520Go%2520in%2520Retirement.jpg&amp;description=Heres%20How%20Far%201%20Million%20Dollars%20Will%20Actually%20Go%20in%20Retirement"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Heres%20How%20Far%20%241%20Million%20Will%20Actually%20Go%20in%20Retirement.jpg" alt="Here's How Far $1 Million Will Actually Go in Retirement" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/toni-husbands">Toni Husbands</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-far-1-million-will-actually-go-in-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-money-is-harder-today">Why Saving Money Is Harder Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks">Here&#039;s How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-couples-are-shortchanging-their-retirement-savings">4 Ways Couples Are Shortchanging Their Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-almost-anyone-can-afford-to-retire-in-mexico">How Almost Anyone Can Afford to Retire in Mexico</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement cities cost of living expenses health care income life span old age relocation saving money withdrawal rate Tue, 28 Nov 2017 10:00:06 +0000 Toni Husbands 2059323 at http://www.wisebread.com Don't Get Audited! How Your Side Gig Needs to Handle Taxes http://www.wisebread.com/dont-get-audited-how-your-side-gig-needs-to-handle-taxes <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dont-get-audited-how-your-side-gig-needs-to-handle-taxes" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/going_on_a_family_vacation.jpg" alt="Going on a family vacation" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The gig economy is booming. In 2016, a TIME poll found that 45 million Americans offered some kind of good or service through an online platform, whether it was running errands, renting out their homes, or offering rides in their cars. With so many people earning extra income this way, you can bet that Uncle Sam wants its fair share of those earnings. Understanding some basic rules about taxes in the gig economy can help you avoid frustration and penalties.</p> <h2>Renting out your home</h2> <p>At $924 per month, Airbnb hosts command the highest average monthly income out of all others taking part in the sharing economy. Here are some key things to keep in mind if you rent your space. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-things-i-learned-from-renting-out-my-home-on-airbnb?ref=seealso" target="_blank">13 Things I Learned From Renting Out My Home on Airbnb</a>)</p> <h3>1. The 14-day rule</h3> <p>According to the IRS, if your rental property also serves as your residence, and you rent out the space for no more than 14 days during the year, you don't have to report those earnings as income. Note that you also cannot claim any deductions from rental expenses if you rent for fewer than 14 days per year.</p> <p>Airbnb and similar companies will still report your earnings even if you're under the two-week threshold. But as long as you provide documentation that you meet the 14-day rule, you don't have to include rental income on your federal return. If you do have to report income, use Schedule C or E of Form 1040.</p> <h3>2. Deductible expenses</h3> <p>The IRS allows you to deduct a long list of applicable costs for your rental operation, including advertising, cleaning and maintenance services, utilities, property insurance, and property taxes. Check the rental section on <a href="https://www.irs.gov/publications/p527/ch01.html#en_US_2016_publink1000218979" target="_blank">IRS Publication 527</a> for a full list of eligible expenses.</p> <p>You can deduct 100 percent of direct rental expenses such as fees to Airbnb and rental insurance, and allocate a portion of general expenses such as mortgage interest and utilities. If you only rent out a room that is one-sixth of the size of your home, you can only allocate one-sixth of a general expense.</p> <h3>3. Form 1099-K</h3> <p>When you earn over $20,000 and make over 200 transactions in a calendar year, Airbnb will issue you a Form 1099-K. Airbnb will mail you this form and keep an electronic copy under &quot;Payout Preferences.&quot; This form is an IRS information return used to report certain payment transactions, which improves your voluntary tax compliance.</p> <h3>4. Pay attention to local occupancy taxes</h3> <p>On top of the IRS, you should also keep an eye on state and local government agencies. For example, throughout 2017 the House Finance Committee of Hawaii is evaluating an &quot;Airbnb bill&quot; to collect hotel room and general excise taxes from Hawaii-based short-term and vacation rentals.</p> <h3>5. Report rental losses</h3> <p>In the event that your rental operation goes sour, you can deduct losses up to applicable limits. Let's imagine that you own a $400,000 home and that you spent $400 to get a room ready for rental. However, nobody took you up on your offer. Per the IRS at-risk rule (for property placed in service after 1986), you can write off up to $400,000 in rental losses. So, you can deduct the $400 as a rental loss on your return.</p> <h2>Driving people in your car</h2> <p>Lyft and <a href="https://uber.7eer.net/c/27771/207645/3437?sharedid=000_wisebread.com">Uber drivers</a> make an average $377 and $364 per month, respectively. Here are some tax-related pointers to keep in mind when declaring that income. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-more-money-as-an-uber-driver?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Get a High Rating and Make More Money as an Uber Driver</a>)</p> <h3>1. Keep track of all 1099s</h3> <p>Unlike a full-time employer, Uber and Lyft won't issue you a W-2. Instead, these and other ride-sharing companies issue two types of 1099 forms to most drivers.</p> <ul> <li> <p>Form 1099-K: Includes all payments that you received from customers directly related to driving.</p> </li> <li> <p>Form 1099-MISC: Keeps track of all other non-driving income, such as payments for referrals and other types of bonuses.</p> </li> </ul> <p>While companies aren't required to issue a 1099-K unless you process 200 transactions or more (and make at least $20,000), and they're not required to issue a 1099-MISC unless you make at least $600, Uber and Lyft generally will issue those forms anyway just to remind you to report your income made through ride-sharing.</p> <p>On Uber, access your tax documents by logging in to partners.uber.com and clicking &quot;Tax Information.&quot; On Lyft, look for tax documents in the &quot;Tax Info'&quot; tab of the &quot;Driver Dashboard&quot; of your Lyft app.</p> <h3>2. Deduct applicable expenses</h3> <p>You'll quickly notice in Box 1a of your 1099-K that the reported amount is actually greater than what you received. The reason is that the reported amount in that box includes Uber's commission and other fees. On your Schedule C, Profit or Loss from Business (Form 1040), you can deduct those fees and other applicable expenses. Some examples are:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Bottled water and snacks for your passengers.</p> </li> <li> <p>Business taxes and license costs.</p> </li> <li> <p>Highway tolls.</p> </li> <li> <p>Car cleaning expenses.</p> </li> <li> <p>Car maintenance costs.</p> </li> <li> <p>Gas.</p> </li> </ul> <p>It's a best practice to keep a copy of all receipts so that you can back up your claims. One great way to do so is to open a bank account or credit card and use it solely for driving-related expenses. That way, your monthly statement becomes your monthly expense report. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-you-should-get-a-business-credit-card-over-a-consumer-card?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">When You Should Get a Business Credit Card Over a Consumer Card</a>)</p> <h3>3. Include mileage in your return</h3> <p>Within your 1099s, you'll also receive a summary for &quot;On-Trip&quot; mileage. For all business miles driven in 2017, you can deduct 53.5 cents per mile. So, if you were to drive 2,000 miles, you would deduct $1,070 (2,000 x $0.535) on your return.</p> <p>You may also deduct additional miles that Uber and Lyft didn't report as long as those miles are directly related to your gig. Some examples are miles that you drove before a ride was canceled or on your way to meet an Uber or Lyft inspector. Keep a detailed log of those miles and include date, time, initial mileage, and final mileage.</p> <h3>4. Consider getting a separate smartphone</h3> <p>An internet-enabled smartphone is a key part of your operation. To make it easier for the IRS to identify what mobile phone expenses are related to your driving, get a new phone and use it exclusively for Uber or Lyft. This way you'll be able to deduct 100 percent of all phone costs, including cost of the phone, monthly charges for voice and data, and any essential accessory (chargers or mounts) from your driving income.</p> <h2>Tips for all side giggers</h2> <p>Whatever your gig, be sure you're keeping up with your taxes.</p> <h3>1. Report all income</h3> <p>From assembling furniture through TaskRabbit to delivering business supplies with Postmates, there are plenty of other ways to make money through the sharing economy. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-ways-to-make-money-online-that-arent-scams?ref=seealso" target="_blank">13 Ways to Make Money Online That Aren't Scams</a>).</p> <p>All companies have to issue you a 1099-MISC once you make $600. Even when you don't hit that threshold and don't receive a form, report the income on your return. The IRS charges a 25 percent inaccuracy penalty on top of applicable taxes and interest for late payments.</p> <p>If you happen to complete additional tasks or services for a client that aren't tracked on an app or website, it's a good idea to still include them in your income. When you're making the bulk of your income through the gig economy, your federal tax return becomes a key document to prove how much you make per year. This can be useful when applying for a credit card or other form of credit.