life lessons http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/8796/all en-US 8 Ways Your Customer Service Job Can Help You Win at Life http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-your-customer-service-job-can-help-you-win-at-life <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-ways-your-customer-service-job-can-help-you-win-at-life" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/waitress_holding_tray_with_cappuccinos.jpg" alt="Waitress holding tray with cappuccinos" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Maybe you'd hoped for a different job by this point in your life, but here you are, still waiting tables, and it feels like you will never move up in the world.</p> <p>But here's the good news: While serving people may not be what you want to do forever, you will learn some important lessons along the way. These will not only make you a better person, but are also likely to make you more successful later in life.</p> <h2>1. You learn to be polite to everyone</h2> <p>When you're serving people, you have to be polite, even when they aren't polite to you. Customers can do and say some horrible things, but you still have to smile and do your best to get them what they want. Sure, it's frustrating at the time, but these are skills that you need to learn. There are, unfortunately, rude people in every walk and station of life, and learning how to deal with them will make you happier and less likely to lose your cool later, when it could matter more.</p> <h2>2. You learn to prioritize</h2> <p>When the restaurant rush is on and you're slammed, you have to figure out how to be as efficient as possible. Instead of running to the kitchen seven separate times, you learn to do things in batches. Instead of bringing all of the condiments individually, you learn to grab them all at once. Working in the service industry, especially during busy times, helps you decide quickly what is important, what can wait, and which tasks best go together.</p> <p>No matter what you do later in life, these skills will help you do it better. They will make you a more productive employee, whether you are deciding which arguments are the most important in legal cases, or triaging injuries in an emergency room.</p> <h2>3. You learn which battles are worth fighting</h2> <p>At some point in your service industry job, people are probably going to treat you poorly. While these can be miserable experiences in the moment, they can help you learn when you need to stand up for yourself and when it's better to just smile, nod, and be on your way. This will help you to be a calmer person, and also to be more confident about when you should take a stand.</p> <h2>4. You learn to embrace pressure</h2> <p>Service industry jobs come with a lot of pressure, especially when it's busy and people are putting in complicated orders or making very specific requests. If you stay long enough, you will learn to thrive under this kind of pressure. You will become someone who is unruffled, even when things get hectic, and someone who can be relied upon even when life is challenging.</p> <p>And life<em> is</em> challenging. So learning how to function well, how to control your stress reactions, and how to be kind and polite even when the heat is on will serve you throughout life. It will make you the kind of person who doesn't melt down simply because things got hard for a little while.</p> <h2>5. You learn empathy</h2> <p>I have found it to be universally true that everyone you meet is fighting a battle of some sort. When you work in the service industry, you will eventually learn this. That customer who reordered her food five times just found out she has a severe allergy and is terrified of eating something that will make her sick. The child who screams for the entire dinner just got out of the hospital. The harried parent is involved in a messy divorce.</p> <p>As you work, you will hear people's stories and sometimes they will involve hard, awful things. Hearing these, and seeing how so much of our bad behavior comes from stress and pain, will teach you empathy. It will help you see things from a different perspective, which makes you a better person overall.</p> <h2>6. You learn humility</h2> <p>You are more than your job. But while you're at work, you still have to do that job. And service industry jobs are not about you, but about whatever product you are offering, and about the people you are offering it to. Service industry jobs teach you to step outside of yourself and be about something else for a little while.</p> <p>Anyone who can step outside of themselves for a job can also do it for their spouse, their children, or for another job that means more to them. While you should never sacrifice yourself long term, being able to do it for a period of time means that you understand that it's not all about you all the time, and you can let life &mdash; even your life &mdash; be about someone or something else in certain times and under certain circumstances.</p> <h2>7. You learn the importance of manners</h2> <p>It only takes someone being rude to you once or twice for you to learn the importance of good manners. Even the difference between an order given gruffly and one with a &quot;please&quot; will astound you. As you take these lessons to heart, you will learn to use your own manners, no matter the circumstances. Being rude never makes things better.</p> <h2>8. You learn to work with people you don't like</h2> <p>You will be on a team throughout life. Even in your home, as you marry and maybe have children, you will be part of a team. Sometimes, you won't like the other people on your team (even when that person is your spouse!). But you will still have to work with them. A service industry job can help you learn how to do that.</p> <p>There will most likely be people you don't like at work. But learning how to communicate with them, and how to break up the necessary workload with them, will help you succeed later in life, when working as a team may be even more important.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-ways-your-customer-service-job-can-help-you-win-at-life&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Ways%2520Your%2520Customer%2520Service%2520Job%2520Can%2520Help%2520You%2520Win%2520at%2520Life_1.jpg&amp;description=8%20Ways%20Your%20Customer%20Service%20Job%20Can%20Help%20You%20Win%20at%20Life"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Ways%20Your%20Customer%20Service%20Job%20Can%20Help%20You%20Win%20at%20Life_2.jpg" alt="8 Ways Your Customer Service Job Can Help You Win at Life" width="250" height="374" /></p> <div align="center"> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-your-customer-service-job-can-help-you-win-at-life">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-wise-tips-famous-ceos-would-give-their-younger-selves">8 Wise Tips Famous CEOs Would Give Their Younger Selves</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-myths-boomers-should-stop-believing">6 Job Myths Boomers Should Stop Believing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-benefits-of-volunteering">9 Unexpected Benefits of Volunteering</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crappy-service-great-food-what-to-do">Crappy service, great food...what to do?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sit-in-on-a-class-at-mit-for-free">Sit in on a Class at MIT for Free!</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Lifestyle better person customer service empathy job skills life lessons manners server service job teamwork waiter waitress Mon, 10 Jul 2017 09:00:09 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1980031 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Life Skills Your Kids Won't Learn in School http://www.wisebread.com/7-life-skills-your-kids-wont-learn-in-school <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-life-skills-your-kids-wont-learn-in-school" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/little_girl_glasses_483686789.jpg" alt="Girl learning life skills outside of school" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>During my freshman year of college, there was a young man in my dorm whose mother would do his laundry for him whenever she came to visit. While this beleaguered mother did not plan on being her son's part-time laundry service, she was so horrified by the state of his unwashed clothes that she felt like she had to do his laundry for him. Considering the fact that she only visited a couple of times over the course of that academic year, I can sympathize with her horror, if not her actions.</p> <p>While I was a step or two above this young man in terms of laundry skills, I still made some errors that cost me on occasion &mdash; like the time I accidentally bleached holes right through a shirt, or when I shrunk wool sweaters. That's because knowing how to wash clothes is not a skill taught in school. It's one of many life skills that parents need to teach their kids to help prepare them for the adult world.</p> <p>Your kids need you to teach them the following life skills so that they are not caught by surprise once they reach adulthood &mdash; and you are never stuck laundering the clothes of a capable young adult.</p> <h2>1. Budgeting</h2> <p>It can feel very difficult to teach someone else how to budget if you struggle with money yourself. But you don't have to have a black belt in budgeting to be able to teach your children. Here are some steps you can take to help them master money.</p> <h3>Give them an allowance</h3> <p>Give your kids an allowance starting around age six. When your child wants something, ask if he or she has enough money to pay for it on their own. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-easy-way-to-set-an-allowance-that-wont-ruin-your-kid?ref=seealso">The Easy Way to Set an Allowance That Won't Ruin Your Kid</a>)</p> <h3>Let them make mistakes</h3> <p>Allow your young kids to make financial mistakes while the stakes are still low. For instance, if your child spends all of their money on a toy when they'll be going to the carnival later, do not give them more money to spend at the carnival. Let your child recognize that once money is spent, it's gone.</p> <h2>2. How to fail</h2> <p>Failure is an important component of success, since no one achieves their goals without experiencing setbacks. Unfortunately, schools are set up so that failure is seen as a terrible outcome, and the way that failure is talked about in our society can make kids (and adults) believe that they need to avoid failure at all costs. This leads to kids and adults who give up when they feel frustrated and are afraid to take risks.</p> <p>To teach your kids how to fail, emphasize to them that there are lessons to be learned from failure. After your child experiences a setback or a failure, ask what they learned from it.</p> <h2>3. Etiquette</h2> <p>For many of us, etiquette may seem like an overemphasis on which fork to use, but teaching etiquette to kids starts with insisting on &quot;please&quot; and &quot;thank you&quot; as soon as they can get the words out, and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-basic-manners-you-must-teach-your-kids">teaching them not to interrupt</a> as their language skills develop. From there, make sure they know the basics of good manners:</p> <ul> <li>Making eye contact when talking or shaking hands with someone.</li> <li>Making guests feel comfortable.</li> <li>Handling introductions.</li> <li>Apologizing sincerely and accepting responsibility when you are wrong.</li> <li>Knowing how to politely phrase requests and respond to questions.</li> </ul> <h2>4. Time management</h2> <p>Many adults struggle with time management because they were never explicitly taught how to arrange their time and schedule. And though there is no one way to handle time management, there are some underlying principles you can teach your children to help them develop their own method of time management.</p> <h3>Daily routines</h3> <p>Routines can help kids understand when things are supposed to happen every day, which can give them the tools to create their own routines and have less unstructured time to manage.</p> <h3>How long an hour is</h3> <p>Use timers during chores and other tasks to teach this principle so your children learn how long various blocks of time are, which will make it easier for them to anticipate how long things will take.</p> <h3>Planning ahead</h3> <p>Creating a family calendar together can help your child see how planning can make events run more smoothly.</p> <h2>5. How to cook</h2> <p>When you don't have any cooking skills, then you are stuck spending more money than you need to on convenience foods and restaurant meals. Your kids need to be able to feed themselves when they are adults, which includes knowing how to buy and prepare basic meals.</p> <p>Have your kids help you in the kitchen, so that they learn these skills with your support. If you don't know how to cook, learning with your child is a great way to show them how to pick up a new skill as an adult. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-frugal-and-delicious-meals-to-make-with-your-kids?ref=seealso">10 Frugal and Delicious Meals to Make With Your Kids</a>)</p> <h2>6. Self-advocacy</h2> <p>When I taught high school English, I was always amazed by the number of parents who would call me to discuss their children's grades. While I could understand why parents were concerned, the student's grade was between the student and myself. Every time a parent tried to cut the student out of that conversation, the parent made it clear through their actions that they thought their child was not competent.</p> <p>Kids need to learn how to be their own advocates so they can handle conflicts with authority figures in adulthood. To teach your children this important skill, allow them to speak for themselves as early as possible. Start by letting them order their own meal at a restaurant.</p> <p>When your child does need to talk to a teacher, practice with them beforehand and don't succumb to the temptation to do it on their behalf.</p> <h2>7. Cleaning the house</h2> <p>The best way to teach your kids how to clean and maintain a home is to have them help you as you complete household chores.</p> <p>When your kids are very little, they want to help you, and you should let them, even though you could get it done more quickly by yourself. Explain what you are doing and why, so that your kids have a baseline understanding of how everything works within your home.</p> <p>As they grow, have them take over chores around the house &mdash; including doing their own laundry. Ahem.</p> <h2>Achieving adulthood, one skill at a time</h2> <p>Preparing your child for adulthood is no easy feat. But recognizing which skills your child will need can help you figure out the best way to introduce those skills. Not only will teaching your child these skills help her to feel confident, capable, and ready to take on the world, but it will also keep you from having to do their laundry in adulthood.</p> <p>That's a big win-win.