new job http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/9625/all en-US 6 Quick Ways to Retrain for a New Career http://www.wisebread.com/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i_have_made_my_tablet_a_mini_workstation.jpg" alt="I have made my tablet a mini workstation" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You need more than an entry-level job to pay the bills, but you don't have the time or funds to get a four-year college degree. Or maybe you already have a college degree, but it's not helping you find work. You could be a stay-at-home parent re-entering the workforce, or a midlevel manager who's sick of your industry and wants to start fresh.</p> <p>If this sounds familiar, you could soon be one of the most in-demand types of workers in America: the &quot;middle skill&quot; worker. More than half of all available jobs fall into this category. These are jobs that require more than a high school diploma, but less than a college degree &mdash; whether it's a certificate program, an apprenticeship, or on-the-job training.</p> <p>If you're ready to switch gears and retrain for a new gig, there are some fast and affordable ways to do that.</p> <h2>1. Pinpoint your target job</h2> <p>Even if you need to get retrained quickly, that doesn't mean you should skip the planning stage. <em>Do not </em>enroll in a training program without knowing what job you're going for and how much it would pay.</p> <p>If you haven't chosen a target industry yet, look at the ones with the highest-paying jobs that don't require a college degree. Once, these jobs were mostly found in manufacturing, but now they're more likely to be in the &quot;skilled services industries,&quot; such as health care, finance, and information technology.</p> <p>Georgetown University lists the <a href="https://goodjobsdata.org/wp-content/uploads/Good-Jobs-States.pdf" target="_blank">top industries and occupations in each state</a> that don't require a BA; in Pennsylvania, for instance, the top industries are manufacturing and health services, and the top occupation is office and administrative support (median earnings: $51,000). You can also check the resources offered by your state development department; California, for example, lists the <a href="http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/customers/middle-skill-infographics.html" target="_blank">most in-demand middle skill occupations</a> for each region. Also think about the job's future; check <a href="https://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_table_103.htm" target="_blank">job growth projections</a> and find out which workers may be <a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2015/05/21/408234543/will-your-job-be-done-by-a-machine" target="_blank">replaced by robots</a>.</p> <p>Besides this online research, you should get the word on the street in your community. Ask your friends and family what type of jobs their employers have trouble filling, what those jobs are like, and what they pay. Visit your local job center and study the openings.</p> <p>Finally, consider working with a vocational counselor or career coach who could guide you. If you recently lost your job, your local workforce agency or your former employer might provide you with this kind of help for free. If not, it may be worth the money to hire one out of pocket. Make sure you find a counselor with experience in the middle-skills market &mdash; not an executive recruiter or coach &mdash; and make it clear what you want out of the relationship before you start.</p> <h2>2. Focus on fit</h2> <p>Once you have a list of promising jobs you could train for, cross out those that you know you don't have the aptitude for or would hate. If you're a couch potato, there's probably no point in trying to get certified as a personal trainer. Ask yourself which jobs could make good use of your soft skills or transferable skills from previous jobs. Take an aptitude test if you don't already know what you're best at. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-soft-skills-every-employer-values?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Soft Skills Every Employer Values</a>)</p> <h2>3. Find the right training program</h2> <p>Local research is probably your best friend here, too. If you can land an informational interview at a prospective employer, find out what certificate, associate degree, or other training they look for or require. Ask contacts who are already in your desired field where they trained and if they would recommend it.</p> <p>Perhaps the most important question you can ask about a job training program is whether it is connected with local companies that hire graduates. Programs codeveloped by hiring companies, or otherwise &quot;demand driven,&quot; produce graduates with higher employment rates.</p> <p>Having teachers who work full-time in the industry can be a plus, too; when my husband was training to be a video game artist, he ended up getting hired as a part-time game tester by one of his teachers, and that job later led to a full-time artist position.</p> <p>You should also research potential schools and programs online. Is the program recognized by a national association for the field? What do students say about the program in forums? Has the school been targeted by student lawsuits for fraud or does it have other bad press? What is the school's graduation and employment rate? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-online-certifications-worth-the-price?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are Online Certifications Worth the Price?