</p> <h3>2. Make estimated federal and state tax payments</h3> <p>Lessen the tax blow by submitting estimated tax payments throughout the year. Use Form 1040-ES, Estimated Tax for Individuals to submit tax payments up to four times per year. For tax year 2017, you can submit payments on April 18, June 15, September 15, and January 16, 2018.</p> <p>Most states also allow side-giggers and freelancers to submit estimated tax payments. To learn more about your state tax obligations, contact your local <a href="https://www.irs.gov/tax-professionals/government-sites" target="_blank">state tax office</a>.</p> <h3>3. Adjust withholding from your day job</h3> <p>Don't pay more taxes than you have to. If a full-time employer is already withholding taxes from your paycheck, use the <a href="https://apps.irs.gov/app/withholdingcalculator/" target="_blank">IRS Withholding Calculator</a> to adjust how much is taken out. It has been estimated that 75 percent of Americans pay too much in taxes throughout the year. The calculator will provide you suggestions to adjust your withholding so that you meet your tax liability and keep the most out of your day job paychecks.</p> <h3>4. Hire an accountant</h3> <p>Using Schedule C from Form 1040 is a great way to reduce your taxable income, but is also a way to increase your chances of receiving an audit from the IRS. Individuals using Schedule C are more likely than corporations to get an audit. If you're planning to include a very long list of deductions, paying a professional will be worth your while to hedge against a potential audit. You can deduct what your accountant charges you as a business expense, after all.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Dont%20Get%20Audited%21%20How%20Your%20Side%20Gig%20Needs%20to%20Handle%20Taxes.jpg" alt="Don't Get Audited! How Your Side Gig Needs to Handle Taxes" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-get-audited-how-your-side-gig-needs-to-handle-taxes">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-plan-for-saving-up-a-2000-fun-fund">A Simple Plan for Saving Up a $2000 Fun Fund</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-lessons-from-tax-day-to-remember-for-next-year">7 Lessons From Tax Day to Remember for Next Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-easy-ways-retirees-can-earn-extra-income">9 Easy Ways Retirees Can Earn Extra Income</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-earn-extra-money-with-your-car">7 Ways to Earn Extra Money With Your Car</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-seasonal-side-hustles-thatll-cover-your-holiday-spending">8 Seasonal Side Hustles That&#039;ll Cover Your Holiday Spending</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Extra Income Taxes AirBnb audits deductions earnings expenses freelance gig economy income IRS lyft sharing economy side jobs Uber Thu, 26 Oct 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Damian Davila 2038890 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Family Money Matters Your Kids Don't Need to Know http://www.wisebread.com/9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/working_at_home_1.jpg" alt="Working at home" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you have kids, there will come a time when you want to teach them about money. Some basic personal finance lessons can go a long way toward helping your children understand things like spending, saving, and even investing.</p> <p>But there are many things about your family's finances that your children don't need to know right away, even if they are curious. Information about your family's income, debt, and spending can be confusing and even troubling to younger kids. And kids are prone to share this information when it's best to keep it private.</p> <p>Older teenagers may benefit from learning more about your financial situation as they approach an age when they will be earning money and making purchases on their own. But for younger children, especially, it may be best to keep the following financial information close to your vest. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a>)</p> <h2>1. Your income</h2> <p>Your kids don't need to know how much money you make. All they need to know is that you love them and will care for them. Younger kids, in particular, have no real sense of the value of money anyway. You could tell them you earn $100 a year and they would think you are rich.</p> <p>Children also have a habit of blabbing, and you never want to find your children bragging to other kids &mdash; or even worse, their parents &mdash; about how much money you earn. Your kids will be better off learning that happiness and financial security have less to do with your income and more to do with what you do with money when you have it. This means teaching them about saving, about being charitable to others, and about being appreciative of what you have.</p> <h2>2. Which parent earns more</h2> <p>It's common for one parent to earn more than the other. This is especially true if one parent chooses to stop working or works part-time to raise a family. Children should generally be left oblivious to which spouse is higher earning because salaries don't represent a person's full contribution to the family.</p> <p>If one parent stops working, it may mean they are taking on a greater share of household responsibilities. And it's also important to note that many of our more important professions are not particularly high paying. A schoolteacher may bring in less money than their banker spouse, but is likely to work just as hard. Rather than share details with your child about which spouse earns more, simply explain to them the value of all work, and give them an appreciation of the broad, non-monetary contributions needed to keep a household going.</p> <h2>3. Your retirement balance</h2> <p>Let's say you've been saving aggressively for retirement and have several hundred thousands of dollars saved. Now, let's say you just told your daughter she can't have ice cream because it costs too much. A child, if she was aware of your retirement savings, might find this baffling. It's hard for young people to grasp that you may have a large amount in savings but are still pinching pennies.</p> <p>Your retirement savings and overall net worth is not something that should be shared too widely. A child who finds out his dad has hundreds of thousands of dollars in the bank may be motivated to brag, and that's not good. So it's best to keep information about your retirement plan to yourself.</p> <h2>4. Your debts</h2> <p>Debt can be a major source of family stress, but it's a stress that only parents should carry. Your worries about how you'll pay off that credit card bill or how you'll make those car payments are your worries, not your kids'. There may be instances when you need to be honest with your children if there is money trouble, and older children may benefit from lessons in money management, credit, and the cost of borrowing. But as long as you are able to provide and care for your kids, they are best left unaware of your financial debt burden.</p> <h2>5. The price of your home</h2> <p>The cost of your house is public information, but that doesn't mean you need to broadcast it to your kids. The only thing that kids need to know about housing is that they have a roof over their head. What you paid for your house should, to the best of your ability, be kept between the buyer, seller, and real estate agent.</p> <p>Additionally, it's best not to share too much detail about mortgage debt. If they ever get a hint that you are struggling to make mortgage payments, that will only lead to anxiety.</p> <h2>6. What you inherit</h2> <p>If a relative passes away and leaves some assets to you, the specifics of that inheritance should be kept as private as possible. This is especially true if the inheritance is quite large. If a child learns of a sizable windfall and shares that information with others, that can lead to jealous family members or friends, and could even make you a target for thieves and scammers.</p> <p>Sometimes, certain family members receive less than others, or are cut out of the will altogether. This can result in family strife that children should not be concerned about.</p> <p>For older children, it is OK to explain to them how inheritances work, as they may take comfort in believing you'll leave them something when you pass. And there will be a time when you need to tell older children about their own inheritance so they have an idea of what they may have to manage.</p> <h2>7. The cost of gifts</h2> <p>Kids have a way of believing that the most expensive item is always the best. They'll reject something if they believe you got it at a deep discount or (gasp!) second-hand. So parents may be best served by not indicating how much they spent on that video game system or that baseball bat. By hiding the cost of items you buy for your kids, they may be more inclined to evaluate the gift on its merits.</p> <h2>8. Child support payments and alimony</h2> <p>If you and your spouse have divorced, you may be on the hook for child support payments, alimony, or both. These costs are usually determined by courts and can be a major source of tension between parents. The children are best left unaware of these details and any drama or conflict surrounding them. It may be comforting to a child if they are aware that support payments are being made, but sharing specific dollar figures can be problematic.</p> <h2>9. In some cases, the cost of college</h2> <p>This is a tricky one. If your child will end up paying for their own college education, he or she will obviously need to know what they'll be on the hook for. And if you are paying for all or part of college, they will be well served to know how much of a financial commitment you are making toward their education. (It will comfort them to know you are saving as much as possible.) But this information should not come to them immediately. A child's first priority should be to stay in school and get good grades. A young high schooler does not need to be burdened with the stress of whether they need to get scholarships or whether they'll be on the hook for student loans later.