saving energy http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/9190/all en-US 15 Easy Ways to Lower Your Electric Bill http://www.wisebread.com/15-easy-ways-to-lower-your-electric-bill <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/15-easy-ways-to-lower-your-electric-bill" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/piggy-bank-470351123.jpg" alt="piggy bank" title="piggy bank" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>My family is looking to move into a new house in the near future. With all the added rooms and exciting DIY projects on the horizon, I realize we'll also need to more carefully watch our utilities costs. More space equals more places to heat, plug in lamps, and otherwise use electricity. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-win-the-war-against-this-summers-electric-bill?ref=seealso">4 Ways to Win the War With Your Electric Bill This Summer</a>)</p> <p>Whether you live in a small studio apartment or a sprawling McMansion, there are some smart, easy ways you can cut down on your electric bill. And many of these tips are things you can implement today to garner savings immediately. As always, if you have more tips to share, please leave them in the comments!</p> <h2>1. Open and Close</h2> <p>For some of us, switching on lights is more habit than necessity. So, in the daylight, avoid using lamps and other illuminating devices. Instead, open blinds to let the sun flood in. On the other hand, you can keep a home considerably cooler on hot days by closing curtains. I know this from personal experience! Before hitting high on your AC unit, you might want to try this trick.</p> <h2>2. Set the Bar</h2> <p>Have you looked at your water heater lately? Chances are your temperature might be set above the energy efficient suggestion of <a href="http://www.treehugger.com/clean-water/does-turning-down-my-water-heater-really-make-a-difference.html">120 degrees</a> (or often marked &quot;warm&quot; or as a triangle on your heater's settings). If you need scalding hot water for tea or cooking, heat it on the stove.</p> <h2>3. Maintain It</h2> <p>Something as silly as a dirty furnace filter can cost you money when it comes to heating costs. The same goes with any other machine or component you must maintain. Plus, keeping your operations up-to-date is safer than neglecting them, and it may extend the life of the appliance &mdash; meaning even bigger savings. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-your-fridge-last-almost-forever-with-these-8-tips?ref=seealso)">Make Your Fridge Last Forever</a>)</p> <h2>4. Unplug Yourself</h2> <p>This tip is twofold: Unplug your electronics when they're not in use &mdash; including battery chargers and power adapters &mdash; they still suck power from outlets and power strips even when off. Better yet, truly unplug by heading outdoors to read a book or to exercise. Totally free!</p> <h2>5. Negotiate</h2> <p>Take stock of your bills from the past year and see if you can strike a deal with your provider(s). You may also explore spreading out your costs so they are the same each month versus fluctuating seasonally to help make your budget more predictable. Don't be shy to shop around if there's more than one electric provider in your area.</p> <h2>6. Shift Your Day</h2> <p>While you're at it, ask your provider if there are &quot;off peak&quot; or &quot;time-of-use&quot; rates or times of the day when electricity costs less. You can choose to do your laundry, blow-dry your hair, cook a great meal, wash your dishes, or do any other task at the cheaper rate.</p> <h2>7. Slow the Flow</h2> <p>I think we all remember the &quot;<a href="http://www.seinfeldscripts.com/TheShowerhead.htm">Seinfeld&quot; episode</a> with the superintendent switches out the showerheads to low flow. If you're really into pinching pennies, swapping yours out can mean <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ethicallivingblog/2008/mar/14/switchtolowflowshowerheads">less water to heat</a> over the course of your shower. Limiting yourself to a shorter shower, too, is another drop in the bucket.</p> <h2>8. Upgrade Your Thermostat</h2> <p>When we had to upgrade to a new furnace (ouch!), our contractor also updated us to a programmable thermostat. By setting designated temperatures for night and day, we have definitely saved money. Plus, now I don't have to remember to adjust the temperature every night before bed.</p> <h2>9. Survey Bulbs</h2> <p>By now I think most of us are familiar with compact fluorescent bulbs as a great alternative to conventional incandescents. But did you know there are other energy efficient options like LED? A little extra money up front can mean <a href="http://www.energystar.gov/certified-products/detail/light_bulbs">up to $40 to $135 per bulb</a> over a bulb's lifetime.</p> <h2>10. Put Your Laptop to Sleep</h2> <p>Enable your computer's energy savings features, they could save you upwards of <a href="http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/energy-efficient-computer-use">$30 each year</a> on electricity costs per computer. Sounds like an insignificant amount, but it's still your money and a super simple fix.</p> <h2>11. Put a Damper on Things</h2> <p>If your home features a fireplace, be sure to close the flue when its not in use. Otherwise the outdoor air, whether hot or cold, will infiltrate your home and suck energy (to adjust your home's temperature) along with it.</p> <h2>12. Fan Yourself</h2> <p>No matter the time of year, ceiling fans can be useful for inexpensive temperature control. In the summer, run them on low to keep air flow up and air-conditioning costs down. In the winter, use the switch to reverse the blades to draw warm air down into a room from the ceiling.