credit card agreements http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/9226/all en-US How to Choose a Credit Card http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-choose-a-credit-card <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-choose-a-credit-card" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman-choosing-credit-card-iStock_000012807667Small.jpg" alt="choosing credit cards" title="choosing credit cards" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As the economy continues its slow recovery, credit card issuers are ready to start enticing consumers with the promise of great terms and easy money. The Federal Reserve and J.D. Power and Associates have both reported an increase in credit card spending for 2012.</p> <p>With credit cards are becoming popular again and creditors loosening their standards a little bit, you are probably seeing more credit card offers in your mailbox. For best results, you need to be a little picky.</p> <p>Before you sign up for a credit card, evaluate the offer to ensure that you are getting the best deal for you. Here are 10 things to do. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-awesome-credit-card-tricks-that-will-save-you-money">6 Awesome Credit Card Tricks That Will&nbsp;Save You Money</a>)</p> <h3>1. Avoid Independent Marketers</h3> <p>You might be surprised to learn that some credit card offers come from independent marketers. These offers come in very plain envelopes that, rather than being branded with a bank&rsquo;s logo or name, bear generic return addresses to &ldquo;Credit Card Administration&rdquo; or &ldquo;Processing Center.&rdquo;</p> <p>These card offers are rarely your best choice. Many of them attempt to charge you for an application or come with other fees. Instead, choose from credit card offers straight from the issuer.</p> <h3>2. Choose a Rewards Program You Will Use</h3> <p>Many credit card issuers try to lure you in with the promise of a rewards program. Before you decide, make sure that you will use the rewards. Don&rsquo;t get a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-sign-up-bonuses-for-airline-miles-credit-cards">miles card</a> if you are more interested in cash back.</p> <p>Also, pay attention to the terms of the rewards. Some cards advertise that you can get 5% cash back, but then you find out that you only receive that amount on certain categories, rotated throughout the year. Miles programs are notorious for making you feel as though you are receiving a lot, but then you find out that you need 40,000 miles in order to redeem your rewards for a flight.</p> <p>Finally, make sure you understand redemption fees, blackout dates, and expiration policies. Also, some cards will zero out your rewards if your card is inactive for a certain period of time.</p> <h3>3. Evaluate the Annual Percentage Rate</h3> <p>Next, look at the annual percentage rate (APR). Consider the purchase and cash-advance APRs. Understand what you will be charged for each type of transaction. Your purchase APR is the rate you pay on regular purchases made with the card, and your cash advance APR is the rate paid for cash withdrawals at the ATM.</p> <p>You should also pay attention to the default rate. This is the rate you are charged if you are late with a payment or go over your limit. Often the default rate is as high, or higher than, the cash advance rate &mdash; which is often much higher than the purchase rate.</p> <p>When possible, choose a credit card with a lower interest rate. The purchase rate is often the most important charge to consider, but you should also be aware of the other rates you could be charged, especially if you plan to use your credit card to access cash.</p> <h3>4. Pay Attention to Introductory Periods</h3> <p>It&rsquo;s easy to get drawn in by a 0% introductory rate. It seems like a good deal, since you can make purchases without having to worry about the interest charged. Make sure you understand how long the period lasts, though. Some credit cards only offer an intro period of 3 months, while others offer 18 or even 24 months.</p> <p>Understand, too, that you might get an introductory period on a balance transfer, but not on a purchase. Or you might receive the low intro rate on your purchases, while paying interest on any balances you transfer. Sometimes there are different intro periods; you might receive 6 months on a balance transfer, and 12 months for purchases.</p> <p>Look for a longer introductory period, but also make sure you understand what is covered in that intro period. Try to find a card that gives you an intro period on both balance transfers and purchases.</p> <p>Also plan to pay of balances before the intro period ends. Otherwise you could end up paying the higher regular rate. Make sure you find out whether the interest is &ldquo;capitalized&rdquo; at the end. While most issuers don&rsquo;t do this, some will add up all the interest you would have paid, and then add it at the end of the intro period if you still have a balance.</p> <p>Finally, don&rsquo;t forget that your intro period can end abruptly if you are late with a payment or go over your limit.