</a>)</p> <h2>4. Don't forget the trades</h2> <p>Deciding to become a plumber, electrician, or carpenter isn't a quick fix. It takes four years of apprenticeship, for example, to become a licensed journeyman electrician. That's after passing the union application exam, which many people spend months or years preparing for. On the other hand, you can earn while you learn; the average apprentice electrician earns around $35,000 a year. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Jobs That Pay Over $50K and Don't Require a Bachelor's Degree</a>)</p> <h2>5. Try temping</h2> <p>Registering with one or more temporary agencies can be more than a way to make ends meet while researching your career move; it can be a way of conducting that research. Think about it: If you apply for a job or even attend a job interview, you get a very limited peek inside the company. But as a temp, you'll spend all day on the inside. You could be exposed to job roles you might not have even known about. Ask questions of everyone you work with, from the agency staff, to your on-site supervisor, to co-workers.</p> <h2>6. Look for retraining opportunities within your current company</h2> <p>If you like where you work, try to get trained for a better job within the organization. You might approach a manager about this, or you could ask human resources what education programs the company has.</p> <p>You might also discreetly talk to other managers, or browse internal job listings. I recently met someone who had been driving a forklift at a large grocery warehouse, until the company paid for her to get trained in refrigerator/freezer repair. Now she makes more money and has more job satisfaction, without ever having to interview for a new job.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Quick%2520Ways%2520to%2520Retrain%2520for%2520a%2520New%2520Career.jpg&amp;description=6%20Quick%20Ways%20to%20Retrain%20for%20a%20New%20Career"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Quick%20Ways%20to%20Retrain%20for%20a%20New%20Career.jpg" alt="6 Quick Ways to Retrain for a New Career" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree">5 Jobs That Pay Over $50K and Don&#039;t Require a Bachelor&#039;s Degree</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-escape-a-dying-industry">8 Ways to Escape a Dying Industry</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job">12 Things You Should Do in the First Six Months of a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/starting-a-new-job-3-rules-to-live-by">Starting a New Job: 3 Rules to Live By</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building apprenticeships certifications job growth middle skills new job research retraining training programs Fri, 06 Apr 2018 09:00:07 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2120733 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Things You Should Do in the First Six Months of a New Job http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/leading_a_great_team_to_success_0.jpg" alt="Leading a great team to success" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A new job comes with a lot of excitement, trepidation, and change. While you're settling into your new role, it's easy to forget the reasons you got the job, and the things you need to do to make sure you keep it, grow, and move up the ladder. Here is a guide to the first six months on the new job, with what you should aim to achieve by month one, month three, and month six.</p> <h2>The first month</h2> <p>Some would say it's the hardest month, but that's not always true. As a newbie, you'll be cut a little slack, but after the first month you'll see that wiggle room disappear. So, take advantage of it, and do whatever you can to create an excellent impression. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job</a>)</p> <h3>1. Establish yourself as a conscientious worker</h3> <p>First impressions last. During the first month on the job, get in early and leave late as often as you can. Never do that the other way around; you need to become a valued team member before you occasionally duck out early or stroll in a little late. You should also be making sure you cross every t and dot every i. No mistakes. No sloppy work. No excuses. Think of your first month as a trial period. During this time, you're still being tested, and you want an A. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-ways-to-make-a-fantastic-first-impression?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Simple Ways to Make a Fantastic First Impression</a>)</p> <h3>2. Ask as many questions as you can</h3> <p>How do things work? Who are the people you need to know? Who are the heads of the different departments, and what do they do? What are the challenges of the company? What are the strengths? Become the most inquisitive employee you can, and take notes. Learn from the people that have been at the company for years, but remember to take some comments with caution. Jaded employees can inaccurately color your view of the company. Also, don't be afraid to watch how people do certain tasks. Ask if you can shadow them; most of the time, they'll be flattered that you want their expertise.</p> <h3>3. Find out what is expected of you</h3> <p>Job descriptions are all well and good, but once you have the position, you may find out that reality is a little different from perception. The employer may have painted a glowing picture of the company, but it might not really be all smooth sailing. Also, managers and interviewers are only human, and may have forgotten a few of your duties.</p> <p>So, make sure you sit down with your supervisor as soon as you can after starting in your new position, and find out exactly what is required of you. Do you have to submit reports, and if so, when? How will your daily duties be assessed? What standards are you required to meet? Get it all down, and if possible, get your boss to acknowledge it.