</p> <p>It's also important to understand that final college costs can vary from family to family, depending on scholarships and financial aid. A wealthy family might pay the full price to send their child to an Ivy League school, while a low-income family may pay next to nothing. This family financial information is really nobody's business, so it's important to be judicious in what you share with your child.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520Family%2520Money%2520Matters%2520Your%2520Kids%2520Don%2527t%2520Need%2520to%2520Know.jpg&amp;description=9%20Family%20Money%20Matters%20Your%20Kids%20Don't%20Need%20to%20Know"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20Family%20Money%20Matters%20Your%20Kids%20Don%27t%20Need%20to%20Know.jpg" alt="9 Family Money Matters Your Kids Don't Need to Know" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-manage-your-money-during-a-spousal-separation">How to Manage Your Money During a Spousal Separation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-protect-yourself-financially-during-a-divorce-or-separation">How to Protect Yourself Financially During a Divorce or Separation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-smart-money-moves-for-empty-nesters">7 Smart Money Moves for Empty Nesters</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family alimony borrowing child support children debt divorce high earners income kids retirement spending Wed, 25 Oct 2017 08:00:07 +0000 Tim Lemke 2038887 at http://www.wisebread.com 15 Unexpected Expenses of a New Baby http://www.wisebread.com/15-unexpected-expenses-of-a-new-baby <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/15-unexpected-expenses-of-a-new-baby" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i_never_thought_i_could_love_one_being_so_much.jpg" alt="I never thought I could love one being so much" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Can you afford to have a baby?</p> <p>You may have calculated obvious costs such as diapers, clothing, food, and day care, but don't be too quick to assume that you've accounted for everything. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, middle income families spend an average $12,980 a year on each kid, and $233,610 in a lifetime, <em>not including college</em>.</p> <p>When I was expecting my first baby, I thought there was no way I could spend that much. I may have been more frugal than most, but I still ran into all kinds of expenditures &mdash; and decreases in income &mdash; that I hadn't anticipated.</p> <p>Watch out for these unanticipated ways a baby may impact your family budget. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/24-tips-for-having-a-baby-without-going-broke?ref=seealso" target="_blank">24 Tips for Having a Baby Without Going Broke</a>)</p> <h2>1. A birth that doesn't go as planned</h2> <p>If you have a high-deductible health plan or no health insurance at all, you may have carefully planned for a low-cost birth. That's smart. But one thing I learned from having three babies is that &quot;birth&quot; and &quot;plan&quot; can be oxymorons. So many factors are outside your control, such as when and where your labor begins, whether the baby has any trouble making their big entrance, and what kind of care you and the baby need after the birth.</p> <p>I know couples who planned a homebirth with a midwife, but ended up being transferred to the hospital in an ambulance for a C-section. If you are birthing at home or at a non-hospital birth center, both of which can be great choices, please have a financial plan for what happens if you get transferred. You will be under enough stress on the day of without adding financial unknowns to the mix. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-newborn-costs-that-took-me-by-surprise?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Newborn Costs That Took Me by Surprise</a>)</p> <h2>2. Higher utility bills</h2> <p>When my husband and I were childless, we lived in a San Francisco flat with no central heat and we typically ran our electric wall heaters an hour a day or less.</p> <p>Once we brought home our first child, our electricity bill jumped for two reasons: One, we felt that baby needed a warmer room to sleep in at night, not to mention the fact that I had to leave the cocoon of blankets multiple times a night to feed her. Two, since I took a six-month maternity leave, then left our child at home with a nanny, our apartment was suddenly occupied nearly 24/7 instead of only on evenings and weekends. We ran the heat much more, kept more lights on, and certainly ran more loads of laundry and dishes. If you decide to use cloth diapers, expect your laundry use to increase even more than average. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-cloth-diapers?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Everything You Need to Know About Cloth Diapers</a>)</p> <h2>3. Convenience food</h2> <p>When I stopped working full-time to stay home with my new baby, I expected to make more home-cooked meals. In the long run that was true, but in the early months, I had trouble getting dinner on the table. Like many babies, my infant fussed most in the late afternoon, and often I couldn't put her down without her screaming. Many things can safely be done with a baby strapped to your body, but stirring a dish over a hot stove or putting a casserole in the oven aren't among them.</p> <p>For many households &mdash; especially if both parents work and have limited time between day care pickup and dinner &mdash; bringing home a baby is going to mean also bringing home more pizzas, ordering Chinese, and heating up Trader Joe's fake out. Don't guilt yourself about it; just budget for it.</p> <h2>4. Health care</h2> <p>Your health plan may not charge copays for the well baby visits scheduled frequently during the first year, which is great. But keep in mind that these may not be your only doctor visits. An ear infection may lead to two visits and a prescription. For one of my babies, a cold turned into a hospitalization for pneumonia. Another had frequent chest congestion that necessitated a breathing machine at home.</p> <p>If you have been on a health care plan that only covers major illnesses, you may need to look into a plan that covers more frequent visits before your baby is born.</p> <p>Then there are all the nonprescription supplies that you might buy for minor infant health concerns: baby Motrin, teething gel, a humidifier to ease congestion, medicated cream for eczema or rashes, a high-tech thermometer, so on and so forth. All these things add up, and quickly.</p> <p>Babies have to be taken to the doctor so often &mdash; weekly at first, then monthly, plus sick visits &mdash; that even transportation costs for getting to the doctor may have to be taken into account.</p> <h2>5. Loss of income</h2> <p>The last time I earned a full-time paycheck was 13 years ago. I may never earn one again.</p> <p>My family is an extreme example &mdash; many must and do have both parents return to working full-time within six weeks of birth. But I took six months away from my job after my first birth, some of that time unpaid, and then returned as a part-time worker. While pregnant with my second child, I quit my job altogether. I only began contributing freelance income to the family budget gradually as my kids got older.</p> <p>Even for families where both parents plan to keep working full-time, income may decline. Both parents may pass up opportunities for overtime. Time for side hustles evaporates. Parents may have to take unpaid days off if the baby is sick, or for those numerous well baby visits. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-side-jobs-for-stay-at-home-moms-and-dads?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Side Jobs for Stay-at-Home Moms and Dads</a>)</p> <h2>6. A bigger house</h2> <p>My husband and I brought our first baby home to a 750 square foot, one-bedroom apartment with no immediate plans to move. After all, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends sharing a room with your baby! We were sure we would be cozy.</p> <p>Unfortunately, we almost immediately felt crowded out by baby equipment, not to mention the fact that there was nowhere to escape to if the baby was crying and one parent was trying to sleep or work. Living in a building with shared walls also became a problem, especially when the baby learned to bang her toys on the floor.</p> <p>Housing accounts for around a third of the expense of raising a child, according to the USDA. If you think you won't move after you have a baby, go to some open houses and ask the sellers why they're moving. Lots of them will tell you it's because their family is growing. And if you don't move after the first baby, you will probably want a bigger place once the second is on the way.</p> <p>Our family moved out of that one-bedroom flat into a three-bedroom house around the time that our second baby was born. The mortgage is twice what we paid before having kids. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-easy-ways-to-make-room-for-baby?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Easy Ways to Make Room for Baby</a>)</p> <h2>7. A larger car</h2> <p>You do not need to rush out and buy a minivan the moment you see two pink lines on the pregnancy test. However, it can be shocking how much space today's infant seats take up in the back seat. If you've been driving a two-door compact car, you may find yourself wanting something larger after the baby comes. And if you have more than two children, good luck fitting their car seats in the back of any sedan. The first baby saw us upgrade from a two-door hatchback to a Subaru; the third child sent us from the Subaru to small sport utility vehicle.