risk http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/8974/all/%22http%3A/www.wisebread.com/dont-be-fooled-by-an-investments-rate-of-return%22%3EDon en-US How to Invest in Mutual Funds http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-invest-in-mutual-funds <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-invest-in-mutual-funds" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/tree_growing_on_coins.jpg" alt="Tree growing on coins" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Mutual funds are an easy way to invest in a broad portfolio of stocks, bonds, and other securities. You don&rsquo;t need to spend a lot of time picking individual stocks and making trades. Just invest in a mutual fund, and the mutual fund takes care of managing an investment portfolio for you.</p> <p>There are thousands of mutual funds to choose from that contain different investment portfolios and fund features. Here are the most important types of mutual funds to consider to find the right ones for your portfolio.</p> <h2>Equity funds</h2> <p>Equity funds invest in stocks. You can choose an equity fund that specializes in certain types of stock investments, such as U.S. stock, international stock, growth stock, or value stock. Another variation is the size of companies that are targeted by the fund. Small-cap funds buy stock of smaller companies, mid-cap funds buy stock in midsize companies, and large-cap funds buy stock in large companies. Some equity funds specialize in stocks from specific sectors of the economy such as finance, energy, or health care.</p> <h2>Fixed income funds</h2> <p>Also known as bond funds, fixed income funds invest in debt issued by local and national governments and by large businesses. Bond funds are typically considered a lower risk alternative to stock investments, but offer less growth potential.</p> <h2>Balanced funds</h2> <p>Balanced funds invest in a mix of stocks and bonds. Many investors want to capture the growth potential of stock investments and the lower-risk income from bonds. A balanced fund provides a simple way to cover both stock and bond investments in a single fund.</p> <h2>Index funds</h2> <p>Index funds are designed to track a broader market such as the S&amp;P 500. The main advantage of index funds over equity funds is that they typically have very low fund expenses since index funds require almost no management. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-warren-buffett-says-you-should-invest-in-index-funds?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Why Warren Buffett Says You Should Invest in Index Funds</a>)</p> <h2>Target-date funds</h2> <p>Target-date funds adjust their asset allocation mix over time, from more aggressive investments to more conservative choices as the target date approaches. These funds are usually named with a date that represents the retirement or target year that the investor expects to begin accessing the funds. For example, &ldquo;Freedom 2035&rdquo; would target the year 2035 to reach its most conservative investment position. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/start-planning-now-for-when-your-target-date-fund-ends?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Start Planning Now for When Your Target-Date Fund Ends</a>)</p> <h2>How to select the best mutual funds</h2> <p>Once you have identified the best types of mutual funds for your investment goals, you will need to select the specific mutual funds you want to purchase. Some of the key criteria to consider when evaluating funds are:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Investment objective: Do you want an aggressive growth fund that takes higher risks to seek higher returns, or would you rather have a more conservative fund that will be more likely to protect your investment?</p> </li> <li> <p>Active vs. passive management: Do you want a fund with a fund manager making trades to try to maximize returns, or a passive fund that simply tracks a segment of the market?</p> </li> <li> <p>Fees (expense ratio): Funds with lower fees are best for maximizing the growth of your investment over time, but some investment types are more complex and tend to have higher fees. Actively managed funds have higher fees than passive funds and index funds.</p> </li> <li> <p>Performance record (return): While past performance does not predict future results, most investors tend to select funds with returns that have performed well compared to similar funds over the past one to five years.</p> </li> <li> <p>Management team tenure: Some investors prefer funds that have had a consistent management team for a number of years.</p> </li> </ul> <p>You can do research to find funds that meet your investment objectives using online research tools at your stock broker&rsquo;s website. Most brokers allow you to search for desired types of funds and review key information such as returns and fees. Some of the leading mutual fund brokerages include:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Fidelity</p> </li> </ul> <ul> <li> <p>Vanguard</p> </li> </ul> <ul> <li> <p>Merrill Edge</p> </li> <li> <p>TD Ameritrade</p> </li> <li> <p>E*TRADE</p> </li> <li> <p>Charles Schwab</p> </li> </ul> <p>In case you don&rsquo;t already have a broker, or if you want to check out a wider range of mutual fund offerings, here are some additional online mutual fund research tools to help you find and compare mutual funds:</p> <ul> <li> <p><a href="http://online.wsj.com/public/quotes/mutualfund_screener.html" target="_blank">Wall Street Journal Mutual Fund Screener</a></p> </li> <li> <p><a href="http://www.maxfunds.com/" target="_blank">Maxfunds</a></p> </li> <li> <p><a href="http://www.morningstar.com/funds.html" target="_blank">Morningstar</a></p> </li> <li> <p><a href="http://www.lipperleaders.com/" target="_blank">Lipper</a></p> </li> </ul> <h2>How to buy mutual funds</h2> <p>After you have done your research and have selected a mutual fund that you want to buy, there are two ways you can make the trade and buy into the fund through a brokerage:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Execute an exchange to sell funds or stocks you currently own and use the proceeds to purchase the mutual fund you want to buy.</p> </li> <li> <p>Transfer cash funds to your brokerage to execute a trade to buy the mutual fund you want.</p> </li> </ul> <p>You may be able to achieve tax advantages if you purchase mutual funds as part of an IRA or 401(k) retirement plan. After you buy a mutual fund, you should monitor the performance of the fund, its fees, and whether or not the fund is still a good fit for your investment portfolio on at least an annual basis.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-invest-in-mutual-funds&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Invest%2520in%2520Mutual%2520Funds.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Invest%20in%20Mutual%20Funds"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Invest%20in%20Mutual%20Funds.jpg" alt="How to Invest in Mutual Funds" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dr-penny-pincher">Dr Penny Pincher</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-invest-in-mutual-funds">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-steps-to-getting-started-in-the-stock-market-with-index-funds">3 Steps to Getting Started in the Stock Market With Index Funds</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essentials-for-building-a-profitable-portfolio">5 Essentials for Building a Profitable Portfolio</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-warren-buffett-says-you-should-invest-in-index-funds">Why Warren Buffett Says You Should Invest in Index Funds</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mutual-funds-for-wise-bloggers">Mutual Funds for Wise Bloggers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment actively managed equity index funds mutual funds passively managed risk target date funds Fri, 02 Feb 2018 09:00:06 +0000 Dr Penny Pincher 2095997 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways Longevity Is Changing Retirement Planning (And What to Do About It) http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-longevity-is-changing-retirement-planning-and-what-to-do-about-it <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-longevity-is-changing-retirement-planning-and-what-to-do-about-it" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-680410686.jpg" alt="how longevity is changing retirement planning" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There's no doubt about it: People are living longer and need more money to support their extended life spans. In the U.S. alone, the average life expectancy has reached the mid-80s for people turning 65 today, though it's not unusual for someone to live well into their 100s.</p> <p>Longer life spans should be a reason to rejoice &mdash; after all, it means additional memories and experiences that come with having more time on earth. However, living longer also brings legitimate concerns about saving enough money to support such a long stay.</p> <p>If you're uncertain that you'll have enough money to enjoy a retirement of 30 or 40 years, you should start planning now. Take a look at how living longer could affect your retirement income and what you can do to prepare for it.</p> <h2>1. You need to save more money</h2> <p>Much of the financial advice for retirement hasn't considered a retirement period that could last 30 or 40 years. If people aren't advised to save enough during their career, they'll likely have a smaller nest egg that will be depleted much faster. In the case of a long life span, saving the typical 10 to 15 percent of income traditionally recommended for retirement probably won't be enough.</p> <p>You should consider working with a financial planner to discuss the prospects of a longer retirement. Get solid numbers on your potential cost of living to cover various scenarios. Calculate what you could need 20, 30, and even 40 years after you leave the working world, and figure out the amount of money you should be saving to cover those scenarios. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-these-7-scary-facts-about-retirement-saving?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Face These 7 Scary Facts About Retirement Saving</a>)</p> <h2>2. Your investments may need longer exposure to risk</h2> <p>There are a couple of ways your investing strategy may change with a longer life span. For one, you may find yourself using catch-up contributions and may opt to max out every retirement vehicle you can as early as your 40s and 50s.</p> <p>Then, there's the idea of allocation and risk. Morgan Ranstrom, CFA of Trailhead Planners, says that moving away from equities into bonds may no longer be a good strategy. &quot;It may be necessary to maintain more stock and/or risk exposure in a retiree's investment portfolio to reduce the risk of outliving their money,&quot; he says.</p> <p>An investment adviser can help you create a reasonable asset allocation plan that considers a longer retirement period. Make sure you have a rebalancing plan for each stage of your life, from pre-retirement through 20 or 30 years post-retirement. Seeing these scenarios, with possible outcomes, will give you an idea of how to adjust your investment strategy both now and later on in life. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a>)</p> <h2>3. You'll need more insurance</h2> <p>Michael Dinich, professional estate and tax planner, points out that, &quot;Many universal life policies were funded at a level that would only guarantee coverage until mid-80s.&quot; Extending policies for older retirees can be extremely costly, leaving people without coverage when they need it most.</p> <p>In addition to life insurance, longer life spans could increase the need for long term care insurance. This type of insurance can help cover nursing home costs. Getting this insurance in your 50s or 60s can be expensive, but it will be significantly cheaper than if you wait until you're older. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-age-to-buy-long-term-care-insurance?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Best Age to Buy Long-Term Care Insurance</a>)</p> <p>Check your existing insurance policies to find additional products that may cover your needs. For example, some policies can be converted partially or completely once the term expires so they last longer. There may also be hybrid products that cover a combination of life, burial, and long term care. The key is to check into these options early to prevent being ineligible at an older age.</p> <h2>4. You may need to work longer</h2> <p>Living longer means you may need to keep working longer to continue growing your retirement savings. Kevin Langman, financial planner at Finovo, says he sees clients with a more fluid concept of their working careers. &quot;Instead of working to a set date and stopping,&quot; he explains, &quot;we see careers going through stages, with a few decades of full-time work followed by a shift to more part-time and passion-fueled work.&quot;</p> <p>Just because you may need to work later in life doesn't mean it has to be stressful or you have to languish in a job you dislike. Investigate ways to extend your career in a way you don't dread &mdash; maybe turn a passion or hobby into a side gig. Langman encourages his entrepreneurial clients to explore residual income options like, &quot;products and services that can continue to generate income even once they are not working on them full-time anymore.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-great-retirement-jobs?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Great Retirement Jobs</a>)</p> <h2>5. You'll need to account for inflation</h2> <p>Brian Saranovitz, of Your Retirement Advisor, says that planning for inflation can be tricky such a long way out. He says, &quot;In some cases, retirees will need to create an inflation-adjusted retirement income for 25, 35, or possibly more years.&quot; With such a far-out horizon, it can be hard to pinpoint exactly how much inflation will affect an asset base.