life lessons http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/8796/all en-US 8 Surprising Life and Money Lessons from Will Ferrell Movies http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-life-and-money-lessons-from-will-ferrell-movies <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-surprising-life-and-money-lessons-from-will-ferrell-movies" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/news-148489585.jpg" alt="camera" title="camera" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You may love Will Ferrell movies for the hilarious characters, catchy one-liners, and entertaining outfits, but if you watch closely, you'll spot some surprising personal finance and career advice tucked in amid the jokes. Come along for a brief synopsis of some of Will's movies and the lessons that can be learned. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-personal-finance-lessons-from-bruce-springsteen?ref=seealso">Personal Finance Lessons From Bruce Springsteen</a>)</p> <h2>1. Anchorman: Don't Overestimate Job Security</h2> <p>As Ron Burgandy can attest, losing your job can be tough. Even though Ron was San Diego's #1 news anchor in the first &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008LXZFH6/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B008LXZFH6&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Anchorman</a>,&quot; he was no match for the ambitious Veronica Corningstone, who ultimately outsmarted him into reading a verbal gaffe on the teleprompter. Ron quickly loses his job, his friends, his dog, and his lifestyle. As he says to Veronica in an angry mob outside of the station, &quot;You have reduced me to rubble.&quot;</p> <p>But, losing your job doesn't mean you have to end up like Ron &mdash; a slovenly drunk, hated by the city, and clearly making milk a bad choice. If Ron had a backup plan in place, he could have improved his situation a lot sooner than rescuing Veronica out of the Ling-Wong panda pit. No matter how secure your job may be, it is always smart to have an emergency fund in place, your network active, and your resume up to date. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-things-you-need-to-survive-a-job-loss?ref=seealso">How to Survive a Job Loss</a>)</p> <h2>2. Blades of Glory: Be Resourceful</h2> <p>Lady's man and champion figure skater Chazz Michael Michaels, Ferrell's character in &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AEFXJS6/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00AEFXJS6&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Blades of Glory</a>,&quot; doesn't let a little something like being banned from men's skating stop him. Instead, pairing with his former arch-rival, Jimmy MacElroy, in the first ever male-male figure skating pair and improvising the &quot;Iron Lotus&quot; in reverse earns them the championship over the wicked Van Waldenberg siblings.</p> <p>Like Chazz, when career or financial obstacles exist, it's important to be resourceful. If you are unhappy at work, perhaps there is an alternative role in the company where you could succeed. Or, if you need to save money, maybe there are creative ways to cut back and still be happy. Just be sure to properly balance any out-of-the-box actions with the associated risks (not everyone needs an Iron Lotus to win).</p> <h2>3. Zoolander: Act Ethically</h2> <p>In &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000I62JAK/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000I62JAK&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Zoolander</a>&quot; Ferrell's character Mugatu is an eccentric, self-absorbed, teacup poodle-toting fashion designer, hiding a distant past (inventing the piano key necktie), and doing whatever it takes to have his fashion empire succeed. Mugatu's attempts to brainwash Derek Zoolander into becoming an assassin to help keep child labor in place fails as his evil plan is thwarted by Matilda and fellow-supermodel, Hansel &mdash; who is &quot;so hot right now.&quot;</p> <p>Unethical business dealings have made headline news for years, from Enron to Madoff. Whether it's something large scale or just doing small things on a daily basis, it's important to always act ethically. Steer clear of any firm or person who seems to support immoral practices, no matter how much money is promised. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-i-just-won-t-do-to-save-money?ref=seealso">Things I Just Won't Do to Save Money</a>)</p> <h2>4. Step Brothers: Financial Independence Is Important</h2> <p>At the age of 40, extremely immature &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001GF8WPS/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B001GF8WPS&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Step Brothers</a>&quot; Brennan and Dale cause chaos for their newly married parents by refusing to move out of the house and get jobs. Antics, like fights over Dale's drum set, wearing tuxes to job interviews, dressing up in culturally offensive outfits, and ruining their dad's prized-possession boat, ultimately cause their parents to divorce.</p> <p>It was only when Brennan and Dale moved out and grew up that their parents got back together. While it may seem easy enough to live off of your parents (or anyone else for that matter), totally relying on someone else means that you never really learn responsibility and the worth of things, plus it may not last forever. Parents can help by teaching children early on about the importance of financial independence. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-raise-your-kids-to-be-financially-independent?ref=seealso">How to Raise Financially Independent Kids</a>)</p> <h2>5. Kicking and Screaming: Choose a Good Mentor</h2> <p>Getting Mike Ditka to be your mentor may be great if you're a professional athlete, but for gentle, family man Phil Weston (&quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000JCPWKW/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000JCPWKW&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Kicking and Screaming</a>&quot;) it's a disaster when he needs help coaching his 10-year-old son's losing soccer team. While Ditka introduces Phil to the powers of coffee and recruits a ringer to move the team into first, Phil eventually morphs into a tyrannical, winning-is-everything role model, like his own father.</p> <p>Having a mentor is an important step to succeeding in your career. Mentors can help you navigate the work environment and encourage you when you need it most. However, it's important to follow a mentor who you can relate to and who shares admirable traits worth emulating.</p> <h2>6. Elf: Stay True to Yourself</h2> <p>In &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000YHE4AG/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000YHE4AG&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Elf</a>,&quot; Buddy's journey from the North Pole to New York City to find his real father includes fun revolving doors, the world's best cup of coffee, and chewing gum on the street. Despite his love of maple syrup and all things Christmas, Buddy's naivety and accidentally mistaking his father's important business associate for an elf cause his father to disown him.</p> <p>In the end, Buddy's true nature saves the day as he helps fix Santa's sleigh and spreads the spirit of Christmas, which makes even his hardened father come around. Like Buddy, staying true to yourself can help you get ahead in work and life. It's important not to let others dictate your career choices or how you spend your money. Stick to what motivates you and always follow your own passions.