</p> <h2>8. Life insurance</h2> <p>Before having kids, my husband and I didn't worry about life insurance. If I died, my husband would have been able to handle the payments on our condo by himself, and vice versa.</p> <p>But once you have a child, you have to ask yourself what would happen if one parent suddenly died. Your child would likely receive Social Security payments, but would this be enough to keep living where you live, to pay for child care while the surviving parent works, and to save for college? And what if both parents died?</p> <p>Life insurance costs can vary widely depending on your overall health and lifestyle and the specifics of your plan. However, you need to seriously consider this expense once you become a parent. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/term-vs-whole-life-insurance-heres-how-to-choose?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Term vs Whole Life Insurance: Here's How to Choose</a>)</p> <h2>9. Child care</h2> <p>Of course, you knew before you had a baby that you weren't going to be able to leave it home alone while you worked. But you probably didn't realize just how much child care would cost. According to a recent NerdWallet study, half of expecting parents thought diapering would be the biggest expense of having a baby, not child care.</p> <p>According to that study, the cost of full-time child care ranges from $8,000 at a day care center to $27,000 or more for a nanny.</p> <p>Even if you had realized that child care would be expensive, you may find yourself paying even more than you'd imagined. For instance, when my first child was born, I hoped I wouldn't need child care because I planned to change my work shift to evenings. That plan collapsed when my boss turned down my request. My second thought was to use a day care center, but I quickly found out that all the centers in my urban neighborhood had years long waiting lists for infant care. Home-based day cares were more affordable and available, but each one I visited had a worrisome condition, such as kids sitting in front of the TV for hours or being left crying in their cribs well after naptime. I finally ended up sharing a nanny with another family, at a cost far higher than I had anticipated.</p> <h2>10. All the cute things</h2> <p>You might think that you won't waste money buying clothes and toys for your newborn. After all, you got all those clothes at your baby shower. Then you meet your baby and realize that she's the most beautiful creature on earth and that beautiful creatures need accessories. After my first child was born, I developed a habit of popping into the Gymboree near my work regularly to see if new styles were in and if anything had gone on sale. This routine did not help our family budget.</p> <h2>11. Feeding</h2> <p>If you're planning on breast-feeding your baby, you might expect that to be free, right? Not exactly.</p> <p>A surprising number of newborns have trouble getting the hang of breast-feeding. You might need to consult a lactation specialist just once to help your infant latch and learn to suck, or you may need multiple home visits. You may need to buy products, such as nipple shields, to help the latch happen. All this struggle may wreak havoc on the mother's body and soul, necessitating anything from nipple cream to doctor visits for mastitis to seeing a counselor.</p> <p>Whether your baby succeeds immediately at breast-feeding or not, you still probably need a breast pump. You'll also likely need a better, more expensive breast pump than you thought. I've tried a lot of them, and trust me, a cheap breast pump will not enhance postpartum life.</p> <p>Many parents end up bottle feeding instead of or in addition to breast-feeding, which brings the expense of formula and bottles. You might even buy a sanitizer for the bottles, an insulated carrying pack for either breastmilk or formula, or a mini fridge for the office or nursery.</p> <p>In the second half of the first year, your baby will start eating solids, an occasion you can mark by purchasing many kinds of organic foods for him to spit onto the kitchen walls, and new feeding gadgets such as suction cup bowls and spoons that hold puree in the handle. Expect to throw away most of the food you purchase, either directly from the container because it went bad before your baby finished it, or after scraping it off the floor, walls, cupboards, and your own clothing.</p> <h2>12. Specialists</h2> <p>Taking care of a baby might sound easy before you try it. After all, humans have been doing this since they lived in caves. If that were true, though, there wouldn't be so many specialists out there ready to help you figure it out for an hourly fee.</p> <p>You might realize after you come home from the hospital that you need a postpartum doula or baby nurse to help you get back up to speed and get a few hours of sleep at night. Many more families than you would imagine consult a sleep specialist to help them figure out how to get their infants to sleep.</p> <h2>13. Baby gear</h2> <p>Before my first was born, I read a book called <em>The Baby Book</em> by a certain Dr. Sears. This book, which embraces attachment parenting, convinced me that I wouldn't need anything but my own arms and maybe a sling to care for my baby. After all, I would never want to turn my baby over to a mechanical device like a swing when I could be cuddling her in my arms.</p> <p>Then I brought the baby home, and I realized that sometimes I needed to use the bathroom or shower or cook dinner. This wasn't really covered in the book. We purchased our first baby swing, a weak little portable model. By the time we had our third baby, I had the most powerful swing on the market downstairs, another swing for upstairs, plus a bouncy seat for the bathroom, two strollers, and countless other pieces of baby gear.</p> <p>Even if you think your baby shower will cover your gear needs, the fact is that you will end up spending money on baby equipment. Don't feel the need to buy every single product that's advertised for babies, but accept the fact that there will be gadgets, and some of them really help.</p> <h2>14. Replacing things that baby wrecks</h2> <p>That sweet thing can't even raise his head; how could he destroy your possessions?</p> <p><em>Just wait.</em></p> <p>My babies have slobbered and mouthed a cellphone into oblivion. They've grabbed fragile things that I thought were out of reach and flung them. They have vomited on strangers and caused me to have to pay for those strangers' meals. They have stretched out the necklines of my shirts while reaching for my breasts. One of them even wrecked an expensive ballpark beer before I got the chance to take a sip by throwing a cleaning wipe into the cup.</p> <p>And oh, the pacifiers. I have surely spent thousands of dollars replacing pacifiers that babies flung out of car windows, dropped in the park, and just disappeared into the baby ether.</p> <p>You really can't have nice things with a baby around. And even your mediocre things will need replacing or professional cleaning more often than you'd expected.</p> <h2>15. Entertainment and education</h2> <p>Before I became a mother, I laughed out loud at a colleague who told me he took his infant to a music class. But when I was on maternity leave with my daughter, the hours began to weigh on me. We needed somewhere to go, and you can only grocery shop so many times per day.</p> <p>We signed up for a baby sign language class and later &mdash; yes &mdash; a baby music class.</p> <p>For the parents, there are also continuing education classes to pay for, such as infant CPR. And if you stay home with your baby, there's the cost of being out and about instead of sitting in an office all day. I found myself spending on things like lattes and lunches with other moms, just because I was out pushing the stroller.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F15-unexpected-expenses-of-a-new-baby&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F15%2520Unexpected%2520Expenses%2520of%2520a%2520New%2520Baby.jpg&amp;description=15%20Unexpected%20Expenses%20of%20a%20New%20Baby"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/15%20Unexpected%20Expenses%20of%20a%20New%20Baby.jpg" alt="15 Unexpected Expenses of a New Baby" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-unexpected-expenses-of-a-new-baby">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-money-is-harder-today">Why Saving Money Is Harder Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks">Here&#039;s How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-sneaky-vacation-costs-that-add-up-quickly">10 Sneaky Vacation Costs That Add Up Quickly</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-college-expenses-you-arent-saving-for">9 College Expenses You Aren&#039;t Saving For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-manage-your-money-no-budgeting-required">How to Manage Your Money — No Budgeting Required</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Family babies child care day care expenses Food Health hidden costs income infants newborns unexpected costs Tue, 24 Oct 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2039971 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50 http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_sitting_on_floor_with_piggy_bank_under_money_rain.jpg" alt="Man sitting on floor with piggy bank under money rain" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Conventional investing wisdom says that as people age, they should put less of their money in stocks and more into stable investments such as bonds and cash. This is sound advice based on the idea that in retirement you want to protect your assets in case there is a major market downturn.</p> <p>But there are still strong arguments to continue investing in stocks even as you get older. Few people recommend an all-stock portfolio, but reducing stock ownership down to zero doesn't make sense, either.