resumes http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/9430/all en-US How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/we_are_hiring_sign_530186607.jpg" alt="Learning how to keep a job hunt from busting a budget" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Searching for a new job can be a stressful ordeal. There is always a feeling that you could be doing more to make yourself attractive to employers: more networking, more updates to your LinkedIn profile, more classes to boost your skills. This desire to do more, however, sometimes comes with an urge to spend money on products and services that you may not need.</p> <p>Are you throwing away money during your job search? Here are a handful of things that may not be worth spending money on in your quest for new employment. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-forget-about-these-7-job-hunting-expenses?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Don't Forget About These 7 Job Hunting Expenses</a>)</p> <h2>Resume writers</h2> <p>There are many people who offer advice on how to craft your resume to help you land a job. This can be a useful service, but keep in mind that there's also plenty of free advice out there.</p> <p>Before spending a significant amount of money on a resume consultant, do a search of some well-regarded business and career publications to see if they've written extensively on this topic. There are also countless examples online of well-crafted, effective resumes that are easy to replicate.</p> <p>Additionally, it's easy to turn to knowledgeable friends and family for feedback before deciding to pay for outside help. A resume consultant may be useful if you really don't feel confident crafting a resume yourself, but most people are able to get by without one. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/great-ways-to-improve-your-resume-today?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Great Ways to Improve Your Resume Today</a>)</p> <h2>Costly networking meals</h2> <p>When you are networking, you may feel it necessary to treat a contact to an expensive meal in order to make a good impression. But this is rarely necessary. People are busy, and generally have no desire to set aside an entire lunch hour or evening just to hear you pitch yourself.</p> <p>If someone is willing to help you in your job search, they will be fine meeting over a cup of coffee or even just an in-person chat in their office. Remember that your work history and accomplishments are what matter most in your job search, not your ability to pick up the check for a steak dinner. If you feel the need to make a grand gesture to thank someone for their help, do it after you've landed the job.</p> <h2>Expensive clothes</h2> <p>If you are interviewing to be the CEO, it makes sense to spend some bucks to look right for the job. Most job applicants, however, don't need to spend $3,000 for a custom Italian suit.</p> <p>Sure, you'll want to have appropriate dress clothes and shoes that make you look like a professional. But there's no need to go overboard. Also keep in mind that many employers allow for casual dress. In those situations, you may be able to save money by skipping the suit altogether and wearing tailored, well-fitting clothing. If you don't already have these in your closet, you can buy them for less than $100.</p> <h2>Premium job search engines</h2> <p>Many job boards and career networking sites offer paid services that promise enhanced job listings and the ability to be labeled as a &quot;featured&quot; applicant. These services can come with some bells and whistles that might help you in your job search, but they are not cheap. LinkedIn Premium, for example, starts at $25 per month. These services can't guarantee you'll get a job, and aren't a replacement for having good qualifications and networking.</p> <h2>Costly technology</h2> <p>You may be tempted to go out and get a new computer or smartphone to help you with your job search. Perhaps you think a costly piece of software will enhance your chances of landing a position.</p> <p>In reality, it's rarely necessary to upgrade your technology just to search for jobs. Sure, a reliable computer will help, along with a phone so companies can reach you. But there are many technological solutions that don't cost a dime, including free online software that can help you easily set up a professional website. Besides, the most important component to getting a new job is the most low-tech one there is: you. Your skills, qualifications, and experience are what matter most.</p> <h2>Travel for jobs you don't want</h2> <p>I'm a firm believer that interviewing for a job can be beneficial, even if it's for a job you aren't crazy about. But if you have to incur significant expense to show up, it's probably not worth it. There's no need to hop on a plane and book a hotel for a job that does not interest you, unless you have a strong indication that it could lead to a more attractive opportunity. Even train fare and parking may be a waste of money if you really don't have an interest in the job.</p> <h2>Education or certifications you don't need</h2> <p>It is true that you should never stop learning, and it's never a bad idea to enhance and expand your skill set to give your career a boost. But you need to be thoughtful in what you pursue.</p> <p>Why spend thousands of dollars for an associate degree in accounting when your background is in engineering? Why spend thousands more to be trained in Adobe Creative Suite if you have no real interest in graphic design? Remember, there are many professional &quot;certifications&quot; that are not worth the paper they are written on. Taking some classes or gaining skills can boost your career, but only when they can truly help you, and only when these efforts are properly aligned with your goals and strengths. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-online-certifications-worth-the-price?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are Online Certifications Worth the Price?</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Keep%2520Your%2520Job%2520Hunt%2520From%2520Busting%2520Your%2520Budget.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Keep%20Your%20Job%20Hunt%20From%20Busting%20Your%20Budget"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Keep%20Your%20Job%20Hunt%20From%20Busting%20Your%20Budget.jpg" alt="How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving">How to Ask for Your Old Job Back After Leaving</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">How to Ace Your Next Coffee Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-resume-sucks-try-one-of-these-instead">Your Resume Sucks — Try One of These Instead</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting certifications expenses job interviews job search meals networking resumes skills travel wasting money Mon, 02 Oct 2017 08:30:16 +0000 Tim Lemke 2029156 at http://www.wisebread.com Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-544340484.jpg" alt="job hunting with an employment gap" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Looking for a job after taking time off, either by choice or circumstance? You're not alone. In the recovery years since the Great Recession, career gaps have been stubbornly common. While an employment gap can make finding a new job trickier, there's no need to panic. Experts say there are plenty of ways to get your foot in the door.</p> <h2>Network</h2> <p>It's always important to tap your social and professional connections when job hunting, but even more so if you are facing the headwind of getting back into the workforce after an absence. If you find your network has shrunk in recent years, make new connections by joining a professional organization or meetup in your area and attending local events. Volunteer work is also a great way of expanding your professional skills and network. A job recommendation from the right connection can help answer an employer's questions about your dedication and capabilities before they even get asked.</p> <h2>Go back to school</h2> <p>One of the big worries employers have about people who haven't worked in awhile is that their skills will be out of date. Getting a graduate degree, taking a certification course, or even just attending a continuing education class in your field can quell those concerns. This activity also shows that you're serious about returning to work and not just fooling around. Best of all, attending some kind of training gives you a recent activity to list on your resume, pushing the work gap lower on the page.</p> <h2>Look for a &quot;returnship&quot;</h2> <p>Some companies, including Goldman Sachs and Sara Lee, have offered these short-term jobs as a springboard for returning workers getting back into their careers. If you can't find a returnship, consider an ordinary internship, especially if you want to change or shift your career role. Yes, it could be humbling to compete against college grads and possibly work for no pay, but it's a lot better than doing nothing and letting the gap widen.</p> <h2>Write your resume carefully</h2> <p>One of the first images a potential employer sees of you likely comes via your resume, so it's important to use this as a tool to stop the door from being slammed in your face. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search" target="_blank">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a>)</p> <h3>Don't be super specific on dates</h3> <p>If your employment gap is a matter of months, not years, there's no need call attention to it by using the month that you started and ended each job. Say you started at XYZ Corp in June of 2012 and were laid off in August of 2015: Just list it as &quot;XYZ Corp. 2012&ndash;2015.&quot;</p> <p>This is not being dishonest with the hirer; you can disclose the gap if it comes up in the interview. But it could save your resume from being discarded before you get the chance to have that interview.</p> <h3>Include temporary jobs</h3> <p>So you made lattes or answered phones when your job as a graphic designer ended. You may want to include these gigs on your resume rather than leave a gaping hole. And expect the subject to come up in the interview as well. &quot;Regression&quot; in job responsibility and pay is not taken lightly by employers, but it's still better than a gap.</p> <h3>Self-employment counts</h3> <p>If you did freelance or contract work in between jobs, you could cover that period with a heading that conveys this. If you have a company name, list the company as the employer. The fine line here is to avoid misleading the hirer, or to appear to be engaging in puffery. Give yourself credit for achievements in self employment, but don't try to make it seem like more than it was.</p> <h3>Just list the gap</h3> <p>If your gap was more than a few months, and you weren't working a temp job or working for yourself, you're still going to have to address the gap. You don't want to jump right from a job that ended in 2015 to the present with no explanation.</p> <p>That doesn't mean you have to title it &quot;unemployed&quot; and leave it at that. You could title it with a substantial volunteer position you held during that time, or any training courses you attended.</p> <p>Another idea is to describe what you were doing, without going into unnecessary detail about anything that's not relevant to your job search. If you spent your employment gap caring for children or other family members, or recovering from an injury or illness, simply leave it at that.</p> <h2>Look beyond the resume</h2> <p>While the resume will be just the facts, the other information you provide to your potential employer can offer context.</p> <h3>The cover letter</h3> <p>The great thing about this document is that you're not tied to a chronological format like with a resume. The cover letter is your sales pitch, so start with why you're excited about this specific opportunity, and sell your skills and achievements. Then, take a line or two to explain your career lapse. Keep it upbeat and forward-looking, and never apologize.</p> <h3>The interview</h3> <p>If you're lucky enough to land an interview, expect to address the career gap. Recruiters and managers give the following tips for dealing with employment gaps in an interview: Be prepared with a list of talking points about the gap. Don't act surprised or defensive when it's brought up. Be honest, even if you were fired. Dishonesty is a big red flag. And whatever you do, don't dwell on negativity.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fjob-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FJob%2520Hunting%2520With%2520a%2520Long%2520Employment%2520Gap.jpg&amp;description=Job%20Hunting%20With%20a%20Long%20Employment%20Gap"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Job%20Hunting%20With%20a%20Long%20Employment%20Gap.jpg" alt="Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving">How to Ask for Your Old Job Back After Leaving</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-networking-tips-for-the-recently-unemployed">7 Networking Tips for the Recently Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-crucial-job-searching-steps-most-people-skip">6 Crucial Job Searching Steps Most People Skip</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting back to work employment gap job interviews networking recession resumes time off unemployed Thu, 28 Sep 2017 08:31:09 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2028008 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Land the Job When You're Overqualified http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/more_than_qualified_for_the_job.jpg" alt="More than qualified for the job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For whatever reason, be it a career change or the need to pay the bills after a layoff, many people apply for jobs that require much less experience than they have. And far too often, it's considered a negative: &quot;Sorry, you're too overqualified.