</p> <h3>5. Watch Out for Balance Transfer Fees</h3> <p>Many credit cards come with <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-0-balance-transfer-credit-cards">balance transfer offers</a>. It&rsquo;s important to carefully evaluate balance transfer offers &mdash; especially if you are trying to reduce your debt faster. A balance transfer can help you put more money toward the principal of your debt rather than reducing your payment&rsquo;s effectiveness with interest payments.</p> <p>However, before you transfer a balance, make sure that you are ready to meet the terms. Most cards have a balance transfer fee of between 3% and 5%. So even though you might pay 0% interest for six months, you could still pay a hefty balance transfer fee.</p> <p>Run the numbers and make sure that your interest savings during the intro period will more than offset your balance transfer fee. Even better, look for a credit card that doesn&rsquo;t charge balance transfer fees.</p> <h3>6. Pay Attention to Balance Computation</h3> <p>It&rsquo;s one of those fine-print things, but the way your balance is computed makes a big difference in how much interest you pay. If you pay off your balance each month, this isn&rsquo;t such a big deal, but if you carry a balance, it does. There are two options:</p> <p><b>Average Daily Balance</b></p> <p>Each day, your credit card balance is figured. At the end of the billing cycle, all of it is averaged. Interest is charged on your average balance.</p> <p><b>Adjusted Balance</b></p> <p>With this method, the issuer takes the balance at the end of the last period, and subtracts any payments that you have made during the current cycle. This is considered advantageous to consumers, since it gives you the chance to pay part of the balance without interest during the next billing cycle.</p> <h3>7. Understand How Often the Interest Is Compounded</h3> <p>Another small item to consider is how interest is calculated. Your credit card represents compound interest, meaning that when you are charged interest, it is added to your balance, and you pay interest on the total. Essentially, you pay interest on your interest.</p> <p>Unfortunately, most credit cards compound interest daily. This means that at the end of each day, your interest is added to the balance. Because you are charged interest more often, the bill is slightly bigger by the end of the month.</p> <p>There are some credit cards that compound interest monthly, but those are few and far between. It doesn&rsquo;t hurt to check, though, since the difference can matter if you plan to carry a balance.</p> <h3>8. Consider the Annual Fee</h3> <p>Find out whether or not <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-avoid-rewards-cards-with-annual-fees">the card has an annual fee</a>. In some cases, the card materials make a big deal of not having an annual fee, but when you look closer, you can see that there is an annual fee &mdash; it&rsquo;s just waived for the first year.</p> <p>You can also determine whether that annual fee is worth paying. In some cases, the rewards program and other perks are so generous that they more than make up for the annual fee. If you know that you will use the credit card enough to offset the fee, it might be worth it for the other perks and rewards.</p> <h3>9. Watch Out for the Minimum Finance Charge</h3> <p>Read the terms to find out whether or not your credit card comes with a minimum finance charge. This is the minimal amount you will have to pay each month &mdash; no matter how small your balance. If the minimum finance charge is $15 a month, and you happen to have just a small amount on the card, like $10, you might still have to pay the minimum finance charge.</p> <p>If you have a large balance that you carry regularly, the minimum finance charge probably doesn&rsquo;t matter. However, it can make a big difference if your balance is small, since you could be paying a little extra due to the minimum finance charge. If you do have a card with a minimum finance charge, you are better off keeping tabs on the balance, and paying it off in its entirety.</p> <h3>10. Look for Other Fees, Terms, and Conditions</h3> <p>Make sure that you look at other fees and conditions. One of the biggest items to pay attention to is the dispute resolution process. You might be subject to binding arbitration, meaning that rather than resolving the issue in court, you have to abide by the decision made by an independent third party.</p> <p>Other conditions might include additional fees for various services, as well as qualifiers that indicate that you might not receive the advertised interest rate. Carefully read the fine print. Credit card issuers include information on the complete terms and conditions, and you can also usually find the information online.</p> <p>Before you commit to apply for a credit card, double check the offer. Compare offers, and then choose the one that is likely to provide you with the greatest benefit.