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-life-skills-your-kids-wont-learn-in-school&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Life%2520Skills%2520Your%2520Kids%2520Won%2527t%2520Learn%2520in%2520School.jpg&amp;description=7%20Life%20Skills%20Your%20Kids%20Wont%20Learn%20in%20School"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Life%20Skills%20Your%20Kids%20Won%27t%20Learn%20in%20School.jpg" alt="7 Life Skills Your Kids Won't Learn in School" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-life-skills-your-kids-wont-learn-in-school">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/downsizing-with-kids">Downsizing With Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-bad-money-habits-youre-teaching-your-kids">4 Bad Money Habits You&#039;re Teaching Your Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-financial-pitfalls-stay-at-home-parents-should-avoid">5 Financial Pitfalls Stay-at-Home Parents Should Avoid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-sell-your-kids-stuff-at-a-consignment-sale">How to Sell Your Kid&#039;s Stuff at a Consignment Sale</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/five-tips-for-a-smooth-nanny-share">Five Tips for a Smooth Nanny Share</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Lifestyle kids life lessons life skills reading school smart kids street smarts Wed, 28 Jun 2017 08:00:11 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1973971 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Lessons on How to Be a Financial Grownup From Bobbi Rebell http://www.wisebread.com/6-lessons-on-how-to-be-a-financial-grownup-from-bobbi-rebell <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-lessons-on-how-to-be-a-financial-grownup-from-bobbi-rebell" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_serious_successful_517011428.jpg" alt="Woman learning how to be a financial grownup" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Thanks to Toys 'R Us and its catchiest ad ever, I spent several years never wanting to grow up. Being a kid was easy, and being a grownup always seemed terrifying. It meant being financially responsible for everything and struggling to make ends meet while pursuing my goals.</p> <p>Luckily, every single person on this planet can relate to that fear, and they are all trying to make it on their own, as well. So when I read the new book by <a href="http://www.bobbirebell.com/" target="_blank">Bobbi Rebell</a>, award-winning TV anchor and former personal finance columnist at Reuters, entitled <em>How to Be a Financial Grownup</em>, I was immediately put at ease.</p> <p>Rebell's book is a compelling collection of stories from successful entrepreneurs and famous faces, detailing the moments they became financial grownups, and the wisdom they picked up along the way. Rebell brilliantly interweaves these powerful stories with her own expertise, and provides actionable steps to make your financial goals a reality. Here are the lessons on how to be a financial grownup that stuck with me the most.</p> <h2>1. Don't compare your path to others</h2> <p>The third chapter of <a href="http://amzn.to/2rRSEUK" target="_blank"><em>How to Be a Financial Grownup</em></a>, titled &quot;Careers Are for Making Money&quot; is my absolute favorite section of the book. Fashion designer Cynthia Rowley, Betterment CEO Jon Stein, Macy&rsquo;s Chairman and CEO Terry J. Lundgren, and others share their stories of how they made it big. All have extremely different paths to success, and some had significant bumps along the way. But you have your own unique background, which shapes your own unique goals. Follow them, and embrace the fact that you are putting yourself out there as someone new, hungry, and different from the rest.</p> <h2>2. Accept that failure is a given</h2> <p>You're going to fail. You're going to struggle. You're going to get burned. It's inevitable. And failure can come in many different forms, but none should deter you from chasing your goals. An extreme example of struggle is when Jim Cramer, host of <em>Mad Money</em>, shared his story with Rebell of being the target of multiple robberies while living in Los Angeles, and upon returning from a journalism assignment in San Diego, learned he was evicted from his L.A. apartment. Cramer was homeless, and his financial grownup moment came when he realized he never wanted to be that poor again. He switched from a career in journalism to finance.</p> <p>The good thing about human beings is our incredible ability to adapt to our surroundings. So when you're facing an epic financial or professional failure, you'll still be able to get some clarity, pick yourself up, and try again the next day.</p> <h2>3. Allow yourself to splurge on those lattes, sometimes</h2> <p>Rebell fully acknowledges that gourmet, pricey lattes should not be an everyday occurrence. We've heard a million times before that expensive coffee is the reason we're all broke, why we can't buy houses, etc. Luckily, Rebell finds a healthy balance between overspending on and abstaining from your morning beverage of choice. Her two exceptions to the &quot;never buy lattes&quot; rule are as follows:</p> <ul> <li>&quot;Buy coffee at a coffee shop if you're going there for social reasons. Meeting friends at a coffee shop is going to be a lot cheaper than going out for a meal.&quot;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>&quot;If you're using the coffee shop as an ad hoc office, by all means buy some coffee. Sitting at a coffee shop for a few hours to get some work done, or having a meeting, is a lot less expensive than paying rent on an office.&quot;</li> </ul> <p>See? It's all about balance and moderation. Being a financial grownup shouldn't mean setting restrictive limits on things you enjoy, so long as you don't overdo it.</p> <h2>4. Push bad debt out of your way</h2> <p>According to Rebell, bad debt &mdash; most commonly credit card debt and student loan debt &mdash; is what's standing in your way of becoming a financial grownup. You don't need all of your bad debt to be paid off to before you become a financial grownup, though. The first step to reaching financial maturity is acknowledging the obstacles in front of you. Then you come up with a strategy to defeat them, including reasonable goals that you can meet on a flexible timeline. This process will never be as simple as, &quot;Day 1: Add up bad debt, Day 2: Pay it all off,&quot; unless you stumble upon a pile of cash. But coming up with a realistic plan that works will be immensely rewarding.</p> <h2>5. Nurture your relationship with credit</h2> <p>The thing about credit is that it's not all bad. We all want to be careful about the way we spend money and manage bad debt, but credit is something to be built, embraced, and closely monitored. You need it, even if you'd rather avoid it altogether.</p> <p>This is something millennials should work on. NerdWallet found that about a third of people ages 18 to 34 have never applied for a credit card. While it's wise to have a healthy fear of how irresponsible spending with credit cards can ruin your life, you still need to build credit in order to eventually buy a car or house, and to do all the other things financial grownups do. Rebell suggests using only a small portion of the credit you have available, &quot;ideally about 10 percent, and really try to use no more than 30 percent.&quot;</p> <h2>6. Stop asking the wrong questions</h2> <p>When Rebell asked Kevin O'Leary, successful entrepreneur and star of <em>Shark Tank</em>, to share his financial grownup moment, he recalled a powerful conversation with his stepfather. O'Leary was in high school when his stepfather, George, asked him what he wanted to do with his life. O'Leary wanted to skip college and become a photographer. George told him that &quot;'to be or not to be' isn't the question. The question is: What are you willing to do in order to be what you want to be?&quot;</p> <p>That shift in mindset helped O'Leary realize he wasn't willing to make the sacrifices involved in becoming a photographer. He wanted to make money, and in his business ventures he has made lots of it. That financial freedom has, in turn, allowed him to take up photography in his free time.</p> <p>So when you think about each goal you set for yourself, you shouldn't be asking what you want, but rather, how you're going to get it, and strategize from there.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/chrissa-hardy">Chrissa Hardy</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-lessons-on-how-to-be-a-financial-grownup-from-bobbi-rebell">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-5-money-saving-hacks-are-a-huge-waste-of-time">These 5 Money-Saving Hacks Are a Huge Waste of Time</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-money-lessons-to-take-from-the-great-depression">9 Money Lessons to Take From the Great Depression</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/read-ageproof-living-longer-without-running-out-of-money-or-breaking-a-hip-to-live-your-best-life">Read &quot;AgeProof: Living Longer Without Running Out of Money or Breaking a Hip&quot; to Live Your Best Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tips-from-playbook-for-tough-times-thatll-help-you-live-your-best-life">5 Tips From &quot;Playbook For Tough Times&quot; That&#039;ll Help You Live Your Best Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-38-money-lessons-we-can-learn-from-celebrities">Flashback Friday: 38 Money Lessons We Can Learn From Celebrities</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Budgeting budgeting finances financial grownup financial success frugal living investing life lessons money lessons saving money Thu, 08 Jun 2017 08:30:18 +0000 Chrissa Hardy 1962380 at http://www.wisebread.com 13 Things I Learned From Renting Out My Home on Airbnb http://www.wisebread.com/13-things-i-learned-from-renting-out-my-home-on-airbnb <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/13-things-i-learned-from-renting-out-my-home-on-airbnb" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-511477310.jpg" alt="renting your home on airbnb" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's a leap of faith to open up your primary home to paying guests. When I listed my family home on Airbnb while we were traveling, I had to accept the idea of strangers sleeping in our beds, snooping through drawers and closets, and perusing the shows on our DVR. I also had to accept the risk that something might be stolen or damaged. But most nerve-wracking for me was submitting my home to judgment. After each stay, guests are expected to rate my home on a scale of one to five, not just overall, but on cleanliness as well. Having your home and your hospitality critiqued on the Internet can be tough.</p> <p>The upside, of course, is the money. During one long trip, we earned enough on Airbnb to cover our own vacation lodging. Another trip paid for a new master bedroom set. The unexpected upside has been lessons &mdash; good and bad &mdash; that I've learned from the experience.</p> <h2>1. It Can Be Profitable if You Live in the Right Area</h2> <p>I've been pleasantly surprised to learn that because we live in the popular San Francisco Bay area, we are able to charge up to $200 a night for a home that would have otherwise been sitting empty. And I was amazed to read that another Bay Area Airbnb'er is close to paying the entire mortgage of a house in the mountains by renting it out, and that fellow Wise Bread writer Mikey Rox <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-how-you-rent-your-place-on-airbnb-and-succeed?ref=internal" target="_blank">bought a second home on his Airbnb profits</a>. My husband and I are now contemplating adding a bathroom to the lower level of our house, with the goal of renting out that area as a studio, even when we are home. We hope the rents will help pay for the project.</p> <h2>2. It's a Lot of Work to Prepare a Lived-In Home for Rental</h2> <p>Before hosting guests who are staying a week or more, I like to provide an empty drawer and some closet space in each bedroom, and generally declutter the house so that the guests can use every surface without being encumbered by all the junk my family usually has around. I knock off to-do list items such as getting a leaky faucet or a sticky door lock fixed, and scrutinize my house for fixable flaws such as scuff marks on walls or grubby shower grout. Then of course, I need to remove and lock up personal documents and valuables. All this takes <em>forever</em>.</p> <p>Prepping my four-bedroom home for rental typically takes me about 40 hours, meaning that the rental wouldn't even be a very good hourly rate, except for the fact that we enjoy returning to a decluttered home after our trips. On the downside, we sometimes can't find things that I've boxed up and stored away while we were gone.</p> <h2>3. People Are Generally Polite and Honest</h2> <p>Maybe we've just had good luck so far, but we have never come home to find that our home has been blatantly abused. Once I accidentally left a sheet of bank account passwords out &mdash; of all things! &mdash; and none of my accounts were breached. (Of course I changed all the passwords immediately.) We always have the house professionally cleaned before we return, but the cleaners have told us that the house is usually not terribly messy when they arrive.</p> <h2>4. Some People Are Complainers</h2> <p>A few times, we have had guests stay in our home at a discount in exchange for caring for our cats. They're pretty low-maintenance cats, and guests have enjoyed having them around. All except that <em>one</em> lady, who texted me daily to complain about the cats and various other problems around the house. Her constant kvetching ruined our trip.</p> <h2>5. You Must Be Completely Upfront About Any Potential Problems</h2> <p>In retrospect, I realized that although the guest mentioned above was probably just a complainer in general, one reason she was upset was that I had waited until the last minute to warn her about one potential behavior problem with the cats. She felt blindsided by that.</p> <p>On the flip side, we received one booking while the central heat in our home was unexpectedly inoperative. Not only did we get in touch to warn the bookers, we invited them over, since they were local, to check out the situation and determine whether the electric space heaters we'd borrowed were adequate. We gave them the option to cancel the booking, of course, but they opted to stay (at a discount) and left us a positive review.</p> <h2>6. Something Always Gets Broken</h2> <p>Despite the fact that people seem to have treated our home pretty gently, it seems some little thing is always awry when we return. A door will have stopped closing properly or a picture has been knocked off the wall and cracked. We've come to expect it as part of the cost of doing business.</p> <h2>7. Something Always Gets Left Behind</h2> <p>Some folks have left useful things in our house &mdash; the complainer left a small space heater, even though it was summer when she was staying &mdash; and since she never replied to my email asking if she wanted it back, we've enjoyed using it over the years. Others leave things that we don't notice until weeks later and then wonder where on earth it came from.</p> <h2>8. A Few Items Are Usually Moved Around</h2> <p>Although we've never had anything stolen, it's very common to come home and immediately notice something is not in its usual place. Once I searched and searched for the dishpan I always keep in the kitchen sink, finally locating it in the backyard. Naturally, dishes that have been used and washed are often put away in the wrong places. These little things, while not harmful, can be unsettling reminders that others have been using your things while you were gone.