&quot;</p> <p>The employer sees a litany of reasons why you would be a bad fit. They think you'll be unhappy, or take a better job the second one comes along. You may even be gunning for the boss's position.</p> <p>To combat these perceptions, you need to find ways to convince the employer that you are right for the job, regardless of your experience. Here's how to approach it.</p> <h2>Edit your resume to fit the job you want</h2> <p>If your resume is three pages long, and filled with impressive titles and experience, it's a good time to start editing it. You are not lying; you are simply not putting down every single thing you have accomplished.</p> <p>You don't even have to list job titles if you don't want to. Just list the companies you worked for, and then the appropriate experience for each one. Sure, you may well have overseen the international distribution for a major multinational. But did that job also entail getting on the phone and delivering great customer service (regardless of who those customers were)?</p> <p>Find ways to temper some of your achievements. It will seem counterintuitive to everything you've done in your career, but if you want this job, you need to find ways to bring your resume down a peg or two.</p> <h2>Use your industry connections for introductions</h2> <p>A resume and a cover letter, even if they are exceptional and targeted, don't always do the job. You will want to tap into the many connections you have made over the years, and find people who can vouch for you.</p> <p>Ideally, you'll know someone at the company you want to work for. Or, you know someone who knows someone at the company. LinkedIn is an excellent place to find these kinds of connections. When you find the right person, ask them to make the first move for you. A recommendation from someone trusted and reliable is worth far more than any polished resume.</p> <p>They can also talk about what you bring to the table, and why you're a good fit. By the time your over-qualifications come up, you will already be seen as someone who could easily fit the role. And if the salary is right, why not you? They're getting more bang for their buck.</p> <h2>Talk about what you can do for them</h2> <p>Employers are selfish, and rightly so. They are ready to pay you a salary and benefits, so they want someone who will be a good return on that investment. And if you show them that your experience will benefit them, but won't cost them any more, then they'll be all in.</p> <p>One great example comes from the movie <em>The Wolf of Wall Street</em>. After Jordan Belfort loses his job on Wall Street, he can't find a new gig anywhere. Then, he sees an ad for a little brokerage selling penny stocks. When they first see Belfort, they think it's a joke. He's way too qualified. Why would he even set foot in this place? Then, he brings his experience (albeit morally bankrupt experience) to the firm, and before they know it, they're making more money than they ever dreamed of.</p> <p>So, highlight what you can do, not what titles you have earned. Explain how the experience you have is perfect for the job. And remember, only talk about the experience that is relevant to this employer. All your other accolades and achievements are best left out of the conversation.</p> <h2>Explain why you're excited for the position being offered</h2> <p>Money isn't everything. Titles aren't for everyone. Sometimes, people genuinely want to change the course of their careers, and if that's you, you have to find a way to make your potential new employer understand this. You may well have been part of the top brass at your last company, but you could also have become tired of the rat race. You want to take a job with less money and less responsibility, but one that gives you exciting new challenges.</p> <p>Many people in advertising, for instance, find that after they get to the top of the ladder, they are not doing the fun and creative work that they did early on in their careers. For this reason, a lot of creative directors will actually step back from the role, and apply for lower-paying jobs as copywriters and art directors. As long as you can make the case for why you are ready to work for less money and less power, the employer should have no reason not to take your application seriously.</p> <h2>Acknowledge that you know you're taking a step down</h2> <p>If you're the victim of corporate downsizing, you will usually have to find a job quickly to replace the lost income. And that usually means taking whatever is available, even if it's a considerable step down. Hiring managers are wary of candidates in this situation. They believe the overqualified candidate is simply taking the job as a stopgap, and will be looking for something better immediately. The last thing any hiring manager wants to do is be interviewing for that same role a few months down the line. But, this can be addressed early on.</p> <p>Acknowledge that this is a step down for you, in salary and experience. But let the employer know that you also see it as providing a wealth of benefits, including new experiences, new challenges, and perhaps better work-life balance. Assure the employer that this is not a temporary position, but one you are going to dig into and be successful at.</p> <h2>Do not let salary come into play until the last minute</h2> <p>One of the biggest problems that comes with being overqualified is your salary history. As you climbed the ladder of success, your income was right there rising with you. And in your last position, you may have had a most impressive salary. However, now that you're looking for a job that requires less (or different) skills, the money that goes with it will also be less.</p> <p>The easiest way for a human resources manager to sort through candidates is salary expectations, or previous salary. If the current role offers $60,000 a year, and your most recent salary was $100,000, you're going to be rejected in a heartbeat. Why would you even consider this role, they wonder. They don't know your current situation, your wants and needs, and why you're switching to a role that requires less experience.</p> <p>So, don't bring salary into it. If there's a space on the form that must be completed, put $1. If it comes up initially, tell HR that salary is not something you're concerned with right now. You want to focus on being the right person for the job, regardless of money.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Land%2520the%2520Job%2520When%2520Youre%2520Overqualified.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Land%20the%20Job%20When%20Youre%20Overqualified"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Land%20the%20Job%20When%20Youre%20Overqualified.jpg" alt="How to Land the Job When You're Overqualified" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting connections experience interviewing new job overqualified references resumes salary skills Thu, 24 Aug 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 2008287 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/interview_panel.jpg" alt="Interview panel" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Looking for a job can be tricky when you already have one. You want to take your career to the next level, but you don't want to risk the job you currently have &mdash; which can happen if your employer finds out you're trying to jump ship.</p> <p>Use these tips to keep your search a secret until you're ready to put in your two weeks' notice:</p> <h2>Keep your job search to yourself</h2> <p>There's no need to tell anyone else about your job search, least of all your coworkers. It doesn't matter how close you are, it's still none of their business. Loyalty is a fickle beast when positions are up for grabs, and if your coworkers see a chance to get a leg up, you may find yourself thrown under a proverbial bus. Rumors can spread like wildfire, and they'll eventually hit the boss. You could compromise your current employment if you don't have control of the narrative. Best to say nothing at all.</p> <h2>Stay away from company equipment</h2> <p>Using company equipment to conduct a job search seems like an obvious no-no, but you'd be surprised how many people don't recognize the risk until they get caught. Your activities may be monitored, and it'll be hard to explain yourself when IT has proof that you're wasting company time and resources to further your career elsewhere.</p> <p>Always use your personal computer and mobile devices to look for jobs and respond to emails, and only provide your personal phone numbers for calls. Don't use the office copier or fax for resume or other job-search materials, either; you could accidentally leave your resume on the machines, thereby ratting on yourself.</p> <h2>Continue giving 100 percent at your current job</h2> <p>Remember when you were a senior in high school? It was so hard to put forth the effort during that last week of class. It's common to adopt a similar attitude when you're planning to leave a job. You might tell yourself that you'll be gone soon anyway, so why bother trying to impress anyone? But this is a dangerous mentality. It's important to remain professional until the day your tenure ends at your current position.</p> <p>&quot;Don't ease off the gas just because you are thinking about leaving,&quot; says Ryan Naylor, CEO and founder of LocalWork.com. &quot;Maybe that new job won't come, or maybe you want a good referral later. If you do leave, you want to leave behind a continued path of goodwill, not burned bridges.&quot;</p> <h2>Don't announce your intentions on social media</h2> <p>Even though you think your social media accounts are &quot;private,&quot; remain cautious. People are nosy, and it's common practice these days for employers to check in on their employees' social media presence. If you don't say anything, you don't have to explain anything. This is especially true on LinkedIn; use the service to search for open positions and network with contacts, but don't outwardly declare that you're looking for a new job. It's almost guaranteed to get back to your employer.</p> <p>Nancy Schuman, chief marketing officer at recruitment firm Lloyd Staffing, adds, &quot;Make your activity stream on LinkedIn private and turn off broadcasts. Don't list your current employer by name on your resume. Instead, describe it as a 'large financial institution,' 'a well- known consumer products company,' etc.&quot;</p> <p>Same goes for Facebook, Twitter, and any other platforms you use. You may not be directly connected to your boss, but chances are you're connected to someone you work with, or someone who knows someone you work with. These services may help you make connections faster, but it's best to target individuals in your network directly who may be able to help you. It'll certainly be less dangerous than making a blanket post on Facebook about how you'd like a better job.</p> <h2>Don't send resumes to blind ads</h2> <p>When applying for positions, make sure you know to whom you're sending your resume and information. On platforms like Craigslist, often the job description is listed but the employer remains anonymous. This could spell trouble if you inadvertently respond to an ad your current employer is running.</p> <p>Certified career coach Cheryl Palmer relays a story of a job seeker who made that mistake.</p> <p>&quot;A woman once told me that her coworker responded to a blind ad and then was confronted a short while later by someone in the company from Human Resources,&quot; she says. &quot;The HR professional asked her if she was looking for another job. The woman lied and said no. The HR professional responded, 'I got your resume.' It turned out that the job that this woman had unwittingly applied for was at her own company.&quot;</p> <p>If you're posting to job boards, do that anonymously as well. You never know who's on there. If HR is searching for candidates for your office and they find you, you'll have some explaining to do.</p> <h2>Keep your interview attire in your car</h2> <p>Try not to take time off work to go on job interviews, if only to avoid raising a red flag on why your attendance is suddenly sporadic. If need be, schedule interviews during your lunch break or possibly after work. If there's no wiggle room, as a last resort, take one day off from your current job and try to schedule multiple interviews on that day.</p> <p>To expedite the interview process during work hours &mdash; like lunchtime, for instance &mdash; keep interview attire in your vehicle so you can change in and out of it at a discreet location. A suit and tie will be a dead giveaway if you normally wear jeans and a polo. You can only use the &quot;I have a funeral to attend after work&quot; excuse so many times before your coworkers start to think you're an agent of death.</p> <h2>Use references outside your current company</h2> <p>If you're trying to keep your job search a secret, why would you list your current employer as a reference? Surely you can find other people to vouch for you who don't have the power to fire you for making poor decisions.</p> <p>To avoid this predicament, Schuman suggests letting a prospective employer know that you will offer a current reference once you have a job offer. &quot;But do have other references lined up who know you and your work well for them to contact in the interim,&quot; she adds.</p> <h2>Ask for confidentiality at your interview</h2> <p>You may even go so far as to ask the person with whom you're interviewing not to reach out to your current employer. Just mention that you'd rather keep your current employer out of it; most hiring managers will understand.</p> <p>Schuman suggests, &quot;If you are working with a recruiter, tell them your confidentiality must be maintained; ask to be made aware of all prospective opportunities <em>before</em> your resume is referred.