</p> <h2>7. Old School: Build a Strong Network</h2> <p>Newly married at the beginning of &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009IF6U98/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B009IF6U98&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Old School</a>,&quot; Frank slowly reverts to his old Frank-the-Tank college ways of excessive partying, beer bongs, and streaking. Short of taking a petting-zoo tranquilizer dart in the neck and jumping through a flaming hoop dressed as a mascot, Frank embodies the true meaning of dedicated fraternity brother. He also heavily relies on Mitch and his new brothers after his wife wants to separate.</p> <p>It can be said that the reason Frank and his fraternity win out in the end, defeating the evil Dean Pritchard and finding happiness, is because they supported one another. Having a strong network can help you in your career and just about everything else in life. Whether you are job searching, growing your business, or just needing advice, your contacts can help you. It's also important to network the right way, which means not dismissing others who need help or only reaching out when you need something. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-31-hidden-networks-that-can-help-you-land-jobs?ref=seealso">Hidden Networks That Can Help You Land Jobs</a>)</p> <h2>8. Talladega Nights: Be Happy With Less</h2> <p>Star NASCAR driver Ricky Bobby (&quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000LWUA7U/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000LWUA7U&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20">Talledega Nights</a>&quot;) basks in the fame and fortune of being a top racer. However, it takes a life-changing accident against his French arch-rival Jean Girard, the betrayal of his best friend, Cal, with his wife, and being relegated to delivering pizzas to provide for his sons, Walker and Texas Ranger, to make him realize what ultimately makes him happy &mdash; driving fast.</p> <p>In personal finance terms, it's also important to realize what truly drives your happiness. If your current situation leaves you wanting more, it's time to think of why. Do you really need more money to live happily or is some of it for show? It's also a good eye-opener to learn how to cut back and focus your money and energy on the things that matter most.</p> <p><em>Will Ferrell may be an unexpected source of personal finance and career advice, but what has Ferrell taught you about money and jobs or anything else? Please share in comments.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kelly-medeiros">Kelly Medeiros</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-life-and-money-lessons-from-will-ferrell-movies">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/21-things-that-young-adults-absolutely-need-to-know-about-money">21 Things That Young Adults Absolutely Need to Know About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-lessons-from-millionaires">5 Money Lessons From Millionaires</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-places-to-get-free-personal-finance-classes">10 Places to Get Free Personal Finance Classes</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-financial-lessons-everyone-should-learn-in-their-30s-did-you">5 Financial Lessons Everyone Should Learn in Their 30s (Did You?)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-you-know-these-5-financial-lessons-most-people-learn-in-their-40s">Do You Know These 5 Financial Lessons Most People Learn in Their 40s?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance life lessons money lessons will ferrell Mon, 17 Mar 2014 09:36:28 +0000 Kelly Medeiros 1130799 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Things You Didn’t Learn in College (but You Should Have) http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-didn-t-learn-in-college-but-you-should-have <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-things-you-didn-t-learn-in-college-but-you-should-have" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/thinking-5086391-small.jpg" alt="thinking" title="thinking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I used to see school as a sort of factory &mdash; one that ingested small children and spat out highly trained adults who would be snapped up by big companies that would pay them lots and lots of money.</p> <p>Of course, somewhere along the way, we all tend to come to the (very crushing) realization that it doesn't quite work that way. I think it happens right around when school stops pulling you along from one grade to the next and asks you what you'd like to do with the rest of your life. Oh, and by the way, your happiness, your financial future, and the respect of your family and friends all hang in the balance. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tips-for-my-career-clueless-college-self">5 Tips for My Career-Clueless College Self</a>)</p> <p>It's kind of ironic that most of us head to college hoping to get smarter and end up feeling so stupid. This isn't because college doesn't teach you anything, but because it often tends to give the wrong impression. To that end, here are a few things you probably didn't learn in college &mdash; but maybe you should have.</p> <h2>1. Most of What You Learn Will Be Useless</h2> <p>Sorry. It's the truth. Once you graduate, all those facts you worked so hard to memorize will seem so bafflingly inane that you'll wonder why you even bothered. That's no knock on the education system, but most of the struggling you'll do at work will be completely remote from facts, figures, and even logical reasoning; it'll have to do with interpersonal relationships, self doubt, company-specific systems and practices, and plain, old boredom. Your degree will give you some background in your field and possibly some fancy words to use around the water cooler, but most of the real training happens on the ground.</p> <h2>2. It's Not About the Degree</h2> <p>There's a lot of debate about whether an English degree is useless, or a philosophy degree's a waste of time or whether you can get anywhere with sociology. I think these arguments miss the point. Getting a job is not about your degree; it's about you.</p> <p>The degree you choose will give you an opportunity to hone (and discover) your key skills, but it's still up to you to figure out how you're going to capitalize on them. People tend to look at a degree in terms of what it can do for them, but what's actually more productive is looking at how you can use your degree to do something great for an employer. After all, that's what they'll be paying you for.</p> <h2>3. School Isn't Everything</h2> <p>College is this weird microcosm where a quiz suddenly seems like the most important thing in the world. It isn't. That isn't to say you should blow off your studying, but if you're pouring all your efforts into getting straight A's, you might be missing out on things that will actually do you more good in the long run, like getting some experience in your field, volunteering, joining a student organization, or even just making some new friends. These are all things that you can use on a resume, in an interview, and in life. They're things that'll make you stand out. Because let's face it, you're not the only one who can get a 4.0.</p> <h2>4. Your Degree Doesn't Dictate Your Future</h2> <p>If you get a degree in education, you have to become a teacher, right? Otherwise, you're not using your degree. Maybe not, but life's not a straight shot to the finish line. Sometimes it's meandering, and while that's pretty frustrating, it's actually a good thing. After all, do you really want to make a beeline for a life you don't want? If you've gone the wrong way, the only thing to do is turn back. Your experiences &mdash; including college &mdash; make you who you are. That's not a mistake. And you don't have to let a decision you made when you were 18 dictate the course of your entire career.