</p> <h3>4. Get to know your colleagues</h3> <p>Whether you're working in a massive corporation or a mom 'n' pop shop, you need to make an effort to get to know people. Do it sooner rather than later, otherwise you may come across as anti-social or aloof.</p> <p>You don't have to be the life and soul of the department, but find the time to introduce yourself to the people you'll be working with on a regular basis. Learn about their roles, and how you can help each other out. You're not looking to make best friends, you're simply laying the foundation for a good working relationship. If possible, ask for an organization chart from human resources or your supervisor, so that you can see how you fit into the company.</p> <h3>5. Show enthusiasm and passion for your role</h3> <p>The first month may present unexpected challenges, but you have to take them all in stride. You've only been on the job around 30 days, so you really haven't had the time or experiences to become jaded and downtrodden. Remember, you are fresh blood and there will be an expectation for you to inject new life into the department. So, approach your job with zeal and energy, and try to turn every challenge into an opportunity.</p> <h2>Three months in</h2> <p>Crunchtime. The honeymoon period is over. Now, you're part of the team and should know what you're doing. By now, your employer will expect to see you start walking the talk you gave in the interview. In many ways, this is your make-it-or-break-it milestone.</p> <h3>6. Find a mentor</h3> <p>After three months, you'll have a pretty good lay of the land. Now, if you haven't already done so, you need to connect with someone that can really help you get ahead in the company.</p> <p>This is not about sucking up or finding cliques to cover your back. In fact, either of those strategies can often have a negative impact on your career. Instead, consider who the shining stars are in the company. Who are the ones leading the charge? Who has a lot of common sense and business savvy? Who is respected or admired, even if he or she is not the most popular person at work? That is someone you should be looking to for advice.</p> <h3>7. Get a feel for your performance so far</h3> <p>Some organizations insist on a performance review after three months. Some are more relaxed. If you haven't been invited to a meeting with your supervisor to discuss your progress, take the initiative and set one up.</p> <p>This is a great time to establish, on paper if possible, what the positives and negatives have been about your first 90 days. Hopefully, it's way more good than bad, but don't be afraid to ask about the latter. What can you improve? Where have you made a few missteps? Your boss will appreciate your candor, and will be more invested in you if he or she believes you genuinely want to be better.</p> <p>Set some goals, but also get down your achievements and your contributions to the company so far. This is also a great time to read your boss directly. Are you getting good vibes and positive body language? Are you hearing a lot of references to the future? This means you're becoming valued.</p> <h3>8. Begin to push boundaries</h3> <p>After three months, you should know which rules to follow, and more importantly, which rules you can bend a little. This kind of flexibility will come in handy when you want to push ideas or initiatives that have, for one reason or another, never been implemented.</p> <p>As a newcomer to the business, you will have a fresh set of eyes on problems and solutions. You also aren't weighed down by the baggage of being told no a bunch of times. You will be amazed at what can be achieved simply by not having any history with the typical negativity or cynicism that can come from years of doing things the same old ways. What's more, even if your ideas don't come to fruition, the fact that you're really trying to push boundaries and make things happen will be seen as positive.</p> <h3>9. Make your voice heard</h3> <p>It's not easy to speak up during the first few months. You're new, you don't know how a lot of things work, and you could be saying things that may sound naive, or are just uninformed due to your lack of company experience. After three months, however, you should have a good grasp of the culture, the business, and the successes and failures that have come before you. Now is the time to start speaking up and get noticed for the right reasons.</p> <p>Often the people that get the promotions aren't the brightest or the most talented &mdash; they're simply the loudest. They speak up, they say what they're thinking, and they are not a wallflower in the weekly status meeting. Do likewise. Don't speak all the time and have nothing to say, but don't stay quiet and let someone else make the point you wanted to make two days earlier. You're good at your job. You have great ideas. Now &hellip; let everyone else know that.</p> <h2>Six months in</h2> <p>By this point, you can breathe a little easier. You've been accepted, you will probably have a six-month review coming up, and you'll want to reinforce the positives you've achieved. However, this is no time to rest on your laurels.</p> <h3>10. Establish a network of professionals</h3> <p>You're settled in. You've made a name for yourself. You're comfortable with your day-to-day tasks, and have a good feeling for the place. This is the perfect time to reconnect with some of your old colleagues and professional friends, for several reasons.</p> <p>First, it never hurts to have friends in other businesses. They can help you should you ever get laid off or want to switch jobs. They can also offer valuable advice. Some of these friends may help you win new business for your new company, or give you leads that turn into great opportunities.