&quot;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jumpstart-your-job-search-with-instagram">Jumpstart Your Job Search With Instagram</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting career confidentiality discreet interviewing new jobs privacy resumes social media work Thu, 01 Jun 2017 08:30:18 +0000 Mikey Rox 1957429 at http://www.wisebread.com 11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-476073295.jpg" alt="College grad learning how to get ahead on the job hunt" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's a dog-eat-dog post-college world out there for new grads. It was when I graduated in 2003, and I hear the same grumblings today from next-gens looking for work.</p> <p>While I can't promise that any of my advice will get you hired, I can ensure that it'll at least help you get your professional endeavors off on the right foot. As such, consider these ways to get ahead in the job hunt.</p> <h2>1. Explore entrepreneurship while you're still in school</h2> <p>Entrepreneurship isn't for everyone, but I do recommend it to everyone. I started my first business while I was still in college, which eventually evolved into a successful media business. That has, in turn, provided me with the financial and recreational freedom to pursue other interests and revenue streams.</p> <p>More than that, though, trying to become your own boss at a young(ish) age, even if you don't quite know what you're doing yet, will never be considered a failure. At the very least, you'll gain skills than can help you in future prospects, learn how to interact with customers, and make connections networking with other professionals. This will give you a major edge over your contemporaries.</p> <h2>2. Volunteer to enhance work ethic and build references</h2> <p>Volunteering, especially right after college, looks great on a resume because it lets an employer know that you're committed to a cause. It's not just about listing the noble charities to which you've given your time, but rather how you turned these opportunities into in-the-field, ethic-building ventures. The experience will undoubtedly help you make contacts and build references who will sing your praises when called upon. Of course, seeing the world, meeting and helping people, and gaining a sense of purpose and self are pretty cool, too.</p> <h2>3. Pursue internships to gain industry experience</h2> <p>I held two internships at a time in college because I knew I wanted to work in media, specifically journalism. Unfortunately for me, I fell in love with a college that didn't offer a journalism major, and that meant I had to make up the difference &mdash; big time.</p> <p>One of my internships was writing news for an ABC-affiliated AM news-radio station, while the other was writing about music for a local magazine. Each of these internships provided me with vastly different skills, but they both prepared me for applying to my first paid writing positions. I went into those jobs better prepared, perhaps, than other candidates.</p> <p>Alexis Chateau, founder and managing partner of her own eponymous public relations firm, credits internship for her success. In addition to the internship, she suggests taking on spec assignments for free to show potential employers what you've got.</p> <p>&quot;College students should take on pro-bono work, to build their portfolio, if they work in an area that requires it,&quot; she says. &quot;An impressive portfolio can open up almost any door in business.&quot;</p> <p>I can personally vouch for this tactic. When I started my journalism career, I wrote many articles for free just to get published. When I had enough clips that showed that I was a capable and cognizant writer, editors responded in kind by hiring me for work.</p> <h2>4. Connect with prospective companies online</h2> <p>If there are particular companies at which you're interested in working, follow them online so you can get a better idea of what they're all about. When you go into an interview with something smart and relevant to say about the company, you won't go unnoticed by the interviewer.</p> <p>&quot;These days, smart companies are using their social media to have a dialogue with the public, and this dialogue is a great way for people to figure out a company's core values, their mission, and the language they use in order to connect with them, and present yourself as an ideal candidate,&quot; explains Carlota Zimmerman, a New York-based career coach and success strategist.</p> <p>Zimmerman suggests also liking the company's Facebook page, as someone through the grapevine may notice and reach out. It may not be that easy, but any potential connection is a valuable connection.</p> <h2>5. Clean up your social media</h2> <p>This is the digital age, when everyone and their mother has a social media presence. Chances are, if you're fresh out of college, you've got a few things floating around your Facebook or Instagram account that may not paint the prettiest picture of you to an employer. And believe me, your prospective employers will be looking.</p> <p>Before you even send out your resume, do a deep clean of all of your social media accounts. Scrub embarrassing posts, delete or untag yourself from unflattering photos, and double check your privacy settings. Then, view your profile publicly to see what information is still accessible. A tedious process? Yes, but so is unemployment. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-clean-up-your-image-on-social-media?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Easy Ways to Clean Up Your Image on Social Media</a>)</p> <h2>6. Tap into your personal network for professional tips</h2> <p>Nearly every single adult you know is a professional with years of experience in their field. Some of them have had the same jobs forever, and some of them have changed careers frequently. No matter the case, these folks can be helpful not only in the advice they can provide, but they may also be able to point you in the right direction of employment.</p> <p>Kristine Thorndyke, who landed a full-time gig in Los Angeles before she graduated, offers advice on how to apply this principle within your own college community.</p> <p>&quot;Join a club or school committee based around a particular skill or interest you intend on pursuing in the future,&quot; she says. &quot;For example, if you are a business major, see if there are any groups or committees that meet up or, oftentimes, a designated business fraternity. These kinds of groups usually have access to professionals in the field you intend on pursuing and can help coordinate meet and greets with these professionals or alumni.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Take advantage of your school's career services resources</h2> <p>When I was looking for a job in Manhattan, I was willing to take all the help I could get. Enter Career Services at my alma mater. These centers provides free resources that not only help students write proper resumes, but also facilitate conversations between alumni and new grads based on field of interest, skill level, and more. My own Career Services connected me with the right people so I could start putting out feelers and getting a handle on what my options were.</p> <p>&quot;Reach out to alumni from your school and ask them out for a coffee to 'pick their brain,'&quot; Thorndyke suggests. &quot;Oftentimes, this alumni has connections or ties to companies that are hiring and will be impressed that you were driven enough to meet and learn more about the kind of work they do and their insight and/or suggestions for you.&quot;</p> <h2>8. Practice how to give a good interview from start to finish</h2> <p>Interviewing for a job is an art form. There are a million things that go into giving a great one, from how you dress to your follow-up thank-yous. As with everything else, of course, practice makes perfect &mdash; and you have ample time to hone your skills since, ya know, you're currently unemployed. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a>)</p> <p>Thorndyke advises, &quot;Interview with a professional career counselor. It's the best way to figure out how to most effectively convey your thoughts and accomplishments before the big interview. Oftentimes, it's difficult to get any honest feedback from HR or interviewers about notes on your qualifications or interviewing ability from a gig you were declined an offer from.&quot;</p> <p>An interview counselor can point out where you need to improve before the rejections become a trend.</p> <h2>9. Learn how to write a resume that will get you noticed</h2> <p>First, let's start with the number one thing you shouldn't do with your resume: Do not send the same one to every job prospect, regardless of industry or field. Your resume should be specifically tailored to the job you're seeking. If that means changing it 57 times a week to make sure it's relevant to each prospect, that's what you need to do. Secondly, it needs to stand out. There are lots of ways you can do that, but the highest on the list is providing details about past accomplishments opposed to generic lines like, &quot;Provided marketing assistance to the director of sales.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a>)</p> <p>You know what HR people do when they read resumes full of bland descriptors? They slam dunk it into the circular file and move on to the next one.</p> <h2>10. Put your GPA on your resume</h2> <p>Maybe I've been out of college for too long, but I don't remember including my GPA on my resume &mdash; or anybody ever suggesting I do so. But Chris Kolmar, co-founder of Zappia.com, makes a good point about adopting the practice, at least for the first couple years after graduation.</p> <p>His logic?</p> <p>&quot;Any good hiring manager will ask for it because it's a decent predictor of success right of out college,&quot; he says.</p> <p>Not gospel, but it certainly won't hurt.</p> <h2>11. Start your job hunt months before graduation</h2> <p>Looking for a job well before you graduate doesn't always work, but getting a head start never hurts.</p> <p>&quot;I secured a job in public relations three days before graduation because of this,&quot; explains Alyssa Pallotti, an account supervisor at Montner Tech PR in Connecticut. &quot;I began applying, participating in phone interviews, and meeting potential employers in person as early as the beginning of my final semester. This allowed me to tweak my resume, cover letters, and interview style based on feedback from those companies. Therefore, my overall presentation and nerves were refined by the time I was actually eligible to take on a position.&quot;</p> <p>Yes, job hunting takes work &mdash; and that can be an overwhelming prospect when you're still dealing with school &mdash; but don't put this off. It could potentially save you months of job-hunt headaches.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving">How to Ask for Your Old Job Back After Leaving</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting advice career college grads internships interviewing looking for work networking new grads resumes tips Mon, 24 Apr 2017 08:30:13 +0000 Mikey Rox 1931722 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_work_thinking_473428184.jpg" alt="Woman learning things she should never include on a cover letter" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Writing the perfect cover letter is a job skill unto itself. In just a few paragraphs, you need to capture the reader's attention and expertly sell your skills and experience, all while striking the right professional tone.</p> <p>It's tempting to slap something together and tell yourself that your resume is more important. Truth be told, though, your cover letter is a key part of the package. Avoiding these seven cover letter gaffes will get you through the interview door faster.</p> <h2>1. Wrong information</h2> <p>Make sure that you have all the details right. Double check that you have the correct company name and spelling, the correct job title, the right address, and, where necessary, the correct name of the hiring manager.</p> <p>If you don't have the name of the hiring manager, you can often find it by calling the company's human resources department. Let HR know which position you're applying for and ask, &quot;To whom should I address my cover letter?&quot; They won't always tell you, but sometimes they will.</p> <p>Also double check your own personal information, including your name, address, email, and phone number. It may sound like common sense, but you'd be surprised how often these tiny typos cost people a job opportunity. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/almost-half-of-job-applicants-make-this-same-foolish-mistake?ref=seealso">Almost Half of Job Applicants Make This Same Foolish Mistake</a>)</p> <h2>2. Poor writing</h2> <p>Use complete sentences. Spell words correctly. Check (and have someone else check) your grammar and punctuation. You want this letter to be the best possible reflection of who you are and how you work, and making silly mistakes won't put your best self forward.</p> <h2>3. What you're lacking</h2> <p>Don't mention any skills or qualifications that you don't have. The cover letter is not the place to bring up any shortcomings.</p> <p>Instead, use this as an opportunity to sell yourself. Tell the potential employer why your skills and experiences are a perfect fit for the position. Remember, your cover letter isn't actually about you. It's about the company you'd like to work for and why you would be a good fit for them. Wow them with what you're offering, and maybe they won't even notice the experience you don't have.</p> <h2>4. Generic, cliché language</h2> <p>Show that you care and that you spent time on your cover letter by eliminating any generic, cliché phrases that could be part of any cover letter, for any job. Don't say that you're a &quot;team player&quot; with &quot;leadership experience&quot; who is also a &quot;hard worker.