</p> <h2>9. You Have to Really Spell Things Out for People</h2> <p>Once I went to a bit of trouble putting together a nice gift basket for guests, with a fancy chocolate and a bottle of local wine. When we returned home, it was still sitting on the counter, untouched. The only explanations for this I could think of were the guests were non-drinkers or on a diet, or they didn't realize this was for them.</p> <p>Now, I always leave my guests an introductory note and specifically invite them to eat, drink, or use any of the things we've left for them. I also spell out house rules clearly, since things that might seem natural to us &mdash; like don't remove the dishpan from the kitchen &mdash; apparently aren't universally obvious.</p> <h2>10. People Use Airbnb for More Than Just Vacation Lodging</h2> <p>I've had a request to book my house for a school seminar &mdash; which I declined &mdash; and another from folks who are between moving out of their old home and moving into a new one. Since Airbnb encourages it, we typically hear from guests why they want to stay in our home, and it's kind of fun to learn that.</p> <h2>11. It's Hard to Get a Lived-In House &quot;Hotel Room&quot; Clean</h2> <p>Although our guests report positive experiences, we always get only four stars for cleanliness &mdash; despite the fact that we hire a professional cleaner to go over the house before they arrive, in addition to extra cleaning I do myself. This is a little embarrassing, but not that surprising when you think about it. Many rental houses are practically empty, with just a few cooking supplies in the kitchen. There's nothing in the closets or on the shelves to collect dust. Also, my home is almost 100 years old and the interiors are not up to date. Some surfaces are going to look a little dingy even when freshly scrubbed.</p> <h2>12. It's Hard to Find Lodging With a Lot of Beds for a Family</h2> <p>Most of the people who book our house are families, sometimes multiple generations traveling together. They've told us that our listing is often one of the few houses with enough beds for them available. When I see full-time rental units on Airbnb, I often wonder why more of them don't put a bunk bed or two in a room to increase the bed count.</p> <h2>13. Neighbors Are Probably Watching and Listening When You Rent Someone's Home</h2> <p>Every time we rent out our house, we ask neighbors to keep an eye on things. We never request that they <em>spy </em>on the guests, of course, but we tend to hear about it if the guests say anything about our house to neighbors, or if they do anything weird like put out an excessive amount of garbage on trash day.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div align="center"><a href="//www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F13-things-i-learned-from-renting-out-my-home-on-airbnb&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F13%20Things%20I%20Learned%20From%20Renting%20Out%20My%20Home%20on%20Airbnb.jpg&amp;description=13%20Things%20I%20Learned%20From%20Renting%20Out%20My%20Home%20on%20Airbnb" data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-config="above" data-pin-color="red" data-pin-height="28"><img src="//assets.pinterest.com/images/pidgets/pinit_fg_en_rect_red_28.png" alt="" /></a> </p> <!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><script type="text/javascript" async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <div align="center">&nbsp;</div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/13%20Things%20I%20Learned%20From%20Renting%20Out%20My%20Home%20on%20Airbnb.jpg" alt="13 Things I Learned From Renting Out My Home on Airbnb" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-things-i-learned-from-renting-out-my-home-on-airbnb">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/got-extra-space-make-money-and-meet-travelers-with-short-term-rentals">Got Extra Space? Make Money and Meet Travelers With Short-Term Rentals</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-about-a-terrible-airbnb-stay">What to Do About a Terrible Airbnb Stay</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-easy-ways-to-make-good-money-from-airbnb">5 Easy Ways to Make Good Money From Airbnb</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-should-you-get-a-vacation-rental-instead-of-a-hotel">When Should You Get a Vacation Rental Instead of a Hotel?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/turn-your-home-into-a-rental-in-9-easy-steps">Turn Your Home Into a Rental in 9 Easy Steps</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Extra Income Real Estate and Housing Travel AirBnb home rental lessons learned life lessons real talk travel tips traveling vacation rental vrbo Thu, 09 Mar 2017 11:00:10 +0000 Carrie Kirby 1905993 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Frugal Living Skills You Should Be Teaching Your Children http://www.wisebread.com/7-frugal-living-skills-you-should-be-teaching-your-children <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-frugal-living-skills-you-should-be-teaching-your-children" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/kid_education_money_45175586.jpg" alt="Kid learning frugal living skills from parents" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We all want to pass our frugal living skills on to our kids, but what lessons are most important? How specific should we get? How soon should we start? Don't sweat the details. Sometimes the most important frugal living skills aren't financial skills at all &mdash; they're life skills that serve us well in dozens of ways. Here are seven frugal living skills you should be teaching your children, no matter how young or old they are.</p> <h2>1. Patience</h2> <p>The ability to delay gratification is the foundation of frugality. It gives us space to mentally separate our needs from our wants, time to find the best deals, and &mdash; most importantly &mdash; a chance to let momentary impulses pass us by.</p> <p>As with most lessons, patience is easier to embrace when taught early. For items your kids want, build in wait times that are dependent on their own effort (grades, chores around the house, or progress toward their own personal goals). If their wants change during that time, which is inevitable with children, complete the lesson by pointing out how the slight delay translates into dollars saved. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-being-patient-saves-you-money?ref=seealso">8 Ways Being Patient Saves You Money</a>)</p> <h2>2. Self-Confidence</h2> <p>Here's the dirty little secret that keeps our consumer culture thriving: Advertisers and marketers hate personal confidence and they do everything in their power to knock our self-image off kilter. Every day, we face a barrage of neuroses-inspiring messages that tell us we have the wrong car, wrong clothes, dull hair, bad breath, and hopelessly yellow teeth.</p> <p>Instilling a strong sense of self-confidence can help kids avoid falling victim to these messages for the rest of their lives &mdash; and sacrificing a large part of their personal wealth in the process. Seize every opportunity to reinforce the idea that your kids are fine just the way are and model that truth yourself. Then, when age-appropriate, pull back the advertising curtain. Point out how commercial messages are artfully crafted to make us all spend more than we should by making us all feel less than we are. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-confidence-makes-you-better-with-money?ref=seealso">3 Ways Confidence Makes You Better With Money</a>)</p> <h2>3. Collaboration</h2> <p>In our hyper-consumer culture, collaborating and sharing are revolutionary acts because they slightly erode the need for more. Why buy your own lawn mower if you can borrow one from a close neighbor? Likewise, why should your neighbor buy a snowblower if he can use yours a few times a year?</p> <p>Encourage sharing at an early age by helping your kids develop strong communication skills, showing them how to make and honor agreements, and teaching them how to be good stewards of what they (and others) own.</p> <h2>4. Creativity</h2> <p>Making do with less takes creativity and ingenuity. It's how the moms and dads of yesteryear stretched meals, made new clothes from old, bartered for goods, and kept life going on what was often a shoestring budget. Foster your children's imagination with free-form toys, unstructured play, and arts and crafts &mdash; anything that gets them moving, thinking, and exploring new ideas.</p> <h2>5. Negotiation</h2> <p>Knowing how to negotiate on price, payment terms, and extras can save a person thousands of dollars over a lifetime. Teach <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-negotiating-skills-everyone-should-master">essential negotiation skills</a> by example; take your kids with you to flea markets, yard sales, and the used car lot &mdash; any venue where a bit of friendly haggling is expected. Show them how to use to research to their advantage, develop a rapport with sellers, and be fair but fearless in what they ask for.</p> <h2>6. Contentment</h2> <p>Much like low self-confidence, discontentment moves product. Keeping consumers in a constant state of desire is how retailers sell us more than what we need. To complicate matters, teaching children to be content is tricky business in America because we're all afraid of sapping their motivation. While encouraging kids to strive for more is important, make it less about things and money. Instead, help them focus on achieving their personal goals, expanding their experiences, appreciating the moment, and building rich friendships.</p> <h2>7. Individuality</h2> <p>In a world where consumerism and consumer debt is a way of life, choosing a different path takes a steely sense of self. Promoting a spirit of individuality in children helps them cope with &mdash; and even celebrate &mdash; being different. Point out how your family's own spending and saving habits go against the grain and don't be afraid to show the benefits (monetarily and otherwise) of your simpler, saner lifestyle. It will serve them well for the rest of their lives.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-frugal-living-skills-you-should-be-teaching-your-children">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-frugal-living-skills-i-wish-my-parents-would-have-taught-me">8 Frugal Living Skills I Wish My Parents Would Have Taught Me</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-bad-money-habits-youre-teaching-your-kids">4 Bad Money Habits You&#039;re Teaching Your Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-life-lessons-ive-learned-since-becoming-a-parent">3 Life Lessons I&#039;ve Learned Since Becoming a Parent</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-having-a-family-boosts-your-career">6 Ways Having a Family Boosts Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Family children family frugal living lessons life lessons money lessons parenting parenting tips skills Tue, 15 Nov 2016 09:00:08 +0000 Kentin Waits 1833153 at http://www.wisebread.com Flashback Friday: 45 Life Lessons You'd Give to Your Younger Self http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-45-life-lessons-youd-give-to-your-younger-self <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/flashback-friday-45-life-lessons-youd-give-to-your-younger-self" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_thinking_concerned_77389547.jpg" alt="Woman thinking about lessons she&#039;d give to her younger self" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you had a time machine, what would you change about your past? (Other than investing in Apple immediately, of course.) You've spent at least a few years on this earth, and with time comes wisdom. Why not go back and crack an egg of knowledge on your younger self? They could use some serious guidance.</p> <p>Here are 45 brilliant life lessons we wish we could give our younger selves.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/child_holding_cash_000073924377.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-finance-tips-you-wish-you-could-tell-your-younger-self?ref=fbf">11 Finance Tips You Wish You Could Tell Your Younger Self</a> &mdash; Your parents told you to save money, pay off credit cards consistently, shop wisely, etc. But did you listen? No. Now that you've seen the other side of poor financial decisions, little you would definitely take your money advice.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-frugal-living-commencement-speech-id-give-to-my-younger-self?ref=fbf">The Frugal Living Commencement Speech I'd Give to My Younger Self</a> &mdash; Remember how exciting graduation was? You had your whole life ahead of you. Now your school days are loonnnggg behind you, and what do you have to show for that time? If nothing else, experience. Share all of it with your naive new-grad self.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/iStock_000071991467_Large_0.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-career-tips-you-wish-you-could-give-your-younger-self?ref=fbf">7 Career Tips You Wish You Could Give Your Younger Self</a> &mdash; When you first started on your career path, you were so wide-eyed and innocent. But in the professional world, office politics are everywhere, and things can get tricky. Here are all the things you wish you knew way back when.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-investing-tips-you-wish-you-could-tell-your-younger-self?ref=fbf">11 Investing Tips You Wish You Could Tell Your Younger Self</a> &mdash; Investing might seem like an overwhelming concept for those who are still learning the basics of money management, but it's something we all should've been doing the moment we got our own bank accounts, like these 11 investing moves.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/woman_credit_card_000043691962.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-credit-card-truths-you-wish-you-could-tell-your-younger-self?ref=fbf">10 Credit Card Truths You Wish You Could Tell Your Younger Self</a> &mdash; Ah, credit cards. We need them to help build credit, but they can be tricky little buggers, can't they? Once you have your own, and can spend money without having to pay it back right away, debt can quickly pile up. Here's how you would've done it differently, if you could go back in time.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/advice-to-your-younger-self-what-would-you-say?ref=fbf">Advice to Your Younger Self: What Would You Say?</a> &mdash; Our writing team got to share the advice they'd give to their younger selves, and it was all kinds of brilliant and fascinating!</p> <p><em>What other important lessons would you give your younger self? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/chrissa-hardy">Chrissa Hardy</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-45-life-lessons-youd-give-to-your-younger-self">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-70-brilliant-ways-to-beat-the-heat-this-summer">Flashback Friday: 70 Brilliant Ways to Beat the Heat This Summer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-107-best-breakfast-hacks-to-start-your-day-off-right">Flashback Friday: The 107 Best Breakfast Hacks to Start Your Day Off Right</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-50-money-moves-you-need-to-make-when-big-changes-happen">Flashback Friday: 50 Money Moves You Need to Make When Big Changes Happen</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-51-ways-to-organize-your-whole-life-in-2017">Flashback Friday: 51 Ways to Organize Your Whole Life in 2017</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-34-ways-fitness-can-improve-your-finances">Flashback Friday: 34 Ways Fitness Can Improve Your Finances</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Life Hacks adulting fbf flashback friday Food frugal living growing up life hacks life lessons money management personal finance Fri, 08 Jul 2016 10:00:06 +0000 Chrissa Hardy 1747540 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Career Mistakes New Grads Make http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-mistakes-new-grads-make <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-career-mistakes-new-grads-make" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/new_grad_unemployed_85374233.jpg" alt="Woman making career mistakes new grads make" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>After four long years of studying hard, budgeting every thin dime, and learning the finer points of a ramen-based cuisine, you've finally graduated. As you toss that mortar board in the air and begin the job hunt, be mindful of common pitfalls that can get your career off to a bad start. Here are eight career mistakes new grads make.</p> <h2>1. Keeping Social Media Accounts Public</h2> <p>It's called <em>social </em>media for a reason. No matter how run-of-the-mill our Facebook or Twitter posts may be, we always run the risk of offending someone for something. Assume every potential employer will attempt to review your online presence early in the hiring process. If you can't <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-break-your-social-media-habit">break your social media habit</a> completely, set your status to &quot;private&quot; across all networks and control the conversation.</p> <h2>2. Not Having a Plan</h2> <p>Without a plan, your career can take on a life of its own &mdash; and not in a good way. Think of your career as an extension of your education and design a plan for short-term and long-term success. Where do you want to be in three years? What about in 10? What are your income and lifestyle goals? What will it take to reach them? Shape every job search around specific incremental moves that will help make your plan a reality and avoid taking any job &quot;just because.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Not Dressing the Part</h2> <p>In today's hyper-casual culture, most young people have never learned how to dress for business success. Invest in an interview wardrobe that reflects the sort of professional you want to become. Choose versatile pieces that are understated, classically styled, and fit flawlessly. Oh, and two more things: Rediscover the lost art of ironing and remember that club wear is not formal wear. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-a-work-wardrobe-for-any-job-on-a-budget?ref=seealso">Build a Work Wardrobe for Any Job on a Budget</a>)</p> <h2>4. Submitting Standardized Resumes and Cover Letters</h2> <p>Hiring managers are impressed by applicants who do their research. Avoid the &quot;click-apply-submit&quot; job search method by taking a few minutes to learn about each company you're interested in and each role you're applying for. Then, customize your resume and cover letter to address the employer's specific needs.</p> <h2>5. Jumping on the First Job Offer</h2> <p>Getting your first job offer after college is exciting and flattering, but don't let that cloud your judgment. Before you accept that job, know why. How does it fit with your career plan? Is it something you'll excel at and enjoy? Is there an obvious path for advancement? Does it pay enough to cover your expenses?</p> <h2>6. Buying a New Car</h2> <p>It happens so often it's almost cliché: A new graduate receives her first real paycheck, gets a little cash drunk after four lean years of college, and rewards herself with a brand-new car. This isn't just a financial mistake; it's a career mistake, too. That new car you'll be paying off for the next five years depreciated 25% the minute you drove it off the lot. And now you can't risk even a temporary hiccup in income and wouldn't dare settle for a more fulfilling job that pays less.</p> <p>A better option is to stay lean and nimble the first few years in your career by avoiding all forms of consumer debt. Remember, you're not sure where your professional life will take you &mdash; be ready to seize new opportunities. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-reasons-why-you-should-never-buy-a-new-car?ref=seealso">3 Reasons Why You Should Never Buy a New Car</a>)</p> <h2>7. Gunning for a Promotion</h2> <p>First jobs are exciting and some newly-minted employees can get overeager to prove themselves. But trying to move up the corporate ladder too early can alienate coworkers and suggest to management that you're dissatisfied. Pace yourself by fully investing in your current role, building a strong network with colleagues, and waiting for the right opportunity to come along.</p> <h2>8. Freaking Out and Going Back to School</h2> <p>Overwhelmed by responsibility and underwhelmed by the glacial pace of career advancement, many new graduates respond by going back to school to pursue an advanced degree. A few years later, they've amassed more debt, lost valuable career-building time, and still have no clear plan for success. Be strategic. If you're unhappy with your work life, explore ways to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-a-major-career-switch-without-going-back-to-school">shift careers without further schooling</a>. And if you decide to return to college, make sure it's a proactive and not a reactive decision.</p> <p><em>What advice would you give new grads? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-mistakes-new-grads-make">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee">12 Ways You&#039;re Being a Terrible Employee</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-the-adventures-of-johnny-bunko">Book review: The Adventures of Johnny Bunko</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career career advice career mistakes grads graduation life lessons new grads students Wed, 22 Jun 2016 09:00:04 +0000 Kentin Waits 1736431 at http://www.wisebread.com Here's What I Learned About Money After Using Acorns http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-i-learned-about-money-after-using-acorns <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/heres-what-i-learned-about-money-after-using-acorns" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman _holding_cash_000088024827.jpg" alt="Woman learning money lessons using acorns " title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I have a rich history of being broke. I've always struggled with managing my money properly, and being able to resist the urge to buy things I don't need, rather than saving for my future. The problem with the future is that it's <em>the future.</em> It's off in the distance, a haze that I can't even see. There's no immediate reward in investing or saving. When faced with a new book, a flowy frock, or a delicious meal, the peace of mind that comes with planning for the future has always seemed like the boring, undesirable option. Until now.</p> <p>Now, I'm actually an adult. I've got big plans that go beyond what I'll be doing this coming Saturday night, and they involve retiring comfortably with lots of cash in the bank and lots of grandkids running around my yard. And what caused this shift in mindset was not only age, but also, <a href="https://www.acorns.com/">Acorns</a>.</p> <h2>How It Works</h2> <p>Acorns is a service that takes your electronic spare change, and invests it into a diversified portfolio. A team of experts, including mathematicians, financial experts, and top investors work behind the scenes to make sure your chump change grows into a brilliant little nest egg. You connect your bank account to your Acorns account, and the &quot;spare change&quot; from each transaction in that bank account gets automatically transferred into your Acorns account.</p> <p>So, for example, with the bank I use, I have a checking account with a debit card, a savings account, and a credit card. Acorns sees the transactions of all these accounts, and rounds up the total of each purchase to the next dollar. If I buy something on Amazon and spend $19.60 &mdash; whether I use my debit card or credit card to pay &mdash; Acorns will round that transaction up to $20.00, and invest the remaining $.40. Once the round ups reach $5.00, the funds will be automatically deducted from my checking account, and Acorns will invest it.</p> <p>The investments are spread over large company stocks, small company stocks, emerging market stocks, real estate, corporate bonds, and government bonds. Based on your investing goal and general time frame, you can change your investing style from conservative to aggressive whenever you want.</p> <p>It's easy, convenient, and it really teaches you a lot about money &mdash; especially if you're prone to recklessly spending all your dough. Here's what I learned about money after using Acorns for just three months. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-microsaving-tools-to-help-you-start-saving-now?ref=seealso">5 MicroSaving Tools to Help You Start Saving Now</a>)</p> <h2>Investing Doesn't Need to Be Complicated</h2> <p>I've had a few investment accounts through previous employers, and it always seemed like such a complex and intimidating process to make the right investment decisions. It was like learning a new language, and I can't even remember most of the French I learned in high school, so I felt utterly left out.</p> <p>But Acorns breaks it down and lets you see any changes to your investments in real time. You can also make changes to your portfolio at any time, depending on your goals. It could not be a more painless process.</p> <h2>Patience Is Money</h2> <p>They say, &quot;Time is money&quot; but I'd argue that patience, specifically, is way more valuable. Because you can't get anywhere in saving money or investing money without patience. Safeguarding your financial future takes a long time, and you need to be in it for the long haul, if you're going to do it right. Luckily, by using Acorns, and playing with their projection tools, that hazy future is a whole lot clearer.</p> <h2>Saving Is Surprisingly Thrilling</h2> <p>Getting any joy out of spending money used to mean purchasing a tangible thing that I could look at, wear, or play with like a shiny new toy. But Acorns has flipped that habit on its head, by giving me a substantial peek into just how cozy I can be if I save regularly and invest wisely. Being smart is way more fun than being spendy.</p> <p>Since I started using acorns three months ago, I've invested about $300, between round ups, weekly automatic transfers, and occasionally sending over an extra $20 when I'm feeling particularly money-motivated. My total gain is $4.48. It doesn't seem like much, right? But that money was working hard for me over the course of 90 days. And if I hadn't used Acorns, I probably wouldn't have saved that much, and I <em>definitely </em>would not have made any extra. I'm proud of that baby gain, and I'm excited to see where I'll be in six months. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-millennial-money-apps-everyone-should-use?ref=seealso">The 5 Millennial Money Apps Everyone Should Use</a>)</p> <h2>The More You Earn, the More You Learn</h2> <p>With Acorns, once you start seeing your account grow, you feel a sense of accomplishment that often leads to a hunger for more knowledge. You don't want to worry about losing it all, or your &quot;luck&quot; wearing out. So you want to know more, to become more informed, so you can maybe take what you've learned from Acorns and find other ways to invest in your future.</p> <h2>Your Money Should Never Get a Day Off</h2> <p>You work hard. And your money should always be working hard, too. Acorns makes monitoring your investments so easy that you can check in on everything while on a tropical vacation, sipping blended cocktails in the sun, while your moola is still on the 9-5 grind.</p> <h2>An Automated Life Is a Happy Life</h2> <p>The best part of Acorns, by far, is the automation. You link your bank account to Acorns to get it set up, and then you can also set up recurring deposits, track upcoming round-ups, and make checking on your investments as quick and easy as checking your Twitter notifications. This is now a quick part of your daily routine that leads to zero headaches, and only profitable progress in the right direction. Does it really get any better than that?</p> <p><em>Have you tried Acorns? Has it worked for you? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fheres-what-i-learned-about-money-after-using-acorns&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHeres%2520What%2520I%2520Learned%2520About%2520Money%2520After%2520Using%2520Acorns.jpg&amp;description=Heres%20What%20I%20Learned%20About%20Money%20After%20Using%20Acorns"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Heres%20What%20I%20Learned%20About%20Money%20After%20Using%20Acorns.jpg" alt="Here's What I Learned About Money After Using Acorns" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/chrissa-hardy">Chrissa Hardy</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-i-learned-about-money-after-using-acorns">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-lessons-on-how-to-be-a-financial-grownup-from-bobbi-rebell">6 Lessons on How to Be a Financial Grownup From Bobbi Rebell</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/zen-and-the-art-of-hiding-money">Zen and the Art of Hiding Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-lessons-we-can-learn-from-the-easter-bunny">6 Money Lessons We Can Learn From the Easter Bunny</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-new-toys-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use New Toys to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/23-effortless-ways-to-go-green-and-save-money-too">23 Effortless Ways to Go Green (and Save Money, Too)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Investment acorns life lessons money lessons rounding up saving money Thu, 14 Apr 2016 09:30:19 +0000 Chrissa Hardy 1687439 at http://www.wisebread.com Best Money Tips: Life Lessons From the Very Wealthy http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-life-lessons-from-the-very-wealthy <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-life-lessons-from-the-very-wealthy" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/rich_couple_jet_000064952463.jpg" alt="Learning life lessons from the very wealthy" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found helpful articles on life lessons from the very wealthy, the ultimate guide to better posture, and the best places to sell your crafts.