</p> <p>Consider that many mutual funds geared toward older investors still comprise hefty doses of stocks. The 2020 Retirement Fund from T. Rowe Price, for example, is made up of 70 percent stocks for retirees at age 65, and is still made up of 25 percent stocks when that same retiree is past 90 years of age.</p> <p>Why does owning stocks make sense even for older investors? Let's examine these possible motivations.</p> <h2>1. You're going to live a lot longer</h2> <p>If you are thinking about retirement as you approach age 60, it's important to recognize that you still may have several decades of life remaining. People are routinely living into their 90s or even past 100 these days. Do you have enough savings to last 40 years or more? While it's important to protect the assets you have, you may find that higher returns from stocks will be needed in order to accrue the money you need.</p> <h2>2. You got a late start</h2> <p>If you started investing early and contributed regularly to your retirement accounts over the course of several decades, you may be able to take a conservative investing approach in retirement. But if you began investing late, your portfolio may not have had time to grow enough to fund a comfortable retirement. Continuing to invest in stocks will allow you to expand your savings and reach your target figure. It still makes sense to balance your stocks with more conservative investments, but taking on a little bit more risk in exchange for potentially higher returns may be worth it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a>)</p> <h2>3. Other investments don't yield as much as they used to</h2> <p>Moving away from stocks was good advice for older people back when you could get better returns on bonds and bank interest. The 30-year treasury yield right now is about 2.75 percent. That's about half what it was a decade ago and a third of the rate from 1990. Interest from cash in the bank or certificates of deposit will generate a measly 1.5 percent or less. The bottom line is that these returns will barely outpace the rate of inflation and won't bring you much in the way of useful income.</p> <h2>4. Some stocks are safer than others</h2> <p>Not all stocks move up and down in the same way. While stocks are generally more volatile than bonds and cash, there are many that have a strong track record of steady returns and relative immunity from market crashes. Take a look at mutual funds comprised of large-cap companies with diversified revenue streams. Consider dividend-producing stocks that don't move much in terms of share price, but can generate income. To find these investments, search for those that lost less than average during the Great Recession and have a history of low volatility.</p> <h2>5. Dividend stocks can bring you income</h2> <p>Dividend stocks are not only more stable than many other stock investments, but also they can generate cash flow at a time when you're not bringing in other income. A good dividend stock can produce a yield of more than 4 percent, which is more than what you'll get from many other non-stock investments right now. This will help ensure the growth of your portfolio is at least outpacing inflation.</p> <p>If you are unsure about which dividend stocks to buy, take a look at a well-rated dividend mutual fund. The T. Rowe Price Dividend Growth Fund [NYSE: PRDGX], for example, has a three-year total return of more than 10 percent, outpacing the S&amp;P 500. Its overall returns also dropped less than the S&amp;P 500 during the Great Recession.</p> <h2>6. Busts are often followed by bigger booms</h2> <p>A person who retired 10 years ago would have stopped working right when the market crashed, and there's a good chance they may have lost a significant chunk of their savings. That's bad. But it's important to note that in the decade since, the S&amp;P 500 has gone up every year at an average of more than 8.5 percent annually. In other words, someone who lost a lot from the crash of 2007&ndash;2008 will have gotten all of their money back and much more if they stayed invested in stocks.</p> <p>This is not to suggest that older investors should be unreasonably aggressive, but they should be aware that a single bad year or two probably won't completely wipe you out financially. If your retirement is long, you may see some market busts, but you'll also see some long stretches of good returns.</p> <h2>7. You may still be helping out your kids</h2> <p>When you're retired, you're supposed to be done with child rearing and helping out your kids financially, right? Unfortunately, it seems that older Americans are continuing to lend a hand to their children even as they grow into adulthood and have children of their own.</p> <p>A recent survey from TD Ameritrade said that millennial parents between the ages of 19 and 37 receive an average of more than $11,000 annually in the form of money or unpaid child care from their parents. With these additional costs on the horizon, those approaching retirement age may still want to invest in stocks to build their nest egg further. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-ruining-your-retirement-by-spoiling-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Ruining Your Retirement by Spoiling Your Kids?</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Reasons%2520to%2520Invest%2520in%2520Stocks%2520Past%2520Age%252050.jpg&amp;description=7%20Reasons%20to%20Invest%20in%20Stocks%20Past%20Age%2050"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Reasons%20to%20Invest%20in%20Stocks%20Past%20Age%2050.jpg" alt="7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easiest-ways-to-catch-up-on-retirement-savings-later-in-life">7 Easiest Ways to Catch Up on Retirement Savings Later in Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-sure-you-dont-run-out-of-money-in-retirement">How to Make Sure You Don&#039;t Run Out of Money in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-far-1-million-will-actually-go-in-retirement">Here&#039;s How Far $1 Million Will Actually Go in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation">4 Ways to Protect Your Retirement From Inflation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-safe-investments-that-arent-bonds">9 Safe Investments That Aren&#039;t Bonds</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement adult children bonds cash dividend stocks giving money to kids income late starters life span living longer risk saving money stocks yields Thu, 05 Oct 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Tim Lemke 2031342 at http://www.wisebread.com How Your New Job Might Affect Your Mortgage Application http://www.wisebread.com/how-your-new-job-might-affect-your-mortgage-application <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-your-new-job-might-affect-your-mortgage-application" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/couple_stylish_paperwork_635876724.jpg" alt="Woman learning how new job might affect mortgage application" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You just got a new job. Congratulations! New beginnings are an exciting part of life. If you're in the market to qualify for a new mortgage, your new beginning could have an impact on your mortgage application. Here's what you need to know. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-moves-that-will-ruin-your-mortgage-application?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Money Moves That Will Ruin Your Mortgage Application</a>)</p> <h2>Continuity of some kind is key</h2> <p>Lenders like to see financial and career stability. If you've recently changed jobs, that's OK, provided that lenders see some kind of continuity.</p> <p>For example, if your new job is in the same field that you've been in for the past two years, the lender would probably be comfortable with that. This is especially true if your new job is a promotion in title, responsibility, or salary. If you took a pay cut, but stayed in the same field, the lender would also likely find that acceptable, as long as your new income is at a level that is appropriate for the size of mortgage you want.</p> <h2>Stability and history in your field matters</h2> <p>Lenders start to get uncomfortable when you move into a brand-new field because they view that as a less stable work situation. That said, this is not an insurmountable problem. Be honest and upfront with your lender. Explain how your previous experience is applicable to your new field. This could take the form of your responsibilities, or similarity in the fields themselves.</p> <p>It is also helpful if you can show that your education and any other training you've received aligns with your new role. You could secure a reference letter from your new employer, too.</p> <p>Remember, getting a mortgage with a lender is a conversation. You aren't putting in an application as a faceless entity. The lender wants to know who you are, what you do, and, most importantly, how you will repay the mortgage. You need to paint a picture of yourself as a responsible professional on a stable career path.</p> <h2>The paperwork you need</h2> <p>In addition to a letter or contract, the lender will also need other paperwork to verify your income. If you have all of this paperwork together before going to the lender, your sense of organization and preparedness will work in your favor. You will need:</p> <ul> <li>Your job offer letter with the details of your start date, title, and compensation. This letter should be on official company letterhead.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>At least two pay stubs, though I have recently heard of lenders asking for three or four pay stubs.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>The contact information for your human resources department. The lender will eventually need to talk to someone at your company to confirm the information you've provided is legitimate.