&quot; Nothing about that is unique, and it'll do nothing to differentiate you from other applicants.</p> <p>Instead, fill your letter with facts that demonstrate your unique skills. Emphasize results whenever possible. Talk about how you led a diverse team to solve a particular problem, or increased revenue by X percent. Then, explain how you would bring those skills to your new job.</p> <h2>5. Lies</h2> <p>Most people who lie on a cover letter don't do so intentionally. They panic &mdash; maybe feel inadequate &mdash; and then they either make something up or, more often, stretch the truth so it looks like they have more experience or qualifications than they actually do.</p> <p>The problem is, these things are easy to check, and besides &mdash; why would you want a job requiring skills you don't actually have? Instead, focus on qualifications you do have. If you feel tempted to stretch the truth often, maybe you need to look at different jobs or take some online courses so you actually have the skills you need for the work you want to do.</p> <h2>6. Personal information</h2> <p>This is not the time to talk about your dog, or your divorce, or about how you need this job because you have to support your three kids all on your own. Yes, those are important things to you, but they don't belong in your cover letter.</p> <p>Like I mentioned above, the cover letter isn't actually about you. It's about the company where you're applying, and how you can make it better. Even if your need for work is desperate, or if there are some personal things you think the company should know about you before they make a decision, the cover letter isn't the place to list them. Wait for an interview.</p> <h2>7. Long paragraphs</h2> <p>No one wants to read a wall of text, especially when they are scanning cover letters for keywords. So, keep your paragraphs short and limit your letter to a single page.</p> <p>This means that you have to be pithy in what you say. Straightforward is usually best. Describe your experience and qualifications, highlight how they satisfy key requirements of the job you're applying for, and then wrap it up. More words aren't necessarily better.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/almost-half-of-job-applicants-make-this-same-foolish-mistake">Almost Half of Job Applicants Make This Same Foolish Mistake</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-low-key-jobs-for-people-who-hate-stress">5 Low Key Jobs for People Who Hate Stress</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting advice career cover letters employment job applications Mistakes new jobs resumes Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:30:11 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1929793 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Tricky Interview Questions Successful CEOs Always Ask http://www.wisebread.com/5-tricky-interview-questions-successful-ceos-always-ask <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-tricky-interview-questions-successful-ceos-always-ask" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-505892722.jpg" alt="Woman learning tricky question CEOs ask" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you're vying to get an exciting job run by a brilliant CEO, you may have to answer some pretty tough questions. If you want to stand out you'll have to have your response as polished as your suit. Here's a list of tricky interview questions some of the most successful CEOs ask.</p> <h2>1. &quot;Tell me the story of your life&quot;</h2> <p>The business acumen of serial entrepreneur Elon Musk is so impressive, it became the inspiration for Robert Downey Jr.'s big-screen portrayal of Iron Man's Tony Stark. The CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, and Chairman of SolarCity, is known for having job applicants explain their thought process behind solving a problem. But that isn't all he's interested in learning. While he does throw in questions about space travel and car manufacturing, he has revealed in several interviews one other very detailed interview question: &quot;Tell me the story of your life, and the decisions that you made along the way, and why you made them, and also tell me about some of the most difficult problems you worked on and how you solved them.&quot;</p> <p>Sound like a long conversation? Well, better have your life story all squared up! Previous job applicants recall that interviews with Musk are <a href="https://www.quora.com/Whats-it-like-to-have-a-job-interview-with-Elon-Musk/answer/Jeff-Nelson-32" target="_blank">highly conversational</a>.</p> <h2>2. &quot;What is your favorite property in Monopoly, and why?&quot;</h2> <p>According to renowned board game designer <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/articles/2013/03/20/what-monopoly-can-teach-you-about-smart-investing" target="_blank">Philip Orbanes</a>, Monopoly teaches players of any age an understanding of the concept of diversification and offers practical training in managing money. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-fun-games-that-make-you-smarter-too?ref=seealso" target="_blank">11 Fun Games That Make You Smarter, Too</a>)</p> <p>So, that's why Ken Moelis, founder and CEO of investment bank Moelis &amp; Co., loves asking this question during interviews to recent MBA graduates seeking midlevel positions. Why? Moelis strongly believes that to attract top talent, the investment and banking industry needs to update its hiring practices.</p> <p>&quot;Through innovation and creativity we need to actually underwrite the exceptional experience we are promoting,&quot; says Moelis. And with this question, he seeks to infuse that creativity into the process of assessing risks and rewards of financial assets.</p> <h2>3. &quot;If you had 10 years left to live, would you take this job?&quot;</h2> <p>Talk about commitment! But that's exactly what Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky is looking for in his job applicants. If you think this is a bit of an extreme, think again.</p> <p>&quot;Whatever you want to do in those last 10 years you should just do. I really want you to think about that, that was enough time for you to do something you really cared about and the answer doesn't have to be this company,&quot; <a href="https://genius.com/Alfred-lin-lecture-10-company-culture-and-building-a-team-part-i-annotated" target="_blank">explains Chesky</a>. Given that he interviewed the first 300 Airbnb employees and his company was valued at $30 billion in 2016, this CEO may be onto something about requiring that level of commitment from his employees &mdash; or at least that level of self awareness.</p> <h2>4. &quot;What didn't you get a chance to include on your resume?&quot;</h2> <p>When you're knighted by the Queen of England for your &quot;services to entrepreneurship,&quot; you probably know a thing or two about running a business and hiring the right people. Known for his extreme antics, Founder of Virgin Group Sir Richard Branson is no stranger to thinking outside of the box.</p> <p>&quot;Obviously a good CV is important, but if you were going to hire by what they say about themselves on paper, you wouldn't need to waste time on an interview,&quot; Branson wrote about his favorite interview question in his book <a href="http://amzn.to/2odTsyt" target="_blank">The Virgin Way: If It's Not Fun, It's Not Worth Doing</a>.</p> <p>He added in a LinkedIn post why he looks <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20130923230007-204068115-how-i-hire-focus-on-personality" target="_blank">beyond qualifications</a>: &quot;I only look at them after everything else. If somebody has five degrees and more A grades than you can fit on one side of paper, it doesn't necessarily mean they are the right person for the job.&quot;</p> <h2>5. &quot;Sell me this pen&quot;</h2> <p>Some CEOs don't just want you to talk the talk, they want you to walk the walk. And that's precisely what Jordan Belfort, former CEO of brokerage firm Stratton Oakmont, would ask his job applicants to do.</p> <p>While the real life &quot;Wolf of Wall Street&quot; isn't the best example of business ethics, there's no denying his master salesmanship. Even after spending four years in federal prison and being mandated to restitue $110 million to his victims, Belfort was still able to command <a href="http://www.theaustralian.com.au/life/weekend-australian-magazine/whos-afraid-of-jordan-belfort-the-wolf-of-wall-street/story-e6frg8h6-1226906434759" target="_blank">up to $75,000</a> for a speaking fee in 2014.</p> <p>His classic interview question has been adopted by several recruiters beyond just the sales industry. Why? This question tests your ability in value-added sales skills (&quot;This pen has refillable ink cartridges so you never need to buy a new one&quot;) and solution-based sales skills (&quot;What color pen are you in the market for?&quot;).</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tricky-interview-questions-successful-ceos-always-ask">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-job-hunting-roadblocks-millennials-must-overcome">5 Job Hunting Roadblocks Millennials Must Overcome</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-outdated-job-search-techniques-to-avoid">10 Outdated Job-Search Techniques to Avoid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting banking big companies CEO dream jobs interview questions resumes sales technology Tue, 04 Apr 2017 09:00:13 +0000 Damian Davila 1917877 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Deal When You Hate Your New Job http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-529254969.jpg" alt="Man learning how to deal when he hates his new job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 1994, I started a new job in an entirely new field. The gig seemed perfect: It was a step up financially, it was ripe with opportunity &hellip; and it was a complete disaster.</p> <p>Within days, I had a sinking feeling that my new dream job was actually a nightmare. But I was stuck. Without a clear plan, I stayed in that job for two years and hated nearly every minute of it. If your new job feels like a bad dream, here are seven things you can do.</p> <h2>1. Determine if it's the job or the transition</h2> <p>Starting a new job is a huge change, and one that can be very stressful. It's easy for that stress to be misinterpreted and misplaced. Ask yourself, &quot;Is it the job I hate, or is it the transition?&quot; Many times, once we settle into a new job, get acquainted with co-workers, and begin to understand the expectations, that &quot;nightmare job&quot; becomes just a job.</p> <h2>2. Focus on the good</h2> <p>OK, so you've determined that it's the job &mdash; not the transition itself &mdash; that's the nightmare. Now what? At the risk of sounding like a blind optimist, focus on the good. It can help you tolerate a job when there are no other options immediately available. What duties do you enjoy? Are there co-workers that make the day-to-day grind easier to manage? Is there a nearby coffee shop or park where you can unwind for a few minutes every afternoon? All of those things, even though small, are positives you can look forward to.</p> <h2>3. Retreat</h2> <p>Sometimes the smartest strategy is a hasty retreat. Contact the supervisor of your previous job and explain the circumstances &mdash; you made a career misstep and would like the opportunity to return to your old job. If you left on good terms, if the position is still open, and if you're willing to eat a little crow, this tactic just might work.</p> <h2>4. Set a deadline</h2> <p>Toiling away at a job you hate year after year can sap your motivation and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor?ref=internal" target="_blank">keep you poor</a>. If you have a financial cushion, don't stay in a nightmare job one minute longer than necessary. Set a deadline for your departure and stick to it. In the meantime, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=internal" target="_blank">polish your resume</a>, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired?ref=internal" target="_blank">build a better LinkedIn profile</a>, and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-come-up-with-1000-in-the-next-30-days?ref=internal" target="_blank">save aggressively</a> so you can weather gaps in employment.</p> <h2>5. Work your network</h2> <p>There's a kernel of truth to the adage, &quot;It's not what you know, it's whom you know.&quot; If you need to find a new job quickly, tap into the power of your professional network. To avoid the deadly &quot;job hopper&quot; wrap, frame your situation carefully but honestly. Be ready to explain to potential employers why your new job is a bad fit, what you learned from the experience, and how you're applying those lessons in your current job search. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40</a>)</p> <h2>6. Be willing to take a step backward</h2> <p>Even if going back to your old job is out of the question, be willing to take a temporary step backward. Though it may bruise your ego, a strategic step down the career ladder allows you to regroup, plan your next move, and build additional experience in a more positive environment.</p> <h2>7. Once you're back on track, purge it from your resume</h2> <p>Mistakes happen, but there's no need to document each one permanently on a resume. If your nightmare job was short-lived, don't include it in your work history. Instead, own the mistake on a personal level. Use it to learn more about yourself, improve how you research new career opportunities, and &mdash; perhaps most importantly &mdash; make sure all your future jobs are nightmare-free.