</p> <p>Work closely with your retirement planner or investment adviser to control the effects of not only inflation, but other forces that can erode assets quickly like taxes and market volatility. Some options include exploring alternative investments and insurance products to increase the effectiveness of your portfolio. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Ways to Protect Your Retirement From Inflation</a>)</p> <p>Roger Whitney has been a financial adviser for 27 years. He sums up the idea of a longer retirement in this way: &quot;Traditional retirement planning worked for our parents. They lived retirement on the park bench of life. The modern retiree will likely live longer, be more active, and spend more in retirement. They'll still be on the playground.&quot;</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-ways-longevity-is-changing-retirement-planning-and-what-to-do-about-it&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Ways%2520Longevity%2520Is%2520Changing%2520Retirement%2520Planning%2520%2528And%2520What%2520to%2520Do%2520About%2520It%2529.jpg&amp;description=5%20Ways%20Longevity%20Is%20Changing%20Retirement%20Planning%20(And%20What%20to%20Do%20About%20It)"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Ways%20Longevity%20Is%20Changing%20Retirement%20Planning%20%28And%20What%20to%20Do%20About%20It%29.jpg" alt="5 Ways Longevity Is Changing Retirement Planning (And What to Do About It)" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/aja-mcclanahan">Aja McClanahan</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-longevity-is-changing-retirement-planning-and-what-to-do-about-it">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation">4 Ways to Protect Your Retirement From Inflation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easiest-ways-to-catch-up-on-retirement-savings-later-in-life">7 Easiest Ways to Catch Up on Retirement Savings Later in Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-roadblocks-to-retirement-and-how-to-clear-them">7 Roadblocks to Retirement (And How to Clear Them)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-threats-to-a-secure-retirement">9 Threats to a Secure Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement inflation insurance long term care longer life span longer retirement longevity nest egg old age risk saving money stocks Mon, 22 Jan 2018 09:30:09 +0000 Aja McClanahan 2091126 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Easiest Ways to Catch Up on Retirement Savings Later in Life http://www.wisebread.com/7-easiest-ways-to-catch-up-on-retirement-savings-later-in-life <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-easiest-ways-to-catch-up-on-retirement-savings-later-in-life" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/investing_money_for_retirement_in_piggy_bank.jpg" alt="Investing money for retirement in piggy bank" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>According to a survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute, three in 10 workers report that preparing for retirement causes them emotional distress. Why? Well, because most people feel they are sorely behind when it comes to retirement savings.</p> <p>The Economic Policy Institute reports that baby boomer families, on average, have just a little over $160,000 saved for retirement. With longer life spans, inflation, and increasing health care costs, it's possible that many retirees won't have enough to comfortably sustain their retirements.</p> <p>If you feel behind with your retirement savings, you may be panicking. However, there's hope for you. If you're open to suggestions, a few smart moves will help you catch up on savings even late in the game. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a>)</p> <h2>1. Change your mindset</h2> <p>One of the best ways to take the pressure off catching up with retirement savings is to change your mindset.</p> <p>Rob Hill, owner of financial advisory firm R. Hill Enterprises, Inc., helps people plan for retirement and other stages of life. He says that in order to catch up with your savings, you need to first be more flexible with your idea of retirement. &quot;The first thing I would suggest is not looking at retirement as an age, but rather a financial position,&quot; he says.</p> <p>Hill explains that focus can ease anxiety and make a catch-up goal more feasible for some. He explains, &quot;The goal of retirement is not a pile of assets, it is cash flow that makes retirement possible.&quot;</p> <p>If you look at retirement in this light, you may discover you have more retirement runway than you thought and that building up your nest egg is a little more possible.</p> <h2>2. Make catch-up contributions</h2> <p>If you're over 50 years old, you can contribute more than usual to your 401(k). For 2018, employees within the age guidelines can contribute $18,500 plus a catch-up contribution of $6,000, for a total of $24,500. This approach can be even more helpful if your employer offers a match.</p> <p>Kevin Ward, of Park Elm Investment Advisors, notes another way to save: an IRA &mdash; either a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA. &quot;Aside from your employer-sponsored plan, you can save $5,500 in an IRA,&quot; he says. &quot;For those over 50, there is an additional catch-up contribution of $1,000, for a total of $6,500.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-meeting-the-2018-401k-contribution-limits-will-brighten-your-future?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways Meeting the 2018 401(k) Contribution Limits Will Brighten Your Future</a>)</p> <h2>3. Contribute to a health savings account (HSA)</h2> <p>Though HSAs were created as savings vehicles for health care expenses, there are some tax advantages and treatments that can make this type of account a supplemental retirement option. In order for you to open an HSA, you must have a qualified health care plan, like a high deductible health plan (HDHP).</p> <p>Shobin Uralil, founder of HSA management platform Lively, says placing money in an HSA has many benefits and &quot;loopholes&quot; that make this a great addition for retirement savings.</p> <p>&quot;You can save pretax money and then use pretax dollars to pay for qualified out-of-pocket medical expenses,&quot; he says. &quot;After the age of 65, you can use HSA funds for anything you want, not just qualified out-of-pocket medical expenses.&quot;</p> <p>It's also worth noting that HSAs have no mandatory distributions in retirement so you can save into your 70s, 80s, and beyond. This is helpful for anyone behind on retirement saving and needing more time to save. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-an-hsa-could-help-your-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How an HSA Could Help Your Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>4. Be frugal</h2> <p>You might be excited about the idea of saving more money, but wondering how you'll actually achieve those higher savings rates. Your best bet is to reduce your current lifestyle expenses. Of course, you'll want to adjust your spending to a level that is comfortable for you. But keep in mind the ultimate goal of having enough money to support your retirement.</p> <p>The options for saving money are unlimited. With some creativity and motivation, you should be able to find some frugal habits that will help you make your savings goals &mdash; everything from downsizing your home, to eating out only once per month. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2>5. Postpone collecting Social Security</h2> <p>This is another strategy that can help you earn more income during retirement. The Social Security Administration reports that postponing Social Security benefits past your full retirement age can boost future payments by up to 8 percent for every year the income is deferred until age 70.</p> <p>Tom Foster, national spokesperson at MassMutual, works with financial advisers and employers to educate them about 401(k) plans. He recommends postponing Social Security benefits because the returns are pretty significant if you can hold off. He notes, &quot;Few investment strategies net such a return, never mind one with a guarantee.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-ways-to-boost-your-social-security-payout-before-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Smart Ways to Boost Your Social Security Payout Before Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>6. Keep working</h2> <p>A 2013 Georgetown University study estimates that there will be as many as 55 million job openings by 2020 due to baby boomers retiring and leaving the workforce. So the chances are, there will be plenty of demand for those who want to stick around and work longer.</p> <p>Fortunately, we live in a wonderful time where the internet allows people to work longer, under flexible conditions from almost anywhere in the world. If you can keep working longer, it will add to your potential to save up even more money. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-creative-remote-jobs-that-can-supplement-your-retirement-income?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Creative Remote Jobs That Can Supplement Your Retirement Income</a>)</p> <h2>7. Keep investing</h2> <p>It used to be that people drastically reduced their investment portfolios in anticipation of their &quot;golden years.&quot; In order to reduce the risk of losing the principal amount of their savings, a retiree might be prompted to go with a very conservative investing strategy by keeping their assets in cash, bonds, or a combination of both.</p> <p>Nowadays, people are living and working longer and may be able to invest and save more aggressively for longer periods of time.</p> <p>Cliff Caplan, CFP at Neponset Valley Financial Partners, suggests that people needing to save more should continue to invest for growth. &quot;Establish and continually fund a growth-oriented account that can benefit from lower long-term capital gains treatment,&quot; he says. &quot;Dollar cost averaging can also be used to reduce volatility in a portfolio.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-easiest-ways-to-catch-up-on-retirement-savings-later-in-life&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520To%2520Travel%2520More%2520With%2520a%2520Full-Time%2520Job.jpg&amp;description=7%20Easiest%20Ways%20to%20Catch%20Up%20on%20Retirement%20Savings%20Later%20in%20Life"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20To%20Travel%20More%20With%20a%20Full-Time%20Job.jpg" alt="7 Easiest Ways to Catch Up on Retirement Savings Later in Life" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/aja-mcclanahan">Aja McClanahan</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easiest-ways-to-catch-up-on-retirement-savings-later-in-life">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/which-of-these-9-retirement-accounts-is-right-for-you">Which of These 9 Retirement Accounts Is Right for You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-moves-for-retirement">8 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Moves for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-roadblocks-to-retirement-and-how-to-clear-them">7 Roadblocks to Retirement (And How to Clear Them)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) catching up contributions cutting expenses HSA IRA late starters risk saving money social security stocks Tue, 16 Jan 2018 10:00:06 +0000 Aja McClanahan 2085769 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Avoid These 3 Investment Worries That Will Derail Your Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-avoid-these-3-investment-worries-that-will-derail-your-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-avoid-these-3-investment-worries-that-will-derail-your-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/retirement_chances_0.jpg" alt="Retirement chances" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wall Street analysts often describe bull market investors as climbing a &quot;wall of worry.&quot; The point being that even during good times, many investors find plenty to fret about. When these worries keep you from investing in your retirement, you run the risk of derailing your future.</p> <p>Let's take a closer look at three common investing-related concerns that could keep you from saving enough for your later years, along with some ideas for moving forward despite your fears.</p> <h2>1. Fear of investing in general</h2> <p>Of all the aspects of managing money, investing is the one that frightens people the most. At first glance, that's understandable. Just look at what happened during the Great Recession. From October 2007 until March 2009, the U.S. stock market fell by more than 50 percent.</p> <p>Think about that. If you had $100,000 invested at the beginning of that horrible stretch, you ended it with less than $50,000. That experience was enough to drive some people out of the market completely, and keep them out.</p> <p>How can you conquer your fear of investing? One way is to adopt the mindset of a long-term investor, not a short-term trader.</p> <p>Investors understand two important facts. First, the market doesn't move in a straight, smooth path. They expect to experience many ups and downs. Second, the longer you stay invested, the better your chances of making money.</p> <p>For example, according to a Morningstar analysis, of all the one-year U.S. stock market investment holding periods from 1926 to 2016, 26 percent showed a loss. Widen your perspective to all five-year periods, and just 14 percent showed a loss. And when you stretch your view to 15-year periods, none showed a loss.</p> <p>How would a long-term perspective have helped an investor who put money in the market at the beginning of 2007? Someone who started that year with $100,000, held on through the brutal downturn, and kept holding on, would have ended 2016 with nearly $200,000. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing</a>)</p> <h2>2. Fear of 401(k) plans</h2> <p>Pity the poor 401(k) plan. Critics complain of high fees, and they say it's unreasonable to expect participants to know how much to contribute or what to invest in.