</p> <p>Perhaps most importantly, friends who know you and what you do can really help when times get tough. After six months, the bloom will definitely have gone off the rose, and you'll start to see problems that now seem impossible to solve, or challenges that the culture make impossible to change. This network of professionals will be there for you, and could help you on those days you really need a boost.</p> <h3>11. Cement your reputation</h3> <p>You have six months of solid work behind you (hopefully). It's time to use that bank of achievements to establish yourself as an indispensable member of the team. This doesn't mean bragging or constantly bringing up your wins. What it does mean is using what you have learned to have a positive and lasting impact on other initiatives. Your contributions on certain projects can be your &quot;in&quot; to larger developments. You have proved yourself on smaller jobs, now is the time to build on that success. From the foundation you have worked hard to establish, you can start looking at the next role.</p> <h3>12. Set your sights on a raise/promotion</h3> <p>If you have worked wonders for the company, you could have built up enough validation for a raise and/or promotion even though you've only been at the company for six months. Take a look at the hierarchy, talk to the human resources department (if you have one), and find out the process and procedures involved in getting promoted or adding to your paycheck.</p> <p>It's quite possible that there is a history of some people being promoted after six months, or even less. It's also possible that there are some gaps in some departments, and you are a natural for that larger role. Scope it out. Start asking for more responsibility. Begin doing the job you want, not the one you currently have. Even if it doesn't pay off right away, you will be seen as a go-getter, and someone that is valued enough to get a raise or promotion to keep you from looking elsewhere. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F12%2520Things%2520You%2520Should%2520Do%2520in%2520the%2520First%2520Six%2520Months%2520of%2520a%2520New%2520Job.jpg&amp;description=12%20Things%20You%20Should%20Do%20in%20the%20First%20Six%20Months%20of%20a%20New%20Job"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/12%20Things%20You%20Should%20Do%20in%20the%20First%20Six%20Months%20of%20a%20New%20Job.jpg" alt="12 Things You Should Do in the First Six Months of a New Job" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/starting-a-new-job-3-rules-to-live-by">Starting a New Job: 3 Rules to Live By</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career">6 Quick Ways to Retrain for a New Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-types-of-people-who-will-help-grow-your-career">7 Types of People Who Will Help Grow Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building coworkers expectations first impressions goals new job performance reviews six months timeline Mon, 26 Mar 2018 09:30:23 +0000 Paul Michael 2115361 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Land the Job When You're Overqualified http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/more_than_qualified_for_the_job.jpg" alt="More than qualified for the job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For whatever reason, be it a career change or the need to pay the bills after a layoff, many people apply for jobs that require much less experience than they have. And far too often, it's considered a negative: &quot;Sorry, you're too overqualified.&quot;</p> <p>The employer sees a litany of reasons why you would be a bad fit. They think you'll be unhappy, or take a better job the second one comes along. You may even be gunning for the boss's position.</p> <p>To combat these perceptions, you need to find ways to convince the employer that you are right for the job, regardless of your experience. Here's how to approach it.</p> <h2>Edit your resume to fit the job you want</h2> <p>If your resume is three pages long, and filled with impressive titles and experience, it's a good time to start editing it. You are not lying; you are simply not putting down every single thing you have accomplished.</p> <p>You don't even have to list job titles if you don't want to. Just list the companies you worked for, and then the appropriate experience for each one. Sure, you may well have overseen the international distribution for a major multinational. But did that job also entail getting on the phone and delivering great customer service (regardless of who those customers were)?</p> <p>Find ways to temper some of your achievements. It will seem counterintuitive to everything you've done in your career, but if you want this job, you need to find ways to bring your resume down a peg or two.</p> <h2>Use your industry connections for introductions</h2> <p>A resume and a cover letter, even if they are exceptional and targeted, don't always do the job. You will want to tap into the many connections you have made over the years, and find people who can vouch for you.</p> <p>Ideally, you'll know someone at the company you want to work for. Or, you know someone who knows someone at the company. LinkedIn is an excellent place to find these kinds of connections. When you find the right person, ask them to make the first move for you. A recommendation from someone trusted and reliable is worth far more than any polished resume.</p> <p>They can also talk about what you bring to the table, and why you're a good fit. By the time your over-qualifications come up, you will already be seen as someone who could easily fit the role. And if the salary is right, why not you? They're getting more bang for their buck.