</p> <h2>5. Passing Tests Isn't the Point</h2> <p>College &mdash; and school in general &mdash; often teaches us to shove information into our short-term memories, spit it out for a test, and promptly forget it all. Pulling an all nighter might just be a rite of passage, but it isn't learning. That takes time and thought, and it leaves a lasting impression.</p> <h2>6. Creativity Counts</h2> <p>In the Liberal Arts department, creativity is given a free pass, but it seems a bit unwelcome in other classes (business, I'm looking at you). As a result, for a long time, I assumed that some pursuits were creative, while others were not. The truth is that creativity isn't just painting a picture; it's building a business, coming up with a scientific theory, or writing a computer program. In other words, it's about being able to imagine something that doesn't already exist. People who do that tend to be very successful in any field.</p> <h2>7. So Does Your Personality</h2> <p>Some professors try to teach you how to play with others by assigning &quot;group work.&quot; Most people hate it. That's because getting along with people is hard. Just wait until you get to the workforce where the stakes are higher and you could be stuck working alongside the same people for months or years, rather than a few weeks out of a semester. If any of us had any idea how important working and getting along with other people really is, we'd probably put a lot more thought into it, rather than just spending the whole time wishing that group project could be over.</p> <h2>8. There's Luck Involved</h2> <p>University &mdash; and the entire school system &mdash; is propped up by the idea that we can all do whatever we want to do as long as we apply ourselves and try hard enough. Sorry. Not true.</p> <p>If you're colorblind, you can't be a pilot. You can't be a veterinarian if you're deathly allergic to animals. And there's a little bit of luck involved in succeeding at just about anything. That doesn't mean you shouldn't try. What it means is that you have to go in knowing that failure's a possibility and that if and when it happens, you'll be ready to face it. It also means you should keep an eye out for any lucky break you can get.</p> <h2>9. It Isn't About the Money</h2> <p>College often teaches us how to find high-paying jobs, but it misses the other side of the equation &mdash; how to properly manage the money we make. If you haven't already, take some time to learn about <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-tips-for-improving-or-starting-a-budget">budgeting</a>, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/37-savings-changes-you-can-make-today">saving</a>, and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/begin-your-investing-career-right-with-some-mutual-fund-basics">investing</a>. That way you'll be able to get the most of what you earn, rather than making way more and having remarkably little to show for it.</p> <h2>10. You Never Really Graduate</h2> <p>Once you graduate, it's tempting to breathe a sigh of relief &mdash; the hard part is over! Not so fast. If you really want to excel in your career &mdash; and in life &mdash; you have to keep learning. It allows you to stay current in your field, and to discover all the new things that keep life interesting. Plus, do you really want to spend your whole life doing things the wrong way, or just a little while?</p> <p>I learned a lot of things in college (some of which I won't get into), but there are also a lot of things I would've liked to know a little earlier. I guess that's another lesson I had coming to me &mdash; you never know what you don't know...until you do.</p> <p><em>What did you really learn in college?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tara-struyk">Tara Struyk</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-didn-t-learn-in-college-but-you-should-have">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/college/college-resources">40+ College Resources for Parents and Students</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/great-ways-to-invest-in-yourself">Great Ways to Invest in Yourself</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-go-to-college-to-learn">Don&#039;t Go to College to Learn</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-creative-uses-for-a-529-plan">5 Creative Uses for a 529 Plan</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-times-you-should-choose-private-school-over-public">7 Times You Should Choose Private School Over Public</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Job Hunting Personal Development college education learning life lessons Mon, 05 Aug 2013 10:24:30 +0000 Tara Struyk 980786 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Life Lessons I've Learned Since Becoming a Parent http://www.wisebread.com/3-life-lessons-ive-learned-since-becoming-a-parent <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-life-lessons-ive-learned-since-becoming-a-parent" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mother%20and%20son.jpg" alt="Mom and child" title="Mom and child" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The past few months have been a blur as my husband and I welcomed our first child into our lives. Between 3 a.m. feedings, poopy diapers, walking and rocking the baby, and trying to fit a shower into my day, the parenting learning curve has been a steep one. I&rsquo;m learning more every day, and in the midst of this dramatic life change, three glaring lessons have stood out to me since I brought my daughter into the world; three life lessons that took becoming a parent for me to learn. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-important-lessons-frugal-parents-teach-their-children">7 Important Lessons Frugal Parents Teach Their Children</a>)</p> <h2>1. Don&rsquo;t Judge</h2> <p>I have to confess that before I had a baby, I subconsciously (and let&rsquo;s admit it, consciously) judged other parents. This included parents frantically trying to calm a screaming baby while shopping, mothers quickly mixing a bottle of formula to give their children while on the run, frustrated parents yelling at their kids, parents who put their kids to sleep in a swing, etc&hellip;.</p> <p>I guess the universe had a karmic lesson to teach me &mdash; after my baby was born, I had difficulties breastfeeding, and finally, when my baby wasn&rsquo;t gaining weight, I was forced to supplement with formula. Good gracious, now I was the one feeling judged and guilty when I whipped out a bottle of formula in front of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-breast-feeding-saves-money">other breastfeeding moms</a> in the nursing lounge at the mall! Additionally, while I had sworn I wouldn&rsquo;t be one of those moms who bought every swing, bouncer, or toy available, now I found myself desperately spending money on any gadget that promised to let me put my baby down for a few minutes and have a cup of coffee. Lesson learned &mdash; don&rsquo;t judge other people&rsquo;s parenting choices, or life choices in general. Instead, I&rsquo;m learning to accept that everyone makes the best choices they can given their unique circumstances.</p> <p>I&rsquo;ve found a new level of acceptance and camaraderie with other moms, even if they&rsquo;re just strangers I meet at the grocery store. We swap stories of staying up late at night, which swing works best for calming a baby, and &ldquo;crying-it-out&rdquo; versus &ldquo;attachment&rdquo; approaches to sleeping. The best thing is, although we&rsquo;ve all made different choices, our babies are all doing fine.