</p> <p>It's true that some plans <em>are </em>filled with excessively high-cost investment options. However, the more recent trend has been for plans to add low-cost index funds. If you work for a larger company, you may be able to see an evaluation of your plan's fees via <a href="https://www.brightscope.com/" target="_blank">Brightscope</a>. If they seem high, talk with someone in your human resources department and ask about having some lower-cost investment options added to the plan. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/watch-out-for-these-5-sneaky-401k-fees?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">Watch Out for These 5 Sneaky 401K Fees</a>)</p> <p>To figure out how much to contribute, use one of the many free online tools that are available, such as <a href="https://www.fidelity.com/calculators-tools/fidelity-retirement-score-tool" target="_blank">Fidelity's Retirement Score</a> calculator. Estimating how much you <em>should </em>be saving in order to be adequately prepared for retirement will help make the distant goal of retirement more tangible and may motivate you to contribute more than you are now.</p> <p>As for deciding what to invest in, many 401(k) plan providers offer target-date funds, which make investing very simple. Just choose the fund named for the year closest to the year of your intended retirement date, such as the Fidelity Freedom 2040 Fund or the Vanguard Target Retirement 2045 Fund. Such funds are designed with the mix of stocks and bonds the fund company has deemed appropriate for someone your age. They automatically adjust that mix over time, becoming more conservatively invested as you near retirement age. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-easiest-way-to-save-for-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">What You Need to Know About the Easiest Way to Save for Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>3. Fear of missing out (FOMO)</h2> <p>Does it seem like everyone around you is making money by investing in something you're not quite sure you understand? In the late '90s, it was the stocks of online companies, which kept zooming even though the companies were far from profitable. Remember Pets.com or Webvan?</p> <p>Today's investment craze is cryptocurrencies. Every day seems to bring a new story about Bitcoin investors who doubled their money or more <em>in hours</em>. But what exactly <em>is </em>a cryptocurrency? Could you explain it to a sixth grader in a few simple sentences?</p> <p>Investing in something you don't understand because of the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-letting-fomo-ruin-your-finances?ref=internal" target="_blank">fear of missing out</a> has great potential to do more harm than good. What to do instead? Take a lesson from Sarah Stanley Fallaw. As founder of DataPoints, a company that studies the factors that enable people to build wealth, she's continuing the work her late father, Thomas Stanley, popularized in the best-selling book he co-authored, <em>The Millionaire Next Door</em>. One of the factors she has identified centers on what <em>not </em>to do, which she describes as <em>social indifference</em>:</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">&quot; &hellip; Those who ignore trends have higher net worth, regardless of their age, income, and percentage of wealth that they inherited,&quot; she told MarketWatch in 2016. &quot;Building wealth means ignoring what others are doing, which may be more challenging today than in the 1990s.&quot;</p> <p>So, just because <em>everyone </em>seems to be piling into Bitcoin doesn't mean you have to. At very least, take the time to understand what you're investing in and why. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-is-cryptocurrency-anyway?ref=seealso" target="_blank">What is a Cryptocurrency Anyway?</a>)</p> <h2>It comes with the territory</h2> <p>If investing gives you pause, welcome to the human race. Because the markets are unpredictable and can be volatile in the short-run, most investors feel some fear, at least occasionally. But that doesn't mean you have to let it keep you from investing for your later years. The suggestions above should help.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-avoid-these-3-investment-worries-that-will-derail-your-retirement&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Avoid%2520These%25203%2520Investment%2520Worries%2520That%2520Will%2520Derail%2520Your%2520Retirement.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Avoid%20These%203%20Investment%20Worries%20That%20Will%20Derail%20Your%20Retirement"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Avoid%20These%203%20Investment%20Worries%20That%20Will%20Derail%20Your%20Retirement.jpg" alt="How to Avoid These 3 Investment Worries That Will Derail Your Retirement" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-avoid-these-3-investment-worries-that-will-derail-your-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easiest-ways-to-catch-up-on-retirement-savings-later-in-life">7 Easiest Ways to Catch Up on Retirement Savings Later in Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-easiest-way-to-save-for-retirement">What You Need to Know About the Easiest Way to Save for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-get-the-most-from-your-employer-s-automated-retirement-plan">5 Ways to Get the Most From Your Employer’s Automated Retirement Plan</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-things-millennials-can-do-right-now-for-an-early-retirement">8 Things Millennials Can Do Right Now for an Early Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) cryptocurrency fear of missing out fears FOMO risk target date funds worries Mon, 08 Jan 2018 10:00:06 +0000 Matt Bell 2083334 at http://www.wisebread.com Why Playing It Safe With Your Money Is Actually Risky http://www.wisebread.com/why-playing-it-safe-with-your-money-is-actually-risky <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/why-playing-it-safe-with-your-money-is-actually-risky" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/retirement_chances.jpg" alt="Retirement chances" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The stock market has had a good run lately, but all good things come to an end eventually. And many of us remember a time not too long ago when a big crash wiped out billions of dollars in investment gains.</p> <p>Fear of a downturn, however, should not be an excuse to get too conservative in your investment approach. While it may be tempting to avoid stocks and keep all your money in cash and bonds, there is a real risk that you may find yourself without enough saved for retirement.</p> <p>While many of us may view stocks as &ldquo;risky&rdquo; investments, the more risky move is to play it too safe. Here&rsquo;s why.</p> <h2>1. You may live a long time</h2> <p>It was once common for someone to work into their 60s and pass away in their 70s. It wasn&rsquo;t necessary to prepare for a retirement of more than 15 years or so. But now, there are many cases of people living into their 90s and beyond. In fact, it&rsquo;s not unheard of to have a retirement that lasts longer than your work life. Are you on track to save enough to last 30 or 40 years?</p> <p>Accumulating enough for this length of time requires the investor to expand their risk tolerance and invest largely in stocks, especially earlier in life. It&rsquo;s OK to shift to some cash and bonds later, but going too conservative will leave your nest egg short of what you need. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a>)</p> <h2>2. Interest rates are low</h2> <p>You may be tempted to put money in a savings account or in certificates of deposit due to their safety. But bank interest rates and bond yields are still very low by historical standards. Consider that you&rsquo;ll be lucky to get a 1.5 percent annual yield from a savings account, while bond yields are between 1 and 3 percent. With rates this low, your money may barely grow faster than the rate of inflation if you don&rsquo;t invest in something more aggressive. It&rsquo;s fine to keep a sizable fund in cash in the event of an emergency, but keeping the bulk of your retirement fund in low-interest accounts is not the ticket to a comfortable retirement.</p> <h2>3. There&rsquo;s no pension to help you</h2> <p>We&rsquo;ve all heard stories of our parents and grandparents walking into retirement with a hefty pension that took care of them for however long they had left on Earth. Those days are gone. While many employers still contribute to retirement through 401(k) plans, their overall contribution is less than in the past, or at least partially dependent on you setting aside some of your own money. It&rsquo;s now up to the individual to set aside enough money for a comfortable retirement, and this may require taking some risk and investing in stocks with a potential for growth. Play it too safe, and you may find yourself short on cash later in life. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/if-youre-lucky-enough-to-receive-a-pension-here-are-6-things-you-need-to-do?ref=seealso" target="_blank">If You're Lucky Enough to Receive a Pension, Here Are 6 Things You Need to Do</a>)</p> <h2>4. You may end up helping your kids</h2> <p>You may envision your retirement as a time spent traveling with your spouse, lounging on beaches, and doing crossword puzzles. In truth, it may be all that, plus a hefty dose of financial and child care support for your kids. A survey from TD Ameritrade revealed that millennial parents receive an average $11,000 annually from their own parents in the form of financial assistance or free child care. While these older citizens are eager to help their kids, 47 percent of them do admit that they have to make sacrifices in their own life to offer this assistance.</p> <p>In planning for your retirement, are you taking into account the possible expense of helping out your own kids? This assistance can add tens of thousands of dollars to your retirement costs, so it&rsquo;s important to have an investment strategy that is aggressive enough to take these costs into account. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-ruining-your-retirement-by-spoiling-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Ruining Your Retirement by Spoiling Your Kids?</a>)</p> <h2>5. Future benefits aren&rsquo;t guaranteed</h2> <p>You may be banking on Social Security and other government programs to help support you when you get older. We all hope they&rsquo;ll be in place when we retire, but the stability and future of those benefits is subject to the whims of our lawmakers. Social Security and Medicare both are facing long-term budget shortfalls, and many lawmakers have advocated for adjustments to benefits in order to ensure these programs remain solvent.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s impossible to predict what government benefits will exist for retirees decades into the future, but no one should assume they will remain as-is forever. Moreover, these benefits were never designed to support a robust, active retirement. By taking a more aggressive approach with your own saving and investing, you can accumulate enough to enjoy a good retirement regardless of what government benefits look like in the future. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-sobering-facts-about-social-security-you-shouldnt-panic-over?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Sobering Facts About Social Security You Shouldn't Panic Over</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fwhy-playing-it-safe-with-your-money-is-actually-risky&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FWhy%2520Playing%2520It%2520Safe%2520With%2520Your%2520Money%2520Is%2520Actually%2520Risky.jpg&amp;description=Why%20Playing%20It%20Safe%20With%20Your%20Money%20Is%20Actually%20Risky"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Why%20Playing%20It%20Safe%20With%20Your%20Money%20Is%20Actually%20Risky.jpg" alt="Why Playing It Safe With Your Money Is Actually Risky" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-playing-it-safe-with-your-money-is-actually-risky">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-sure-you-dont-run-out-of-money-in-retirement">How to Make Sure You Don&#039;t Run Out of Money in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-plan-for-a-forced-early-retirement">How to Plan for a Forced Early Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-working-while-collecting-social-security">What You Need to Know About Working While Collecting Social Security</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-claim-social-security-benefits-while-living-abroad">How to Claim Social Security Benefits While Living Abroad</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-american-cities-where-you-can-retire-on-just-social-security">5 American Cities Where You Can Retire On Just Social Security</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement 401(k) plans benefits fear of investing growth inflation interest market downturns pensions risk social security Fri, 22 Dec 2017 10:00:06 +0000 Tim Lemke 2073022 at http://www.wisebread.com The High Cost of Pursuing Fame and Fortune http://www.wisebread.com/the-high-cost-of-pursuing-fame-and-fortune <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-high-cost-of-pursuing-fame-and-fortune" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/red_carpet_glamour.jpg" alt="Red carpet glamour" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wouldn't it be great to achieve stardom and become rich and famous? I can imagine becoming a famous author, making TV appearances, meeting fans at book signings, and stopping by the set where the movie version of my book is being filmed. This level of success would be exciting, and I would be making millions of dollars.</p> <p>If writing isn't your thing, perhaps you can imagine becoming rich and famous as a rock star, elite athlete, or popular actor. It clearly takes talent to become a famous star, but it also takes a lot of hard work and plain old good luck. Even though there are a lot of benefits to reaching &quot;superstar&quot; status, is the cost of taking a shot at becoming famous worth the potential payoff?