</p> <h2>Talk about what you can do for them</h2> <p>Employers are selfish, and rightly so. They are ready to pay you a salary and benefits, so they want someone who will be a good return on that investment. And if you show them that your experience will benefit them, but won't cost them any more, then they'll be all in.</p> <p>One great example comes from the movie <em>The Wolf of Wall Street</em>. After Jordan Belfort loses his job on Wall Street, he can't find a new gig anywhere. Then, he sees an ad for a little brokerage selling penny stocks. When they first see Belfort, they think it's a joke. He's way too qualified. Why would he even set foot in this place? Then, he brings his experience (albeit morally bankrupt experience) to the firm, and before they know it, they're making more money than they ever dreamed of.</p> <p>So, highlight what you can do, not what titles you have earned. Explain how the experience you have is perfect for the job. And remember, only talk about the experience that is relevant to this employer. All your other accolades and achievements are best left out of the conversation.</p> <h2>Explain why you're excited for the position being offered</h2> <p>Money isn't everything. Titles aren't for everyone. Sometimes, people genuinely want to change the course of their careers, and if that's you, you have to find a way to make your potential new employer understand this. You may well have been part of the top brass at your last company, but you could also have become tired of the rat race. You want to take a job with less money and less responsibility, but one that gives you exciting new challenges.</p> <p>Many people in advertising, for instance, find that after they get to the top of the ladder, they are not doing the fun and creative work that they did early on in their careers. For this reason, a lot of creative directors will actually step back from the role, and apply for lower-paying jobs as copywriters and art directors. As long as you can make the case for why you are ready to work for less money and less power, the employer should have no reason not to take your application seriously.</p> <h2>Acknowledge that you know you're taking a step down</h2> <p>If you're the victim of corporate downsizing, you will usually have to find a job quickly to replace the lost income. And that usually means taking whatever is available, even if it's a considerable step down. Hiring managers are wary of candidates in this situation. They believe the overqualified candidate is simply taking the job as a stopgap, and will be looking for something better immediately. The last thing any hiring manager wants to do is be interviewing for that same role a few months down the line. But, this can be addressed early on.</p> <p>Acknowledge that this is a step down for you, in salary and experience. But let the employer know that you also see it as providing a wealth of benefits, including new experiences, new challenges, and perhaps better work-life balance. Assure the employer that this is not a temporary position, but one you are going to dig into and be successful at.</p> <h2>Do not let salary come into play until the last minute</h2> <p>One of the biggest problems that comes with being overqualified is your salary history. As you climbed the ladder of success, your income was right there rising with you. And in your last position, you may have had a most impressive salary. However, now that you're looking for a job that requires less (or different) skills, the money that goes with it will also be less.</p> <p>The easiest way for a human resources manager to sort through candidates is salary expectations, or previous salary. If the current role offers $60,000 a year, and your most recent salary was $100,000, you're going to be rejected in a heartbeat. Why would you even consider this role, they wonder. They don't know your current situation, your wants and needs, and why you're switching to a role that requires less experience.</p> <p>So, don't bring salary into it. If there's a space on the form that must be completed, put $1. If it comes up initially, tell HR that salary is not something you're concerned with right now. You want to focus on being the right person for the job, regardless of money.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Land%2520the%2520Job%2520When%2520Youre%2520Overqualified.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Land%20the%20Job%20When%20Youre%20Overqualified"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Land%20the%20Job%20When%20Youre%20Overqualified.jpg" alt="How to Land the Job When You're Overqualified" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-employers-care-about-more-than-your-degree">7 Things Employers Care About More Than Your Degree</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting connections experience interviewing new job overqualified references resumes salary skills Thu, 24 Aug 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 2008287 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/leading_a_great_team_to_success.jpg" alt="Leading a great team to success" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Some people have a dream job; others have a dream company. If your dream gig is more of a &quot;who&quot; than a &quot;what,&quot; you'll need to switch up your job-hunting technique. Use these tips, and hiring managers will be eager to extend you an offer at your dream company.</p> <h2>1. Do your homework</h2> <p>You'll give yourself a better fighting chance if you've done your homework before any face-to-face meeting. Find out who the C-level executives are and what the company's mission statement is. This ground-floor research will help you decide if the company's views are in line with your long-term objectives. It'll also demonstrate your dedication when interview day arrives.