&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/miranda-marquit">Miranda Marquit</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-choose-a-credit-card">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-key-things-to-look-for-when-choosing-a-credit-card">3 Key Things to Look for When Choosing a Credit Card</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/possible-protections-for-credit-card-holders">Possible protections for credit card holders</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-benefit-from-your-credit-card">6 Ways to Benefit From Your Credit Card</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-airline-credit-cards-to-score-premium-travel-awards">Using Airline Credit Cards to Score Premium Travel Awards</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/primer-on-visa-signature-credit-cards-all-the-benefits-that-come-with-your-card">Primer on VISA Signature Credit Cards: All the Benefits That Come with Your Card</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Credit Cards credit card agreements credit card benefits Fri, 25 Jan 2013 10:48:37 +0000 Miranda Marquit 955322 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Key Things to Look for When Choosing a Credit Card http://www.wisebread.com/3-key-things-to-look-for-when-choosing-a-credit-card <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-key-things-to-look-for-when-choosing-a-credit-card" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/couple-shopping-with-tablet-iStock_000021201439Small.jpg" alt="shopping on tablet" title="shopping on tablet" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When used correctly, a credit card can be a trusted financial tool. The right credit card provides you with rewards and perks, and doesn&rsquo;t penalize you overmuch when you carry a balance or make a mistake.</p> <p>Because there are so many credit card options available to you, it can seem overwhelming to compare every detail of each card. But you don&rsquo;t have to spend hours looking for the best credit card for you. A quick comparison will suffice &mdash; as long as you know the three key things to look for. (See also:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/consumer-reports-picks-top-3-credit-cards-for-your-needs">Consumer Reports Picks the Top Three Credit Cards for Your Needs</a>)</p> <h2>1. Rewards Should Match Your Shopping Habits</h2> <p>A good rewards credit card provides you with bonuses. When used correctly, a rewards card can <i>earn</i> you money. However, you need to choose a card that matches your shopping habits.</p> <p>The first thing to look for is a rewards card that provides you with something that you will actually use. If you travel a lot, a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/top-5-travel-reward-credit-cards">travel rewards card</a>, offering you bonus points for airfare purchases and hotel stays, can be just right for your situation.</p> <p>If you don&rsquo;t drive a lot, even the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-gas-rewards-credit-cards">best gas rewards card</a> won&rsquo;t do you much good. Maybe you would benefit more from a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-5-credit-cards-for-groceries">credit card that rewards you for buying groceries</a>, or one that provides you the chance to earn extra <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-credit-cards-for-dining-out">rewards for dining out</a>.</p> <p>Before you start looking at credit cards, consider what you want to accomplish with your credit card, whether it&rsquo;s earning free stuff or <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-0-balance-transfer-credit-cards">paying down debt with the help of a balance transfer</a>. Think about your lifestyle, and choose a card that reflects your priorities and interests.</p> <p>If you don&rsquo;t want to limit yourself to certain rewards, there are a number of good <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-cash-back-credit-cards">cash back credit cards</a> that can help you meet your goals. If you just want to earn consistent rewards for your regular purchases and only want to worry about one card, it&rsquo;s hard to beat the value of a cash back credit card.</p> <h2>2. Interest Rate and Fees Should Be Reasonable</h2> <p>Once you figure out what you want your credit card to help you accomplish, look at the interest rate associated with the card, as well as the fees charged. Fees and interest can destroy the value of your rewards, offsetting the progress you have made with them.</p> <p><b>Interest Rates</b></p> <p>Your interest rate will depend largely on your credit rating. The higher your credit score, the lower your interest rate. Someone with excellent credit can expect to see interest rates as low as 10.79% to 13.99%. If your credit isn&rsquo;t as good, you will probably pay more, usually in the 15.99% to 19.99% range. Those with poor credit, if they are approved, may pay 22.99% or more.</p> <p><b>Fees</b></p> <p>If you pay off your credit card balance each month, the interest rate isn&rsquo;t such a big deal because you don&rsquo;t have to worry about interest charges. You can work on improving your credit, and then ask your credit card issuer to lower your interest rate later.