</li> </ul> <p>A new job and a new home are exciting prospects. Though continuity of employment eases the path to a new mortgage, many people buy a new home in conjunction with a new job. Be prepared with a solid, concise explanation of your decision to change jobs and have your paperwork in order. Also remember to shop around for a mortgage with a few different lenders to secure the best terms and rates. Happy house hunting!</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-your-new-job-might-affect-your-mortgage-application&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520Your%2520New%2520Job%2520Might%2520Affect%2520Your%2520Mortgage%2520Application.jpg&amp;description=How%20Your%20New%20Job%20Might%20Affect%20Your%20Mortgage%20Application"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20Your%20New%20Job%20Might%20Affect%20Your%20Mortgage%20Application.jpg" alt="How Your New Job Might Affect Your Mortgage Application" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/christa-avampato">Christa Avampato</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-your-new-job-might-affect-your-mortgage-application">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-freddie-mac-and-fannie-mae">Everything You Need to Know About Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-mortgage-details-you-should-know-before-you-sign">5 Mortgage Details You Should Know Before You Sign</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-buy-a-house-without-a-mortgage">4 Ways to Buy a House Without a Mortgage</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-qualify-for-a-mortgage-with-a-small-downpayment">5 Ways to Qualify for a Mortgage With a Small Downpayment</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-these-5-money-moves-before-applying-for-a-mortgage">Make These 5 Money Moves Before Applying for a Mortgage</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Real Estate and Housing approval home loans income lenders mortgages new jobs paychecks stability Mon, 02 Oct 2017 08:30:16 +0000 Christa Avampato 2029141 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Things Your Credit Report Does NOT Include http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-your-credit-report-does-not-include <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-things-your-credit-report-does-not-include" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-629305628_0.jpg" alt="these things don&#039;t show up in your credit reports" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Ordering your credit reports every year and studying them carefully is a smart way to get a window into your financial well-being. But while credit reports contain a wealth of information about your history with money, they don't tell you <em>everything </em>about your financial health.</p> <p>In fact, there is plenty of financial information you won't find in any of your credit reports.</p> <h2>1. Your credit score</h2> <p>Your credit score is a key financial number. It gives lenders a snapshot of how responsible you've been with your finances. If you have thousands of dollars of credit card debt and you routinely pay bills late, your credit score will be low. If you pay your bills on time and you are using a smaller percentage of your available credit, your score will be high.</p> <p>Unfortunately, your credit report does not contain your credit score. To obtain your score, you'll have to pay one of the three national credit bureaus for it. Your credit card provider might also list a credit score on your monthly statements. This score might not be your official FICO credit score &mdash; the one most lenders rely on when deciding whether to lend you money. It can still give you a general idea of where you stand, though, and is worth keeping track of. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fico-or-fako-are-free-credit-scores-from-credit-cards-the-real-thing?ref=seealso" target="_blank">FICO or FAKO: Are Free Credit Scores From Credit Cards the Real Thing?</a>)</p> <h2>2. Your payments to utility companies</h2> <p>You pay your gas and electric bills on time every month. You might think that this key indicator of your financial responsibility would be listed on your credit report. Unfortunately, it's not. Utilities don't report payments to the credit bureaus.</p> <p>This means that your on-time payments to utility providers don't help your credit score. Late payments aren't reported, either. But be careful: If you're far enough behind on your payments that a utility sends your account to collections, that will show up on your credit report. And that black mark will give lenders reason to hesitate when deciding whether you qualify for a loan. An account in collections can also send your credit score plummeting by 100 points or more. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/account-in-collections-heres-how-to-fix-it" target="_blank">Account in Collections? Here's How to Fix It</a>)</p> <h2>3. Your rent payments</h2> <p>Paying your rent on time probably won't help your credit score, either. That's because most landlords still don't report rent payments to the credit bureaus, meaning that these payments don't show up on your credit report.</p> <p>There are services today, though, that landlords can use to report rent payments to the bureaus. Most landlords don't use these services yet, but the fact that they are available could be a sign that rent information will become more common on credit reports in the future.</p> <h2>4. Medical bills</h2> <p>The payments you make to doctors, dentists, and other medical professionals don't show up on your credit reports, either. Again, this is because doctors don't report payment information to the credit bureaus.</p> <p>Paying these bills late, though, could show up on your credit report if your medical providers send your account to a collections agency.</p> <h2>5. Your salary</h2> <p>You'd think the money you earn would be a key indicator of your financial health, and it is. But it's not an indicator of how likely you are to pay your bills on time and manage your credit. Because of this, it doesn't show up on your credit reports.</p> <h2>6. A job loss</h2> <p>Your credit reports do provide some basic employment information, with some listing your past and most recent employers. But if you've just lost your job, that information won't be included in your report. Your reports never mention whether you are still employed, and they don't list how long you've worked with any one company.</p> <h2>7. Your spouse's credit history</h2> <p>Your credit reports list financial information about you and you alone. If you're married, your spouse's history of paying bills and running up debt won't show up.</p> <p>However, if you and your spouse both have your names on a loan or credit card, that debt will show up on both of your credit reports. So will late payments you made on these accounts, even if paying the bills was your spouse's responsibility and not yours.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-things-your-credit-report-does-not-include&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Things%2520Your%2520Credit%2520Report%2520Does%2520NOT%2520Include.jpg&amp;description=7%20Things%20Your%20Credit%20Report%20Does%20NOT%20Include"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Things%20Your%20Credit%20Report%20Does%20NOT%20Include.jpg" alt="7 Things Your Credit Report Does NOT Include" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-your-credit-report-does-not-include">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-often-your-credit-score-gets-calculated">Here&#039;s How Often Your Credit Score Gets Calculated</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-apps-that-monitor-your-credit-for-you">7 Apps That Monitor Your Credit for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-why-you-shouldnt-freak-out-if-you-miss-a-payment-due-date">Here&#039;s Why You Shouldn&#039;t Freak Out If You Miss a Payment Due Date</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/once-bitten-twice-shy-what-is-credit-security-worth-to-you">Once Bitten Twice Shy: What is Credit Security Worth to You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-protect-your-credit-after-the-equifax-breach">How to Protect Your Credit After the Equifax Breach</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance bills collections credit history credit reports credit score Equifax Experian income payments rent TransUnion utilities Fri, 22 Sep 2017 08:30:11 +0000 Dan Rafter 2024892 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Money Conversations Couples Should Have Before Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/budgeting_works_better_when_we_do_it_together.jpg" alt="Budgeting works better when we do it together" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Retirement for you and your spouse is just a few years away. Maybe you're both eagerly awaiting the days when you no longer must commute to work, sit in long meetings, and turn in reports.</p> <p>But retirement does come with its own challenges, many of them financial. It's important for spouses to have the same expectations of what their retirement years will look like. And it's equally important for each spouse to understand where their income will be coming from and how much money there will be.</p> <p>Here are five key conversations that couples must have before retirement arrives.</p> <h2>1. What kind of retirement do you both want, and how expensive will it be?</h2> <p>There are many different ways to spend your retirement years. Maybe you want to travel the world. Maybe you'd prefer spending more time with your grandchildren. Your version of a dream retirement might consist of days on the golf course or fishing on the lake.</p> <p>But what if you have the travel bug, and your spouse would prefer to sit home and catch up on some reading? These are two radically different versions of retirement. And, when it comes to your retirement finances, one is far more expensive than the other.