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="http://www.moneysmartguides.com/7-life-lessons-from-the-very-wealthy">7 Life Lessons From The Very Wealthy</a> &mdash; Don't become cash rich and time poor. Learn what the opportunity costs are for every decision, and recognize that the costs are not always financial. [Money Smart Guides]</p> <p><a href="http://www.artofmanliness.com/2016/03/08/the-ultimate-guide-to-posture/">The Ultimate Guide to Posture</a> &ndash; Whether you&rsquo;re standing or sitting, learn what cues you should watch out for if you want to develop better posture. [The Art of Manliness]</p> <p><a href="http://www.retiredby40blog.com/2016/03/08/8-places-to-sell-crafts-and-make-extra-money/">8 Places To Sell Your Crafts To Make Extra Money</a> &mdash; Pinterest's Buy It Now feature allows people to shop for goodies&hellip;and sell them! Just set up a Shopify store for your products and apply for a Buy It Now pin. [Retired By 40!]</p> <p><a href="http://savingdollarsandsense.com/5-ways-the-time-change-saves-you-money/">5 Ways the Time Change Saves You Money</a> &mdash; With more daylight after work, you can exercise outdoors instead of hitting the gym. [Saving Dollars &amp; Sense]</p> <p><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Laundry-Apps-38085554#photo-38085554">5 Ultraconvenient Laundry Apps You NEED in Your Life</a> &mdash; Some chores are worth shelling out the money to have someone else do it for you. If you hate doing laundry and there's a huge load piling up, you might one to check out one of these convenient apps for laundry service. [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="http://www.dealiciousmom.com/gift-ideas-for-foodie-friends/">Gift Ideas for Foodie Friends</a> &mdash; Look for a cookbook that focuses on your friend's favorite food or cuisine. [Dealicious Mom]</p> <p><a href="http://www.shebudgets.com/personal-finance/real-estate/what-do-you-really-need-to-make-to-buy-that-new-house/66773">What Do You Really Need to Make to Buy That New House?</a> &mdash; Pittsburgh is the cheapest major US city for buying a home. A single person with an annual income of $31,000 can afford one of the average $128,000 homes in this city. [SheBudgets]</p> <p><a href="http://rhondasherwood.com/well-know-financial-advisor-5-questionsyou-ask/">How Well Do You Know your Financial Advisor? 5 Questions You Should Ask</a> &mdash; What is your advisor's investment style, and is it in line with what you're comfortable with? [Rhonda Sherwood]</p> <p><a href="http://sidsavara.com/personal-development/time-management-secret-selfish">A Dirty Time Management Secret: Be Selfish</a> &mdash; It's up to you to decide where to focus your time and energy. Figure out what your priorities are and make time for them. [Sid Savara]</p> <p><a href="http://parentingsquad.com/6-reasons-kids-need-to-see-daddy-cleaning">6 Reasons Kids Need to See Daddy Cleaning</a> &mdash; When mom and dad share the workload around the house, your kids learn that everyone needs to do their part to make sure the house is clean and tidy. [Parenting Squad]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-life-lessons-from-the-very-wealthy">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-yoga-can-teach-you-about-money">5 Things Yoga Can Teach You About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-finance-tips-you-wish-you-could-tell-your-younger-self">11 Finance Tips You Wish You Could Tell Your Younger Self</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-same-actions-will-produce-the-same-results-ten-tenets-for-arranging-your-rich-part-2">The Same Actions Will Produce The Same Results (Ten Tenets for Arranging Your Rich: Part 2)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-amazing-life-lessons-from-scrooge-mcduck">4 Amazing Life Lessons from Scrooge McDuck</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-life-and-money-lessons-from-will-ferrell-movies">8 Surprising Life and Money Lessons from Will Ferrell Movies</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance best money tips life lessons Fri, 11 Mar 2016 10:30:38 +0000 Amy Lu 1670328 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Things Yoga Can Teach You About Money http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-yoga-can-teach-you-about-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-things-yoga-can-teach-you-about-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000076935935_Large.jpg" alt="doing yoga and learning about money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Whether or not yoga is your thing, you're probably familiar with it. The practice of yoga has become popular enough that most people know how yoga is done and how to do the basic poses.</p> <p>What you may not know is that you can learn a lot about life in general while holding a pose like downward dog or happy baby. When you practice, you study not only the yogic postures, but also things like balance, flexibility, and mindfulness. And you can apply all of these concepts outside of the studio, too.</p> <p>Here's how I've come to apply things I've learned from yoga to my personal financial life. I hope these ideas help you think about your money a little differently, maybe with a little more Zen! (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-zen-concepts-thatll-improve-your-finances?ref=seealso">4 Zen Concepts That'll Improve Your Finances</a>)</p> <h2>1. Balance Is Central</h2> <p>My favorite yoga teacher will tell us to center ourselves not just over the left foot, but over the toes, or the heel. Slowly, I've come to realize that how I balance myself changes the posture subtly, often bringing in more of a stretch or making it more challenging.</p> <p>Just as how you balance is key in the yoga studio, it's helpful when you're thinking about money, too. Most of us want more money, but what if we were to focus somewhere else? For instance, is there enough to pay the bills? Are we spending more thoughtfully than we did last year? And what would making more money actually add to our lives?</p> <p>These questions, and more, can help us think in a more balanced way about our money. This, in turn, will free us to change spending or saving habits that might be harming us.</p> <h2>2. Proper Preparation Is Key</h2> <p>A good yoga teacher will prepare you for what is coming, both in the current class and in the future. There's a reason that harder poses often come near the end of a yoga class &mdash; it's because you wouldn't be ready for them before that. You have to open your hips, your hamstrings, your shoulders, and whatever else is needed for that final, challenging pose of the flow. If you don't prepare, you'll hurt yourself and hamper your ability to progress in the long term.</p> <p>Money works the same way. What are your long-term financial goals? And your short-term goals? These aren't just going to happen. They require planning and preparation ahead of time. Just like in yoga, you need to do specific things now so you can reach your goals later. Want to travel around the world? Start saving. Need a specific kind of of mortgage, come spring? Look at starting the application now. Proper planning will help ensure your long-term financial health, just like a proper flow will help ensure that you stay healthy enough to continue practicing yoga.</p> <h2>3. Flexibility Is Crucial</h2> <p>Most people who practice regularly see an increase in their flexibility. And people like me &mdash; who just thought they weren't flexible at all &mdash; begin to see how this rise in flexibility influences their entire lives.</p> <p>Similarly, the more flexible you can be with your money, the better prepared you'll be financially. Financial flexibility has to do with your ability to change how you spend based on your current circumstances. If you empty your emergency fund because your car breaks down, can you flex for a few months until the fund is replenished? And if you realize you need more than you'd anticipated for a down payment, can you find the funds and flex on a few things until you've made up the difference?</p> <p>Financial flexibility pertains to small things, like how much coffee you buy and how often you dine out. But it also pertains to bigger things, like when you decide to buy a house, how you structure your investments, and more. Just as flexibility and strength are tied in yoga, they often come together financially, too. And you want your money to be as strong as it can be.</p> <h2>4. Self-Care Is Always Worth It</h2> <p>People start yoga for all different sorts of reasons, but they often continue because of self-care. Doing yoga feels good. It makes your body feel better, even alleviating long-term aches and pains. And it's often meditative, offering quiet and space that most of us don't have in our daily lives. So, in learning yoga, we often stumble onto self-care, too.</p> <p>Learning self-care through yoga often helps people take better care of themselves financially. This can mean spending money on things &mdash; even little things &mdash; that make you feel good. A sweet smelling candle, a good book, or a cup of coffee can all be acts of self-care. It can also mean using more discretion about how you spend your money, so that you aren't always worrying about debt, overdraft fees, and how to pay the bills. Once people get started on a path to self-care, it often spills into their entire lives.</p> <h2>5. Mindfulness Will Help You Reach Your Goals</h2> <p>Mindfulness means staying aware in the present, and is often stressed in the yoga studio. Living in the now, paying attention to how your body is moving, what you need to do, and how to stay in a pose, can all help you learn to remain present &mdash; even when so many things pressure you to think about them, instead.</p> <p>More than anything else, mindfulness is a path to self-mastery. It teaches us to choose where we focus, rather than letting the mind run willy nilly wherever it wants. And when we learn to focus in yoga, we learn a skill that can help us financially, too.</p> <p>Being mindful &mdash; and therefore a master of ourselves &mdash; can help us stick to a budget. It can help us save up for something we really want. It can help us get through a frugal season without taking on debt. And it can even help us buy Christmas presents, because it will help us focus on the recipient and what they want, rather on everything we might like to buy for them. In the end, being mindful will help us save more, invest better, and be happier with what we have.</p> <p>When we are open, willing learners, yoga can improve not only our physical health, but our financial health as well.</p> <p><em>How does your yoga practice tie to your financial life? What yoga lesson can you start applying to your personal finances today?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-yoga-can-teach-you-about-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-morning-mantras-that-ll-help-keep-your-finances-on-track">8 Morning Mantras That’ll Help Keep Your Finances on Track</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-34-ways-fitness-can-improve-your-finances">Flashback Friday: 34 Ways Fitness Can Improve Your Finances</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-exercise-mats">The 5 Best Exercise Mats</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-99-best-fitness-hacks-of-all-time">Flashback Friday: The 99 Best Fitness Hacks of All Time</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-and-keep-amazing-posture-by-doing-these-10-stretches-today">Get — and Keep — Amazing Posture by Doing These 10 Stretches Today</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Life Hacks Health and Beauty budgeting fitness life lessons money habits yoga zen Tue, 19 Jan 2016 10:00:02 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1638732 at http://www.wisebread.com 11 Great Life Hacks Your Grandparents Forgot to Share With You http://www.wisebread.com/11-great-life-hacks-your-grandparents-forgot-to-share-with-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/11-great-life-hacks-your-grandparents-forgot-to-share-with-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/housewife_watering_plant_000018649549.jpg" alt="Woman learning life hacks her grandparents forgot to share " title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Times may change, but people will always find ingenious ways to solve life's little problems. These days we call them &quot;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-lessons-every-20-something-should-learn">life hacks</a>,&quot; but your grandparents probably called them something else; perhaps &quot;grandma's secrets.&quot; But whatever they were called, some of them are just as awesome today as they were all those years ago. Here are 11 of the best.</p> <h2>1. Make Cheap Coffee Taste Gourmet With Salt</h2> <p>Coffee is a multi-billion dollar business, and you can really spend some serious money on expensive brands. But, you don't have to. Buy the cheap, pre-ground, store-brand coffee. Then, stir a <a href="http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2012/12/should-you-put-salt-in-your-coffee-reduce-bitterness.html">pinch of salt into the coffee</a> grounds in the filter basket, and brew as normal. There is science at work here. The salt reduces bitterness, fooling the brain into believing the coffee is smoother and creamier than it actually is. This also cuts down on the need to rely on creamers and sugar. Try it. You will be surprised.</p> <h2>2. Water Your Plants With Yarn</h2> <p>Do a search for &quot;automatic plant watering system&quot; and you'll see lots of expensive new products, such as the very popular <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B012WC1804/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B012WC1804&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=GJDXHNYILSRR5QFQ">self-watering probes</a>. However, this clever new idea isn't new at all. The basic system has been around for many decades, and works on the same &quot;capillary action&quot; principle &mdash; which is the ability of a liquid to move through a narrow space without gravity. Simply place a bucket of water at a level above the plants you want to water, and then drape strands of yarn from the bucket to the soil in the plant pot. Your plants will get an adequate supply of water while you are away, without over watering. Or you can simply set this system up if you're not interested in watering your plants everyday by hand.</p> <h2>3. Keep Eggs Fresh for up to Six Months</h2> <p>This is another life hack that came from necessity over a century ago. What do you do to preserve the many eggs your hens are laying for the coming months, especially without refrigeration? Well, if you have a cooler (one of those <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000JWEF00/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B000JWEF00&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=Y6CZZSJLFV4FASET">cheap Styrofoam coolers</a> will do), a big bag of rock salt, and some grease (shortening works well), you can <a href="http://hubpages.com/food/How-to-Store-Raw-Eggs-in-Grease-and-Salt-An-Illustrated-Guide">store hundreds of eggs</a> for up to six months. Simply put a layer of rock salt on the bottom of the container, then coat the eggs in grease and bury them. Continue layering like this until your container is full, and keep it in a cold, dry place like a basement or cellar. Then, remove eggs when you need them, wash off the grease, and enjoy. The older the eggs get, the less versatile they are. But, they're still edible.