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-ways-to-leave-your-job">10 Fun Ways to Leave Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job">5 Things You Must Do Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income bad job employment job offers networking new job quitting resumes Fri, 31 Mar 2017 08:30:31 +0000 Kentin Waits 1915859 at http://www.wisebread.com They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What? http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-525955132.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are usually two ways to get a pay bump in your career; either you move to a new job that offers more money and a better title, or you get promoted at your current company with a raise. These days though, a promotion is not always accompanied by a bigger paycheck. When this happens, you may be wondering: Is it worth it?</p> <p>Let's look at the arguments for, and against, this new trend.</p> <h2>Yes! Take the Promotion Even Without a Raise</h2> <p>If there's a title change on the table, but no extra money to accompany it, there are still plenty of positives to consider.</p> <h3>1. You Will Gain More Experience</h3> <p>Hands down, one of the best reasons to take a promotion without a raise is to take advantage of the experience you'll get. Moving into a bigger role means more responsibility, more work, and more to learn. While it would be ideal to be compensated for this, remember that experience in and of itself is a kind of compensation. Think about it: Everyone who is paying many thousands of dollars to get an education, or learn a new skill, is paying for experience. You're getting this additional experience at no cost to you, and it can only help you grow and become a better employee.</p> <h3>2. It Looks Great on Your Resume</h3> <p>A <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=internal" target="_blank">flat resume</a> is like a flat landscape; it's not very inviting. If you're looking to move jobs, you want to show your prospective employer that you have achieved things. You made waves, you made a difference, and you climbed the ladder. Promotions without pay raises do that just as effectively as those that come with extra cash. After all, how often do you put a specific salary next to each job or position you ever held? So, if you get promoted from Account Manager to Account Director, but there's no raise in pay, don't worry too much. It may not pay off now, but when you do move to a different job, you can jump right in at the higher level.</p> <h3>3. You May Get Additional Benefits Aside From the Pay</h3> <p>So you're not getting any extra money. But, what else does the promotion give you? Ask, and you may be surprised at the additional benefits that could come with the job. In some companies, that promotion can mean extra vacation days and personal days. In others, it may mean that you can work at home occasionally, or travel more. Some companies will give you extra discounts on products and services, or freebies. You may be able to get the cost of your cellphone bill reimbursed, or get a free company phone, which eliminates the need to pay for your own. Is there a company car? All these benefits, and more, add up to either saving money, or you not having to spend it, and that's a kind of pay raise.</p> <h3>4. With a Better Title Comes a Bigger Role in the Company</h3> <p>Even without the extra money, a promotion can be an excellent way to get more gravitas at work. Now, you have the title to push through ideas that might not have gone very far before. You may also have people reporting to you, which means you can delegate some of the less interesting work to them. It is rare &mdash; very rare &mdash; for a promotion to give you nothing more than a title change. Take the chance to grab those advantages. Or even better, suggest some. If the new title doesn't come with more money, can it come with something else? Get creative.</p> <h3>5. Turning a Promotion Down Can Look Bad</h3> <p>Finally in the &quot;for&quot; camp, it's the one point you cannot ignore. How is this going to look? It may be that the company is in financially unstable times, and cannot afford to give you more money right now. But, they really want you to take a bigger role, and more responsibility. They may well be counting on you. Saying &quot;Not without a raise&quot; can make you look mercenary, and while it is your right to do so, it could have implications further down the road. So, think hard before saying no. You may be saying no to a bigger promotion and actual raise down the road.</p> <h2>No! Don't Take That Promotion Without a Raise</h2> <p>More problems and no more money? Here's why you should consider declining the offer.</p> <h3>1. It's More Responsibility for the Same Money</h3> <p>Or, to put it another way, it's a pay cut. Look closely at the new title, and look at how the new job differs from your current role. Do you have to come in earlier and leave later? Are you on the road more? Are you now handling a much bigger workload, more stress, and the working lives of a lot of new people now reporting to you? Will this mean less time with your family or other relationships? Will you have to sacrifice hobbies and other personal interests? You may even have to relocate, and without more money, that could be impossible. Weigh up all these options carefully.</p> <h3>2. You Don't Want to Be a Pushover<strong> </strong></h3> <p>As an employee, you want to be respected. You do what you are required to do, and you do it well. But, you do not want to be a pushover, either. Taking a promotion without a pay raise might leave you feeling taken advantage of. Explore the reasons why this promotion comes without money. Does the company have a good excuse? It's certainly not the norm to get a promotion without extra pay, so what's the party line from HR?</p> <h3>3. Your Company May Be Hiding Something<strong> </strong></h3> <p>There's a scene in the movie <em>Fun With Dick and Jane</em> where Jim Carrey's character, who works for an Enron-like company, gets a big promotion only to find out he's the fall guy for his company's fall into the toilet. Sadly, this is not just something that happens in the movies. People sometimes get promoted into jobs that are dead ends, or into positions that make them immediately liable for something bad happening. You really need to do the research here. What exactly does this promotion entail? What is the state of the department? Talk to people who had that position before you. Get the scoop before you even consider saying yes, or no.</p> <h3>4. The Position May Require You to Actually Spend More Money</h3> <p>Not only will you be doing more work for the same money, but it's possible you'll have to dip into your pocket more as well. The promotion may require you to buy clothing and equipment that won't be reimbursed by the company. You may have to do a lot more driving, which means more gas and more wear and tear. You may have to organize and attend lunch meetings, which are once again not reimbursed. Ask what is required of you in the new role, and do the math.</p> <h2>What to Do?</h2> <p>As you can see, there are more reasons &quot;for&quot; taking this promotion than &quot;against&quot; it. But, that doesn't mean you should blindly take any promotion that comes without a raise. Take each situation on a case-by-case basis. Really look into it. Chances are, it's a good career move, even if it doesn't do anything for your bank account. But, there are risks, and they can be big ones. Good luck.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-you-shouldnt-vacation-shame-your-coworkers">7 Reasons You Shouldn&#039;t &quot;Vacation Shame&quot; Your Coworkers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-get-a-promotion">8 Money Moves to Make the Moment You Get a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job">How to Deal When You Hate Your New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income employment job titles promotions pros and cons raises resumes work Mon, 27 Feb 2017 10:00:20 +0000 Paul Michael 1896816 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Things You Should Never Do on LinkedIn http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-do-on-linkedin <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-things-you-should-never-do-on-linkedin" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/linkedin_000038175350.jpg" alt="Learning things you should never do on LinkedIn" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>How dialed in is your LinkedIn profile? As the world's most successful social business network (at last count, the site had 380 million members across more than 200 countries and territories), LinkedIn has become synonymous with online career-building. And with such a mind-boggling reach, it's worth making sure you're not <em>locked out</em>. Here are seven things you should never do on LinkedIn.</p> <h2>1. Confuse It With Facebook</h2> <p>The distinctions are obvious to most, but some lump all social media tools together in a bucket marked &quot;anything goes.&quot; Don't be one of these people.</p> <p>LinkedIn connections, messages, and posts should be reserved for building your professional network, joining groups of people who share your interests, expanding your career skills and knowledge, and learning about new work opportunities. Don't use it for a casual social interaction, posting office party selfies, or anything else that might turn a potential employer off.</p> <h2>2. Send a Standard Connection Request</h2> <p>If you're interested enough to make a connection on LinkedIn, take a moment to do it with a personal message. Remember, be professional and polite. If you've met, remind the person of your affiliation; if not, briefly explain your interest in connecting.</p> <h2>3. Pick the Wrong Pic</h2> <p>A great photo is an important way to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-your-linkedin-profile-noticed-with-a-few-attention-grabbing-tweaks">get your LinkedIn profile noticed</a>. But skip the one that includes your husband, your kids, your friends, or the family pet. Also, make sure the photo is clear, professional, and relatively recent (no vintage glamour shots, please).</p> <h2>4. Write Wrong</h2> <p>LinkedIn is a continuous online snapshot of who you are professionally. And just as there's an art to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">writing a great resume</a>, there's an art to crafting great content on LinkedIn. Even though it's a social media site, grammatical errors on LinkedIn can immediately cast you in bad light. Proofread every word you write; even quick status updates and link introductions should be polished and perfect.</p> <h2>5. Solicit Recommendations</h2> <p>Soliciting recommendations from previous employers and co-workers is tricky. First of all, never overwhelm new connections with a recommendation request right away. Second, don't spam your entire network with requests. Be tactical and tactful; only reach out to those with whom you have (or have had) a strong professional relationship. And keep in mind, people are more likely to respond to requests that are simple and easy. Explain the specific skill sets you're hoping to emphasize on LinkedIn and then politely request a recommendation &mdash; once and only once.</p> <h2>6. Ignore Your Privacy Settings</h2> <p>Privacy on a professional networking site is an essential feature for obvious reasons. If you're currently employed, but actively looking for your next opportunity, you'll naturally want to maintain a certain level of discretion. If you're engaged in a job search, customize your privacy settings so your boss can't see what you're up to. You can find LinkedIn's privacy options by scrolling over the small version of your profile photo in the upper right hand of the homepage. Navigate to &quot;Privacy &amp; Settings&quot; and make the necessary adjustments.</p> <h2>7. Be Passive</h2> <p>Active users make LinkedIn a vibrant community and a valuable tool. Be part of it by updating your status a couple of times each week. Updates on promotions and professional pursuits or links to events keep things fresh and gives potential employers a reason to reach out to you. Joining groups, sharing articles, and growing your network are other important ways to show you're more than just a lurker.</p> <p>Today, learning to use social media effectively is a big part of professional <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/networking-basics-for-regular-people">networking basics</a>. With some time, attention, and discipline, LinkedIn can become a powerful career-building tool&hellip; just as long as you don't post those glamour shots.</p> <p><em>Have you found a job through a LinkedIn connection? What tips do you have for other LinkedIn users?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-do-on-linkedin">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-ways-to-use-social-media-in-business">13 Ways to Use Social Media in Business</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-someone-to-accept-your-linkedin-invitation">How to Get Someone to Accept Your LinkedIn Invitation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-34-smart-ways-to-improve-your-social-media-presence">Flashback Friday: 34 Smart Ways to Improve Your Social Media Presence</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-freelancers-and-telecommuters-can-make-friends-and-network">11 Ways Freelancers and Telecommuters Can Make Friends and Network</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-online-tools-to-help-you-land-a-job">5 Online Tools to Help You Land a Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building business connections Internet LinkedIn networking resumes social media Mon, 28 Sep 2015 09:00:32 +0000 Kentin Waits 1568938 at http://www.wisebread.com 11 Life Skills That Are Now Completely Obsolete http://www.wisebread.com/11-life-skills-that-are-now-completely-obsolete <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/11-life-skills-that-are-now-completely-obsolete" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_reading_map_000040537316.jpg" alt="Woman using life skills that are now completely obsolete" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Just 30 &mdash; heck, even 20 &mdash; years ago we had to do most things using our hands and our brains. Some would argue that life is more convenient because of our technological advances since then, but somewhere along the way we lost a few <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-life-skills-you-must-learn-in-your-40s">valuable skills</a>. From reading paper maps to balancing a checkbook to resume writing, take a look at all the things we used to know how to do that &mdash; for better or worse &mdash; are now becoming obsolete.