</p> <h2>13. Cook Smart (I)</h2> <p>Use the correct sized burners when heating up a tea kettle or dinner on the stove. For example, using a &quot;six-inch pan on an eight-inch electric burner can waste <a href="http://www.consumerenergycenter.org/residential/appliances/ranges.html">more than 40%</a> of the heat produced.&quot;</p> <h2>14. Cook Smart (II)</h2> <p>While you're at it, resist the urge to check on baked goods by opening the door, which can drop the temperature by <a href="http://www.consumerenergycenter.org/residential/appliances/ranges.html">up to 25 degrees</a>. If you need to use your appliance's self-cleaning option, try planning it after cooking a meal to use less energy heating to the highest temperatures.</p> <h2>15. Switch It Off</h2> <p>And one of the simplest ways to save money on your electric bill is to always remember to turn off lights or other electronic devices when you're leaving a room. It sounds ridiculously easy, but it can take some getting used to for the whole family. You may wish to place a reminder note at each switch as a first step in the right direction.</p> <p><em>How do you conserve energy and keep your electric bill in check? Please share in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-marcin">Ashley Marcin</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-easy-ways-to-lower-your-electric-bill">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/youre-washing-your-clothes-too-often-what-to-do-instead">You&#039;re Washing Your Clothes Too Often! (What to Do Instead)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-youre-wasting-electricity-without-realizing-it">8 Ways You&#039;re Wasting Electricity Without Realizing It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-lower-winter-energy-costs">7 Easy Ways to Lower Winter Energy Costs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-monthly-bills-you-can-slash">10 Monthly Bills You Can Slash</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-money-will-you-save-with-energy-star-appliances">How Much Money Will You Save With Energy Star Appliances?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Home conservation electric bill saving energy utilities Tue, 27 May 2014 08:12:24 +0000 Ashley Marcin 1140317 at http://www.wisebread.com The 5 Best Energy Efficient Light Bulbs http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-energy-efficient-light-bulbs <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-5-best-energy-efficient-light-bulbs" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/bulb-81266198.jpg" alt="light bulb" title="light bulb" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>With the gradual phasing out of incandescent light bulbs, folks looking to illuminate their households need to look toward more energy efficient light bulbs in order to do the job. Fortunately, energy efficient bulbs are not only good for the environment, they&#39;re also good for your wallet; the average compact fluorescent light bulb will save you about $6 per year per light bulb. Here to help you choose which bulb to buy is our list of the top five energy efficient light bulbs.</p> <h2>What Is an Energy Efficient Light Bulb?</h2> <p>The most energy efficient light bulbs are compact fluorescent light bulbs, or CFLs, and LED bulbs. CFLs use mercury to cause a phosphor coating on the inside of the bulb of fluoresce, thereby producing light, while LED bulbs use light-emitting diodes as their light source. While LEDs last significantly longer than CFLs (up to 20+ years under ideal conditions), their higher cost means that, for the most part, CFLs still maintain the best cost-utility ratio. However, the use of mercury and other chemicals require that CFLs be disposed of separately from other waste, so LED bulbs may very well take over in the future as they become brighter and less costly.</p> <h2>Best 5 Energy Efficient Light Bulbs</h2> <h3><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00A9V7RA6/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00A9V7RA6&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=bguidelink-20"><img alt="" src="http://static1.killeraces.com/files/fruganomics/u784/bulb-Utilitech.jpg" style="width: 250px; height: 250px; float: right;" /></a>Utilitech 100W Soft White CFL</h3> <p>Recommended by Consumer Reports, this <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00A9V7RA6/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00A9V7RA6&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=bguidelink-20">Utilitech CFL bulb</a> produces the same amount of light as a 100 watt incandescent light bulb, but uses only 23W to do so. Users agree that it produces a great, cool color that mimics natural daylight. Under ideal conditions, this bulb can last up to 10,000 hours, which means it has a longevity of about nine years if you use it for about three hours a day.</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00A9V7RA6/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00A9V7RA6&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=bguidelink-20">Currently $39.99 on Amazon for a pack of 4.</a></em></p> <h3><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006OTAE8Y/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B006OTAE8Y&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=bguidelink-20"><img alt="" src="http://static1.killeraces.com/files/fruganomics/u784/bulb-Philips.jpg" style="width: 250px; height: 250px; float: right;" /></a>Philips A21 75W Soft White LED Light Bulb</h3> <p>Another bulb recommended by Consumer Reports, the <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006OTAE8Y/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B006OTAE8Y&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=bguidelink-20">Philips A21 LED light bulb</a> generates the equivalent of 75W on an incandescent bulb using only 17W, making it brighter than the 60W-equivalent bulbs out on the market. Because this is an LED light bulb and not a CFL, it casts the full extent of its light the moment it turns on instead of requiring additional time to fully brighten. Under ideal conditions, this bulb can last up to 23 years when used three hours a day.