</p> <h2>4. Cool a Wine Bottle Without Ice</h2> <p>You're having a big party, or you just want a nice chilled glass of wine with dinner, but&hellip; you're out of ice, and it will take ages to cool it in the freezer or fridge. Well there is a solution, from the days when automatic ice makers were not readily available. Wrap your wine bottle in a tea towel, place it in a bucket or container in the sink, and then let the water from the cold faucet run over it for about 10 minutes. Then you should have a cold bottle of wine, ready to serve.</p> <h2>5. Relieve Earache With Olive Oil</h2> <p>Some of you may actually remember this from your childhood. I remember it well. If I had an earache as a child, my grandma would put a few drops of warm <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003VKQT9C/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B003VKQT9C&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=35GPY5RRXX64ZGWF">olive oil</a> inside my ear, then put a cotton ball in there to stop it oozing out. The oil serves as a lubricant, and it also has properties that help fight infection. It won't cure it, but if you have nothing else at hand, it's a good way to provide some comfort.</p> <h2>6. Slice Bread With a Hot Knife</h2> <p>You know, bread didn't always come pre-sliced. We often take it for granted, but your grandparents will tell you tales of whole loaves, and the difficulty involved in making sandwiches. That's where this tip comes from. If you have to cut a whole loaf into slices, take your serrated knife and submerge it into boiling water. Dry it off with a tea towel, and start to cut. The hot knife will make it much easier to cut thin slices from your loaf.</p> <h2>7. Use a Cold Onion on a Mosquito Bite</h2> <p>So, obviously it's important to have an onion in the refrigerator for this tip. Some people already do this, but if you don't, and it's mosquito season, leave one in there. If you get bitten (which I did constantly this summer) take out the onion and cut a slice. Apply it to the bite, and it will draw out the mosquito's saliva (which is what causes the itch). Plus, the cold temperature of the onion slice is also soothing.</p> <h2>8. Remove a Splinter With a Piece of Bacon</h2> <p>If you have a stubborn splinter that just will not come out, don't dig at it with a pin or needle. Instead, use a trick that many grandmas, including my own, used back in the day. Before you go to bed, put a small piece of bacon fat over the splinter, and then cover with a band-aid. In the morning, the splinter will have risen to the top of your skin and can easily be removed. In some instances, it will actually transfer into the bacon fat, which can be easily discarded.</p> <h2>9. Bring Cut Flowers Back to Life With Boiling Water</h2> <p>You want to make that bouquet of flowers last as long as possible, but eventually, they will start to wilt and die. However, a tip from your grandparents can extend the life of those flowers for several extra days. When they start to wilt, boil some water in a saucepan. Let it cool for a few minutes, and while it's cooling, cut a 45-degree angle in the stems of the flowers, and also make a slit up through the center of each stem. Then, dip the ends of the stems in the hot water for about 30 seconds, before placing them back in a vase of room temperature water. Within a few hours, your flowers will be revived.</p> <h2>10. A Lemon Can Remove Salt Stains From Shoes</h2> <p>When winter comes around, your leather boots and shoes will get those dreaded salt stains. I have a pair right now that look ready for the scrap heap, but I'm going to use the old lemon trick. Cut a fresh lemon in half, and apply it to the stained areas. You may need to press down and hold it for several seconds. Rinse with a damp cloth, and repeat a few times. The salt stains should be gone. Now, you can apply polish as usual, and your shoes or boots will be ready for another outing.</p> <h2>11. Remove Ink Stains With Milk</h2> <p>There are many products on the market that are designed to remove ink stains, including <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000JF2SWO/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B000JF2SWO&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=TVDJQMGYWZ7J7XOD">Stain Devils</a>. However, your grandparents did not have access to those products, but they still found a way; a cheaper way. All you need to do is soak the stained article of clothing in a bowl of milk, preferably overnight. If it's a really stubborn ink stain, adding a little vinegar to the milk bath will help. In the morning, the stain will be gone.</p> <p><em>Did your grandparents teach you any other brilliant life hacks? Let us know in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-great-life-hacks-your-grandparents-forgot-to-share-with-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-45-life-lessons-youd-give-to-your-younger-self">Flashback Friday: 45 Life Lessons You&#039;d Give to Your Younger Self</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-cities-for-starting-over">The 5 Best Cities for Starting Over</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/shoveling-snow-and-5-other-things-robots-can-do-for-you">Shoveling Snow and 5 Other Things Robots Can Do for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-yoga-can-teach-you-about-money">5 Things Yoga Can Teach You About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-life-skills-your-kids-wont-learn-in-school">7 Life Skills Your Kids Won&#039;t Learn in School</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks Family boomer generation grandparents life hacks life lessons Thu, 10 Dec 2015 22:22:32 +0000 Paul Michael 1619232 at http://www.wisebread.com 11 Finance Tips You Wish You Could Tell Your Younger Self http://www.wisebread.com/11-finance-tips-you-wish-you-could-tell-your-younger-self <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/11-finance-tips-you-wish-you-could-tell-your-younger-self" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/child_holding_cash_000073924377.jpg" alt="Learning finance tips you wish you could tell your younger self" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you could impart some of your current financial wisdom on your younger self, what would you say? Take more risks? Concentrate more on saving? Choose a less expensive education? All of us would do something differently. Perhaps one of these tips would have paved an easier financial path from then to now.</p> <h2>1. Start Contributing to Your 401K as Soon as You Can</h2> <p>When you landed your first job straight out of college, the last thing on your mind was retirement. But even a couple years' delay can defer your retirement to later than expected, or force you to tighten the purse strings mid-career to make up the difference. You're not alone. According to new research from Fidelity Investments in collaboration with the Stanford Center for Longevity, 36% of retirees <a href="http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20151027006025/en/Drives-People-Retire-Isn%E2%80%99t-Fidelity-Research-Busts">wished they had saved more</a> during their working years, and 33% wished they had started saving earlier &mdash; a statistic that isn't exactly comforting in hindsight.</p> <p>To make the most of your 401K right now, max out your employer-match contribution &mdash; don't let that free cash go to waste &mdash; and negotiate to be vested sooner and/or receive a higher match opposed to $1K to $2k more annually. This is a strategy that will pay off more in the long run.</p> <h2>2. Never Say &quot;I'll Pay Myself Back Later&quot; Because You Won't</h2> <p>There are times when we're younger that we need to dip into our personal savings or 401K (which should always be a last resort) for emergencies or something recreational (like a bad-idea road trip with your buddies to Fort Lauderdale &mdash; not that I'm speaking from personal experience, of course). We convince ourselves that we'll pay ourselves back for the deduction so that we feel less guilty about it, but nine times out of 10, that never happens. That was then. Hopefully you've put those costly impulse decisions behind you &mdash; like you have the cargo shorts and keg stands.</p> <h2>3. Credit Cards Aren't Free Money</h2> <p>This tip is very personal to me because I was targeted by credit card companies as soon as I turned 18, and I fell right into their trap. I took whatever they were willing to throw at me &mdash; because, <em>hahaha, I was going to beat the system!</em> &mdash; but the joke was on me. I <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-this-if-you-have-too-much-credit-card-debt">maxed out those cards</a> in less than two months, and because I was a student without a job, I was unable to pay the bills. I missed payments for <em>years</em> until the debt was in such dire straits that I was offered payoff deals. The debt, and the indelible mark it left on my credit score, followed me for years, making it difficult to buy a car, purchase a home, or even build my savings. In this case, I'd tell my younger self to run for the hills &mdash; and keep your nose out of the J.Crew catalog.</p> <h2>4. You Don't Need to Impress Your Friends</h2> <p>As soon as you get that first high-paying job, you want to do two things &mdash; buy shiny stuff and take your friends out for dinner and drinks. Why? Because you made it, and now it's time to show it off! But guess what? Your friends don't give a lick. These are the people who enjoyed your company when you were poor; there's no need to impress them now. And if that's not the case, they're not really your friends. Instead, save your money and pretentiousness for more important things.</p> <h2>5. Pay Your Bills First, Yourself Second, and Everything Else After That</h2> <p>Cash your check and divide it into three parts every time you get paid. The largest part should pay all your bills for the month &mdash; I mean everything. Second, pay yourself. Funnel money into savings and set aside cash for budget items like groceries, gas, and rent. Lastly, if you have any left over, you can use a little for the extra things you'd like to do, like eat out, see a movie, or other non-essentials. It's not the most exciting way to live, but it is the smartest.</p> <h2>6. If You Don't Have the Cash for it, You Can't Afford It</h2> <p>This sort of goes hand-in-hand with steering clear of credit cards if at all possible. And it's as simple as the strategy suggests. If you can't pay for whatever it is you want in cash, you don't need it. Obviously that exempts major life purchases &mdash; a new car, home, etc. &mdash; but it applies to almost everything else, including fancy flat-screen TVs, expensive makeup, the hottest sneakers, or whatever your vice is that you can totally live without.</p> <h2>7. Stop Eating and Drinking Yourself Poor</h2> <p>Fifty-cent wing nights and dollar shots will not get your bills paid, but they will get you fat and house poor. Print out that motivational speech and keep it in your wallet, young buck. In general, eat healthier &mdash; and at home more often. Your 30-year-old body (and bank account) will thank you.</p> <h2>8. Carefully Consider the Debt-to-Income Ratio of Student Loans</h2> <p>Personally I don't regret my costly private college education, despite that I still have eight more years of loan to pay off. Still, I do have plenty of friends who wish they had chosen a less expensive school. Thus, carefully consider how much college will cost, the debt you'll rack up as a result, and the income earning potential of a career in your chosen field. If there's an imbalance between those variables that you don't think you can live with, choosing a cheaper school may be the right move for you.</p> <h2>9. Master the Money-Saving Art of Negotiation</h2> <p>If you can buy it, chances are you can negotiate the price down. From clearance clothing and your first new car to insurance premiums and bank fees (yep, you can even negotiate those, too), you can save a bundle if you learn how to drive a hard bargain.</p> <h2>10. Invest in Real Estate as Soon as You Can</h2> <p>If you search hard enough, you can find anything on the Internet. But I don't believe that, and my younger self didn't either &mdash; which is why I bought property as soon as I could. I'm not alone in this thinking either. Many of my friends who bought early stand by their decisions, even though it set them back financially at first. That sacrifice by way of real estate investment has paid off over the years, because instead of paying someone else a fee to live under a roof, we've paid ourselves in the form of equity that we can now use to continue to purchase real estate as a means of earning passive income. This is probably one of the most lucrative tips on this list, and one everybody should research more in depth.</p> <h2>11. If You Want to Be Reckless, Now's the Time to Do It</h2> <p>While you should have been smarter with your money when you were younger, all is not lost. Truth is, it's better to be a dummy about your finances in your 20s when you don't have much to lose than to make stupid money moves in your 30s and 40s when mismanagement can be costly. So save, spend smartly, but also have some fun &mdash; you may not have the financial freedom later in life, especially if you want nice things.</p> <p><em>Now it's your turn. What financial tips would you tell your younger self? I'd love to hear some of the things you would change about your money management skills from 10 years ago to today.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-finance-tips-you-wish-you-could-tell-your-younger-self">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/rich-people-spend-350k-to-park-their-cars-heres-how-wed-spend-it-instead">Rich People Spend $350K+ to Park Their Cars — Here&#039;s How We&#039;d Spend it Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-does-being-rich-mean-to-you-anyway">What Does Being Rich Mean to You Anyway?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-same-actions-will-produce-the-same-results-ten-tenets-for-arranging-your-rich-part-2">The Same Actions Will Produce The Same Results (Ten Tenets for Arranging Your Rich: Part 2)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-not-buy-something-just-because-you-can-afford-it">Do not buy something just because you can afford it</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-tax-friendly-ways-to-save-beyond-your-retirement-fund">9 Tax-Friendly Ways to Save Beyond Your Retirement Fund</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance 401k life lessons money real estate younger self Tue, 08 Dec 2015 18:00:02 +0000 Mikey Rox 1618967 at http://www.wisebread.com 22 Lessons Every 20-Something Should Learn http://www.wisebread.com/22-lessons-every-20-something-should-learn <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/22-lessons-every-20-something-should-learn" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/twentysomething_woman_000075732963.jpg" alt="Woman learning lessons every 20something should learn" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>&quot;It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.&quot; For better or worse, your 20s are an essential time in your life. Careers, relationships, and an absurd amount of other stuff constantly occupy the minds of twenty-somethings at any given time. Fresh out of college, I myself have inadvertently learned quite a few life lessons as I delve deeper into this defining decade. Bad news, college friends: most real jobs require that you wake up before noon.