</p> <h2>The rocky road to fame</h2> <p>I recently saw a news piece about Kelly Clarkson, who is promoting her latest album. In 2002, Kelly Clarkson won <em>American Idol</em>, which propelled her to rock star status and came with a record deal, allowing her to make at least $1 million in her first year after winning. This is the part of her story that most people are familiar with, but it wasn't smooth sailing to get there. On her quest to become a star, Kelly passed up the chance to go to college on scholarship and instead spent a couple years trying unsuccessfully to land a recording contract. She ended up living in her car for a time and returned home to Texas broke and without a record deal.</p> <p>Taking a shot at becoming a star often requires big sacrifices. Stephen King's breakout hit novel <em>Carrie </em>was written on a portable typewriter while he was living in a trailer and working several odd jobs to keep the bills paid. Drew Carey lived in his car for a year and a half in Los Angeles before he got his big break on <em>The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson</em>. Olympic athletes work odd jobs and barely scrape by as they take their shot at winning gold &mdash; and perhaps a lucrative product endorsement deal.</p> <p>Since taking a shot at big dreams often has a high cost, is it worth the risk?</p> <h2>Calculating the risk</h2> <p>One way to evaluate whether or not to pursue an opportunity is to add up all of the costs of pursuing the opportunity, including expenses and the cost of not pursuing <em>other </em>opportunities. On the other side of the formula is the evaluation of the opportunity in terms of the size of the payoff and the probability of success. The basic formula could be written like this:</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Expenses + Opportunity Costs &lt; Payoff Value x Probability of Success</p> <p>In other words, if the total cost of pursuing the opportunity (the left side of the formula) is less than the value of the opportunity (the right side of the formula), then it makes financial sense to pursue it.</p> <h2>The value of success</h2> <p>Of course, it's hard to find solid numbers to estimate the probability of success, and the payoff is a big guess, too. Let's try out this calculation with some numbers from the world of sports, since statistics are readily available. We'll use an example of an NFL star, and we'll say the payoff value is $10 million for a multiyear contract.</p> <p>According to the National Collegiate Athletic Association, there are 1,083,308 high school football participants with 73,660 going on to play college football. This means that about 6.8 percent make it to the college level. Each year, the NFL drafts about 250 college players from the pool of about 16,000 who are draft eligible, or about 1.5 percent. Of the 250 or so NFL draft choices, perhaps a couple dozen will have the kind of big-money careers that high school players dream of achieving. Let's call the odds of becoming a big star after being drafted into the NFL about 10 percent.</p> <p>So from a purely statistical perspective, the odds of a high school football player becoming a big star in the NFL can be calculated as:</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">6.8% probability of playing in college x 1.5% probability of being drafted into NFL x 10% probability of being a big star in the NFL.</p> <p>Working out the numbers gives:</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">0.068 x 0.015 x 0.10 = 0.000102 or 1 out of 9,804</p> <p>The value of the opportunity is the payoff value times the probability of success:</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">$10 million x 0.000102 = $1,020</p> <p>So to a high school football player, the average value of the opportunity to become a star in the NFL is about $1,000. Calculating probability like this does not account for talent and determination, which of course are huge factors that influence your chances of being successful. But running some numbers based on the statistical odds of making it big can help you decide whether pursuing a big payoff is worth the risk. Most ways of reaching stardom have very long odds, and as a result, the value of the opportunity turns out to be pretty low.</p> <h2>The opportunity cost</h2> <p>Looking now at the &quot;Expenses + Opportunity Cost&quot; side of the equation to decide whether to pursue an opportunity, a college football player could spend thousands of dollars going to football training camps, buying equipment, etc. If they had decided to major in something less demanding than, say, engineering so they could focus more on playing football, the opportunity cost of pursuing football in college could be in the range of a million dollars over the lifetime of an engineering career.</p> <p>So for my fictitious example of deciding whether to pursue a dream of being an NFL star instead of going to college to become an engineer, the expenses plus opportunity cost would have been around a million dollars, and the risk-weighted value of the opportunity would have been in the thousands of dollars. On paper this looks like an easy decision. Most calculations you could do to decide whether to try to become a big star in any field would work out to be similar to this since the odds of becoming a star are so small, even though the potential payoff is immense.</p> <h2>Going for it</h2> <p>No matter what the numbers say, sometimes there is no substitute for going all out for your dreams. Years ago when I was graduating from high school, most of my friends were getting ready to go to college, but one of my friends had a different plan. Instead of going to college, he was planning to move to Hollywood and become a movie star. At the time I thought this was absurd. Sure, he was talented, but lots of people are talented and very few go on to become movie stars. And what would he do if acting didn't work out?</p> <p>In my friend's case, the long shot paid off. He started out in TV commercials, worked his way up to appearing in a TV sitcom as a minor character, and eventually landed some major roles in movies with stars such as Helen Hunt and Tom Hanks. Sometimes the long shot does pay off, but it is important to understand the cost of pursuing fame and fortune before you decide to take your chance.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthe-high-cost-of-pursuing-fame-and-fortune&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThe%2520High%2520Cost%2520of%2520Pursuing%2520Fame%2520and%2520Fortune.jpg&amp;description=The%20High%20Cost%20of%20Pursuing%20Fame%20and%20Fortune"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/The%20High%20Cost%20of%20Pursuing%20Fame%20and%20Fortune.jpg" alt="The High Cost of Pursuing Fame and Fortune" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dr-penny-pincher">Dr Penny Pincher</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-high-cost-of-pursuing-fame-and-fortune">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-lessons-we-could-all-learn-from-dwayne-the-rock-johnson">6 Money Lessons We Could All Learn From Dwayne &quot;The Rock&quot; Johnson</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-inspiring-quotes-about-money-from-successful-women">6 Inspiring Quotes About Money From Successful Women</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-super-splurges-of-the-rich-and-famous">7 Super Splurges of the Rich and Famous</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-38-money-lessons-we-can-learn-from-celebrities">Flashback Friday: 38 Money Lessons We Can Learn From Celebrities</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-everyday-routines-of-wealthy-people">5 Everyday Routines of Wealthy People</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Entertainment celebrities opportunity costs probability rich and famous risk stars statistics value Wed, 13 Dec 2017 09:30:09 +0000 Dr Penny Pincher 2069779 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessman_cowering_on_blue_blackboard_background.jpg" alt="Businessman cowering on blue blackboard background" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you're nervous about investing in the stock market, you're not alone. Stock ownership in the U.S. is down, and a recent poll indicates that frightening memories of the last bear market may be to blame.</p> <p>According to a Gallup survey, just 54 percent of U.S. adults own stocks, including those owned through mutual funds that people invest in via their 401(k) or other retirement accounts. That's down from 62 percent who owned stocks before the last bear market. During that devastating downturn, which began at the end of 2007 and ran through early 2009, the market fell by more than 50 percent. In part, Gallup blames the decline in stock ownership on that painful, fearful time.</p> <p>&quot;It appears the financial crisis and recession may have fundamentally changed some Americans' views of stocks as an investment,&quot; the company stated on its website. &quot;The collapse in stock values in 2008 and 2009 seems to have left a greater impression on these people than the ongoing bull market that has followed it, as well as research showing the strong historical performance of stocks as a long-term investment.&quot;</p> <p>If that sounds like you, here are some suggestions for overcoming your concerns. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-over-these-5-scary-things-about-investing?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Get Over These 5 Scary Things About Investing</a>)</p> <h2>1. Develop a healthy fear of not investing</h2> <p>If it's safety you're after, there are few safer places to put your money than a bank. Because deposits are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, you could put up to $250,000 in a bank account and rest easy knowing that if the bank went out of business, the federal government would make sure you got your money back.</p> <p>While a bank account can be a good place to keep some savings for emergencies, right now many banks are paying just .01 percent interest, making them a horrible place to pursue long-term goals like retirement.</p> <p>For example, let's say you're 30 years old and deposit $10,000 at .01 percent interest. In 40 years, your $10,000 will have turned into &mdash; wait for it &mdash; $10,040. That's right. After 40 years, you will have made just $40 on your 10 grand. And once you factor inflation into the mix, the buying power of your $10,000 will have taken a big step backward.</p> <p>Let's say you earn 7 percent interest instead. In 40 years, your $10,000 will have turned into $150,000. And 7 percent is a very conservative assumption since the stock market's long-term average annual return has been 10 percent.</p> <p>So, instead of being fearful about investing, it is more logical to be fearful about not investing.</p> <h2>2. Learn a little market history</h2> <p>Many of the mistakes investors make are due to their emotions. If the market falls, some people get scared and pull money out of the market, usually to their detriment. A little knowledge of market history can help you stay the course.</p> <p>The longer you keep money in the market, the more likely you are to make money. When Morningstar analyzed the stock market's performance during each one-, five- and 15-year period from 1926 to 2016, it found that 74 percent of the one-year periods showed positive returns, 86 percent of the five-year periods generated gains, and 100 percent of the 15-year periods were up. In other words, based on 90 years of history, if you stay in the market for at least 15 years, it's a virtual certainty that you will make money.</p> <p>Putting time on your side is also the key to surviving a significant market downturn. According to Morningstar, someone with $100,000 invested in the stock market at the beginning of 2007 would have lost nearly half that amount by early 2009. Brutal, right? However, if they had stayed invested, by January 2017 their portfolio would have been worth nearly twice its value on January 2007. Despite that horrible downturn, their average annual return over those 10 years would have been nearly 7 percent. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How the Risk Averse Can Get Into the Stock Market</a>)</p> <h2>3. Start small</h2> <p>If you have a chunk of money to invest but just can't work up the courage to hit &quot;buy,&quot; consider investing a little at a time through dollar-cost averaging. The idea is very simple. Just take the total amount (let's say $12,000), divide by the number of months you plan to invest (let's use 12), and invest that amount at the same time every month ($1,000 per month).</p> <p>If the market has a good month, your money will buy fewer shares. If the market has a bad month, your money will buy more. You never have to worry about getting the timing just right. By spreading your investments over a year a more, you minimize the risk of losing a lot of money through an immediate downturn. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-dollar-cost-averaging-the-right-strategy-for-you?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Is Dollar Cost Averaging the Right Strategy for You?</a>)</p> <h2>4. Keep it simple</h2> <p>Investment terminology can be confusing. Diversification. Asset allocation. What does it all mean? You can put these helpful concepts to work without qualifying for a job on Wall Street by investing in a super simple target-date fund.</p> <p>Because they are mutual funds, target-date funds are inherently diversified &mdash; that is, the money you invest is spread out among multiple stocks, bonds, or other investments. And they take care of asset allocation decisions for you. That means they are designed with an appropriate mix of stocks and bonds for someone your age. They even automatically adjust that mix as you get older, tilting their stock/bond allocation more toward bonds to make your portfolio appropriately more conservative as you near your intended retirement date.</p> <p>It's understandable that the last bear market may have dampened your enthusiasm for the stock market. However, the market continues to offer most people their best opportunity for building wealth. The steps described above should help you wade back into the investment waters without fear.