</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006OTAE8Y/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B006OTAE8Y&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=bguidelink-20">Currently $45.46 on Amazon.</a></em></p> <h3><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00424RC9M/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00424RC9M&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=bguidelink-20"><img alt="" src="http://static1.killeraces.com/files/fruganomics/u784/bulb-EcoSmartCFL.jpg" style="width: 250px; height: 250px; float: right;" /></a>EcoSmart 60W Soft White CFL</h3> <p>This <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00424RC9M/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00424RC9M&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=bguidelink-20">EcoSmart CFL</a> is a 60W-equivalent light bulb that uses only 14W. Users state that this bulb produces a warmer light than many other CFLs, which replicate the 5000K natural daylight. Longevity tests also rate this bulb well, with a lifespan of nine years when used three hours a day. And while all CFLs have mercury, this bulb carries less than the acceptable level of mercury in a CFL, making it all the more safe for your home.</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00424RC9M/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00424RC9M&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=bguidelink-20">Currently $7.19 on Amazon for a pack of 4.</a></em></p> <h3><img alt="" src="http://static1.killeraces.com/files/fruganomics/u784/bulb-EcoSmartLED.jpg" style="width: 250px; height: 250px; float: right;" />EcoSmart 13-Watt (60W) LED Light Bulb</h3> <p>Another EcoSmart light bulb makes the list, this one recommended by Good Housekeeping. This 60W-equivalent LED light bulb uses 13W of energy to produce a daylight white light. Being an LED makes this light bulb dimmable as well as gives it spectacular longevity. At three hours a day, this bulb will last you approximately 23 years.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000NISDNU/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000NISDNU&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=bguidelink-20"><img alt="" src="http://static1.killeraces.com/files/fruganomics/u784/bulb-GECFL.jpg" style="width: 250px; height: 250px; float: right;" /></a>GE 13-Watt Energy SmartTM CFL</h3> <p>This <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000NISDNU/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000NISDNU&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=bguidelink-20">CFL bulb from GE</a> is another 60W-equivalent light bulb that uses 13W to produce its light. With a light output of 2,700K, the light produced from these bulbs are a bit warmer than many of the other bulbs on this list and is closest to the traditional incandescent light bulb. This bulb has a lifespan of about 8,000 hours making it the shortest of the bulbs on this list, but still significantly higher than incandescent bulbs.</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000NISDNU/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000NISDNU&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=bguidelink-20">Currently $10.48 on Amazon for a pack of 8.</a></em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jeffrey-pu">Jeffrey Pu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-energy-efficient-light-bulbs">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-all-purpose-cleaners">The 5 Best All-Purpose Cleaners</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-food-choppers">The 5 Best Food Choppers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-smartphones">The 5 Best Smartphones</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-mattresses">The 5 Best Mattresses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-led-monitors">The 5 Best LED Monitors</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Shopping Buying Guides buying guides light bulbs saving energy Wed, 08 Jan 2014 10:25:20 +0000 Jeffrey Pu 1105393 at http://www.wisebread.com Wear Frozen Clothes and 9 Other Ways to Beat the Heat http://www.wisebread.com/wear-frozen-clothes-and-9-other-ways-to-beat-the-heat <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/wear-frozen-clothes-and-9-other-ways-to-beat-the-heat" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/cold-4767152-small.jpg" alt="frozen clothes" title="frozen clothes" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>With heat waves sweeping across the U.S. and other countries, you&rsquo;re probably feeling hot right about now. So am I. But before you reach for the air conditioner switch, resist the call for instant gratification and try out these energy-saving methods for cooling off. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-places-to-go-to-beat-the-summer-heat">9 Places to Go to Beat the Summer Heat</a>)</p> <h2>1. Wear Frozen Clothing</h2> <p>Weird, right? Placing your clothes in the freezer <a href="http://gizmodo.com/5857596/sorry-levis-freezing-your-jeans-will-not-ungross-them">won&rsquo;t clean them</a>, but it should cool off your threads and, by extension, you. Drop your clothes in a large ziplock bag to keep from mixing with the food. I haven't actually tried this myself, but it seems workable in theory; surely it's more cost effective than standing in front of the fridge with the freezer door open.