</p> <p>It's important for you to share your retirement expectations with your spouse before you actually leave the working world. If you both agree that plenty of travel is in your future, you'll need to work hard to make sure you'll have enough retirement dollars to fund these trips. If only one of you wants to spend time traveling or pursuing a more expensive hobby, you'll have to craft a compromise.</p> <h2>2. Where will the money come from, and how much will you have?</h2> <p>As retirement nears, couples must work together on a new household budget tailored to their new life after work. You won't be able to rely on that steady work income after retirement, and Social Security payments probably won't cover all your daily living needs. This makes writing a household budget &mdash; and agreeing to stick to it &mdash; more important.</p> <p>Your new budget should list all of your sources of monthly income and all of your expected monthly expenses, including mortgage payments if you still have them, car payments, utility bills, groceries, and entertainment. Once you've listed your income and expenses, including how much of your retirement savings you'll need to dip into each month to cover these expenses, you'll have a clearer picture of how much you can spend each month after leaving the working world. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2>3. Where will you live?</h2> <p>Housing expenses can be a challenge after retirement. It's important for couples to discuss where they'll live after leaving the working life behind. Do you want to stay in your current home for as long as possible? The financial ramifications of this will vary depending on whether you've paid off your mortgage or not. It might make more sense to sell your home and move into a smaller condo or apartment. Or maybe you're ready to move into a senior housing facility.</p> <p>Don't put off conversations about housing. This is one of the most important issues couples face after retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/retire-for-half-the-cost-in-these-5-countries?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Retire for Half the Cost in These 5 Countries</a>)</p> <h2>4. Will one of you take on a new job or career?</h2> <p>Retirement doesn't always mean that you or your spouse won't continue to work in some way. Some people take on part-time jobs to occupy their time and earn a bit of extra spending money. Others start the new careers that they've always desired. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-great-retirement-jobs?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Great Retirement Jobs</a>)</p> <p>It's important for couples to discuss their plans for working after retirement. One spouse &mdash; or both &mdash; holding down a part-time job can make a significant difference in your income and budget after retirement, even if this income isn't essential to covering your daily living needs.</p> <h2>5. How will you handle unplanned expenses?</h2> <p>Unexpected expenses aren't unusual while you're working, with everything from burst water heaters to serious medical problems eating away at your savings. The same unexpected expenses can pop up when you're retired, too. When they do, how will you pay for them?</p> <p>Talk with your spouse about maintaining an emergency fund that can cover at least six months' worth of your daily living expenses after retirement. If you don't maintain this fund &mdash; which you should have had while you were working &mdash; one big unexpected expense could wreak havoc on your budget. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-expenses-for-retirees-and-how-to-manage-them?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Unexpected Expenses for Retirees &mdash; And How to Manage Them</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Money%2520Conversations%2520Couples%2520Should%2520Have%2520Before%2520Retirement.jpg&amp;description=5%20Money%20Conversations%20Couples%20Should%20Have%20Before%20Retirement"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Money%20Conversations%20Couples%20Should%20Have%20Before%20Retirement.jpg" alt="5 Money Conversations Couples Should Have Before Retirement" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks">Here&#039;s How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-couples-are-shortchanging-their-retirement-savings">4 Ways Couples Are Shortchanging Their Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-still-need-an-emergency-fund-in-retirement">Yes, You Still Need an Emergency Fund in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-need-to-do-if-youre-retiring-in-2018">6 Things You Need to Do if You&#039;re Retiring in 2018</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-money-is-harder-today">Why Saving Money Is Harder Today</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement career conversations couples emergency funds expenses housing income jobs marriage spouse Tue, 05 Sep 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Dan Rafter 2013258 at http://www.wisebread.com Why Retiring With Debt Isn't the End of the World http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/calculating_our_day_to_day_living_cost.jpg" alt="Calculating our day-to-day living cost" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In a perfect world, you'll retire with no debt at all. But that might not be realistic. Most U.S. adults carry at least <em>some </em>debt with them into retirement. A majority even die owing money. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/who-pays-when-loved-ones-leave-debt-behind?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Who Pays When Loved Ones Leave Debt Behind?</a>)</p> <p>The good news is while retiring with debt might not be uncommon today, it's also not a financial disaster. It mostly depends on the type of debt you bring with you into retirement.</p> <h2>The numbers</h2> <p>In a 2016 study, credit bureau Experian found that 73 percent of consumers died with debt. And these consumers didn't die with just a little debt: Experian reported that these individuals had an average debt of $61,554 when they died. Without counting mortgage debt, that figure fell to a still high $12,875.</p> <p>As you near retirement, you might worry that you'll be saddled with too much debt after you leave the workforce. It's important to realize, though, that there are different types of debt, some better than others. Your monthly income in retirement matters, too: If you can easily cover your debts, and still cover your other expenses, your debt won't be as much of a financial burden.</p> <h2>Start with a budget</h2> <p>You won't know how bad your retirement debt might be until you first draft a household budget for your after-work years. This budget should include all of the money you expect to flow into your hands after you retire, including Social Security payments, pensions, and the income you'll be drawing each month from your retirement savings vehicles.</p> <p>You should then list your monthly expenses, both fixed and estimated. This should include your housing costs, food, utilities, entertainment expenses, medical costs, and, of course, the money you'll have to spend each month to pay off your debts.</p> <p>Once you have your expenses and your income listed, compare the figures. Will you have enough money to cover everything each month? Or will you be short?</p> <p>If you have enough, that's good, though you'll still want to reduce your debt as much as you can before you leave the workforce. The less debt you enter your retirement years with, the better.</p> <p>If you'll be short, it's time to make changes. Figure out ways to reduce your expenses, such as trading in a costly car or maybe selling your expensive home and making the move to a less costly condo or smaller residence. You might also have to scale back your plans for retirement; instead of traveling the world, you might have to be content with catching up on your golf game in your own community.</p> <h2>Good vs. bad debt</h2> <p>Once you've determined your budget, it's time to look at your debt.</p> <p>You might think that all debt is the same. That's not true. Some debt is considered &quot;good debt,&quot; while <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-youve-crossed-from-healthy-debt-to-problem-debt" target="_blank">other debt is considered bad</a>.</p> <p>Good debt is debt you owe for something that can grow in value and provide you with financial benefits in the future. A mortgage is the most common form of good debt. If you're fortunate, the house that your mortgage is financing will grow in value while you own it. When you sell it, you might make a profit. Mortgage debt has the added benefit of coming with low interest rates and some tax benefits.</p> <p>The most common form of bad debt is credit card debt. This debt grows over time and doesn't provide you with any possible financial benefits. It also often comes with sky-high interest rates. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-pay-off-high-interest-credit-card-debt?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Ways to Pay Off High Interest Credit Card Debt</a>)</p> <p>If you're nearing retirement and you have both mortgage and credit card debt, it makes financial sense to spend any extra dollars you have to reduce your credit card debt. Your mortgage debt, as long as you can afford the monthly payment in retirement, should not be a priority.</p> <h2>Attack your bad debt</h2> <p>If you want to eliminate your credit card debt &mdash; or at least a chunk of it &mdash; before retirement, you'll have to send extra money each month to your credit card providers.</p> <p>Generally, financial experts recommend two main approaches here. You can follow the debt snowball strategy, in which you pay extra each month on the credit card that has the lowest balance. Once you pay off that card, you pay more each month on the card with the next lowest amount of debt, working your way through all your cards.