</p> <h2>2. It's OK&nbsp;to Accept Help</h2> <p>Whoever coined the saying &ldquo;It takes a village to raise a child&rdquo; never said a truer word. While I admire superhero moms who seem to manage to take care of their families on their own with nary a helping hand, I accept that I am not one of them. After days without sleeping, I finally accepted offers from family and friends to watch the baby while I napped, or to clean the house while I held the baby. I was grateful to relatives who bought groceries and made dinner, and I stopped feeling bad about asking the in-laws to take the baby for an evening so I could have some time to myself. I realized that although I felt like I was inconveniencing my friends, they were genuinely happy to help, and I finally found the freedom to feel grateful rather than guilty.</p> <p>In fact, I&rsquo;m starting to believe that modern American life is not conducive to raising children well. Think about it &mdash; in traditional cultures, the entire extended family lives in close proximity, so that grandparents, as well as aunts and uncles, are close participants in the raising of a child. It&rsquo;s not all on the mom or dad. But in our modern culture, where extended families are separated by large distances, all the responsibility falls on the two parents, one or both of whom are probably working full time. Instead of relying on a network of relatives, parents now have to find community through parenting groups, play dates, lactation workshops, and other modern inventions. There&rsquo;s probably nothing we can do about the culture, but it&rsquo;s helpful to realize that we were meant to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-afford-to-have-a-baby">raise our kids in a community</a>, and that there&rsquo;s nothing wrong with needing help.</p> <h2>3. Beware of False Guilt</h2> <p>There are so many things that make you feel guilty as a parent, as I&rsquo;m sure all you seasoned parents can attest. As a first-time mom, I tend to feel guilty about everything. A short list includes giving my baby a pacifier, letting my baby sleep in her swing, bonking my baby&rsquo;s head on the car seat handle, and more. That&rsquo;s not to mention the guilt I feel when well-meaning friends ask me <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-side-jobs-for-stay-at-home-moms-and-dads">what I do all day at home</a> (because I should be working) or when I have to decline doing someone a favor because it will interfere with my daughter&rsquo;s naptime.</p> <p>As a natural people-pleaser, there are days when I feel like everything I&rsquo;m doing is wrong. But I&rsquo;m slowly starting to learn that I have the right to make mistakes and say no to other people&rsquo;s requests, and I don&rsquo;t have to feel bad about it. I&rsquo;m able to bring a lot more happiness and joy into my family&rsquo;s life when I&rsquo;m not guilt-ridden. In fact, I hope that my daughter will learn the same lesson and will eventually grow up to be a joyful, confident person who can learn from her mistakes and stand up for herself without being burdened by false guilt.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/camilla-cheung">Camilla Cheung</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-life-lessons-ive-learned-since-becoming-a-parent">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/24-tips-for-having-a-baby-without-going-broke">24 Tips for Having a Baby Without Going Broke</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-places-to-get-cheaper-diapers">5 Places to Get Cheaper Diapers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/happily-ever-after-how-to-stay-married-for-29-years-and-counting">Happily Ever After: How to Stay Married for 29 Years (and Counting)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-basic-manners-you-must-teach-your-kids">10 Basic Manners You Must Teach Your Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-4-worst-mistakes-good-parents-make">The 4 Worst Mistakes Good Parents Make</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Personal Development baby guilt Help life lessons parenting Tue, 22 May 2012 10:00:12 +0000 Camilla Cheung 929267 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Things Angry Birds Has Taught Me About Life http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-angry-birds-has-taught-me-about-life <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-things-angry-birds-has-taught-me-about-life" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/angry_birds.jpg" alt="Woman with Angry Birds on a phone" title="Woman with Angry Birds on a phone" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="159" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I play Angry Birds. I don&rsquo;t know too many people with a smart phone who don't. Good or bad, the game is highly addictive, and sometimes I feel guilty about the time spent playing. Other times, however, I realize that it&rsquo;s time I would have spent zoning out on bad TV or sleeping on a plane. Here are some of the lessons I&rsquo;ve taken away from playing the nation&rsquo;s most popular gaming app &mdash; and they&rsquo;re pretty good, if you ask me. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/21-personal-finance-lessons-from-harry-potter">21 Personal Finance Lessons From&nbsp;Harry Potter</a>)</p> <h3>1. If you don&rsquo;t succeed, try again. And again. And maybe one more time.</h3> <p>Because the game is like crack-cocaine in how it compels you to keep doing it, I&rsquo;ll admit to trying a level 100+ times in a row. I can&rsquo;t think of too many other things that I&rsquo;ve shown the same commitment to, but for those things that I have kept at until the end, I&rsquo;ve seen wonderful rewards. If only we could approach our businesses, families, and desires to change the world with the same stubbornness. (I bet things would get better very soon.)</p> <h3>2. It may simply be your approach.</h3> <p>Not sure what you&rsquo;re doing wrong with an unbeatable level in Angry Birds? It may be that you&rsquo;re attacking it from (literally) the wrong angle. With life, as well, it may work to try something completely off the wall for your next approach or give it a &ldquo;throw it and see if it sticks&rdquo; effort. Even if it&rsquo;s not the winning play, you may gain some insight into just how you should go about it next time. (&ldquo;Let&rsquo;s not try THAT again&rdquo; is also a useful &mdash; even if painful &mdash; revelation.)</p> <h3>3. Move on to new things, but revisit ways to sharpen your existing skills.</h3> <p>I love trying new experiences, but I haven&rsquo;t abandoned those pursuits that I&rsquo;ve kept with me since childhood. Just like in the game, you are allowed to move to new levels once you&rsquo;ve passed the previous; it&rsquo;s very rewarding, however, to go back and master older levels to attain those coveted three gold stars. Whether it&rsquo;s piano playing or snowboarding, I highly recommend taking a trip back to old talents to see how you can polish them up.</p> <h3>4. You don&rsquo;t have to do it alone.</h3> <p>It&rsquo;s amazing how all it usually takes for me to pass a difficult level is to leave my <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/double-duty-protection-multipurpose-ipad-2-cases">iPad 2</a> on the living room couch for my husband or 8-year-old to find. I can come back a day later guaranteed that the code will be cracked. It&rsquo;s not that they are smarter (they also leave levels for me to assist with); more likely they have that unique perspective and fresh approach that I was lacking on that particular day. Handing life&rsquo;s troubles off for a time to someone less frazzled works; don&rsquo;t be afraid to call in reinforcements.</p> <h3>5. Someone will always be better than you.</h3> <p>I&rsquo;ve learned not to obsess about getting a high score in my house or the online Angry Birds community. Life works in the same way for me; there will always be a better blogger, piano player, drummer, and marketer. But I can take peace in focusing on my score in the game <em>and</em> the real world by tuning out what others are doing. (You really can&rsquo;t be happy measuring yourself against others all the time.)