</p> <h2>1. Reading Paper Maps</h2> <p>I remember riding to West Virginia when I was a kid for a weekend getaway with my parents who were using a paper map to navigate. As was common back then, we got lost, my dad's pride wouldn't let him ask for directions, and it took far longer than it should have to arrive at our destination. That's the upside to having GPS systems show us the most efficient way to get someplace nowadays. The downside, however, is that nobody &mdash; myself included &mdash; knows how to read a map anymore; it might as well be an abstract drawing of a fictional land.</p> <h2>2. Cursive Penmanship</h2> <p>Most of us know how to write in cursive &mdash; it was a big deal back in the day. Everything had to be in cursive from grade four onward, and if you didn't do your swirls or hooks correctly (or if you made your lowercase Ds look like lowercase Cs &mdash; and maybe still do), you got points taken off and a letter sent home to your mother explaining how if you didn't become a master of cursive by age 11, you would essentially fail at life. Ah, the good ol' days.</p> <p>Yet as obnoxious as it seemed in elementary school, today the nostalgia of cursive reminds us of how important it is to writing correspondences (well, the one correspondence we send per year anyway; more on that coming up), plus it's just easier to beautifully blend all your letters together instead of writing them out individually like a weirdo. Personally, I don't trust anyone who can't write in cursive (I'm suspicious of people who didn't have cable as a kid, too, by the way), and you shouldn't either.</p> <p>Alas, if you're hoping against hope that cursive will make a comeback, put on the brakes. Headline after headline is decreeing the death of cursive penmanship &mdash; &quot;Cursive handwriting is disappearing from public schools,&quot; &quot;Cursive writing is obsolete; schools should teach programming instead,&quot; &quot;Cursive handwriting will no longer be taught in schools because it's a big, old waste of time&quot; &mdash; which probably means that the government will make the replacement of our useless human hands with voice-activated smartphones mandatory by the year 2025.</p> <h2>3. Letter Writing</h2> <p>It wasn't long ago that I was in college dating a guy several hundred miles away, and we wrote letters to one another. We had email, but that was fairly new to the mainstream world, and it was still common to sit down and write your thoughts on paper and take them to the post office. Seems like a whole other life now, doesn't it?</p> <p>As such, today's youth not only lack the wherewithal to form coherent sentences that they'll write using opposable thumbs, but they also have no idea how to properly format a letter (ask your child to do that and see what kind of look you get). How do I know this as a non-parent? Because as a small business owner, I sometimes receive letters from recent college graduates that I swear were plagiarized from cave people seeking employment in the Bedrock.</p> <h2>4. Writing Checks and Balancing a Checkbook</h2> <p>I learned how to write checks in 8th grade as part of a Junior Achievement class, and it made me feel like a boss. From that moment I embraced adulthood, and I wanted to buy everything by writing out checks with the zero dollars I had in my fake bank account. Now 20 years later, I still prefer paper checks to pay my bills and for accounts receivables because it feels like tangible money in my hands &mdash; and that's psychologically important for me whether it's coming or going. Talk about being a weirdo, eh?</p> <p>Can't say I miss the old days in this regard, but as a personal-finance expert I do wish people took their bank accounts more seriously and monitored them more closely. Millions of us teeter on the edge of broke because, partly at least, that money is just numbers on a computer, not ones that we're logging by hand as a representation of our actual funds. Those two distinctions subconsciously affect how we regard our cashflow, according to the School of Because I Said So.</p> <h2>5. Telephone Etiquette</h2> <p>Have you heard a teenager answer a phone call recently? Traditional and acceptable greetings like &quot;Hello&quot; and &quot;How are you?&quot; are all but dead, having been replaced with more modern equivalents like &quot;Sup,&quot; &quot;Yo,&quot; and &quot;What's poppin'?&quot; And that's if they even pick up the phone. It's not just the youngins who have an aversion to calls though; increasingly, our society is transitioning to communication completely by text, and I'm not exempt. Much to my mother's chagrin, I rarely answer my phone, instead preferring short messages. Because why do we need to have a 20-minute conversation that can be accomplished in a few quick clicks? I know, I know, I'm part of the problem.</p> <h2>6. Proper Grammar Skills</h2> <p>I feel like I can serve as an authoritative voice on the value of proper grammar skills and the impending disaster that is our future since I'm an observant writer who has solid grammar skills. As one of the last living bastions of hope, I can tell you that the problem didn't just start a few years ago. It started <em>way</em> before that, somewhere around the time of the tail end of the Boomer Generation who were school age in the 1970s. How can I be sure? Because based solely on the speech patterns of most of the adults in my life growing up, they wouldn't know a past participle if it was stuffed in their cigarettes.</p> <h2>7. Sewing</h2> <p>I could sew a button back onto my shirt if my life depended on it, but everything else is a job for my tailor or my mother. Though I do envy people who can work a needle and thread like it's their magic wand. My grandmother in particular was a boss on her Singer, making whole outfits, quilts, curtains and more like a pioneer who just got off the Oregon Trail. Her prickly prowess saved me a lot of money when I was starting out on my own, too. Thank you, lady.</p> <h2>8. Ironing</h2> <p>I have an old college friend, who I love for her incredible sense of humor, who said that she's successfully navigated her whole life without ever ironing a single article of clothing &mdash; and she wasn't kidding. She's sadly not alone. My observation is that the majority of Americans in this new millennium are now split into two factions: Those who have only seen an iron on a classic TV show, and those who get their clothes pressed by a third party (significant other, mom, lady/gentleman at the press-and-fold, etc.). Me on the other hand, I hold my head high as a member of that third party. I iron everything I pull out of my closet, and I'll iron your clothes too if it means we don't have to go out in public looking like you pulled your outfit from a ball on the floor. It only takes five minutes to look pressed and put together.</p> <h2>9. Resume Writing</h2> <p>When I first moved to New York City, I was jobless. I left Baltimore with about a thousand dollars to my name, banking on getting hired once Manhattan met my awesome personality. Stop laughing.</p> <p>Of course, I didn't land a gig immediately so I had to find work wherever I could. One of those places was on Craigslist helping people write their resumes. Notwithstanding the irony of the situation (a boy who couldn't get a job was writing resumes for professional candidates), it was the single most exhausting thing I've ever done. Based on what I was provided by the clients, you would have thought I had posted an ad offering magician services. Nearly every resume I received was abominable. Zero formatting, spelling and grammar errors throughout, hardly any real skills to speak about, and I was supposed to turn it into a glowing testament of their work ethic that Donald Trump himself would endorse.</p> <p>I'm so glad that's coming to an end. Personally, I want to see what a potential employee has done in the past &mdash; actual work that they've completed, whether it be in a portfolio, on a website, via photos, whatever. Show me &mdash; don't tell me &mdash; what you can do. The rest of the information I need to make a sound judgment on the person comes via social media, like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn. Some of you may roll your eyes at that, but there's much more value in learning about people where they're being real opposed to the BS they cram onto a single sheet of paper. I haven't hired a lackey yet.</p> <h2>10. Driving a Manual Transmission</h2> <p>Why would I want to drive around town grinding gears when I can put the car in one gear and go about my business? The manual transmission isn't 100% obsolete yet &mdash; though its <a href="http://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/a6308/whats-really-killing-the-manual-transmisson/">death is on the horizon</a> &mdash; so it still may not be a bad skill to learn. Ya know, for those times you're trapped in the desert with your friend who drives a Jeep and he gets bitten by a rattlesnake and you're his only hope for survival. Everyday occurrences like that.</p> <h2>11. Finding Dates IRL</h2> <p>We swipe left and right, we &quot;friend&quot; each other, and we hook-up. But personally, I love dating and connecting with someone on a one-on-one level. I like organically discovering their idiosyncrasies, sharing experiences together like going to a ballgame, and feeling their hand in mine. I'm afraid I'm in the minority in that regard, but I wholly believe that there's no possible way that we can continue to shut one another out emotionally and survive as a species. It's not altogether biologically impossible to continue on that path, but it would certainly be unfortunate.</p> <p><em>Do you have other life skills to add that are now completely obsolete? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-life-skills-that-are-now-completely-obsolete">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-life-hacks-you-should-master-by-age-30">10 Life Hacks You Should Master by Age 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/standout-stuff-to-put-on-your-resume">Standout Stuff for Your Resume and LinkedIn Profile</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-things-americans-were-better-at-in-the-1950s-than-today">8 Things Americans Were Better at in the 1950s Than Today</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks cursive ironing maps obsolete old fashioned resumes sewing skills Thu, 18 Jun 2015 15:01:12 +0000 Mikey Rox 1455422 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Resume Rules You Should Be Breaking http://www.wisebread.com/4-resume-rules-you-should-be-breaking <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-resume-rules-you-should-be-breaking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_shaking_hands_000023014132.jpg" alt="Woman breaking common resume rules" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>America is back, baby!</p> <p>With more and more U.S. cities <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-american-cities-with-the-highest-minimum-wage">raising their minimum wages</a>, job applicants are more excited about their employment prospects. Some people are even looking at changing their careers to chase higher pay.</p> <p>But before you start working on your CV, you should freshen up your resume writing skills. With the <a href="http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm">unemployment rate still at 5.4%</a>, you're likely to face strong competition, so you need to do everything you can to stand out from the crowd. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=seealso">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a>)</p> <p>To prevent your resume from landing in the HR black hole, here are four resume rules that you should be breaking.</p> <h2>1. One-Page Resume</h2> <p>Just like the objective statement, the one-page resume rule is a habit that you picked up way back in high school. The idea behind the one-page resume is that hiring managers have very little time to review applications so you need to be as succinct as possible.</p> <p>However, forcing your resume into a single page ignores two key facts:</p> <ul> <li>The typical U.S. worker <a href="http://www.fastcompany.com/1802731/four-year-career">changes jobs every 4.4 years</a>. Assuming you land your first job at age 21, you would have switched jobs about five times by age 40.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>90% of companies use ATS programs as resume gatekeepers.</li> </ul> <p>If you have solid and relevant work experience for the position that you're applying for, feel free to showcase it using two pages. As long as you're telling a compelling story about your employment history, the extra page will be welcomed. And it will provide extra space to include keywords directly connected the job description, effectively increasing your chances of passing the ATS test.</p> <h2>2. No Contact With Hiring Managers</h2> <p>HR professionals often feel overwhelmed. For example, Starbucks attracted 7.6 million job applicants for about 65,000 job openings and Procter &amp; Gamble received close to one million applications for 2,000 job postings.