</p> <h2>2. Wear Loose Clothing</h2> <p>Sweat evaporation cools you off. What helps sweat evaporation? Air circulation. What increases air circulation against your skin? Loose clothing. It&rsquo;s especially important to wear light and loose clothing if you live in a humid area, where your sweat can evaporate very slowly. Go with a breathable fabric, like cotton.</p> <h2>3. Cool Your Pulse Points</h2> <p>You can <a href="http://lifehacker.com/5571072/know-your-bodys-cooling-spots">target your body's pulse points to cool off</a> because your blood vessels are close to the surface of your skin in those areas. A cold, wet towel against your neck should do quite nicely!</p> <p>You can also cool all your pulse points at once by taking a cold shower. Granted, the initial shock of ice cold water can be quite, well, shocking. I usually start at slightly cooler than lukewarm, then slowly turn the knob over to as cold as I can stand before my teeth start to chatter. The resulting cold shower is simply divine.</p> <h2>4. Use a Programmable Thermostat</h2> <p>A programmable thermostat will help you control your impulses &mdash; no turning on the A/C willy-nilly as soon as you feel a tad warm &mdash; and it will automatically turn off the cooling even if you forget to. The goal is to have a good stretch of time each day when the air conditioner doesn't kick on at all. According to the <a href="http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/tips-programmable-thermostats">U.S. Department of Energy</a>, &quot;You can save as much as 10% a year on heating and cooling by simply turning your thermostat back 7&deg;-10&deg;F for 8 hours a day from its normal setting.&quot;</p> <p>One high tech option is the <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009GDHYPQ/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B009GDHYPQ&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20" target="blank">Nest Learning Thermostat</a>. Once it&rsquo;s connected to your home Wi-Fi, you can change the temperature, adjust your settings and schedules, check how much energy you&rsquo;re saving &mdash; all from your smartphone, tablet, or laptop. With its activity sensors, it knows to go into energy-saving mode when no one is home. About a week after installation, the Nest will develop a personalized schedule to reflect your preferences and habits. Plus, it will continue to adapt as the season changes. Pretty neat, huh?</p> <h2>5. Open and Close Windows Wisely</h2> <p>For a low-tech approach to cooling, be judicious about your window-opening. Keep them closed during the day, especially during the peak heat hours of 10 a.m. to whenever it doesn't feel like you'll melt if you walk to the mailbox. While you're at it, draw close the curtains, too, to keep the sunlight at bay. Only open your windows a crack if there's a breeze to help with airflow, and make sure to close them when the breeze drops.</p> <p>Once the sun begins to set, though, and it starts to get cooler outside &mdash; go wild. Open your windows with abandon. Let out the trapped warmth and enjoy the (hopefully) relatively cooler night air while you can... because come the next morning, the cycle begins anew.</p> <h2>6. Avoid Hot Things</h2> <p>Sounds like a no-brainer, right? But you'd be surprised how much heat our everyday machines give off. Be aware of what machines and appliances give off significant amounts of heat, and try not to power them for so long that they warm up the room. Even if you're not wrapped around a laptop, some computers and game consoles can get pretty warm if they're on long enough. And don't get me started about the oven! Mostly because I don't want to go there &mdash; I love baking! But I try not to do any baking when it&rsquo;s super hot out; we definitely don&rsquo;t need the extra heat inside.</p> <h2>7. Eat Cold Things</h2> <p>This is one of my favorite anti-hot options. From iced drinks to ice cream and frozen yogurt to frozen fruit, I love the way the chill follows the food down my throat to my belly. I like my <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/cold-frugal-drinks-to-keep-you-cool-in-the-heat">cold drinks</a> thick, like slushies or milkshakes, or with something chewable for my mouth to work on, such as boba (tapioca balls, commonly found in milk teas); the semi-solids keep me from downing the entire thing in under a minute. To stay hydrated, though, a cold glass of water is the best way to go.</p> <h2>8. Use Ceiling Fans</h2> <p>Use ceiling fans to increase the air circulation of a room &mdash; but make sure the blades are turning counterclockwise when you look up. You want the air to come down at you from above. While a spinning fan doesn&rsquo;t <em>actually</em> decrease the temperature of room, the airflow creates a wind-chill effect that makes you <em>feel</em> cooler as the sweat on your skin evaporates and your body sheds the heat. But don&rsquo;t leave it on when there&rsquo;s no one in the room; it's only effective as a cooling method if someone is there to feel it.</p> <p>No ceiling fan? No problem. Grab a stand-alone fan, plop it in front of you, and enjoy. For some serious cooling, spritz yourself with some water as the fan runs.</p> <h2>9. Play in the Water</h2> <p>You don't have to be a kid to play in the water. No one will judge you, not in this heat! (And who cares if they do? Water is fun!) Look for parks with sprinklers or water play areas. For some wet and wild fun at home, blow up an inflatable pool or run across the glorious path of a hose when your lawn needs watering. I guess you could just jump into the nearest available swimming pool, too.