</p> <p>The truth is, you have to catch on pretty fast when life is changing around you at the speed of light. We millenials are just <a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/How-Happier-Your-20s-35251458">trying to be happy</a> &mdash; one success (or failure) at a time &mdash; and that's totally okay. We are all trying to figure it out. Read on to discover 22 crucial lessons I have learned about making it through my 20s in one piece.</p> <p>RELATED:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Habits-Confident-People-37623241">19 Epic Traits of Confident Extroverts</a></p> <h2>1. You're Going to Be Broke</h2> <p>Accept it. Think of it as that super savvy, frugal time of your life you will look back on once you can actually buy noodles that aren't ramen.</p> <h2>2. Your Parents Are Actually Really Cool</h2> <p>Remember in high school when you were utterly mortified to be seen in public with them? By now you have finally escaped your angsty adolescence to realize that Mom and Dad are totally awesome and know a lot more about life than you. Don't freak out when realizing that you <em>want</em> to hang out with them.</p> <h2>3. Networking Is Everything</h2> <p>You have heard it a million times, and that's because it's so true. The bigger your professional network is, the more opportunities you will have. Your skills count for a lot, but you'll learn that your connections count for a whole lot more, especially when you're young.</p> <h2>4. You Will Get Your Heart Broken, Probably a Few Times</h2> <p>Love is hard. Some people get lucky and <a href="http://www.tressugar.com/Benefits-Being-Relationship-Your-20s-34515591">find long-term relationships</a> right away, but don't feel discouraged &mdash; or like you have to be one of those twenty-somethings. It can take a few duds before you find a winner, so until the lucky guy comes along, enjoy being single. But when you do find him, don't take what you have for granted.</p> <p>RELATED:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Career-Tips-Introverts-38279445">7 Totally Practical Career Tips For Office Introverts</a></p> <h2>5. Your Metabolism Slows Down</h2> <p>Put down the donut... or the pizza or the chips or whatever it is that's calling your name from the kitchen cupboard. Okay, take a bite, then put it down. You're young, you're stressed, food is good &mdash; trust me, I get it. Unfortunately for us, the human body's metabolism rapidly slows down as it enters its 20s. That means you can't eat what you want anymore &mdash; one of the saddest truths in adulthood.</p> <h2>6. Even iI You Went to College, There's Still More to Learn</h2> <p>A college education is so important, but there's also a lot to learn outside of the classroom. That goes the other way around, too. Learn as much as you can early on both inside of a university's walls and out of it.</p> <h2>7. Speaking Up for Yourself Pays Off</h2> <p>Do you deserve a job? Do you want that raise? Nobody will know that unless you let it be known. Your own voice can take you pretty far.</p> <h2>8. Hangovers Are a Real Thing That Will Actually Happen to You</h2> <p>Ah yes, let's take a moment to reflect on the early years when you could go out multiple nights in a row and feel like a million bucks by the end of the weekend. Say goodbye to those glorious days and hello to your new friends: Advil and coffee.</p> <h2>9. Landing a Job Isn't Easy</h2> <p>We all dream of nabbing the career of our dreams right out of the gate, but as soon as you walk out of your dorm room and into the real world you will realize that it's going to take a lot of résumés, applications, and hard work to get to where you want to be.</p> <h2>10. Make Time for Your Family</h2> <p>So much is happening during this time in your life that it can be pretty easy to let the time you spend with family slip between the cracks. Pick up the phone or go visit, because everything else in your life is temporary. Your family, on the other hand, will always be there. Oh yeah, and they usually provide you with free meals.</p> <p>RELATED:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Working-From-Home-Tips-37778375">11 of the Best Work-From-Home Hacks Ever</a></p> <h2>11. There's More to Life Than Social Media</h2> <p>We millenials love our smartphones. Sure, it's a great way to keep up with friends and news, but obsessing over what you tweet or post every moment makes you miss out on what's right in front of you.</p> <h2>12. Don't Compare Yourself to Your Friends</h2> <p>Your 20s are a time when your friends begin to go their separate ways. Remember that you're all completely different people. While going to college might be right for one person, traveling to another country might be more fitting for another. One choice isn't better than another; it's all relative. You should all be rooting each other on.</p> <h2>13. You Can Still Wear Whatever You Want</h2> <p>Warning: this is your last chance to wear that crop top. The magic of being in your 20s is that you can still get away with wearing just about any crazy fashion trend that you want. Enjoy it while you can.</p> <h2>14. That Credit Card Bill Is Always Going to Come</h2> <p>It won't magically disappear, so don't pretend like it will. Spend your money wisely, because it's likely that you still have plenty of student loans to pay off in the first place.</p> <h2>15. Exercise Now, Thank Yourself Later</h2> <p>Yes, I know it takes a lot of effort. And no, it does not get any easier. But if you exercise now, you will be a whole lot healthier in the future. At least take a walk or something, you know?</p> <p>RELATED:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Happier-Your-20s-35251458">25 Ways to Be Happier in Your 20s</a></p> <h2>16. Your College Major Will Not Define Your Career</h2> <p>Most people don't end up having a career in whatever they majored in, and there's nothing wrong with that. Don't be surprised when your art history degree leads you to a job in marketing (or something else completely unrelated to your intended field; get my drift?).</p> <h2>17. Sleep Is Precious</h2> <p>Say it with us: Sleep. Is. Precious. You will find yourself bragging about how much sleep you got last night far more often than how amazing it was to stay up super late.</p> <h2>18. Don't Worry So Much</h2> <p>I'm worried that you'll be worried about worrying all the time after reading this post... see what I mean? We all fret way too much. Enjoy your life &mdash; these are supposed to be the best years, aren't they? You will get rent paid and you will kill that presentation at work; don't let those thoughts occupy the majority of your mind.</p> <h2>19. You Still Have to Pay Your Dues at Work</h2> <p>Having a college degree is not enough anymore. In fact, it's the bare minimum. That means you might have to start off with a job or position that isn't necessarily ideal. It's a building block for making it to the top, so throw your twenty-something ego into the gutter and remember that you're not too good to start at the bottom. All of your peers are hanging out down here with you.</p> <h2>20. Love Who You Are, Body and All</h2> <p>Sometimes it's really hard to love yourself in this world of Photoshop and unrealistic expectations. If you didn't know it already, you are beautiful and amazing and perfect exactly as you are. As long as you know that on the inside, everyone else is going to see it. Besides, you're at your ultimate hotness peak in your 20s, so enjoy it before the decade sneaks away.</p> <h2>21. You Don't Have to Take Everyone's Advice</h2> <p>This is a very important time in your life, so naturally you are going to be bombarded with&nbsp;<em>a lot</em> of advice and opinions. Nobody said you have to listen to all of it; ultimately it's your life and you know what's best for you. Chances are you'd like to throw out a few points in this very post.</p> <h2>22. Discover Who You Are</h2> <p>Figuring it all out is tricky. You want to know what's going to happen and how it's all going to play out. Chances are your life will be nothing like how you expected, and that's for the better. Take a deep breath and dive into your 20s headfirst; you'll bob back to the surface in no time.</p> <p><em>Have any lessons you have learned in your 20s? Let us know in the comments.</em></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-blog-teaser"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> There&#039;s a lot of years ahead of you; get the basics down now. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p style="text-align:center;"><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com" style="border:none;"><img alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u921/POPSUGARrgb.jpg" style="height:95px; width:300px" /></a></p> <p><em>This is a guest contribution from our friends at </em><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/"><em>POPSUGAR Smart Living</em></a><em>. Check out more useful articles from this partner:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Habits-Confident-People-37623241">19 Epic Traits of Confident Extroverts</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Career-Tips-Introverts-38279445">7 Totally Practical Career Tips For Office Introverts</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Working-From-Home-Tips-37778375">11 of the Best Work-From-Home Hacks Ever</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Happier-Your-20s-35251458">25 Ways to Be Happier in Your 20s</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/popsugar-smart-living">POPSUGAR Smart Living</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-lessons-every-20-something-should-learn">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-can-do-today-to-be-happy">10 Things You Can Do Today to Be Happy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-stay-calm-in-stressful-moments">7 Ways to Stay Calm in Stressful Moments</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-resistance-bands">The 5 Best Resistance Bands</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-exercise-mats">The 5 Best Exercise Mats</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/where-to-find-free-or-cheap-yoga-classes">Where to Find Free or Cheap Yoga Classes</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Health and Beauty Lifestyle Personal Development career goals growing up life life lessons personal goals responsibility twentysomethings Tue, 20 Oct 2015 11:15:25 +0000 POPSUGAR Smart Living 1589994 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Surprising Life and Money Lessons from Will Ferrell Movies http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-life-and-money-lessons-from-will-ferrell-movies <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-surprising-life-and-money-lessons-from-will-ferrell-movies" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/news-148489585.jpg" alt="camera" title="camera" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You may love Will Ferrell movies for the hilarious characters, catchy one-liners, and entertaining outfits, but if you watch closely, you'll spot some surprising personal finance and career advice tucked in amid the jokes. Come along for a brief synopsis of some of Will's movies and the lessons that can be learned. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-personal-finance-lessons-from-bruce-springsteen?ref=seealso">Personal Finance Lessons From Bruce Springsteen</a>)</p> <h2>1. Anchorman: Don't Overestimate Job Security</h2> <p>As Ron Burgandy can attest, losing your job can be tough. Even though Ron was San Diego's #1 news anchor in the first &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008LXZFH6/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B008LXZFH6&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Anchorman</a>,&quot; he was no match for the ambitious Veronica Corningstone, who ultimately outsmarted him into reading a verbal gaffe on the teleprompter. Ron quickly loses his job, his friends, his dog, and his lifestyle. As he says to Veronica in an angry mob outside of the station, &quot;You have reduced me to rubble.&quot;</p> <p>But, losing your job doesn't mean you have to end up like Ron &mdash; a slovenly drunk, hated by the city, and clearly making milk a bad choice. If Ron had a backup plan in place, he could have improved his situation a lot sooner than rescuing Veronica out of the Ling-Wong panda pit. No matter how secure your job may be, it is always smart to have an emergency fund in place, your network active, and your resume up to date. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-things-you-need-to-survive-a-job-loss?ref=seealso">How to Survive a Job Loss</a>)</p> <h2>2. Blades of Glory: Be Resourceful</h2> <p>Lady's man and champion figure skater Chazz Michael Michaels, Ferrell's character in &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AEFXJS6/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00AEFXJS6&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Blades of Glory</a>,&quot; doesn't let a little something like being banned from men's skating stop him. Instead, pairing with his former arch-rival, Jimmy MacElroy, in the first ever male-male figure skating pair and improvising the &quot;Iron Lotus&quot; in reverse earns them the championship over the wicked Van Waldenberg siblings.</p> <p>Like Chazz, when career or financial obstacles exist, it's important to be resourceful. If you are unhappy at work, perhaps there is an alternative role in the company where you could succeed. Or, if you need to save money, maybe there are creative ways to cut back and still be happy. Just be sure to properly balance any out-of-the-box actions with the associated risks (not everyone needs an Iron Lotus to win).</p> <h2>3. Zoolander: Act Ethically</h2> <p>In &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000I62JAK/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000I62JAK&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Zoolander</a>&quot; Ferrell's character Mugatu is an eccentric, self-absorbed, teacup poodle-toting fashion designer, hiding a distant past (inventing the piano key necktie), and doing whatever it takes to have his fashion empire succeed. Mugatu's attempts to brainwash Derek Zoolander into becoming an assassin to help keep child labor in place fails as his evil plan is thwarted by Matilda and fellow-supermodel, Hansel &mdash; who is &quot;so hot right now.&quot;</p> <p>Unethical business dealings have made headline news for years, from Enron to Madoff. Whether it's something large scale or just doing small things on a daily basis, it's important to always act ethically. Steer clear of any firm or person who seems to support immoral practices, no matter how much money is promised. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-i-just-won-t-do-to-save-money?ref=seealso">Things I Just Won't Do to Save Money</a>)</p> <h2>4. Step Brothers: Financial Independence Is Important</h2> <p>At the age of 40, extremely immature &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001GF8WPS/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B001GF8WPS&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Step Brothers</a>&quot; Brennan and Dale cause chaos for their newly married parents by refusing to move out of the house and get jobs. Antics, like fights over Dale's drum set, wearing tuxes to job interviews, dressing up in culturally offensive outfits, and ruining their dad's prized-possession boat, ultimately cause their parents to divorce.