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F4%2520Simple%2520Ways%2520to%2520Conquer%2520Your%2520Fear%2520of%2520Investing.jpg&amp;description=4%20Simple%20Ways%20to%20Conquer%20Your%20Fear%20of%20Investing"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/4%20Simple%20Ways%20to%20Conquer%20Your%20Fear%20of%20Investing.jpg" alt="4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-3-rules-every-mediocre-investor-must-know">The 3 Rules Every Mediocre Investor Must Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market">How the Risk Averse Can Get Into the Stock Market</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you">8 Types of Investors — Which One Are You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-be-fooled-by-an-investments-rate-of-return">Don&#039;t Be Fooled by an Investment&#039;s Rate of Return</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment allocation bonds dollar cost averaging fears losing money not investing risk stock market stocks target date funds Wed, 06 Dec 2017 09:30:11 +0000 Matt Bell 2066563 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Investment Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up http://www.wisebread.com/5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessman_protecting_coins_in_saplings.jpg" alt="Businessman Protecting Coins In Saplings" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You know that investing is a smart move: It's a way to grow your wealth over time and boost the odds that you'll have enough money to live the happiest possible retirement. But how do you know when you're investing your money like a grown-up and not like a kid?</p> <p>It's about taking reasonable risks, doing your research, and changing your investment mix when it makes sense. In other words, you know you're investing like a grown-up when you treat investing like what it is: work.</p> <p>These are the five investment moves that prove you're finally a grown-up.</p> <h2>1. You're not afraid to invest in stocks</h2> <p>It's true that stocks come with more risk. But investing in stocks comes with the potential for much higher rewards, too. If you ignore stocks and only invest in safe assets such as bonds, you run the risk of losing significant profits over time.</p> <p>According to TIME Money, since 1926, portfolios made up mostly of stocks have never had losses that last 20 years or more. These same portfolios reported average gains of more than 10.8 percent annually, while portfolios made up of bonds averaged returns of just 4 percent a year.</p> <p>If you're investing like a grown-up, you won't run away from the high-reward potential of stocks. Instead, you'll make sure to include stocks as part of your overall investment portfolio. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a>)</p> <h2>2. You do your research</h2> <p>Your friend comes to you with a hot tip, claiming that you absolutely must invest in this new company. They tell you you'll be getting in on the ground floor of something big. An immature investor might jump at that opportunity, but a grown-up will do the research before acting on the tip.</p> <p>This means reading company reports and listening to conference calls. It means studying the product or service this &quot;hot&quot; company is offering. It means seeking out the advice of true financial experts. And, yes, all of that takes time and work. But to invest like a grown-up means you're willing to put in that effort before investing your dollars. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-dumb-stock-picking-mistakes-even-smart-investors-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Dumb Stock Picking Mistakes Even Smart Investors Make</a>)</p> <h2>3. You don't sell too quickly</h2> <p>It's tempting to sell a stock when it's either soaring in value or falling. But reacting too quickly to changes in value, whether positive or negative, is the sign of an immature investor. The grown-up investor realizes that investing sometimes requires patience.</p> <p>Consider a stock that rises in value after you buy it. Sure, if you sell it, you'll make a quick profit. But what if you held onto the stock longer? If the stock is a solid one, it might continue to increase in value over time. If you sell too early, you might miss out on plenty of future profit.</p> <p>You also don't want to hold onto a losing investment for too long, but it's still possible to sell too quickly. If you're patient, and if you've done your research on the company before investing, it might make sense to hold onto the stock until its value begins to rebound. If you sell as soon as the stock loses value, you're certain to take a loss. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-secret-to-successful-investing-is-trusting-the-process?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Secret to Successful Investing Is Trusting the Process</a>)</p> <h2>4. You're not hunting for bargains</h2> <p>You don't want to overpay for stocks, but sometimes investing in a quality company takes a significant amount of money. Grown-up investors know that it's better to invest in a strong company while paying a bit more than it is to get a bargain price for a company that won't perform as well.</p> <p>The truth is, if you want to invest in top companies, you'll have to spend more to do so. Don't let your quest for bargain prices trick you into investing in underwhelming companies.</p> <h2>5. You don't cash out your 401(k) when you change jobs</h2> <p>When you change jobs, you'll usually have to figure out what to do with the 401(k) plan in which you've been investing. The immature move? Cashing it out for a quick buck. The grown-up move? Rolling that 401(k) over into an IRA.</p> <p>If you cash out your 401(k), you'll lose a good portion of the money you saved because of taxes and, depending on your age, penalties for withdrawing the cash too early.</p> <p>By rolling over the funds, you won't suffer any penalties or tax hits, and your money will continue to grow over the years. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-step-by-step-guide-to-rolling-over-your-401k?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Step-by-Step Guide to Rolling Over Your 401(k)</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Investment%2520Moves%2520That%2520Prove%2520You%2527re%2520Finally%2520a%2520Grown-Up.jpg&amp;description=5%20Investment%20Moves%20That%20Prove%20You're%20Finally%20a%20Grown-Up"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Investment%20Moves%20That%20Prove%20You%27re%20Finally%20a%20Grown-Up.jpg" alt="5 Investment Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-millennial-investors-can-get-past-the-great-recession">How Millennial Investors Can Get Past the Great Recession</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-lessons-we-can-learn-from-baseball">8 Money Lessons We Can Learn From Baseball</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easiest-ways-to-catch-up-on-retirement-savings-later-in-life">7 Easiest Ways to Catch Up on Retirement Savings Later in Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you">8 Types of Investors — Which One Are You?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment 401(k) bargains buy and hold fear grown-up money moves retirement risk stocks Tue, 07 Nov 2017 09:01:07 +0000 Dan Rafter 2045997 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Ways to Protect Your Retirement From Inflation http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/protecting_your_nest_egg.jpg" alt="Protecting Your Nest Egg" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you're saving for retirement, it's easy to forget that the goods you'll be buying years or decades from now will probably cost more, all thanks to inflation. It's important to keep this in mind when planning the amount of money you'll need during your after-work years.</p> <p>Here are five ways you can inflation-proof your retirement savings:</p> <h2>Don't be too conservative</h2> <p>It can be tempting to stow a greater percentage of your retirement income in low-risk bonds, especially as you get nearer to your retirement date. And bonds certainly should be part of your retirement portfolio. But too many people focus too much on bonds. They don't look at the real return on these investment vehicles with the effects of inflation factored in. Because bonds are less risky, they also offer lower rates of return.</p> <p>Say a bond has rate of return of 6 percent. If inflation is at 3 percent, that rate of return is really only 3 percent &mdash; a fairly low payoff.</p> <p>That's why it's important to include some riskier investments, such as stocks, in your retirement savings plan. Yes, there is more risk that stocks will lose value. But stocks also have the potential of providing a far higher rate of return; one that will help overcome the rising costs that come with inflation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a>)</p> <h2>Do your research</h2> <p>Investing in just any group of stocks won't help you overcome inflation. Certain companies and financial sectors thrive when inflation rises, while others tend to struggle. For instance, investing in retail stocks might not help you overcome inflation. That's because retailers tend to struggle when high inflation makes the products they are selling unattractive to consumers. However, companies in the agricultural sector tend to do better when inflation is higher. Their stocks, then, are a better hedge against a rising inflation rate.</p> <h2>Invest in treasury inflation-protected securities</h2> <p>Treasury inflation-protected securities, better known as TIPS, are designed to protect investors from inflation. That's because the return is tied to the Consumer Price Index. This is an especially useful tool for investors living on a fixed income, like retirees.</p> <p>Say you invest $100,000 in TIPS. If inflation is 4 percent, your principal balance will now be worth $104,000 after a year. When TIPS reach their maturity date, investors get back either their original principal amount &mdash; what they originally invested &mdash; or one that's been adjusted for inflation, whichever is greater. TIPS also provide a bit of interest income, paying this out every six months. Investors don't have to pay state and local taxes on this interest or on the growth in principal, but they do have to pay federal taxes on that money earned.</p> <p>Investors can purchase TIPS at no cost from the U.S. Treasury in $100 values. You might also be able to invest in TIPS when you invest in a mutual fund that includes them as part of their investment mix.</p> <h2>Invest in commercial real estate</h2> <p>The value of commercial real estate can continue to rise even if the stock market is struggling. By including investments in commercial real estate along with stocks in your retirement savings portfolio, you can build a diverse investment mix that you can then use as a hedge against inflation.</p> <p>The easiest way to invest in commercial real estate is to put your money in a real estate investment trust, or REIT. With a REIT, you'll be pooling your money alongside other investors in commercial real estate buildings such as offices and apartment properties. You can also invest in a mutual fund that includes commercial real estate assets among its investment mix. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-only-5-rules-you-need-to-know-about-investing-in-real-estate?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Only 5 Rules You Need to Know About Investing in Real Estate</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F4%2520Ways%2520to%2520Protect%2520Your%2520Retirement%2520From%2520Inflation.jpg&amp;description=4%20Ways%20to%20Protect%20Your%20Retirement%20From%20Inflation"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/4%20Ways%20to%20Protect%20Your%20Retirement%20From%20Inflation.jpg" alt="4 Ways to Protect Your Retirement From Inflation" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-longevity-is-changing-retirement-planning-and-what-to-do-about-it">5 Ways Longevity Is Changing Retirement Planning (And What to Do About It)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easiest-ways-to-catch-up-on-retirement-savings-later-in-life">7 Easiest Ways to Catch Up on Retirement Savings Later in Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-roadblocks-to-retirement-and-how-to-clear-them">7 Roadblocks to Retirement (And How to Clear Them)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-false-assumptions-that-could-threaten-your-retirement-years">4 False Assumptions That Could Threaten Your Retirement Years</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement inflation long term care insurance nest egg protecting your money real estate investing reit risk saving money stocks Fri, 03 Nov 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Dan Rafter 2043245 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50 http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_sitting_on_floor_with_piggy_bank_under_money_rain.jpg" alt="Man sitting on floor with piggy bank under money rain" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Conventional investing wisdom says that as people age, they should put less of their money in stocks and more into stable investments such as bonds and cash. This is sound advice based on the idea that in retirement you want to protect your assets in case there is a major market downturn.</p> <p>But there are still strong arguments to continue investing in stocks even as you get older. Few people recommend an all-stock portfolio, but reducing stock ownership down to zero doesn't make sense, either.</p> <p>Consider that many mutual funds geared toward older investors still comprise hefty doses of stocks. The 2020 Retirement Fund from T. Rowe Price, for example, is made up of 70 percent stocks for retirees at age 65, and is still made up of 25 percent stocks when that same retiree is past 90 years of age.</p> <p>Why does owning stocks make sense even for older investors? Let's examine these possible motivations.