</p> <p>Angry Birds is just a game, but it is crazy good fun. It also resembles so many things that I deal with on a daily basis as a mom of five and a <a href="http://www.1099mom.com/">small business owner</a></p> <p><em>What games do you enjoy that have taught you real-world lessons? </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/linsey-knerl">Linsey Knerl</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-angry-birds-has-taught-me-about-life">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-can-learn-a-new-language-just-use-one-of-these-3-apps">You CAN Learn a New Language — Just Use One of These 3 Apps</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-cycling-apps-for-5-or-less">The 10 Best Cycling Apps for $5 or Less</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/big-bytes-using-tech-for-restaurant-discounts">Big Bytes: Using Tech for Restaurant Discounts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-amazing-life-lessons-from-scrooge-mcduck">4 Amazing Life Lessons from Scrooge McDuck</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-didn-t-learn-in-college-but-you-should-have">10 Things You Didn’t Learn in College (but You Should Have)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Development Technology games life lessons smartphone apps Thu, 29 Dec 2011 11:24:28 +0000 Linsey Knerl 845093 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Amazing Life Lessons from Scrooge McDuck http://www.wisebread.com/4-amazing-life-lessons-from-scrooge-mcduck <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-amazing-life-lessons-from-scrooge-mcduck" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/115821837_113a490cde_z.jpg" alt="Scrooge McDuck" title="Scrooge McDuck" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="184" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When I was a little boy, Donald Duck was my favorite comic series, and I used to read it every week. The ducks are caricatures of us human beings, which makes it interesting reading, and there are always some philosophical lessons to be learned in the comics.</p> <p>One of the most interesting characters is Scrooge McDuck &mdash; a greedy capitalist that is the richest duck in the world. His only goal in life is to get richer, no matter what he has to do in order to succeed financially.</p> <p>Like in every person and duck, there are both good things and bad things in Scrooge. We can learn from both the positive and negative sides of the world's richest duck. Maybe there is something that he has done right to get into the financial position he is, or maybe his greediness is a something we should avoid. It is up to you how you decide to see it.</p> <p>Here are four important areas in life in which we can learn something from Scrooge.</p> <h2>Wealth</h2> <blockquote><p><em>Heavenly heather! The genie in the magic lamp! The fortunes I could own! I could have the world's biggest diamond! No! The world's biggest diamond mine! No-no! All the diamond mines! No! The entire mining industry! Yes, yes, yes! I can see that this is going to take some careful thought.</em></p></blockquote> <p>According to Carl Barks, Scrooge is worth five billion quintiplitilion unptuplatillion multuplatillion impossibidillion fantasticatrillion dollars. No matter what the actual amount is, Scrooge is never satisfied with it and always wants more.</p> <p>While the good thing about Scrooge is that he has been able to build his fortune from the scratch by clever moves and working hard, moderation apparently isn't one of his virtues.</p> <p>Of course, most people want a certain amount of money to get a decent living in a Western society, but after a certain point, additional money does not make us any happier.</p> <p>Giving does.</p> <p>When you have enough (which is, by the way, often quite little compared to Western standards), why not learn from Scrooge's mistakes and, instead of trying to get more things to yourself, give value to other people and focus on making other people happy?</p> <p>Even some of the world's richest men like Bill Gates and Warren Buffet have given a huge part of their fortunes away, and there is certainly a reason for it. It makes them happier than keeping the money.</p> <h2>Education</h2> <p>It appears that Scrooge isn't properly educated and has quit school at an early age, but it is unclear why he did it. However, Scrooge is a clever duck and is always willing and ready to learn new things &mdash; which is much more important than formal schooling.</p> <p>Getting a nice degree will open some doors in life, that is for sure.&nbsp;It also never does any harm to be educated. In my opinion, however, the most important things that I have learned during my studies are how important good language skills and networking with the right kind of people are &mdash; everything else can be learned quite quickly from books or Google, when needed.</p> <p>Willingness to learn new things constantly is much more important than formal education, and usually the most important things in life are not taught in school, anyway. At least I wasn't being taught social skills or how to make my own living by starting my own business &mdash; I have to learn those things by myself.</p> <p>Appreciate education, but remember that education can be anything you do to learn new things in life. It isn't just formal schooling.</p> <h2>Morality and Beliefs</h2> <p>As a businessman and treasure hunter, Scrooge always needs to set new goals and face new challenges. For Scrooge, there is always another rainbow, so to say. His motto is &quot;Work smarter, not harder.&quot;</p> <p>We should all learn from Scrooge's positive attitude towards success and work. Like he believes, it is possible for everyone to do almost anything, if there is just enough persistence involved.</p> <p>You should also always remember to work smarter, not harder. The amount of work becomes insignificant if you are doing the wrong things, so focus on doing the most important things efficiently and try to skip all the insignificant tasks.</p> <p>Scrooge seems to have a personal sense of honesty that offers him an amount of self-control, but as a businessman, he often resorts to aggressive tactics and deception by manipulating people and events towards his own ends.</p> <p>It seems that some successful entrepreneurs are quite selfish and only give to other people when they expect to get something in return in the future. If you have seen the movie <em>There Will Be Blood</em>, you know what I mean.</p> <p>I don't think that any amount of money in the world is worth losing yourself in the process. When you lie in your dying bed, do you want to be remembered as a greedy and lonely guy who was filthy rich or a lovable person who made everyone feel good and whom everyone loved?</p> <h2>Relationships</h2> <blockquote><p><em>Here I sit in this big lonely dump, waiting for Christmas to pass! Bah! That silly season when everybody loves everybody else! A Curse on it! Me &mdash; I'm different! Everybody hates me, and I hate everybody!</em> &mdash; First line, in <em>Christmas on Bear Mountain</em> (1947)</p></blockquote> <p>Scrooge is described in some comic strips as an old, bitter, and lonely person, who does not enjoy being around other people unless it involves making more money. It is a caricature taken to extremes, but I don't think that it is too far from truth for many people around us.</p> <p>The inability to build good relationships is a major obstacle when trying to find happiness. Maybe some people enjoy being alone more than others, but deciding to hate everybody and assuming that everyone hates you is an extreme example of harmful negative energy.</p> <p>Before you get bitter because of feeling lonely, try to see if there is something wrong with your own attitude. Other people are often mirrors of our own attitudes, so it is very useful to test what happens if you, just for one week, decide to only think good things about everyone and genuinely assume that everyone likes you.