</p> <p>It was only when Brennan and Dale moved out and grew up that their parents got back together. While it may seem easy enough to live off of your parents (or anyone else for that matter), totally relying on someone else means that you never really learn responsibility and the worth of things, plus it may not last forever. Parents can help by teaching children early on about the importance of financial independence. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-raise-your-kids-to-be-financially-independent?ref=seealso">How to Raise Financially Independent Kids</a>)</p> <h2>5. Kicking and Screaming: Choose a Good Mentor</h2> <p>Getting Mike Ditka to be your mentor may be great if you're a professional athlete, but for gentle, family man Phil Weston (&quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000JCPWKW/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000JCPWKW&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Kicking and Screaming</a>&quot;) it's a disaster when he needs help coaching his 10-year-old son's losing soccer team. While Ditka introduces Phil to the powers of coffee and recruits a ringer to move the team into first, Phil eventually morphs into a tyrannical, winning-is-everything role model, like his own father.</p> <p>Having a mentor is an important step to succeeding in your career. Mentors can help you navigate the work environment and encourage you when you need it most. However, it's important to follow a mentor who you can relate to and who shares admirable traits worth emulating.</p> <h2>6. Elf: Stay True to Yourself</h2> <p>In &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000YHE4AG/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000YHE4AG&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Elf</a>,&quot; Buddy's journey from the North Pole to New York City to find his real father includes fun revolving doors, the world's best cup of coffee, and chewing gum on the street. Despite his love of maple syrup and all things Christmas, Buddy's naivety and accidentally mistaking his father's important business associate for an elf cause his father to disown him.</p> <p>In the end, Buddy's true nature saves the day as he helps fix Santa's sleigh and spreads the spirit of Christmas, which makes even his hardened father come around. Like Buddy, staying true to yourself can help you get ahead in work and life. It's important not to let others dictate your career choices or how you spend your money. Stick to what motivates you and always follow your own passions.</p> <h2>7. Old School: Build a Strong Network</h2> <p>Newly married at the beginning of &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009IF6U98/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B009IF6U98&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Old School</a>,&quot; Frank slowly reverts to his old Frank-the-Tank college ways of excessive partying, beer bongs, and streaking. Short of taking a petting-zoo tranquilizer dart in the neck and jumping through a flaming hoop dressed as a mascot, Frank embodies the true meaning of dedicated fraternity brother. He also heavily relies on Mitch and his new brothers after his wife wants to separate.</p> <p>It can be said that the reason Frank and his fraternity win out in the end, defeating the evil Dean Pritchard and finding happiness, is because they supported one another. Having a strong network can help you in your career and just about everything else in life. Whether you are job searching, growing your business, or just needing advice, your contacts can help you. It's also important to network the right way, which means not dismissing others who need help or only reaching out when you need something. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-31-hidden-networks-that-can-help-you-land-jobs?ref=seealso">Hidden Networks That Can Help You Land Jobs</a>)</p> <h2>8. Talladega Nights: Be Happy With Less</h2> <p>Star NASCAR driver Ricky Bobby (&quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000LWUA7U/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000LWUA7U&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Talledega Nights</a>&quot;) basks in the fame and fortune of being a top racer. However, it takes a life-changing accident against his French arch-rival Jean Girard, the betrayal of his best friend, Cal, with his wife, and being relegated to delivering pizzas to provide for his sons, Walker and Texas Ranger, to make him realize what ultimately makes him happy &mdash; driving fast.</p> <p>In personal finance terms, it's also important to realize what truly drives your happiness. If your current situation leaves you wanting more, it's time to think of why. Do you really need more money to live happily or is some of it for show? It's also a good eye-opener to learn how to cut back and focus your money and energy on the things that matter most.</p> <p><em>Will Ferrell may be an unexpected source of personal finance and career advice, but what has Ferrell taught you about money and jobs or anything else? Please share in comments.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kelly-medeiros">Kelly Medeiros</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-life-and-money-lessons-from-will-ferrell-movies">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-i-learned-about-money-after-using-acorns">Here&#039;s What I Learned About Money After Using Acorns</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/21-things-that-young-adults-absolutely-need-to-know-about-money">21 Things That Young Adults Absolutely Need to Know About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-yoga-can-teach-you-about-money">5 Things Yoga Can Teach You About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-places-to-get-free-personal-finance-classes">10 Places to Get Free Personal Finance Classes</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-lessons-on-how-to-be-a-financial-grownup-from-bobbi-rebell">6 Lessons on How to Be a Financial Grownup From Bobbi Rebell</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance life lessons money lessons will ferrell Mon, 17 Mar 2014 09:36:28 +0000 Kelly Medeiros 1130799 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Things You Didn’t Learn in College (but You Should Have) http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-didn-t-learn-in-college-but-you-should-have <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-things-you-didn-t-learn-in-college-but-you-should-have" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/thinking-5086391-small.jpg" alt="thinking" title="thinking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I used to see school as a sort of factory &mdash; one that ingested small children and spat out highly trained adults who would be snapped up by big companies that would pay them lots and lots of money.</p> <p>Of course, somewhere along the way, we all tend to come to the (very crushing) realization that it doesn't quite work that way. I think it happens right around when school stops pulling you along from one grade to the next and asks you what you'd like to do with the rest of your life. Oh, and by the way, your happiness, your financial future, and the respect of your family and friends all hang in the balance. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tips-for-my-career-clueless-college-self">5 Tips for My Career-Clueless College Self</a>)</p> <p>It's kind of ironic that most of us head to college hoping to get smarter and end up feeling so stupid. This isn't because college doesn't teach you anything, but because it often tends to give the wrong impression. To that end, here are a few things you probably didn't learn in college &mdash; but maybe you should have.</p> <h2>1. Most of What You Learn Will Be Useless</h2> <p>Sorry. It's the truth. Once you graduate, all those facts you worked so hard to memorize will seem so bafflingly inane that you'll wonder why you even bothered. That's no knock on the education system, but most of the struggling you'll do at work will be completely remote from facts, figures, and even logical reasoning; it'll have to do with interpersonal relationships, self doubt, company-specific systems and practices, and plain, old boredom. Your degree will give you some background in your field and possibly some fancy words to use around the water cooler, but most of the real training happens on the ground.</p> <h2>2. It's Not About the Degree</h2> <p>There's a lot of debate about whether an English degree is useless, or a philosophy degree's a waste of time or whether you can get anywhere with sociology. I think these arguments miss the point. Getting a job is not about your degree; it's about you.</p> <p>The degree you choose will give you an opportunity to hone (and discover) your key skills, but it's still up to you to figure out how you're going to capitalize on them. People tend to look at a degree in terms of what it can do for them, but what's actually more productive is looking at how you can use your degree to do something great for an employer. After all, that's what they'll be paying you for.</p> <h2>3. School Isn't Everything</h2> <p>College is this weird microcosm where a quiz suddenly seems like the most important thing in the world. It isn't. That isn't to say you should blow off your studying, but if you're pouring all your efforts into getting straight A's, you might be missing out on things that will actually do you more good in the long run, like getting some experience in your field, volunteering, joining a student organization, or even just making some new friends. These are all things that you can use on a resume, in an interview, and in life. They're things that'll make you stand out. Because let's face it, you're not the only one who can get a 4.0.</p> <h2>4. Your Degree Doesn't Dictate Your Future</h2> <p>If you get a degree in education, you have to become a teacher, right? Otherwise, you're not using your degree. Maybe not, but life's not a straight shot to the finish line. Sometimes it's meandering, and while that's pretty frustrating, it's actually a good thing. After all, do you really want to make a beeline for a life you don't want? If you've gone the wrong way, the only thing to do is turn back. Your experiences &mdash; including college &mdash; make you who you are. That's not a mistake. And you don't have to let a decision you made when you were 18 dictate the course of your entire career.</p> <h2>5. Passing Tests Isn't the Point</h2> <p>College &mdash; and school in general &mdash; often teaches us to shove information into our short-term memories, spit it out for a test, and promptly forget it all. Pulling an all nighter might just be a rite of passage, but it isn't learning. That takes time and thought, and it leaves a lasting impression.</p> <h2>6. Creativity Counts</h2> <p>In the Liberal Arts department, creativity is given a free pass, but it seems a bit unwelcome in other classes (business, I'm looking at you). As a result, for a long time, I assumed that some pursuits were creative, while others were not. The truth is that creativity isn't just painting a picture; it's building a business, coming up with a scientific theory, or writing a computer program. In other words, it's about being able to imagine something that doesn't already exist. People who do that tend to be very successful in any field.</p> <h2>7. So Does Your Personality</h2> <p>Some professors try to teach you how to play with others by assigning &quot;group work.&quot; Most people hate it. That's because getting along with people is hard. Just wait until you get to the workforce where the stakes are higher and you could be stuck working alongside the same people for months or years, rather than a few weeks out of a semester. If any of us had any idea how important working and getting along with other people really is, we'd probably put a lot more thought into it, rather than just spending the whole time wishing that group project could be over.</p> <h2>8. There's Luck Involved</h2> <p>University &mdash; and the entire school system &mdash; is propped up by the idea that we can all do whatever we want to do as long as we apply ourselves and try hard enough. Sorry. Not true.</p> <p>If you're colorblind, you can't be a pilot. You can't be a veterinarian if you're deathly allergic to animals. And there's a little bit of luck involved in succeeding at just about anything. That doesn't mean you shouldn't try. What it means is that you have to go in knowing that failure's a possibility and that if and when it happens, you'll be ready to face it. It also means you should keep an eye out for any lucky break you can get.</p> <h2>9. It Isn't About the Money</h2> <p>College often teaches us how to find high-paying jobs, but it misses the other side of the equation &mdash; how to properly manage the money we make. If you haven't already, take some time to learn about <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-tips-for-improving-or-starting-a-budget">budgeting</a>, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/37-savings-changes-you-can-make-today">saving</a>, and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/begin-your-investing-career-right-with-some-mutual-fund-basics">investing</a>. That way you'll be able to get the most of what you earn, rather than making way more and having remarkably little to show for it.</p> <h2>10. You Never Really Graduate</h2> <p>Once you graduate, it's tempting to breathe a sigh of relief &mdash; the hard part is over! Not so fast. If you really want to excel in your career &mdash; and in life &mdash; you have to keep learning. It allows you to stay current in your field, and to discover all the new things that keep life interesting. Plus, do you really want to spend your whole life doing things the wrong way, or just a little while?</p> <p>I learned a lot of things in college (some of which I won't get into), but there are also a lot of things I would've liked to know a little earlier. I guess that's another lesson I had coming to me &mdash; you never know what you don't know...until you do.</p> <p><em>What did you really learn in college?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tara-struyk">Tara Struyk</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-didn-t-learn-in-college-but-you-should-have">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan">These 17 Companies Will Help You Repay Your Student Loan</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/college/college-resources">40+ College Resources for Parents and Students</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-go-to-college-to-learn">Don&#039;t Go to College to Learn</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/learn-something-new-with-these-9-cheap-apps">Learn Something New With These 9 Cheap Apps</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-get-student-loan-debt-forgiveness">8 Ways to Get Student Loan Debt Forgiveness</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Job Hunting Personal Development college education learning life lessons Mon, 05 Aug 2013 10:24:30 +0000 Tara Struyk 980786 at http://www.wisebread.com