</p> <h2>1. You're going to live a lot longer</h2> <p>If you are thinking about retirement as you approach age 60, it's important to recognize that you still may have several decades of life remaining. People are routinely living into their 90s or even past 100 these days. Do you have enough savings to last 40 years or more? While it's important to protect the assets you have, you may find that higher returns from stocks will be needed in order to accrue the money you need.</p> <h2>2. You got a late start</h2> <p>If you started investing early and contributed regularly to your retirement accounts over the course of several decades, you may be able to take a conservative investing approach in retirement. But if you began investing late, your portfolio may not have had time to grow enough to fund a comfortable retirement. Continuing to invest in stocks will allow you to expand your savings and reach your target figure. It still makes sense to balance your stocks with more conservative investments, but taking on a little bit more risk in exchange for potentially higher returns may be worth it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a>)</p> <h2>3. Other investments don't yield as much as they used to</h2> <p>Moving away from stocks was good advice for older people back when you could get better returns on bonds and bank interest. The 30-year treasury yield right now is about 2.75 percent. That's about half what it was a decade ago and a third of the rate from 1990. Interest from cash in the bank or certificates of deposit will generate a measly 1.5 percent or less. The bottom line is that these returns will barely outpace the rate of inflation and won't bring you much in the way of useful income.</p> <h2>4. Some stocks are safer than others</h2> <p>Not all stocks move up and down in the same way. While stocks are generally more volatile than bonds and cash, there are many that have a strong track record of steady returns and relative immunity from market crashes. Take a look at mutual funds comprised of large-cap companies with diversified revenue streams. Consider dividend-producing stocks that don't move much in terms of share price, but can generate income. To find these investments, search for those that lost less than average during the Great Recession and have a history of low volatility.</p> <h2>5. Dividend stocks can bring you income</h2> <p>Dividend stocks are not only more stable than many other stock investments, but also they can generate cash flow at a time when you're not bringing in other income. A good dividend stock can produce a yield of more than 4 percent, which is more than what you'll get from many other non-stock investments right now. This will help ensure the growth of your portfolio is at least outpacing inflation.</p> <p>If you are unsure about which dividend stocks to buy, take a look at a well-rated dividend mutual fund. The T. Rowe Price Dividend Growth Fund [NYSE: PRDGX], for example, has a three-year total return of more than 10 percent, outpacing the S&amp;P 500. Its overall returns also dropped less than the S&amp;P 500 during the Great Recession.</p> <h2>6. Busts are often followed by bigger booms</h2> <p>A person who retired 10 years ago would have stopped working right when the market crashed, and there's a good chance they may have lost a significant chunk of their savings. That's bad. But it's important to note that in the decade since, the S&amp;P 500 has gone up every year at an average of more than 8.5 percent annually. In other words, someone who lost a lot from the crash of 2007&ndash;2008 will have gotten all of their money back and much more if they stayed invested in stocks.</p> <p>This is not to suggest that older investors should be unreasonably aggressive, but they should be aware that a single bad year or two probably won't completely wipe you out financially. If your retirement is long, you may see some market busts, but you'll also see some long stretches of good returns.</p> <h2>7. You may still be helping out your kids</h2> <p>When you're retired, you're supposed to be done with child rearing and helping out your kids financially, right? Unfortunately, it seems that older Americans are continuing to lend a hand to their children even as they grow into adulthood and have children of their own.</p> <p>A recent survey from TD Ameritrade said that millennial parents between the ages of 19 and 37 receive an average of more than $11,000 annually in the form of money or unpaid child care from their parents. With these additional costs on the horizon, those approaching retirement age may still want to invest in stocks to build their nest egg further. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-ruining-your-retirement-by-spoiling-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Ruining Your Retirement by Spoiling Your Kids?</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Reasons%2520to%2520Invest%2520in%2520Stocks%2520Past%2520Age%252050.jpg&amp;description=7%20Reasons%20to%20Invest%20in%20Stocks%20Past%20Age%2050"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Reasons%20to%20Invest%20in%20Stocks%20Past%20Age%2050.jpg" alt="7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easiest-ways-to-catch-up-on-retirement-savings-later-in-life">7 Easiest Ways to Catch Up on Retirement Savings Later in Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-sure-you-dont-run-out-of-money-in-retirement">How to Make Sure You Don&#039;t Run Out of Money in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-there-such-a-thing-as-a-safe-investment">Is There Such a Thing as a &quot;Safe&quot; Investment?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-longevity-is-changing-retirement-planning-and-what-to-do-about-it">5 Ways Longevity Is Changing Retirement Planning (And What to Do About It)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement adult children bonds cash dividend stocks giving money to kids income late starters life span living longer risk saving money stocks yields Thu, 05 Oct 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Tim Lemke 2031342 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Types of Investors — Which One Are You? http://www.wisebread.com/8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessman_reading_a_newspaper.jpg" alt="which type of investor are you" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do you tend to invest in a particular way? Identifying which type of investor you are can help you understand the potential pitfalls of your investment approach &mdash; and how to improve your chances for better investment returns. Which type of investor are you?</p> <h2>1. Automatic investor</h2> <p>The automatic investor is all about convenience. Everything related to investing is set on autopilot. Automatic contributions to investment funds come out of every paycheck or are withdrawn from the bank account on a certain day of the month. This type of investor doesn't spend much time or effort thinking about investing, and doesn't need to since everything is automatic. They don't have to remind themselves to invest; it's checked off their financial to-do list.</p> <p>The potential downside for the automatic investor is losing touch with where investment funds are going and how the investment portfolio is performing. If you are not paying attention, you may not have investment selections that meet your current goals, and you may not identify and remove low performing investments or funds with high fees. If you don't check in at least occasionally, this hands-off approach may cost you. Rebalancing your portfolio once or twice a year by transferring funds to maintain your desired proportions of stocks to bonds should be sufficient to keep your investment portfolio on track. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-most-important-thing-youre-probably-not-doing-with-your-portfolio?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Most Important Thing You're Probably Not Doing With Your Portfolio</a>)</p> <h2>2. Daily Dow watcher</h2> <p>The Dow watcher is constantly up to speed. They know at any time if the stock market is up or down. The current market price and chart is only a tap away on their smartphone. This type of investor knows how much their portfolio is worth and worries about how much they are losing when the market has a bad day. Nothing goes over the Dow watcher's head.</p> <p>The risk for the Dow watcher is that he or she can easily get stressed out by day-to-day ups and downs in the market. They may even get discouraged when the market is going down and decide to sell stock when the price is low &mdash; the worst time to sell! It's good to be informed, especially when it comes to your investments, but if you find yourself too glued to the Dow's daily performance &mdash; it might be a good idea to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/want-your-investments-to-do-better-stop-watching-the-news" target="_blank">step away from the news</a> for a bit. Checking in on the stock market and your investment portfolio quarterly is probably more than frequent enough, and you can use the time you save for something more productive and enjoyable.</p> <h2>3. Active trader</h2> <p>The active trader is a studious investor. This type of investor tries to time the market by figuring out that a stock is going up before other investors realize it &mdash; and then selling when it is near the peak price before most investors figure out that it is going down. This type of investor pores over market and economic data, reads business articles, and is well-informed about business trends and news. He or she is willing to take risks for a chance at big returns.</p> <p>If you're an active trader, tread carefully; you can easily lose significant money if your timing is off. Trading fees can also get expensive if your investment approach requires making a lot of trades. You are much more likely to make money from buying good stocks and holding them for the long haul.</p> <h2>4. Conscientious investor</h2> <p>Conscientious investors put their money where their morals are. They have limits to what activities and products they are willing to be involved with in order to make a buck. For example, some conscientious investors invest only in socially-responsible or environmentally-responsible companies, and avoid owning shares in companies that promote values or products contrary to their moral principles. This type of investor is likely to exert economic influence through consumer purchasing decisions as well as through their stock picks.</p> <p>This type of ethical investing unfortunately can limit a person's investment options, which may result in lower returns. But some things are worth more than money to conscientious investors. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-guide-to-socially-responsible-investing?ref=seealso" target="_blank">A Simple Guide to Socially Responsible Investing</a>)</p> <h2>5. Property investor</h2> <p>Not every investor owns stocks. The property investor owns real estate, collectibles, gold, and maybe even bonds. He or she wants to invest in things that they can understand and control to some extent. This type of investor may not trust Wall Street and avoids the volatility of stocks.</p> <p>Historically, however, stocks have had great investment returns compared to other investment types, so property investors who shy away from the stock market could be missing out. Large cap value stocks can be a relatively safe way to start off in stock investing for first-time stock investors.</p> <h2>6. Bargain investor</h2> <p>This is the kind of investor that pounced on GM stock when it was $1 per share in 2009. Of course there is risk that bargain stocks could become worthless, but there is potential for the stock price to bounce back. The bargain investor looks carefully at P/E ratios to check the share price relative to earnings per share when deciding what stock to buy.</p> <p>Bargain hunters should be wary though &mdash; sometimes stocks with low prices are trading at a low price for a good reason. The bigger the bargain, the more research is merited into why the price is so low before you buy.</p> <h2>7. Company loyalist</h2> <p>The company loyalist owns a disproportionate amount of stock from an individual company. This could be a trendy stock that inspires loyalty like Apple or Tesla, or the company loyalist could own a large amount of his or her own employer's stock.</p> <p>Owning a large amount of any single company stock can be risky. The company could <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-these-8-company-stocks-fared-following-scandal" target="_blank">experience a major scandal</a> or product failure and the stock price could tank. Remember Enron? Owning a lot of stock in the company you work for is even riskier, because if something goes wrong you'll not only lose value in your stock fund, but you may lose your job at the same time. Some financial advisers suggest that owning more than 10 percent to 15 percent of your company's stock may be too much.</p> <h2>8. Portfolio tweaker</h2> <p>The portfolio tweaker is not really an active trader, but likes to adjust and fine tune his or her portfolio frequently by making transfers between funds to get the desired balance between large cap, mid cap, small cap, foreign, domestic, growth, value, and bond investment categories.</p> <p>While it is good to adjust your portfolio occasionally to meet your investment goals, frequently selling investments that are performing well just to meet an arbitrary &quot;balance&quot; in your portfolio may not be the best move and could hurt your overall return. As we advised the automatic investor, portfolio rebalancing once or twice per year is a good interval for most investors.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Types%2520Of%2520Investors%2520Which%2520One%2520Are%2520You.jpg&amp;description=8%20Types%20of%20Investors%20%E2%80%94%20Which%20One%20Are%20You%3F"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Types%20Of%20Investors%20Which%20One%20Are%20You.jpg" alt="8 Types of Investors &mdash; Which One Are You?" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dr-penny-pincher">Dr Penny Pincher</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-3-rules-every-mediocre-investor-must-know">The 3 Rules Every Mediocre Investor Must Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-too-much-investment-diversity-can-cost-you">How Too Much Investment Diversity Can Cost You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market">How the Risk Averse Can Get Into the Stock Market</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-be-fooled-by-an-investments-rate-of-return">Don&#039;t Be Fooled by an Investment&#039;s Rate of Return</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment automatic company stock dow ethical investing portfolio property investors returns risk stock market stocks types Fri, 08 Sep 2017 08:00:05 +0000 Dr Penny Pincher 2017190 at http://www.wisebread.com This One Mental Bias Is Harming Your Investments http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-mental-bias-is-harming-your-investments <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/this-one-mental-bias-is-harming-your-investments" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/young_man_holding_his_head_counting_pennies.jpg" alt="Young man holding his head counting pennies" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Are you holding your breath just waiting for the market to fall? If so, you're not alone. Many investors seem to be waiting for the other shoe to drop. That seems logical: After all, today's bull market has been running for more than eight years, and bull markets don't last forever.</p> <p>But is it really logical to think that way? Bull markets don't die of old age. They die from other causes, such as rising inflation or a recession. As of today, inflation is in check and most economy watchers say they see no signs of trouble.</p> <p>Making it far more difficult to decide what, if anything, to do with your investment portfolio are the many cognitive biases that plague us all. One such bias, however, can be especially dangerous in a stock market environment such as the one we're in right now.</p> <h2>A financially dangerous disposition</h2> <p>Think about your portfolio. You probably have several investments that have done very well in recent years. And, if you're well diversified, you may have some that have lost value. Are you thinking about &quot;taking profits&quot; by selling some of your winners? At the same time, are you planning to hang onto those investments that haven't done so well? Perhaps it would be too painful to sell. And besides, they're bound to come back eventually, right?</p> <p>Be careful. You may be under the spell of what behavioral scientists call the <em>disposition effect</em>. That's the tendency to sell winning investments too soon and keep losing investments too long.</p> <h2>The unequal nature of gains and losses</h2> <p>The disposition effect has much to do with a foundational behavioral bias first identified by researchers Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky. It theorizes that losses &mdash; whether in the stock market, real estate, or other domains &mdash; have far more emotional impact on us than equivalent gains.</p> <p>Objectively speaking, it's been well documented that the recent past performance of an investment &mdash; its momentum &mdash; tends to persist. We'd be better off keeping our winners longer and selling our losers sooner.</p> <p>But we are not objective beings. For most of us, in the daily battle between facts and feelings, the truth seldom gets in the way of a bad decision.</p> <p>So strong is our subjective, irrational desire to avoid the pain of regret &mdash; in this case, the regret of having made a losing investment in the first place &mdash; that we tend to keep poorly-performing investments longer than we should.</p> <p>Hersh Shefrin, one of the behavioral finance experts who identified the disposition effect, described it as a &quot;predisposition toward get-evenitis.&quot; Rather than cutting our losses, we tend to hang on in the hope of at least getting back to even.</p> <h2>How to beat the disposition effect</h2> <p>Telling yourself to stop trying to avoid the pain of regret is about as effective as telling yourself not to think about an elephant. But that doesn't mean you're destined to spend your life fighting the disposition effect. Three steps can help.</p> <h3>1. Follow a process</h3> <p>First and foremost, don't make investment buy/sell decisions on your own. Find and follow a proven, objective, rules-based investment selection process. That may mean working with an experienced investment adviser, using a target-date fund that's designed according to your optimal asset allocation, or subscribing to an investment newsletter with a solid track record.</p> <h3>2. Stop the daily updates</h3> <p>Prevent yourself from looking at your investments so often. Research by psychologist Paul Andreassen found that people who receive frequent updates about their investment portfolios tend to trade more often and generate poorer returns than those who receive less frequent updates. Watching the daily gyrations of the market is a prescription for heartburn and bad decision-making. Check in with your holdings once a quarter, or once a month if you must. If you signed up for daily or weekly updates on how your portfolio is doing, today's the day to unsubscribe. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/want-your-investments-to-do-better-stop-watching-the-news?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Want Your Investments to Do Better? Stop Watching the News</a>)</p> <h3>3. Form a plan</h3> <p>Lastly, create a written investment plan. It should identify your investment goals and time frames, the strategy you're using to accomplish them, the process you're following for choosing specific investments, and perhaps most importantly, what you are committed to doing (or not doing) under various market conditions. Then review it anytime market conditions tempt you to veer from your plan.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthis-one-mental-bias-is-harming-your-investments&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThis%2520One%2520Mental%2520Bias%2520Is%2520Harming%2520Your%2520Investments_0.jpg&amp;description=This%20One%20Mental%20Bias%20Is%20Harming%20Your%20Investments"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/This%20One%20Mental%20Bias%20Is%20Harming%20Your%20Investments_0.jpg" alt="This One Mental Bias Is Harming Your Investments" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-mental-bias-is-harming-your-investments">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-keep-envy-from-ruining-your-retirement-investments">4 Ways to Keep Envy From Ruining Your Retirement Investments</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-loss-aversion-is-costing-you-more-than-your-fomo">Your Loss Aversion Is Costing You More Than Your FOMO</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/learn-how-to-invest-with-these-5-stock-market-games">Learn How to Invest With These 5 Stock Market Games</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market">How the Risk Averse Can Get Into the Stock Market</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-invest-if-youre-worried-about-a-stock-market-crash">How to Invest If You&#039;re Worried About a Stock Market Crash</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment bull market cognitive bias disposition effect downturn gains losses overthinking risk stock market Fri, 28 Jul 2017 08:01:05 +0000 Matt Bell 1990503 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Surprising Ways Confidence Can Hurt Your Investments http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-confidence-can-hurt-your-investments <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-surprising-ways-confidence-can-hurt-your-investments" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/strong_man_self_confident_young_entrepreneur.jpg" alt="Strong man, self confident young entrepreneur" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There may come a moment when you feel like you have this investing thing all figured out. You've made some great stock picks and your portfolio is going gangbusters. But are you letting your confidence get the best of you and your investments?</p> <p>Being confident is OK. You need some confidence in yourself to invest in the first place. But being too cocky can lead you to make bad investment choices, and have a blind spot to your own weaknesses. Here are some of the ways confidence may actually hurt your investments.</p> <h2>1. You develop a selective memory</h2> <p>Maybe you bought shares of Facebook when they were trading below $25, and have made a killing on the investment since. You like to hold up that one purchase as proof of your genius as an investor. But are you forgetting about the other investments that didn't do so well? On balance, are you really any smarter than anyone else out there?</p> <p>Don't let your memory of one great decision delude you into thinking you have a special gift as an investor. Doing so can make you believe that every stock will eventually turn out to be a winner, even if there's no rational basis for your confidence.</p> <h2>2. You have too much faith in the market</h2> <p>While it's true that history shows the stock market has gone up consistently over time, it's still important to protect your investments against a possible downturn. As you get older and approach retirement age, consider shifting some investments into less volatile instruments, such as bonds, even if you believe the market will continue to go up.</p> <p>It's also important to avoid being too optimistic about markets in the short term. If you're investing money that you need in a year or two, the stock market may not be the best place to put it. Having faith in the market is crucial to building wealth over time, but protecting your investments against a down period is also part of the formula for success.</p> <h2>3. Your portfolio is not properly balanced</h2> <p>So you've had some great success with some of your investments, and decide to buy more shares of those that have done the best. There's nothing wrong with buying a lot of something if it performs well for you, but it's important to keep your overall portfolio from getting out of whack. This means not being too heavily invested in one particular stock or group of stocks.</p> <p>Ideally, your portfolio should have a nice mix of stocks from various industries, sectors, and asset classes. Depending on your retirement age, mixing in some bonds and dividend stocks may also make sense. You may fall in love with a certain investment, but you should not let it dominate your portfolio. Diversification is key to mitigating risk. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-basics-of-asset-allocation?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Basics of Asset Allocation</a>)</p> <h2>4. You're taking on too much risk</h2> <p>Investing is not without risk, and you must be comfortable with that if you plan to accumulate wealth over time. But don't be too tempted to take on extra risk just to chase higher returns. It's one thing to invest heavily in stocks, but it can be financial suicide to go after notoriously volatile investments, or to engage in risky practices like trading on margin or buying and selling options.</p> <p>The best approach is to build a portfolio that roughly performs in line with the whole stock market, ensuring that you'll likely make money over time but will avoid catastrophic downturns that wipe out your whole savings.</p> <h2>5. You never check up on your investments</h2> <p>For most people, it's not necessary to check your investments every day and obsess over every movement in the markets. But you don't want to completely ignore your investment accounts, either. Even if you are invested in simple, reliable things like index funds, an occasional check-in is usually a good idea. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-4-best-investments-for-lazy-investors?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 4 Best Investments for Lazy Investors</a>)</p> <p>Without a checkup, you may be unaware that certain investments are underperforming. You might allow your portfolio to become unbalanced, leaving you under- or over-invested in some areas. You may be left unaware of company sales or mergers that result in changes to your investment mix. Don't get cocky; the stock market has gone up reliably over time, but your investments still need some tending to from time to time.</p> <h2>6. You trade too often</h2> <p>Let's face it: Buying and selling stocks can be fun. And when you feel confident in your stock picking abilities, you'll feel the urge to trade stocks frequently. You may even feel like you can &quot;time&quot; the market. But trading frequently has financial consequences.</p> <p>First, if your stocks are in a taxable brokerage account, you'll end up paying tax on any gains when you sell. Second, most brokerage firms charge a commission for every trade. These expenses can put a dent in the value of your portfolio.</p> <h2>7. You miss out on popular, but well-performing investments</h2> <p>Imagine there's a hot stock that everyone is buying. But you stay away, because you think everyone else is dumber than you. Your confidence got in the way of rationally examining an investment on its merits rather than being influenced by the decisions of others. Buying a stock just because it's popular is silly, but so is refusing to buy it for the same reason. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-everyday-things-that-are-surprisingly-awesome-investments?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Everyday Things That Are Surprisingly Awesome Investments</a>)</p> <h2>8. You hold on to investments too long</h2> <p>Years ago, you bought 100 shares of OmniCorp and it netted you a massive return in the first year. You still have some of those shares, but the company has since been struggling, and may even declare bankruptcy. But still, you refuse to cut your losses and sell, because you made so much money from this stock early on. You are utterly convinced the company will turn things around, despite all evidence to the contrary. This is a dangerous mentality to have, and can cost you plenty in the long run.