</p> <p>It easily becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy that makes you happier in a short period of time.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This is a guest post by Petteri Ollila. Petteri writes about personal development and traveling in his blog <a href="http://happinesshunters.com/"><span>Happiness Hunters</span></a>. If you want to learn how to feel good, you will love his new free e-book, <a href="http://happinesshunters.com/the-guide-to-happiness/">The Guide to Happiness: 9 Effective Steps to Improve Your Mood Permanently</a>. Read more by Petteri:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://happinesshunters.com/8-myths-in-life-you-should-break-for-success/">8 Myths in Life You Should Break for Success</a></li> <li><a href="http://happinesshunters.com/7-amazing-productivity-tips-for-lazy-people/">7 Amazing Productivity Tips for Lazy People</a></li> <li><a href="http://happinesshunters.com/5-huge-time-management-mistakes-you-should-avoid/">5 Huge Time Management Mistakes You Should Avoid</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/petteri-ollila">Petteri Ollila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-amazing-life-lessons-from-scrooge-mcduck">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-types-of-friends-who-are-costing-you-money">10 Types of Friends Who Are Costing You Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/financial-tricks-to-master-for-a-happier-life">Financial Tricks to Master for a Happier Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-life-and-money-lessons-from-will-ferrell-movies">8 Surprising Life and Money Lessons from Will Ferrell Movies</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-didn-t-learn-in-college-but-you-should-have">10 Things You Didn’t Learn in College (but You Should Have)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-truths-the-rich-live-by-and-you-should-too">5 Money Truths the Rich Live By (and You Should Too)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Personal Development life lessons Fri, 08 Oct 2010 13:00:09 +0000 Petteri Ollila 256012 at http://www.wisebread.com What I Learned From Working at a Bank http://www.wisebread.com/what-i-learned-from-working-at-a-bank <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-i-learned-from-working-at-a-bank" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/1226006_97105217.jpg" alt="dollar bill" title="dollar bill" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>My boss has asked me in my last two performance appraisals what I enjoy about my job and each time, I say that having this job will make me 10 times wealthier in my personal life. I don't mean that I'm making a ridiculous salary. (Maybe someday...) I mean that looking at borrowers all day lets you see all kinds of slices of life &mdash; and hopefully learn from them.</p> <p>In the short time I've been at my job, I've seen all kinds of borrower financial statements: conservative borrowers and leveraged borrowers; those who got rich by <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-real-estate-a-good-investment" title="Is Real Estate a Good Investment?">investing in real estate</a> and those who inherited money. Those who work for their parents' company and parents who work for their children. Here are some of the best lessons I've learned from working at a bank. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-life-and-money-lessons-learned-from-immigrant-parents" title="10 Life and Money Lessons Learned From Immigrant Parents">10 Life and&nbsp;Money Lessons Learned From Immigrant Parents</a>)</p> <h3>Don't buy a house you can't afford. Don't buy two houses you can't afford.</h3> <p>Don't roll your eyes at me; I know everyone is saying that in this economy. But I've seen people who have stuck their necks out even in this economy, thinking they could afford that jumbo home because their income would certainly increase in the future. Or their kids need a place in the country to enjoy while they're still young. Or they can sell when the market picks back up, make a profit, and get another nice place. It's never a good idea!</p> <p>Those who are surviving and thriving in the long term are those who stick to the old rule of a mortgage that is 2.5 times their income or less, and 15-20% down. And that second home in Arizona you bought because it was a short sale? If you can afford to hold onto it, then fine. If not, well, as we say in my department: Hope is not a strategy.</p> <h3>If you make $1 million a year, at least have something to show for it.</h3> <p>No, I don't mean toys. Although they're fun, and awesome, and make you look cool, I can tell you when someone lists $450K of furniture and autos on their financial statement, I see a big fat Zero. That is, depreciating assets don't mean anything when it comes to your net worth.</p> <p>Do me a favor: If you win the next $64 million <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-win-the-lottery-without-paying-a-penny-for-the-ticket" title="How to Win the Lottery">lotto jackpot</a>, at least keep a measly 1% or so of after-tax money in CDs or treasuries. I once saw a guy who made nearly a hundred million dollars in one year, who had about $24K in cash. True, he could have been lying on his statement, but really? How nice would it have been if he saved 10%, especially because he lost nearly that same amount the next year?</p> <h3>Don't bet the farm.</h3> <p>This one is a little heartbreaking, but I see it all the time. Tom has had a small, successful restaurant for 25 years. He makes, say, $100K per year. Not a bad deal. But Tom sees others making oodles of money in real estate investing, so he puts two and two together and decides to build an enormous, gourmet restaurant in the next town over. Then he can double his business and own his own piece of investment real estate! He proceeds to build his $5 million restaurant, using all of the $300K he's saved for retirement, pledging his house as collateral on a bank loan and borrowing $1 million from friends and family.</p> <p>You can guess what happens next. Unless Tom's restaurant does phenomenally well (which restaurants never do), he's DOA. He has lost everything, including his retirement, his house and probably his friends and family. (Side moral: Don't invest in deals like this, people!)</p> <p>Calculated risks are OK. Investing your retirement money in a well thought-out venture when you're 30 is OK. Pledging your house as collateral on a loan is OK. All of these things separately is OK, but not all at once. You have nowhere to turn, and I see it all the time. I've even seen parents pledge their homes as collateral on an adult child's loan. It goes bad, and grandma and grandpa are homeless in retirement.</p> <p>So there you have it: the top things I've learned from working at a bank thus far. Although I'm amazed every day at the poor financial choices some people make, let me be clear: I see at least as many (and probably many more) who make great decisions and grow their net worth year after year. With a host of examples, now I know how to avoid the pitfalls, too.</p> <p><em>Seen anything similar in your own experience? Share your story!