</p> <h2>10. Borrow A/C</h2> <p>Whether you don't have A/C or just want to save electricity at home, you can always share someone else's A/C. Coffee shops and discount theaters are great places to linger a few hours without needing to spend a lot &mdash; even an indoor shopping mall will work if you're careful with your wallet. However, my favorite by far is the library, where it's always free, and there's always something to do. In fact, many libraries are also cooling centers, where people can go for some A/C, water, and sometimes even medical attention. Check with your city or community center to find one near you.</p> <p><em>What energy-efficient strategies do you use to cool off?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/wear-frozen-clothes-and-9-other-ways-to-beat-the-heat">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-big-of-a-house-do-you-really-need">How Big of a House Do You Really Need?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/cold-frugal-drinks-to-keep-you-cool-in-the-heat">Cold, Frugal Drinks to Keep You Cool in the Heat</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-win-the-war-against-this-summers-electric-bill">4 Ways to Win the War Against This Summer’s Electric Bill</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/51-uses-for-coca-cola-the-ultimate-list">51 Uses for Coca-Cola – the Ultimate List</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-cheap-and-easy-homemade-mosquito-repellents">4 Cheap and Easy Homemade Mosquito Repellents</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living cooling saving energy summer Thu, 01 Aug 2013 10:36:38 +0000 Amy Lu 980836 at http://www.wisebread.com How Much Money Will You Save With Energy Star Appliances? http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-money-will-you-save-with-energy-star-appliances <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-much-money-will-you-save-with-energy-star-appliances" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/5301593772_e3ba5eb9fc_z.jpg" alt="energy star" title="energy star" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last week, we wrote about the <a title="Energy Hogs Hiding in Your Home" href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-deadly-energy-sinners-the-energy-hogs-hiding-in-your-home">power hogs that hide in your home</a>, trampling all over your wallet while making your carbon footprint way too fat. This week we'll concentrate on how, going forward, you can combat your energy costs by purchasing Energy Star products. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-save-water-energy-money-the-world-in-one-afternoon" title="5 Ways to Save Water, Energy, Money, and the World in One Afternoon">5 Ways to Save Water, Energy, Money, and the World in One Afternoon</a>)</p> <p>While energy-efficient <a title="appliance deals" href="http://dealnews.com/c304/Home-Garden/Appliances?eref=wisebread">appliances</a> can save you money through usage, few people realize that you can get a tidy refund via a tax credit (after the proper IRS paperwork), too! And though it's too late to claim such a credit on last year's taxes, you can start planning for a payoff on this year's, by purchasing an Energy Star appliance. Here is what you need to know about the savings can you expect when it comes to Energy Star products.</p> <h3>What Is Energy Star?</h3> <p>A joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy, <a title="About Energy Star" href="http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=about.ab_index">Energy Star designates energy efficient products and practices</a>. Besides household products and appliances, Energy Star extends its designations into home construction itself, meaning that a new home can earn an Energy Star seal. Thanks to Energy Star, Americans saved enough power in 2010 to prevent greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to those from 33 million cars &mdash; all while saving nearly $18 billion on their utility bills.</p> <h3>How Much Money Will Energy Star Appliances Save Me?</h3> <p>The operating costs of many Energy Star appliances are printed on their labels, though it helps to know how much your old appliances used in order to gain a proper perspective. As mentioned last week, old refrigerators are often the biggest energy offenders, wasting up to three times as much energy as new ones. (You can calculate your savings with this <a title="refrigerator retirement savings calculator" href="http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=refrig.calculator">refrigerator retirement savings calculator</a>). Of course, Energy Star appliances run the gamut from air conditioners to lawn care tools. There are, of course, <a title="Energy Star products" href="http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=products.pr_find_es_products">general guidelines for how much an Energy Star product can save your household</a>, as compared to a non-Energy Star model.</p> <p>For perspective, here are some <a title="pros and cons of Energy Star products" href="http://www.servicemagic.com/article.show.Pros-Costs-and-Cons-Energy-Star-Appliances.16819.html">figures from the National Resource Defense Council</a>, courtesy of servicemagic.com. Replacing a 1980s model refrigerator with, perhaps, this <a title="Whirlpool refrigerator" href="http://dealnews.com/prices.html?avux=2018447&amp;a=558643&amp;k=WyJTaG9wcGluZ0NvbSIsIjk1MDQ3MDQ1IiwiOTA0NSIsIjE4ODkiXQ%3D%3D">Whirlpool 21.9-Cubic Foot Bottom-Freezer Refrigerator</a> from Abt Electronics can save you $100 a year in total energy costs. Replacing a pre-1994 clothes washer will save you as much as $110 a year; and a new, Energy Star dishwasher &mdash; like the <a title="Whirlpool dishwasher" href="http://www.pcrichard.com/catalog/product.jsp?modelNo=DU1055XTVS" class="image_link">Whirlpool Super Capacity Tall Tub Stainless Steel Built-In Dishwasher</a> &mdash; will save you about $25 per year. Multiply those savings over an appliance's 20-year lifetime, and you're talking thousands of dollars of potential cost reduction.