</p> <p>In hopes of keeping their sanity, hiring managers set up as many hurdles and obstacles between them and applicants. The idea is that hopefully only the &quot;truly great candidates&quot; will be left once the application-process dust settles. The reality is that's very often not the case.</p> <p>To circumvent this &quot;resume black hole,&quot; former Fortune 500 Human Resources SVP and current HR consultant, Liz Ryan recommends to craft a <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20130725040624-52594-forget-the-cover-letter-send-a-pain-letter-instead">compelling pain letter</a> to start a conversation directly with your target hiring manager.</p> <p>Ryan breaks down the pain letter into four parts:</p> <ul> <ul> <li>One to two sentence hook congratulating the hiring manager on a personal work-related achievement. For example, &quot;I was lucky enough to catch the tail-end of your presentation last week at the Miami Retailers Association and I couldn't agree more about your observation that&hellip;&quot;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Discussion of a pain point that hiring manager is currently facing. For example, a payroll coordinator could be frustrated with improper tax deductions and reporting mistakes now that her department went from servicing 25 to 350 employees.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Your one to two sentence &quot;dragon-slaying story&quot; showing how you can alleviate that pain point. Ryan provides a specific example, &quot;When I ran the payroll system at Angry Chocolates, I kept the payroll accurate and in compliance and answered dozens of employee questions every day while we grew from 15 to 650 staff members.&quot; No jargon, no buzz words, just plain language showcasing results.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Short closing inviting hiring manager to set up a meeting time.</li> </ul> </ul> <p>Hiring managers welcome messages, as long as they're hyper-personalized. Remember the Google Job Experiment? Alec Brownstein created Google ads for top advertising creative directors, so that when they would google their own names, they would receive a message from Alec asking for a job interview. By reaching out directly to the hiring managers in a creative way, Alec impressed the ad execs and landed a job at Young and Rubicam. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-6-craziest-things-people-have-done-to-land-a-job?ref=seealso">The 6 Craziest Things People Have Done to Land a Job</a>)</p> <h2>3. List Unemployment Gaps</h2> <p>Unemployed job applicants seem to never get a break.</p> <ul> <li>A study of 4,800 fake resumes at random for 600 job openings showed that employers would rather call back someone with no relevant experience and a few months of unemployment than someone with more relevant experience and <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/04/15/companies-wont-even-look-at-resumes-of-the-long-term-unemployed/">unemployment longer than six months</a>.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Anecdotal accounts from <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/18/nyregion/for-many-being-out-of-work-is-chief-obstacle-to-finding-it.html?pagewanted=all">unemployed job applicants in New York</a> support these findings.</li> </ul> <p>Whether employers do this intentionally or unintentionally, the reality is that listing yourself as unemployed may do more harm than good on you resume. However, this doesn't mean that you should lie. Misrepresenting any information on your resume may bite you back and make you subject to immediate dismissal.</p> <p>Functional resumes aren't viable solutions, either. HR veterans see them as major red flags because resumes in that format often hide lack of experience and don't provide enough information to employers.</p> <p>Instead, a resume expert at Monster recommends that applicants <a href="http://career-advice.monster.com/resumes-cover-letters/resume-writing-tips/leverage-volunteer-work-on-resume/article.aspx">leverage volunteer work</a> on a resume. While you may not having gotten paid for making traditional and online media buys for your local Red Cross, or preparing taxes at Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program, you definitely gained and demonstrated expertise in skills that employers want. Even better, you may also have professional references ready for employers.</p> <p>During unemployment periods, sign up for meaningful volunteer or internship opportunities so that you can prevent the employers' bias towards unemployment. This is a helpful technique for recent grads to avoid the challenge of having no experience.</p> <h2>4. Relying on a Traditional Resume</h2> <p>As many as 58% of employers have caught a lie on a resume. That's why more and more companies are ditching the idea of the traditional resume altogether.</p> <ul> <li>A New York venture capital firm recruits investment analysts by asking applicants to include links to their web presences, such as Twitter account or Tumblr blog.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Instead of reading resumes, a bumper and marketing stickers company uses an online survey to help screen applicants.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>By reviewing <a href="http://mashable.com/2013/11/16/hired-without-a-resume/">code posted on GitHub</a>, a web-based repository for coders, an educational technology company looks for programming candidates that have completed public projects.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Teams of recruiters for a large online lender perform &quot;road rallies&quot; in which they scout for talent at carefully selected groups of shopping malls.</li> </ul> <p>It goes to show that some resume rules are meant to be broken. If you believe that the hiring practices of your industry are outdated, there may be a company in yours or in another industry that agrees with you. That may very well be the key to landing your dream job!</p> <p>After all, nobody wants to work with a company that is completely inflexible and that prefers to stick with outdated resume rules.</p> <p><em>What are some resume rules that you broke &mdash; and still got the job? </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-resume-rules-you-should-be-breaking">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-high-paying-jobs-for-introverts">The 10 Best High Paying Jobs for Introverts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building cover letters CVS employment job interviews resumes Tue, 02 Jun 2015 09:00:12 +0000 Damian Davila 1443454 at http://www.wisebread.com Fired? Here's How to Keep It From Hurting Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/guy_fired_000052937386.jpg" alt="Guy got fired and doesn&#039;t want it hurting his career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Getting fired can destroy your self-confidence and devastate your personal finances, and that's just the start. Handled wrong, getting fired could have a long-lasting negative impact on your career, depending on the circumstances.</p> <p>But don't become discouraged, or think that no one will hire you. Keep your chin up, and check out these five ways to minimize damage to your career after getting fired.</p> <h2>1. Get Creative to Minimize Employment Gaps</h2> <p>It's vital to minimize gaps in your employment history. Even if you can't find a job right away, you might be able to volunteer with a local organization or offer your skills to companies on a freelance basis until real employment comes along. You don't need a lot of freelance clients &mdash; just enough to keep your skills sharp and show employers that you're active in your field.</p> <h2>2. Choose References Carefully</h2> <p>If you were laid off or downsized and left the company on good terms, getting a good reference from your old job likely won't be an issue. But if you were fired because of a bad attitude or poor work performance, your immediate supervisor might not put in a good word. However, if you had a great working relationship with another manager or a team leader, ask this person to provide a letter of recommendation or reference. With so much competition in the job market, the last thing you need is a bad reference slowing down your efforts.</p> <h2>3. Avoid the F-Word</h2> <p>Some people use the word &quot;fired&quot; regardless of the circumstances of their departure. Technically, &quot;getting fired&quot; can apply to any type of involuntary termination. But if you weren't let go because of poor work performance or because of anything you did wrong, avoid the F-word and use more accurate terminology, such as &quot;I was laid off,&quot; &quot;My position was eliminated,&quot; or &quot;The company downsized.&quot; These explanations sound better and might alleviate some of the stigma associated with being unemployed.</p> <h2>4. Be Honest</h2> <p>While it's understandable to downplay getting fired, it's important to be honest with the interviewer. Don't say you were laid off or downsized if you were unmistakably fired for misconduct or subpar work. The interviewer will mostly likely contact your previous employer, and if he learns that you lied or even slightly exaggerated the reasons for leaving the company, this can hurt your chances of getting the job. However, you don't necessarily have to go into extensive details. Keep your answer simple and short to avoid raising additional questions.</p> <h2>5. Exit Gracefully</h2> <p>The way you conduct yourself after getting fired can also affect how fast you're able to bounce back. If you make a scene by yelling, cursing, or acting unprofessionally in another manner, your employer will take note of this behavior. And when future employers call the company for a reference, your former employer may provide all the dirty details about your rude departure. If you exit gracefully and remain professional, this might persuade a former employer to provide a good reference, even though you weren't the right fit for the position.</p> <p><em>Have you ever been fired? Do you agree with these tips? Do you have any tips of your own to offer? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee">12 Ways You&#039;re Being a Terrible Employee</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting fired laid off resumes unemployed work Tue, 05 May 2015 09:00:25 +0000 Mikey Rox 1408957 at http://www.wisebread.com Your Resume Sucks — Try One of These Instead http://www.wisebread.com/your-resume-sucks-try-one-of-these-instead <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/your-resume-sucks-try-one-of-these-instead" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/job-interview-resume-76806707-small.jpg" alt="job interview" title="job interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Of all the things you might need for a successful job search, a good resume has historically been the most essential.</p> <p>The problem is, most resumes look pretty much the same and that can make it hard to get noticed by potential employers. In fact, as someone who's spent time reviewing job applicants, I can tell you that it doesn't take long for all those resumes to start blurring together. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-words-you-need-to-delete-from-your-resume-right-now?ref=seealso">12 Words You Need to Delete From Your Resume Right Now</a>)</p> <p>That means yours needs to &quot;pop&quot; if you want to stand out and as I outline in my upcoming book, <a href="http://prosperity20.com">Prosperity 2.0</a>, there's fortunately a number of ways to make that happen. You can even customize it to target a specific industry or highlight certain skills and accomplishments, giving you a real edge over the competition.</p> <h2>Conservative Industries Expect a Conservative Resume</h2> <p>The easiest way to choose a resume style is to look at your prospective employers. Are you looking in more conservative fields, such as law, banking, or accounting? Is the position you're applying for set in a traditional corporate environment?</p> <h3>Choose Chronological</h3> <p>If so, your resume should be traditional as well. The chronological format is most common, so when in doubt, this version is a safe bet. It's also a good starting point for the others included here.</p> <p>A chronological resume typically runs a page and a half to two pages in length and includes your complete history &mdash; your prior work experience, your education and your skills &mdash; in chronological order, with the most recent entries listed first. You can also include a section devoted to your accomplishments as well as your career goals and objectives.</p> <p>This resume doesn't really &quot;highlight&quot; anything specific &mdash; it's more of a 30,000 foot view &mdash; and works best for those with a strong and continuous work history.</p> <p>In some cases, the chronological resume might not suit your needs. Perhaps you don't have that strong work history or your most recent entries aren't overly relevant to your prospective job. Or maybe your targeted industry isn't quite so traditional and you think a bit more &quot;pizazz&quot; is called for.</p> <p>Not to worry&hellip; that's where the next resume comes in.</p> <h2>Create a Functional Resume to Highlight Skills Over Continuity</h2> <p>The functional resume is designed specifically to draw attention to the areas you want to highlight. It may or may not include your entire history, and the layout itself is also quite different from the chronological format, giving you a little more creative control in how you present yourself to prospective employers.</p> <h3>Put Your Winning Attributes at the Top</h3> <p>You can list your education first for example, or dive right into your accomplishments if that's where you really shine. Your work history is included, but doesn't have to be in any particular order, and in fact, rather than portraying your employment in a &quot;job-by-job&quot; format, you focus more on the goals you accomplished and the experience you gained.