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/janey-osterlind">Janey Osterlind</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-i-learned-from-working-at-a-bank">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards-vs-debit-cards-a-comprehensive-comparison">Credit Cards vs. Debit Cards: A Comprehensive Comparison</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-things-to-do-with-your-bonus">6 Smart Things to Do With Your Bonus</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-one-inspiring-saver-found-true-love-shook-off-debt-denial-and-paid-off-123000">How One Inspiring Saver Found True Love, Shook Off Debt Denial, and Paid Off $123,000</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-when-its-okay-to-take-a-loan">6 Times When It&#039;s Okay to Take a Loan</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/co-signing-for-a-loan-4-things-to-consider-first">Co-Signing for a Loan: 4 Things to Consider First</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Banking Debt Management debt management life lessons Thu, 02 Sep 2010 15:00:05 +0000 Janey Osterlind 223576 at http://www.wisebread.com The Same Actions Will Produce The Same Results (Ten Tenets for Arranging Your Rich: Part 2) http://www.wisebread.com/the-same-actions-will-produce-the-same-results-ten-tenets-for-arranging-your-rich-part-2 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-same-actions-will-produce-the-same-results-ten-tenets-for-arranging-your-rich-part-2" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/862197_73586101.jpg" alt="Predictability - Image Courtesy of Stock Xchng" title="Predictability - Image Courtesy of Stock Xchng" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="303" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A while back I posted the first of what I promised would be &quot;Ten Tenets to Arranging Your Rich&quot;. And wouldn&#39;t you know it, right after posting Tenet #1, things got a little crazy and life interfered with my blogging plans. Go figure :)</p> <p>In any event, I think we&#39;re back on track now and as promised, we&#39;ve got nine more tenets to go. So, without further adieu, here&#39;s tenet #2: </p> <p><strong><em>The same actions will produce the same results.</em></strong></p> <p>I love this little quote for a couple of reasons: 1) its just so very true and its been proven over and over again in history, politics, love and yes, money.</p> <p>The second reason I like this saying is that it tells you everything you need to know to fix the problem. Its not just inspirational... you don&#39;t have to decipher the meaning of the flying eagle and the sun setting behind the mountains... no, this one&#39;s pretty darn clear:</p> <p>The same actions will produce the same results.</p> <p>What does that mean for you?</p> <p>Well, that depends upon how you want to apply it to your life. If your car runs out of gas every time you think you can make it a little further, then perhaps you should start getting gas sooner.</p> <p>If your spouse stops talking to you everytime you go on a rant, perhaps you should consider some anger management or communication courses.</p> <p>And if you&#39;re still living payday to payday even though you&#39;ve done everything you&#39;re &quot;supposed&quot; to be doing, then perhaps you should do something different.</p> <p>As awestruck as I am with mankind&#39;s potential, we tend to be serious creatures of habit. As we venture out into the world of endless opportunity, we quickly find ourselves a safety zone and then concrete ourselves in it.</p> <p>We may complain about it, we may whine about it but the truth is, we have no real intentions of ever leaving it.</p> <p>Why would we? Its predictable. And if there&#39;s one thing we don&#39;t like, its the unknown.</p> <p>So, instead of seeing what&#39;s really out there, we&#39;ll stay where we know what to expect, all the while wondering why we just can&#39;t seem to get ahead.</p> <p>But its hard to get ahead when you&#39;ve stopped moving forward.</p> <p>I spent many years working for one company or another, doing everything I knew I was &quot;supposed&quot; to do. I thought that by climbing the corporate ladder, I would one day have the money I needed to do all the things I wanted to do. So, I made sure I always met expectations, even exceeded them on a regular basis and by all accounts, did &quot;well&quot;.</p> <p>But remember Tenet #1? &quot;<a href="/ten-tenets-for-arranging-your-rich-part-1-rich-is-relative">Rich&quot; is very relative</a> . So, despite my steps up the corporate ladder, I was anything but rich.</p> <p>I left early in the morning and I got home late at night. I missed many of my son&#39;s &quot;firsts&quot; because I was always working. And all those personal enrichment plans I had? There was just no time and in all honesty, the idea of pulling out the paints or tilling up a garden was the last thing on my mind. All I wanted to do was collapse on the couch.</p> <p>I was no longer working for a living. I was living to work.</p> <p>By the time I walked away from the corporate world, I was making $60,000 a year plus expenses but I had no freedom. I enjoyed a cushy office downtown but I had no room to run. I had business cards and an expense account, but the real me was nowhere to be found.</p> <p>So I walked. I did something different. And you know what? I got amazingly different results.</p> <p>Was it scary?</p> <p>Absolutely! Change always is. And even now, there are times when a client doesn&#39;t pay when they should or my flow of new projects just seems too slow. But every time I think I might considered going back to the corporate world for that steady paycheck, I immediately remember what I&#39;d be giving up.</p> <p>I find time to garden just about every day. I&#39;m home when my kids arrive from school and if I feel like sleeping in, well... who&#39;s to say I can&#39;t?</p> <p>No, I&#39;m not saying everyone should quit their jobs... unless of course, that&#39;s what you really want to do. What I am saying is that if you continue to approach life in the same manner you always have, you&#39;re going to get more of the same results you&#39;ve gotten so far and if you&#39;re reading this, I&#39;m assuming you&#39;d like those results to be different. </p> <p>But your boss isn&#39;t going to decide that you should have a shorter work day or Fridays off or a siesta break every afternoon. Your paychecks are never going to surprise you by being substantially more than they&#39;re supposed to be and while I&#39;ll never say &quot;never&quot;, waiting to win the lottery is probably not a good strategy for success.</p> <p>If you want to arrange your rich, you&#39;re going to have to make some changes. You have to make them - they won&#39;t do it on their own. They might be small, they might be big. Maybe you need to save more, spend less, change jobs or invent that little doohicky that no one can do without. Whatever it is, do it. Make the change. And start enjoying the rippling effect they create in your life. :)</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kate-luther">Kate Luther</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-same-actions-will-produce-the-same-results-ten-tenets-for-arranging-your-rich-part-2">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ten-tenets-for-arranging-your-rich-part-1-rich-is-relative">Ten Tenets for &quot;Arranging Your Rich&quot; - Part 1: Rich is Relative</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-rich-like-them-by-ryan-dagostino">Book Review: Rich Like Them by Ryan D&#039;Agostino</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-should-you-say-no-to-those-who-want-to-borrow-money-from-you">When Should You Say No to Those Who Want to Borrow Money from You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-does-being-rich-mean-to-you-anyway">What Does Being Rich Mean to You Anyway?