</p> <p>You can also go with the debt avalanche approach. This method works the same way, only you pay extra on your card with the highest interest rate first instead of the lowest balance. This method will save you the most money because you'll be eliminating your highest-interest debt first. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/snowballs-or-avalanches-which-debt-reduction-strategy-is-best-for-you?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Snowballs or Avalanches: Which Debt Reduction Strategy Is Best for You?</a>)</p> <p>Again, to free up enough money to pay down your debts &mdash; no matter which debts you choose to tackle &mdash; you might have to make lifestyle changes, such as cutting down on your meals out or your entertainment and travel expenses.</p> <p>You'll have to determine how much of a financial burden your debt will be after you retire. The debt you bring into retirement might not scuttle your after-work plans. But if it might, that's why a bit of sacrifice now can really pay off later. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fwhy-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FWhy%2520Retiring%2520With%2520Debt%2520Isnt%2520the%2520End%2520of%2520the%2520World.jpg&amp;description=Why%20Retiring%20With%20Debt%20Isnt%20the%20End%20of%20the%20World"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Why%20Retiring%20With%20Debt%20Isnt%20the%20End%20of%20the%20World.jpg" alt="Why Retiring With Debt Isn't the End of the World" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-still-need-an-emergency-fund-in-retirement">Yes, You Still Need an Emergency Fund in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-need-to-do-if-youre-retiring-in-2018">6 Things You Need to Do if You&#039;re Retiring in 2018</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-youre-retiring-with-debt">What to Do If You&#039;re Retiring With Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks">Here&#039;s How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-red-flags-that-your-retirement-plan-may-be-off-track">4 Red Flags That Your Retirement Plan May Be Off Track</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Debt Management Retirement bills budgeting expenses income mortgages owing money social security Wed, 30 Aug 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Dan Rafter 2011955 at http://www.wisebread.com Here's How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/united_states_treasury_government_check.jpg" alt="United States Treasury government check" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The average retired worker earns a monthly Social Security check of $1,360, according to the U.S. Social Security Administration. And for most retirees, Social Security benefits are just one source of income, with many supplementing their checks with money that they've saved in 401(k) plans, IRAs, and other savings vehicles.</p> <p>This doesn't mean, though, that these Social Security dollars aren't important. The administration says that Social Security benefits represent about 34 percent of the income of the elderly. That's why it's so important for retirees to create a budget for their Social Security benefits and determine the best way to spend such a significant portion of their monthly earnings. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-ways-to-boost-your-social-security-payout-before-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Smart Ways to Boost Your Social Security Payout Before Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>There's always a need for a budget</h2> <p>The first step in determining how to best spend Social Security benefits is to calculate your monthly income from all sources. Then, determine how much of this income comes from Social Security benefits alone. If Social Security accounts for 70 percent of your monthly income, you'll have to be especially careful how you spend it. If it accounts for just 20 percent, you'll have a bit more leeway.</p> <p>Once you determine how important your benefits are to your monthly income stream, it's time to calculate how much of your Social Security check you should devote to each of your main expenses. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2>Housing</h2> <p>Ideally, you'll enter retirement without a mortgage payment. But that doesn't always happen. You might choose to rent during your retirement years. Or, maybe you'll spend your retirement years in assisted living.</p> <p>Housing often remains a significant expense for retirees, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics reporting in March 2016 that seniors age 55 and older spend an average $16,219 a year on housing. Seniors from the ages of 65 to 74 spend an average $15,838.</p> <p>If you receive the average Social Security check of $1,360 a month, you'll receive $16,320 a year. This means that the average amount that retirees spend on housing would consume most of your Social Security income each year.</p> <p>It might make sense to devote a set percentage of every Social Security check to help cover your housing expenses. How much that percentage is will depend on how much you are spending on housing. If you live in a home with a mortgage that's been paid off, you obviously won't need to spend as much of your checks on housing as you would if you were still paying a mortgage. If housing is a significant expense, though, you might consider devoting 60 percent or more of your Social Security check to covering it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-countries-where-you-can-retire-for-1000-a-month?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Countries Where You Can Retire for $1,000 a Month</a>)</p> <h2>Food</h2> <p>The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that seniors from the ages of 65 to 74 spend an average $6,303 a year on food. This makes sense: You have to eat, whether you're working or not. Make sure, then, to reserve part of your Social Security check for groceries and meals out.</p> <p>You do have control over this expense, of course. You can eat out less often and cook at home more, which would reduce your food expenses. But setting aside 20 percent or so of your monthly Social Security check for food should suffice.</p> <h2>Medical expenses</h2> <p>Depending on your health, medical costs could be a significant expense as you age. The numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics bear this out. According to the Bureau, adults from the ages of 65 to 74 spend an average $5,956 a year for medical care. The Bureau says that adults 74 and older spend an average $5,708 a year on health care. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-an-hsa-could-help-your-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How an HSA Could Help Your Retirement</a>)</p> <p>Health expenses are one cost you have little control over. Sure, you can exercise and eat well. But you might still suffer health setbacks. It's important to reserve at least some of your Social Security check to cover these sometimes unexpected costs.</p> <p>Consider saving an additional 20 percent of your Social Security benefits for medical spending.</p> <h2>Other costs</h2> <p>If you've been keeping track, those three expenses might eat up your entire Social Security check. Again, this depends on how much Social Security income you receive each month and how much you actually spend on housing, health care, and food. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-can-you-afford-to-spend-in-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Much Can You Afford to Spend in Retirement?</a>)</p> <p>If you find that these three big expenses do swallow most or all of your expenses, you'll have to dip into your retirement savings and other income vehicles to cover costs such as travel, transportation, entertainment, and any other monthly bills.</p> <p>Budgeting your Social Security check highlights just how important it is to have multiple income sources at your disposal after retirement. As you can see, Social Security doesn't go that far when it comes to covering the basic living expenses of many seniors.</p> <p>You do have options, of course. You can scale back your retirement plans, perhaps choosing to travel less and eat in more often. You can also take on a part-time job. That extra income could come in handy to cover the smaller, unexpected expenses that tend to come up. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-easy-ways-retirees-can-earn-extra-income?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Easy Ways Retirees Can Earn Extra Income</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fheres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHeres%2520How%2520You%2520Should%2520Budget%2520Your%2520Social%2520Security%2520Checks.jpg&amp;description=Here's%20How%20You%20Should%20Budget%20Your%20Social%20Security%20Checks"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Heres%20How%20You%20Should%20Budget%20Your%20Social%20Security%20Checks.jpg" alt="Here's How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-couples-are-shortchanging-their-retirement-savings">4 Ways Couples Are Shortchanging Their Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-still-need-an-emergency-fund-in-retirement">Yes, You Still Need an Emergency Fund in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-money-is-harder-today">Why Saving Money Is Harder Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-retirement-struggles-nobody-talks-about-and-how-to-beat-them">5 Retirement Struggles Nobody Talks About — And How to Beat Them</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Retirement beneficiaries benefits expenses food costs health care housing income medical costs social security Wed, 23 Aug 2017 08:30:05 +0000 Dan Rafter 2007581 at http://www.wisebread.com