</p> <h3>How Do Energy Star Tax Credits Work?</h3> <p>Tax credits are still available for consumers who purchased home improvement items in 2011, so if you splurged on some new windows or an air conditioner for the holidays, you're in luck. These tax-deductible goods include biomass stoves; heating, ventilating, and air conditioning; insulation; roofs (Metal &amp; Asphalt); water heaters (non-solar); and windows and doors. The tax credit for these items is, on average, 10% of cost, and up to a cumulative deduction of $500. The tax credit applies only to an existing home or your principal residence; new construction and rentals do not qualify. To apply for the tax credits for 2011 purchases, you'll need to file <a title="IRS Form 5695" href="http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f5695.pdf">IRS Form 5695</a> for Residential Energy Credits, a five-page attachment that your accountant or tax preparer can fill out easily with the proper receipts and documentation.</p> <h3>What's Changing for the 2012 Tax Year?</h3> <p>Unfortunately, some of the best Energy Star tax credits expired on January 1, 2012, including those that allowed folks to claim up to 30% of improvements like a new roof or hot water heater. However, through December 31, 2016, you'll be able to claim 30% of your costs (with no upper limit) on geothermal heat pumps, small, residential wind turbines, and solar energy systems. Existing homes and new construction qualify, as do principal residences and second homes, though rentals do not. What's more, homeowners can also earn a credit of up to <a title="energy efficiency tax credits" href="http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=tax_credits.tx_index">30% of the cost of residential fuel cells</a> (up to $500 per .5kW of power capacity), through the end of 2016.</p> <p>If you want to know how much a solar or wind system might cost to install, check out the handy cost estimator at <a title="SolarEstimate.org" href="http://www.find-solar.org/index.php">SolarEstimate.org</a>. Entering my ZIP code in Cook County, IL, along with some basic information on my electric bill, I learned that a solar system would be a &quot;good&quot; bet based on my area's solar rating, and that the total cost of a system would run about $17,700, after the $7,590 tax credit is applied. That's a large up-front cost, but long-term energy savings can be substantial; with a handy graphic it's estimated that I'd break even in 12 years &mdash; and be $20,000 <em>ahead</em> in 24 years.</p> <h3>What's the Bottom Line on Energy Star?</h3> <p>Appliances that earn an Energy Star rating may cost a bit more upfront, but in an overwhelming majority of cases, their operating costs yield big savings over the lifetimes of the products. And while you can't bank on the government bringing back the now-expired 2011 tax credits, anything is possible in an election year, especially when energy costs are an important voter issue. Regardless, the facts show that Energy Star is working for the betterment of the environment while simultaneously lowering electric bills. Even in our fractured political climate, that's a platform everyone can agree upon &mdash; and incentive enough for all of us to make some major changes around the house not just in 2012, but also in the years to come as well.</p> <p>This is a guest post by <a href="http://dealnews.com/features/How-Much-Money-Will-You-Save-With-Energy-Star-Appliances-/558643.html">Dealnews</a>.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-blog-teaser"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> While it might seem smarter to stick with older appliances, stocking your home with Energy Star appliances can save you major cash in the long run. </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dealnews">Dealnews</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-money-will-you-save-with-energy-star-appliances">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-simple-ways-to-make-your-refrigerator-more-efficient">8 Simple Ways to Make Your Refrigerator More Efficient</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-low-flow-shower-head-get-640-roi-in-one-year">The Low-Flow Shower Head: Get 640% ROI in One Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-clean-your-dishwasher">How to Clean Your Dishwasher</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-your-dishwasher-last-almost-forever-with-these-6-tricks">Make Your Dishwasher Last (Almost) Forever With These 6 Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-cheap-and-easy-homemade-mosquito-repellents">4 Cheap and Easy Homemade Mosquito Repellents</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Green Living Home appliances dishwasher energy star refrigerator saving energy tax credits Mon, 19 Mar 2012 09:48:19 +0000 Dealnews 911581 at http://www.wisebread.com 19 Tips to Cut Costs by Using Your Oven Efficiently http://www.wisebread.com/19-tips-to-cut-costs-by-using-your-oven-efficiently <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/19-tips-to-cut-costs-by-using-your-oven-efficiently" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/oven-3141270-small.jpg" alt="oven" title="oven" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Saving money is made all the sweeter when you also rest assured that you did your part to <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wisebread.com/hands-in-your-pocket-the-cost-of-standby-power-environmental-and-otherwise">save power</a> and energy. And although using the oven is not nearly as efficient as sticking to the stove-top, sometimes you just have to bake that casserole or cake. So take a look at these 19 tips to help you maximize your oven&rsquo;s energy-efficiency, as well as to cut your cooking costs.