</p> <p>Each credit card charges different fees. You don&rsquo;t have to read through all the terms and conditions to locate the main fees charged by each card, though. Most credit card offers come with the most common fees prominently listed in the marketing materials. Some of the fees you should compare include:</p> <ul> <li><b>Annual fee</b>: There are many rewards cards that don&rsquo;t charge annual fees. However, some of the premium cards, if you use them a lot, can be worth the annual fee. It&rsquo;s fairly common to pay between $50 and $150 for rewards cards. Some premium cards charge as much as $400. Make sure you review the rewards program to ensure that you will earn enough to offset the fees.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li><b>Balance transfer</b>: If you are planning to transfer a balance, this fee is a very important consideration. Most cards charge between 3% and 5% of the amount you transfer. Try to find a card with a lower fee in order to reduce what you pay.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li><b>Cash advance</b>: Most cards charge between 2% and 4% of the amount you withdraw. There might be a minimum, though, of $10 or $15.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li><b>Late and over-the-limit fees</b>: Pay attention to these fees, which average around $35 per incident. If you pay late, or go over your credit limit, it can really start to add up.</li> </ul> <p>You can avoid most of these charges as long as you are responsible with your credit cards and avoid cards with steep annual fees.</p> <h2>3. Terms Should Be Easy to Understand</h2> <p>You don&rsquo;t need to get caught up in the nitty-gritty of the credit card terms, but you do want to pay attention to some key terms. Once again, most of these terms are fairly easy to find in the marketing literature that you receive with credit card offers.</p> <ul> <li><b>If your credit card is being used for a 0% APR balance transfer, find out when the introductory period ends</b>. The longer the period, the better off you&rsquo;ll be. Realize, too, that sometimes the intro period for purchases is different from the balance transfer period. Check these options carefully.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li><b>Double-check the restrictions related to your rewards</b>. There might be expirations, as well as limits on what you can earn. A generous rewards program might have a cap on what you can earn. Pay attention to these items to ensure that you are getting the most for your rewards.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li><b>Check minimum spending requirements</b>. Some rewards programs, like Discover, require that you spend $3,000 before you can access the highest rewards level. Make sure you understand the minimums, and blackouts (especially for travel rewards cards).</li> </ul> <p>Choosing the right credit card for you doesn&rsquo;t have to be a complicated endeavor. Take a few minutes to compare three or four different credit card rewards programs and determine which will benefit you the most.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/miranda-marquit">Miranda Marquit</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-key-things-to-look-for-when-choosing-a-credit-card">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/possible-protections-for-credit-card-holders">Possible protections for credit card holders</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-choose-a-credit-card">How to Choose a Credit Card</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-secured-credit-cards">The 5 Best Secured Credit Cards</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-0-balance-transfer-credit-cards">The 5 Best 0% Balance Transfer Credit Cards</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bankamericard-secured-visa-card-helps-protect-you-from-identity-theft">BankAmericard Secured Visa Card Helps Protect You From Identity Theft</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Credit Cards credit card agreements Mon, 29 Oct 2012 10:24:37 +0000 Miranda Marquit 955324 at http://www.wisebread.com Possible protections for credit card holders http://www.wisebread.com/possible-protections-for-credit-card-holders <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/possible-protections-for-credit-card-holders" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/credit-cards_1.jpg" alt="Credit cards" title="Credit Cards" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="178" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Federal Reserve has proposed some new rules to protect people from a list of abusive lending practices.  The changes aren&#39;t in effect yet, and may not actually go into effect.  It&#39;s worth looking at the proposals, though, to understand what&#39;s been going on just lately.  If you haven&#39;t been paying attention, you probably have no idea what the credit card companies can legally do to you.