</p> <p>This variation also works great for those who are just starting out or have gaps in their employment history. Keep in mind however, that potential employers will likely want to pin you down on dates and length of employment at some point.</p> <h2>Use a Combination Resume to Feature Both</h2> <p>The combination resume is just what it sounds like: a combination of the chronological and function formats. It starts with skills and accomplishments, but also includes a complete, chronological work history. This resume is ideal if you're looking to change careers and want to highlight relevant skills and experience. It's also a good option if your industry is more creative than conservative, and you want to show some individuality.</p> <p>And speaking of showing individuality, there are times when you want to pull out all the stops. So, while it's a good idea to have at least one of these versions on hand &mdash; regardless of what kind of job you're looking for &mdash; it doesn't have to be the version you lead with.</p> <p>In fact, let's look at some other, more eye-catching varieties that can help get your foot in the door.</p> <h2>Resumes That Go a Step Beyond</h2> <p>It's not unusual for people to have multiple versions of the same resume, each one geared toward a specific type of job or to highlight a certain set of skills.</p> <p>But instead of reproducing your entire resume for this purpose, why not do what advertisers do and create tailored &quot;marketing pieces&quot; that push what you want to push.</p> <h3>Maybe Try a Newsletter Resume</h3> <p>For example, a newsletter resume is just what it sounds like: a resume written in a newsletter format. So, think images, columns, callouts, and bold headings, all laid out to highlight the skills and experience most relevant to the job you're applying for.</p> <p>This format allows you to zero in on your community service for example, or really promote those three months that you exceeded your sales quota. In fact, if you present the information in newsletter-style &quot;stories,&quot; you can turn any piece of information into an important (and impressive) asset, making this a perfect choice.</p> <h3>Or Pop With a Rack Card</h3> <p>Rack cards are commonly used by businesses to promote a special or advertise a new product or service, but you can use them to draw attention to your most marketable skills and experience.</p> <p>Standard size is 4x9 and typically uses both sides of the card, but other than that, you're free to use your imagination. And you should.</p> <p>Think big &mdash; lots of color, well-placed graphics and bullet points. Be bold. Market your very best strengths, the things you want a potential employer to notice, and include your contact information too. Have a website? Include that as well, and if you don't, read on to find out why you should.</p> <h2>Resumes That Go Several Steps Beyond</h2> <p>One of the best ways to attract a potential employer's attention is to think outside the box and with all the online tools available, there's just no limit to what you can do. So, let's talk about two very cool options here.</p> <h3>Your Resume Online</h3> <p>Yes, you can simply make an electronic version of a traditional resume, but why stop there? Why not get creative and show employers just how fantastic you truly are?</p> <p>Back in the 90s, when I was still working in the corporate world, I created an online resume that included &quot;The Top 10 Reasons You Should Hire Me&quot; (&quot;I really want this job&quot; was #7) as well as a multiple-choice psychic reading that promised to reveal the perfect candidate for the job in question.</p> <p>The user selected the qualities they wanted using radio buttons and clicked a big &quot;Reveal&quot; button to see the results. They were then taken to the traditional version of my resume which, by the way, was geared to highlight the same skills and experience options offered in the reading.</p> <p>Yes, I know that sounds a little cheesy, especially since resumes have always been such a serious and formal affair. But then, it was supposed to be cheesy &mdash; that was the whole point. I wanted to be different from all the other applicants, and I felt that the potential was worth the risk.</p> <p>A blog for instance, can allow you to show off your industry expertise as well as your stellar writing skills. A good LinkedIn profile can almost substitute as a condensed version of your resume, and a business-only Twitter account might enable you to do some serious networking within your niche.</p> <h3>Your Resume on Video</h3> <p>In <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00005O5CM/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00005O5CM&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=WNTOX6NYW647VOXH">Legally Blonde</a>, sorority diva Reese Witherspoon decides she's going to apply to Harvard Law to win back her ex-boyfriend Warner, after he breaks up with her to find a &quot;serious&quot; girlfriend. Getting into Harvard isn't easy however, so besides studying hard and passing the LSAT, she creates a video resume to stand out and get noticed.</p> <p>Now, she has no legal background to speak of and her character isn't the most intellectual of applicants&hellip; so, she uses the video to play up the strengths she does have instead.</p> <p>And you can do the same.</p> <p>Show off your contribution to the community, your sense of humor, your blazing-fast typing skills, your incredible multi-tasking abilities, and even your hobby if it's appropriate. The key is to create a video that shows off your personality while still tying into the job or industry you're applying for.</p> <p>Just remember that whatever you produce may be shared among others within the company, especially if it's entertaining, so create something for the masses. And don't &quot;be&quot; someone on the video that isn't truly part of your personality &mdash; characters and scripting aside, your prospective employer will expect to see a live version of the candidate they saw in the video, should you get an interview.</p> <p>For ideas, <a href="http://mashable.com/2011/01/17/tips-video-resumes/">Mashable has some great tips and samples of video resumes</a>.</p> <h2>One Resume Is Never Enough</h2> <p>Choosing the right resume can sometimes be a bit of a challenge, especially if you have something other than a run-of-the-mill background to work with.</p> <p>But that's what makes these other options so appealing.</p> <p>Ideally, you should have several versions of your resume to work with &mdash; a complete, traditional resume (be it functional, chronological, or combination format) and then some of the other varieties to help you target your desired industry.</p> <p>And don't be afraid to try new varieties or employ other tools to get you noticed within your niche. It's an easy way to stay in front of those that do the hiring and remind them of why they need you on their team.</p> <p><em>Have you created multiple resumes to attract more interest from employers? Please share your experience in comments (&quot;functional&quot; is fine)!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kate-luther">Kate Luther</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-resume-sucks-try-one-of-these-instead">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-outdated-job-search-techniques-to-avoid">10 Outdated Job-Search Techniques to Avoid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting creative resume job search resumes Fri, 08 Aug 2014 21:00:06 +0000 Kate Luther 1178256 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Tax Deductions Job-Hunters Can’t Afford to Overlook http://www.wisebread.com/6-tax-deductions-job-hunters-can-t-afford-to-overlook <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-tax-deductions-job-hunters-can-t-afford-to-overlook" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/4797027866_37fe25954b_z.jpg" alt="man walking" title="man walking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="223" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you&rsquo;re out of work, any help you can get with expenses is more than welcome. Sometimes these gifts come from unexpected sources, such as the Internal Revenue Service. The IRS provides tax deductions for job-hunting expenses that reduce your taxable income and decrease your tax bill. As an added bonus, you can claim them even if you didn&rsquo;t land a job that tax year. (See also:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/16-great-tax-deductions-you-may-have-overlooked">16 Great Tax Deductions You&nbsp;May Have Overlooked</a>)</p> <p>However, there are a few caveats:</p> <ul> <li>Your job hunting expenses must add up to at least 2% of your total gross income to qualify as deductions.&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>You must be looking for work in the same field. Unfortunately, career changers aren&rsquo;t able to benefit from the government&rsquo;s generosity.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>People looking for their first job are out of luck, too. You can only deduct job search expenses if you&rsquo;ve already been employed, even if it was part-time.&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>The IRS doesn&rsquo;t recognize job hunting expenses you incur after a &ldquo;substantial break&rdquo; between losing your job and starting your search. While the agency doesn&rsquo;t provide a specific definition for &ldquo;substantial break,&rdquo; waiting months to start your search may be a mistake.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Most of these deductions allow you to write off the costs in full, but some do have limits. Check with a tax professional if you&rsquo;re unsure.</li> </ul> <p>The sum of these expenses is listed as a single itemized deduction on line 21 of Schedule A. You won&rsquo;t have to send in any receipts or other documentation with your return, but make sure you have them just in case the IRS initiates an audit. Without comprehensive records, the IRS may disallow them and make you pay any additional tax you owe.&nbsp;</p> <h2>1. Employment Services</h2> <p>Using employment services can give you a boost in your job search, but the costs can get steep. Luckily, job seekers can deduct the fees associated with <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-unique-ways-to-score-a-job-interview">employment counseling, headhunters, or other job placement services</a>. You can also deduct the costs of placing job-seeking ads in newspapers or on classified websites. Fees you pay for access or membership to job ad websites are similarly deductible.</p> <h2>2. Resume Preparation</h2> <p>Your resume is the first impression potential employers have of you, and sometimes you need to shell out a good bit of money to get it just right. You can deduct expenses you incur from professional resume preparation services, as well as books that provide resume-related advice and instruction. You can also write off printing and copying costs such as ink and paper, mailing when you send your resume to employers.</p> <h2>3. Communication</h2> <p>Local and long-distance phone calls you make via land line or cell phone to inquire about work or for job interview purposes are deductible. Keep in mind that unless you use the phone service solely for job-hunting purposes, you cannot deduct your entire phone bill. Only the portion of the charges that directly relate to your employment search are eligible. Request itemized bills so you can see exactly when you made the calls, how long they lasted, and how much they cost.</p> <h2>4. Networking and Professional Development</h2> <p>The fees you pay to attend job fairs, seminars, conferences, and other <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-simple-networking-tricks"> networking events</a> while looking for work are also deductible. You can even write off fees for online networking sites and premium employment services such as those offered by LinkedIn. If you take any classes or training courses to build your skills and make yourself more marketable to employers, you can write off those expenses as well.</p> <h2>5. Travel</h2> <p>Travel expenses can be a little tricky, but if you don&rsquo;t mind a little math, you should be able to write off a good portion of your costs. The IRS gives job hunters a $0.55 deduction per mile that covers both local and out-of-town driving to job interviews, networking events, and other job-related trips. You can also write off parking fees. If you use mass transportation or travel via air or rail, you can deduct the costs in full. Hotel or other lodging costs are deductible as well. And if you grab a bite to eat while you&rsquo;re hitting the pavement, whether it&rsquo;s a fast food breakfast in your car or a lunch interview at a fancy restaurant, you can write off 50%of each meal.</p> <h2>6. Childcare</h2> <p>While this last one isn&rsquo;t actually a deduction, it&rsquo;s still a huge help for many job seekers. The child and dependent care credit covers up to 35% of your day care or <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-on-babysitting-without-ending-up-on-the-local-news">babysitting costs</a> dollar-for-dollar, directly reducing the amount of tax you owe instead of reducing your taxable income. You can only claim expenses that you incurred while looking for a job and you must have the provider&rsquo;s Social Security or Employer Identification number to qualify.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lauren-treadwell">Lauren Treadwell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-tax-deductions-job-hunters-can-t-afford-to-overlook">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving">How to Ask for Your Old Job Back After Leaving</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting Taxes job hunting expenses networking resumes tax deductions Tue, 09 Apr 2013 10:24:31 +0000 Lauren Treadwell 973338 at http://www.wisebread.com