</p> <h2>Multitask</h2> <p>Your oven is pretty big, and probably has multiple racks. So make the most of your cost of power by chucking more than one thing in the oven. For example, baked or roasted potatoes are a good match for that meatloaf, along with a tray of vegetables for roasting. Or if you&rsquo;re an irreverent baker like me, you can throw dessert in while dinner is cooking.</p> <h2>Jump the Gun</h2> <p>With the exception of certain baking items, temperature can be pretty negotiable. So instead of waiting until the oven is fully preheated, use the oven to warm up some part of the meal or get a head start on the cooking.</p> <h2>No Peeking!</h2> <p>Resist the urge to open the oven door, especially while baking, since you lose a disproportionate amount of heat (approximately 25 degrees) in doing so. Instead, stick to your timer, the oven light, and your nose to see if it&rsquo;s done.</p> <h2>Know Which Rack to Use</h2> <p>Don&rsquo;t be afraid to move the oven racks around, and to arrange your food accordingly.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Top Rack:</strong> Watch anything on the top rack, since it is meant for high-temperature and quick cooking.</li> <li><strong>Middle Rack:</strong> Best for moderate temperature cooking.</li> <li><strong>Bottom Rack:</strong> Use this for slow cooking and low temperatures.</li> </ul> <h2>Go Convection</h2> <p>You can <strong>save 20% of your oven-related energy costs</strong> by using a convection oven, which utilizes a fan to force the hot air around the oven. Not only does this mean shorter cooking times and lower temperatures, but your food will cook more evenly too.</p> <h2>Keep It Clean</h2> <p>Similar to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/household-cleaning-hacks-that-save-you-money">cleaning the back of your fridge</a>, keeping your oven sparkly clean will direct the heat at your food and not the burnt stuff caked to the bottom. Keeping it clean also ensures that it&rsquo;s easier to clean each time (saving your own energy and the cost of caustic cleaning products), and keeps your home smelling like what&rsquo;s cooking, instead of what burnt last week.</p> <h2>Use Efficient Baking Dishes</h2> <p><strong>Glass or ceramic baking dishes</strong> hold heat much better than their metal counterparts, so you can turn down the temperature up to 25 degrees and the food will cook just as quickly. (The same applies for cooking with glassware on the stovetop too).</p> <h2>No Foil</h2> <p>Some people line their racks with foil to increase cooking efficiency with the aid of reflection. However, <strong>the foil stops air from flowing freely in the oven</strong>, which actually makes your oven less efficient.</p> <h2>Turn It Off Early</h2> <p>Similar to jumping the gun and putting your food in early, consider turning off the oven and using the residual heat to finish off your meal. Again, this is best tried with less temperamental foods and non-baking items.</p> <h2>Stagger Pans</h2> <p>If you are using multiple pans in the oven, try to <strong>stagger them on the racks to maximize the air flow</strong>. The more the air flows through your oven, the quicker it will cook your food.</p> <h2>Do a Double Batch</h2> <p>By preparing a double batch, you are maximizing your oven&rsquo;s capabilities, and now you have leftovers that can quickly and easily be reheated with much less energy.</p> <h2>Self-Clean After Cooking</h2> <p>If your oven has a self-cleaning option, <strong>turn it on after you have used the oven so it can use the residual heat to get started</strong>. Although the self-cleaning itself uses a fair amount of energy, self-cleaning ovens in general are better insulated and will use less energy while cooking.</p> <h2>Use Smaller Appliances When You Can</h2> <p>An oven can be a cavernous space and inefficient use of energy if you are preparing a smaller meal. If the toaster oven or microwave will do, use it and save the energy (and cost). Don&rsquo;t forget about slow cookers, steamers, rice cookers, and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/save-time-money-energy-and-eat-great">pressure cookers</a> (heck &mdash; even <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/save-energy-costs-by-cooking-with-a-hot-box">hot boxes</a>), which all use less energy than an oven &mdash; especially if you are cooking over an extended time. An electric skillet not only performs a number of cooking functions, but can also double as a serving dish in the end (saving the washing energy and cost too).</p> <h2>Start from Fresh (or Thawed), not Frozen</h2> <p>Where possible, thaw your frozen foods in the fridge before you cook them.</p> <h2>Check the Door Seal</h2> <p>Give your oven the once-over regularly to ensure it is in top working condition. If your door seal is broken or loose, heat (and your money) will escape out the sides. <strong>Even simply keeping the door seal clean can make a difference in efficiency</strong>.</p> <h2>Isolate the Kitchen</h2> <p>By isolating the kitchen when the oven is on, you will:</p> <ul> <li>Contain the extra heat to one room only in the summer, saving on cooling expenses throughout the house.</li> <li>Warm one room of the house efficiently in the winter.</li> <li>Also, when your meal is finished cooking, leave the door open during the winter and use the residual heat in the oven to keep the kitchen cozy. (Obviously, be careful doing this if there are children roaming freely).