</p> <p>The things that would be prohibited would be:</p> <h2>Increasing the rate on a pre-existing balance</h2> <p>At the moment, there are pretty much no rules about this.  Your card agreement probably says how they calculate the rate--but it also says that they can change the agreement at any time, including the part on how to calculate the rate.  Many card agreements also provide for you to &quot;decline&quot; to accept changes--but if you use the card after they send out the notice of changes, that&#39;s the same as accepting the new agreement.  And some cards don&#39;t even offer that protection--they can raise the rate for any reason, or for no reason at all, and there&#39;s nothing you can do about it except pay the new rate until you manage to get the debt paid off.</p> <h2>Applying payments to maximize the interest charges</h2> <p>Your credit card agreement says how they&#39;ll apply any payment that you send in.  It matters, because parts of your balance are at different rates.  If you read the details, things are often set up to pay off low-rate parts of the debt first, leaving you paying on high rate debt for as long as possible.  Under the new rules:</p> <blockquote><p>Banks would be required to give consumers the full benefit of discounted promotional rates on credit cards by applying payments in excess of the minimum to any higher-rate balances first, and by providing a grace period for purchases where the consumer is otherwise eligible.</p></blockquote> <h2>Imposing interest charges using the &quot;two-cycle&quot; method</h2> <p>The &quot;two-cycle&quot; method is a set of rules for calculating the interest owed in such a way that you don&#39;t get any &quot;grace period&quot; if you don&#39;t pay your card off in full every month.  If you carry a balance all the time, it doesn&#39;t matter.  But if you <strong>usually</strong> pay your card off, but <strong>occasionally</strong> take an extra month to get back to zero, the two-cycle method can very nearly double the interest you pay.</p> <p>The rules would also require that banks give card holders a &quot;reasonable&quot; amount of time to make payments.  It used to be that card holders got almost 30 days--basically, you had until the day they printed out your next bill.  Credit card companies, though, have been shortening the grace period, especially for their riskier customers.  For some cards, it&#39;s gotten to the point where you really have to stay on top of your bills every day, in order not to be constantly late on your payment.</p> <p>Of course, the only sensible thing to do with credit cards is to pay them off every month.  Credit cards are a great <strong>payment mechanism</strong>, but a terrible way to borrow money.  Everybody knows that.  And these new rules wouldn&#39;t really offer much to the people who do use their credit cards to borrow money.  </p> <p>What these new rules would do is protect people who fail to run an error-free bill-paying and agreement-reading system.  As things stand right now, someone who pays every bill in-full, but who is only 99% successful at paying on-time, could easily end up owing hundreds of dollars in fees, penalties, and interest.  These rules would ease up some of the worst of the &quot;gotcha&quot; effect.  (And it certainly seems that some banks have been changing their rules specifically to set their customers up to make occasional small errors--and turn those errors into big fees for the bank.)</p> <p>The rules are open for public comment.  No doubt the big banks will be commenting.  They&#39;ll have statistics that show that customers who make a late payment are much more likely to default than customers who are never late.  Maybe a few consumers will comment about the basic unfairness of agreements that the credit card companies can change at any time.</p> <p>Links to the detailed rules and on how to comment are in the Federal Reserve&#39;s press release on <a href="http://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/20080502a.htm">rules to prohibit unfair practices</a>.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/possible-protections-for-credit-card-holders">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-we-really-need-help-in-getting-more-debt">Do we really need help with getting more debt?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/new-credit-card-legislation-buzz-interview-wall-street-journal">New Credit Card Legislation Buzz: An Interview with Wall Street Journal’s Mary Pilon</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-your-spending-patterns-affect-your-credit">Can Your Spending Patterns Affect Your Credit?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-cash-back-credit-cards">5 Best Cash Back Credit Cards</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/top-seven-reasons-why-i-use-my-credit-card-for-everything">Top Seven Reasons Why I Use My Credit Card for Everything</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Consumer Affairs Credit Cards bank regulations credit card agreements credit cards Fed federal reserve regulations Tue, 20 May 2008 15:56:53 +0000 Philip Brewer 2106 at http://www.wisebread.com