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-surprising-ways-confidence-can-hurt-your-investments&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Surprising%2520Ways%2520Confidence%2520Can%2520Hurt%2520Your%2520Investments.jpg&amp;description=8%20Surprising%20Ways%20Confidence%20Can%20Hurt%20Your%20Investments"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Surprising%20Ways%20Confidence%20Can%20Hurt%20Your%20Investments.jpg" alt="8 Surprising Ways Confidence Can Hurt Your Investments" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-confidence-can-hurt-your-investments">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-costly-mistakes-diy-investors-make">9 Costly Mistakes DIY Investors Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-youre-a-helicopter-investor-and-how-to-stop">8 Signs You&#039;re a &quot;Helicopter Investor&quot; (And How to Stop)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-too-much-investment-diversity-can-cost-you">How Too Much Investment Diversity Can Cost You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-an-etf-isnt-right-for-you">8 Signs an ETF Isn&#039;t Right for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-sure-you-dont-run-out-of-money-in-retirement">How to Make Sure You Don&#039;t Run Out of Money in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment arrogance confidence fees rebalancing risk stock markets stocks taxes trading Wed, 26 Jul 2017 08:00:17 +0000 Tim Lemke 1988261 at http://www.wisebread.com Is Dollar Cost Averaging the Right Strategy for You? http://www.wisebread.com/is-dollar-cost-averaging-the-right-strategy-for-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/is-dollar-cost-averaging-the-right-strategy-for-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/saving_money_and_banking_for_finance_concept.jpg" alt="Saving money and banking for finance concept" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You've just received a bonus or an inheritance, and you know that investing your money in stocks and bonds is one of the best ways to create long-term wealth. But you're also worried that your investments might lose value instead of gaining it.</p> <p>It's a common struggle: You want the financial rewards that can come with investing, but the potential risk of losing money nags at you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-over-these-5-scary-things-about-investing?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Get Over These 5 Scary Things About Investing</a>)</p> <p>An investing strategy known as dollar cost averaging might be the answer.</p> <h2>What is dollar cost averaging?</h2> <p>In dollar cost averaging, you invest just a small chunk of money at a time. This differs from the more traditional approach to investing, in which you'd invest all the money that you've targeted for stocks, bonds, or real estate at the same time.</p> <p>Say you've inherited $6,000. You'd like to invest that money in the stock market so that it will grow over time. If you were investing in the traditional way, you'd invest that money all at once. With dollar cost averaging, though, you would invest more gradually, perhaps investing $500 each month throughout the course of a year. That way, you'd buy more stocks when prices are low, and fewer stocks when they're high. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-investing-questions-youre-too-embarrassed-to-ask?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Investing Questions You're Too Embarrassed to Ask</a>)</p> <p>The main benefit of dollar cost averaging is that it reduces your financial risk. Say you invested all that money in stocks at once. A market crash three months later would then impact all your money. But if you'd just invested, say, $1,500 before the market crashed, you'd still have $4,500 of your original $6,000 left untouched by the financial turbulence.</p> <h2>Paycheck contributions versus lump sum investing</h2> <p>If you contribute the same amount to your 401(k) every paycheck, that's equivalent to dollar cost averaging. By default, most people have the same amount deducted from their paycheck each month, so there is no choice to make. Dollar cost averaging, however, usually refers to a choice the investor makes when they've got a lump sum of money, such as an inheritance, royalty check, or bonus. If you don't have a windfall of some sort, you usually don't have to worry about whether or not to do dollar cost averaging.</p> <h2>Pros and cons</h2> <p>The main advantage of dollar cost averaging is the reduced risk of losing as much money in a market downturn. But there's another advantage, too: Dollar cost averaging makes it easier for reluctant investors to enter the market.</p> <p>If you're hesitant about investing, you might find it easier to take the jump if you are investing a smaller amount of money. And that's a good thing: Over time, the stock market has tended to increase in value. If you don't invest, you won't get the chance to take advantage of this.</p> <p>Anything that encourages you to invest &mdash; such as dollar cost averaging &mdash; is a positive.</p> <p>There is a drawback, though, to this approach: By limiting your risk, you are also limiting the potential size of your financial rewards.</p> <p>Because the stock market has historically increased in value over time, the odds are that you'll make more money if you invest a larger sum all at once. The sooner you invest the money, the more time it has to grow. By contrast, if you invest smaller bits of money over time, you will tend to see smaller returns in what has historically been an upward-trending market.</p> <p>A recent study by Vanguard illustrates this. Vanguard studied whether people would see higher returns by <a href="https://personal.vanguard.com/pdf/ISGDCA.pdf" target="_blank">investing a large sum of cash</a> all at once or in smaller doses over a six-month period into a portfolio of 60 percent stocks and 40 percent bonds. They found that investing the lump sum of cash all at once produced higher returns about two-thirds of the time. The longer the investment period, the higher the chance that the lump sum investment would outperform the dollar cost averaging strategy. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-basics-of-asset-allocation?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Basics of Asset Allocation</a>)</p> <p>You'll have to decide whether the reduced risk outweighs the potential of losing out on bigger returns.</p> <p>Of course, it's most important that you do invest your money over the long term. And if dollar cost averaging, and the reduced risk that comes with it, is what encourages you to do this, then it might be the best approach for you.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fis-dollar-cost-averaging-the-right-strategy-for-you&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FIs%2520Dollar%2520Cost%2520Averaging%2520the%2520Right%2520Strategy%2520for%2520You-.jpg&amp;description=Is%20Dollar%20Cost%20Averaging%20the%20Right%20Strategy%20for%20You%3F"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Is%20Dollar%20Cost%20Averaging%20the%20Right%20Strategy%20for%20You-.jpg" alt="Is Dollar Cost Averaging the Right Strategy for You?" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-dollar-cost-averaging-the-right-strategy-for-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you">8 Types of Investors — Which One Are You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/want-your-investments-to-do-better-stop-watching-the-news">Want Your Investments to Do Better? Stop Watching the News</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-millennials-should-stop-being-afraid-of-the-stock-market">7 Reasons Millennials Should Stop Being Afraid of the Stock Market</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-stocks-that-are-actually-having-a-good-year">10 Stocks That Are Actually Having a Good Year</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment dollar cost averaging growth inheritances lump sums returns risk stock market Mon, 24 Jul 2017 08:30:14 +0000 Dan Rafter 1986884 at http://www.wisebread.com Your Loss Aversion Is Costing You More Than Your FOMO http://www.wisebread.com/your-loss-aversion-is-costing-you-more-than-your-fomo <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/your-loss-aversion-is-costing-you-more-than-your-fomo" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-585490666.jpg" alt="Person learning why loss aversion is worse than FOMO" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Imagine the following scenario:</p> <p>You can either pocket a guaranteed $500, or flip a coin. If you get heads, you get $1,000. If you get tails, you get nothing.</p> <p>Now, imagine this second scenario:</p> <p>You are given $1,000 &mdash; woohoo! But you have to decide whether you'll lose $500 of it outright, or flip a coin. If you get heads, you lose nothing. If you get tails, you lose $750.</p> <p>Chances are, in scenario one, you chose to pocket the money, whereas in scenario two, you chose to flip the coin.</p> <h2>How did you know that!?</h2> <p>That's because we feel the pain of losing money so much more than we feel the joy of earning a reward. This trend is called &quot;loss aversion,&quot; but, in everyday terms, you might find it a bit familiar to FOMO: the fear of missing out.</p> <p>FOMO tends to describe the pain of seeing your friends on social media doing fun things and achieving their goals while you're left out. In a way, loss aversion is similar because you're afraid to lose out, but the pain might be a bit deeper with money.</p> <p>It might sound ludicrous that we hurt more when we lose money than we feel joy in earning it. But studies have shown we feel the heartbreak of a financial loss <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/~kahneman/docs/Publications/prospect_theory.pdf" target="_blank">twice as strongly</a> as we feel gaining the same amount of money. So, if you get a $500 bonus from your boss, you'll only be half as emotional as you would be losing that same amount on the stock market.</p> <h2>How might this affect me?</h2> <p>Loss aversion can be both good and bad. For starters, it might lead you to make &quot;safe,&quot; low-risk investments. This turns out to be helpful for investments you <em>have </em>to make, such as your retirement fund. Sure, you could put your life savings into a high-risk scheme, potentially multiply it several times over, and retire in riches &mdash; but you might also lose it all. It's often better to choose something with a low rate of risk so you have a healthy sum of money to live off one day.</p> <p>On the opposite side of the coin, loss aversion can cause you to make rash decisions regarding the stocks and investments you hold. For example, if you're an investor in oil-related stocks and have a meltdown every time oil prices drop, you might be inclined to sell off all your stocks and stop the loss as quickly as possible. While this may be a good decision in certain situations, it's always important to remember that what goes down will likely go up again, and holding onto your stock could mean you'll get it back later. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/want-your-investments-to-do-better-stop-watching-the-news?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Want Your Investments to Do Better? Stop Watching the News</a>)</p> <p>Now, that concerns a drop to the market overall. The other potential pitfall of loss aversion is to hold onto stocks that have been underperforming for <em>way </em>too long. Many investors will sell stocks that appear to be at the top of their game, only to find out later that they've continued to grow. Meanwhile, the stocks they're waiting to see flourish continue to underperform, and they lose money in the long run.</p> <h2>How can I avoid falling into this trap?</h2> <p>One of the best ways to make sure you don't feel the pain of loss &mdash; or loss aversion &mdash; is to diversify your portfolio. In other words, don't put all of your eggs in one basket: Invest in different industries, different types of stocks, and in both short- and long-term investments.</p> <p>If you're going to make a &quot;risky&quot; investment, make sure you're ready for the challenge. Prepare yourself by building your confidence and learning more about what it means to invest in whatever you're considering. Come up with a fallback plan. You've heard it before, and it's worth repeating: risk equals reward. Yes, you might lose, and that'll hurt &mdash; but you might also gain big. If that's worth the leap, then it's time to get off the ground.</p> <p>If all else fails, talk to a professional about your options. Yes, you might have to throw him or her a bit of money in order to receive financial advice. But having a professional tell you the best, most secure way to invest your money might help ease your mind &mdash; and increase your dividends &mdash; without breaking the bank or your heart along the way. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-surprising-truth-of-investing-mediocre-advice-is-best?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Surprising Truth of Investing: Mediocre Advice Is Best</a>)</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/anum-yoon">Anum Yoon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-loss-aversion-is-costing-you-more-than-your-fomo">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/want-your-investments-to-do-better-stop-watching-the-news">Want Your Investments to Do Better? Stop Watching the News</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-mental-bias-is-harming-your-investments">This One Mental Bias Is Harming Your Investments</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essentials-for-building-a-profitable-portfolio">5 Essentials for Building a Profitable Portfolio</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-3-rules-every-mediocre-investor-must-know">The 3 Rules Every Mediocre Investor Must Know</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment advice fear FOMO gains losing money loss aversion market drops risk stock market Wed, 05 Apr 2017 08:00:10 +0000 Anum Yoon 1921000 at http://www.wisebread.com