</li> </ul> <h2>Calibrate</h2> <p>Calibrate your oven by getting an inexpensive thermometer to ensure the oven&rsquo;s temperature setting is accurate. Cooking at the right temperature will not only save your food, but can also save your money if the oven is set high.</p> <h2>Cover It</h2> <p>Although not everything you cook in the oven can be covered, do cover it with a lid or tin foil (which is <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/save-money-by-rekindling-the-art-of-reusing-your-stuff">reusable</a>) when you can.</p> <h2>Gas or Electric?</h2> <p>And if you are in the market for a new oven, here is a <a href="http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/energy-solutions/efficient-cooking">tool to help you determine whether to choose a gas or electric oven</a> next time.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nora-dunn">Nora Dunn</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/19-tips-to-cut-costs-by-using-your-oven-efficiently">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-4-get-free-stuff">Getting by without a job, part 4--get free stuff</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-wonderful-uses-for-witch-hazel">15 Wonderful Uses for Witch Hazel</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/breaking-the-bread-code-how-to-get-the-freshest-loaf">Breaking the Bread Code: How to Get the Freshest Loaf</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/quick-pantry-snacks-for-unexpected-guests">Quick Pantry Snacks for Unexpected Guests</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/curing-warts-removing-splinters-and-19-other-bizarre-uses-for-banana-peels">Curing Warts, Removing Splinters, and 19 Other Bizarre Uses for Banana Peels</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink General Tips Green Living cut energy costs oven saving energy Mon, 26 Oct 2009 14:00:10 +0000 Nora Dunn 3749 at http://www.wisebread.com How Big of a House Do You Really Need? http://www.wisebread.com/how-big-of-a-house-do-you-really-need <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-big-of-a-house-do-you-really-need" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/smallhouse.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="345" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For my entire life, I have never lived in a place bigger than 1400 square feet. The smallest dwelling I had was a studio less than 400 square feet which I shared with my parents. Because of my experience of living in small homes I think of anything over 2000 square feet as excessive for two to three residents. Today I want to highlight some of the reasons why I prefer smaller abodes.</p> <p>A small house or apartment has several advantages over giant McMansions. First, it takes a lot less time to clean and maintain so you could have more time to do other things. Second, it uses a lot less energy to heat or cool so you could save money on utility bills and leave less of a carbon footprint. Third, it encourages you to declutter and get rid of your junk because you do not have enough space for it. Finally, the cost of a smaller home is usually less than a large McMansion so you will save money on taxes and insurance. The bottom line is that a smaller home saves you quite a bit of money over an extremely large living space and also wastes less energy.</p> <p>The challenge of living in a small house is that you really need to simplify your lifestyle. You probably do not have room for a giant sectional, but you could make do with a beanbag. A sprawling gourmet kitchen probably would not fit, but a basic set of stove and oven should suffice for everyday cooking. Having a small abode encourages people to use space efficiently, and thus live more effectively. Myscha <a href="/small-space-survival-strategies" target="_blank">wrote a great article about how to do this</a> on Wise Bread. </p> <p>So how small of a house would you be comfortable with? Personally I feel that I have way more than enough space in a condo of a little over 1000 square feet which I share with my husband. Sometimes I feel that it is too big because there is space that we barely use. I am not sure if I would be fine with living in a <a href="http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/houses_xshouse.html" target="_blank">75 square feet house</a> manufactured by a company in California called the Tumbleweed Tiny House Company, but I think I would do fine in a place half the size of our current place.</p> <p>I am curious, do you have too much space in your house? Could you unclutter and downgrade into a smaller living space?</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/xin-lu">Xin Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-big-of-a-house-do-you-really-need">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/welcome-to-container-city-how-shipping-containers-are-recycled-into-green-dwellings">Welcome to Container City - How Shipping Containers Are Recycled into Green Dwellings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/oprah-asks-a-great-question-what-can-you-live-without">Oprah Asks A Great Question; What Can You Live Without?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-not-buy-something-just-because-you-can-afford-it">Do not buy something just because you can afford it</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/chinese-money-habits-how-my-culture-influences-my-attitudes-toward-money">Chinese Money Habits - How My Culture Influences My Attitudes Toward Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-big">How to save BIG</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Frugal Living Green Living Lifestyle house real estate saving energy small houses Tue, 06 May 2008 23:32:30 +0000 Xin Lu 2073 at http://www.wisebread.com