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-not-buy-something-just-because-you-can-afford-it">Do not buy something just because you can afford it</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Career and Income Life Hacks Budgeting General Tips Lifestyle change life lessons money rich wealth Thu, 17 Apr 2008 02:00:57 +0000 Kate Luther 2015 at http://www.wisebread.com Ten Tenets for "Arranging Your Rich" - Part 1: Rich is Relative http://www.wisebread.com/ten-tenets-for-arranging-your-rich-part-1-rich-is-relative <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ten-tenets-for-arranging-your-rich-part-1-rich-is-relative" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/869848_28588638.jpg" alt="Choose Your Direction - Image Courtesy of Stock.Xchng" title="Choose Your Direction - Image Courtesy of Stock.Xchng" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="172" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Paul Michael wrote a great article about the idea that <a href="/if-youve-got-an-area-of-excellence-rich-can-be-arranged">&quot;rich can be arranged&quot;</a> .</p> <p>I liked that idea so much that I started looking at exactly how one starts the arranging process. And so, I asked myself, &quot;how can I arrange my wealth today?&quot; Not just ideas that would generate some money but more the approach itself. Does my outlook matter? Do I have a plan? Would it matter if I did?</p> <p>After much thought and a Snickers bar, I realized that there are in fact some guiding principles to arranging your own wealth. Ten, in fact. Ten important &quot;tenets&quot; to keep you grounded and on track as you begin the &quot;arranging&quot; process.</p> <p>However, being the wordy person I am, these tenets turned out to be much longer than I had anticipated, making for a rather lengthy read. So, to break things up and to give you something to look forward to, I'm going to post one a day. Think of it as a 10-day course to arranging your &quot;richness&quot; :)</p> <p>Ready to get started? Here's Tenet #1:</p> <p><strong>Rich is relative.</strong></p> <p>A few weeks ago, someone got the bright idea to ask the political candidates to define &quot;middle class&quot;. You can imagine the range of answers and if you accept them all, then middle class is anywhere from $25,000 to $200,000 a year (no specifics on number of family members or other variables).</p> <p>And the truth is, they're all probably right. Most of the population sees themselves as being &quot;middle class&quot;, even if their neighbors don't agree.</p> <p>Why?</p> <p>Because except for the really wealthy, most of us struggle financially in one sense or another. Maybe we can afford expensive cars and homes but we don't have much in the way of retirement and college funds. Maybe we enjoy many of the luxuries life has to offer but we're also ridiculously deep in debt. Maybe we just live in pricier neighborhoods or spend more in gas on our commute. Whatever it is, most of society is painfully familiar with the worry that comes with making ends meet.</p> <p>Want to test that theory? Read Catherine Shaffer's post, <a href="/is-six-figures-really-that-much"><em>Is Six Figures Really That Much</em></a> <a href="/is-six-figures-really-that-much"><em>?</em></a> and you'll see what I mean. Where one family struggles with a six-figure income, another family scoffs because they're making it on less than $50K a year.</p> <p>Which means your &quot;rich&quot; isn't necessarily my &quot;rich&quot; and vice versa. But what it also means is that our definition of rich goes well beyond cold, hard cash.</p> <p>Because after all, its not really the money that we want. Its what the money can buy. No one really drools about having a million dollars in the bank without thinking about the things they could do with that green.</p> <p>Which means that &quot;rich&quot;, is more than just having money, its also equally about being able to enjoy that money.</p> <p>But the problem with money is that there just never seems to be enough to enjoy. Regardless of how much we make, we still seem to struggle.</p> <p>Why?</p> <p>With the exception of winning the lottery or inheriting millions from a long lost relative, most of us experience a short, slow growth. A raise here, a bonus there and over time, our income will grow from $20,000 to $30,000 to $40,000 in small, barely noticeable increments.</p> <p>But so does our spending. And that's why your perceived &quot;rich&quot; will never quite be enough.</p> <p>I'm going to date myself here but when I was all of 19, I got a job as an underwriter trainee making just over $13,000 a year. We didn't have a ton of bills, no mortgage, no kids, just a car payment and a stereo system we financed at one of those rent to own places (that's another blog in itself).</p> <p>But while we weren't broke, we weren't rich either so I did some calculating. &quot;If I could just make $20,000 a year,&quot; I told my man, &quot;we'd be rich&quot;.</p> <p>Well, guess what? $20,000 came and went but it was no big milestone in my financial life. Because by the time my big &quot;rich&quot; marker rolled around, I had increased my spending to match those annual raises. I wasn't rich... I was just living within my means and working longer hours to do it.</p> <p>And there was the real sticker - not only was I not rolling in dough, but I was working harder and longer to achieve the same basic results.</p> <p>And this is why rich is so relative. Not only do you need to define how much your rich is, but you also need to define the &quot;richness&quot; you'll expect to gain from your added wealth.</p> <p>Want me to say that again?</p> <p>Let's say you think that $100,000 a year would be your &quot;rich&quot;. Ok, fine. But what do you have to do to make that $100K? Is it going to take more time out of your day? I mean, you could work three jobs and probably give your income a nice boost, but is it worth what you're giving up?</p> <p>If you think that having more money means that you'll have more freedom to travel or take a cooking class or whatever it is you want to do, think again. In the corporate world, more income typically also means more responsibilities and you'll be expected to stay until the job is done. So, before you start following the almighty dollar, be sure that your strategy for arranging your rich doesn't require you to give up what little free time you have now.</p> <p>Secondly, if you're going to shoot for $100,000, then you need to decide what that extra money will do for you. Remember, you're not likely to get it all in one lump so you need to be able to earmark those added funds so that they don't get lost in your day-to-day expenses. If you don't, you'll come to rely on the extra cash and you'll adjust your spending to match it. And that means that at the end of the day - like me - you'll be working longer and harder to achieve the same basic results.</p> <p>The bottom line? If you want to arrange your rich, forget living within your means. Learn to live below them and learn to balance your net worth with your life's worth.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kate-luther">Kate Luther</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ten-tenets-for-arranging-your-rich-part-1-rich-is-relative">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-same-actions-will-produce-the-same-results-ten-tenets-for-arranging-your-rich-part-2">The Same Actions Will Produce The Same Results (Ten Tenets for Arranging Your Rich: Part 2)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-rich-like-them-by-ryan-dagostino">Book Review: Rich Like Them by Ryan D&#039;Agostino</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-should-you-say-no-to-those-who-want-to-borrow-money-from-you">When Should You Say No to Those Who Want to Borrow Money from You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-does-being-rich-mean-to-you-anyway">What Does Being Rich Mean to You Anyway?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tips-for-finding-legitimate-work-at-home-opportunities">Tips for Finding Legitimate Work at Home Opportunities</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Career and Income Life Hacks Budgeting General Tips Lifestyle life lessons Making Extra Cash money rich wealth Wed, 20 Feb 2008 00:39:07 +0000 Kate Luther 1820 at http://www.wisebread.com