</p> <p>&quot;This means reading about the company in a variety of places &mdash; their own PR and website, articles about the company in industry publications, and the press,&quot; says human resources expert Laura MacLeod, founder of From the Inside Out Project. &quot;Try to find someone who works or has worked at the company and pick their brain. Try your connections and '2nd degree connections' on LinkedIn.&quot;</p> <p>Once you've done your research, use what you find to focus your pitch. Think about how you'll contribute to the company culture and its bottom line. Make your best case on why you're the best choice for the position.</p> <h2>2. Approach your search actively</h2> <p>If you're limiting your job search to passive online applications, you may be waiting a while for a call. Instead, take a more active approach to getting what you want by letting the decision-makers within the company's &quot;<em>hire-archy</em>&quot; know who you are and what you want.</p> <p>&quot;Your dream company is almost certainly looking for assertiveness, and this means attacking the process from the beginning,&quot; explains Ryan Naylor, CEO and founder of LocalWork.com. &quot;When you hear about the job, whether it's through online job boards or an acquaintance, find a way to make contact with someone. Reach out through your network, locate someone within the ranks, and send them an email or call them on the phone. Use networking tools such as LinkedIn and even Facebook. If you make contact, you have a much better shot at getting that prized interview.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Take advantage of social media</h2> <p>Of course, the best people to network with are those on the inside &mdash; but don't discount those on the outside, either. Creating a rapport with your dream company's clients and associates could turn into a good word on your behalf. It may be a slow build toward the end goal (you'll want to establish a relationship before asking for references or favors), but if patience is your virtue, you can succeed in this endeavor.</p> <p>Social media is a great way to make these connections. Check out the various platforms used by your dream company, and engage. Social media managers will then see that you're a constant presence and interested in the company. Leave comments and start conversations. This could be a great transition into reaching out directly via the platforms' messaging systems to inquire about how you can become part of the narrative permanently.</p> <p>Some larger companies, like Google and Huffington Post, also have separate social media accounts just for job openings. If your dream company has a Twitter, Facebook, or other social media platform just for recruiting talent, be sure to give it a follow and check the feed regularly.</p> <h2>3. Set daily progress goals</h2> <p>Looking for a new job is a marathon, not a sprint. You can't expect to land an interview because you sent over one email attachment detailing your accomplishments. Sometimes it happens like that, but companies that have their pick of the litter usual require a bit more involvement in the hiring process. You need to remind them you're in it to win it, regularly.</p> <p>&quot;Do something every day that gets you one step closer to achieving the interview and the job,&quot; advises corporate trainer Chavaz Kingman. &quot;The more often you submerge yourself in your dream company's ideals and goals, the more easily you'll be able to discuss these goals and ideals in your interview, and in turn on the job.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Adopt a &quot;whatever it takes&quot; attitude</h2> <p>Maybe you get a job offer from your dream company, but it's not exactly the position you wanted. Should you take it anyway? If your goal is getting your foot in the door by any means necessary, then yes. There are other factors to consider, such as taking a potential pay cut &mdash; you may be OK with it, or you may need to negotiate a salary you're more comfortable with. Either way, if you can make it work to accept this position, you should take it. The opportunity to work for your dream company may not come again.</p> <p>Once you're hired, you can really make an effort to shine. Keep up the good work, and it will eventually show management you'd be better suited for the position you really want. Don't go stepping on anybody's toes to get there &mdash; you won't make any friends that way &mdash; but go above and beyond whatever your current job is so your boss will see that you're a dedicated worker.</p> <h2>5. Brush up on basic job-hunting techniques</h2> <p>Getting hired by your dream company takes a little extra legwork, but that doesn't mean you can skip the basics. First, polish up your resume to make sure it's current, spell-checked, and tailored to align with the company's needs. Focus on your successes and achievements, especially any that might be relevant to the job you want. (<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a>)</p> <p>Then, prepare for interviews. Yeah, this might be old hat to you by now, but you'll only increase your chances of nailing it if you go in confident and ready to slay. Ask other professionals you know if they'd be willing to give you a practice run and an honest critique. Have them test your knowledge of the subject matter and familiarity with the company background. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-not-to-answer-10-of-the-most-common-interview-questions?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How NOT TO Answer 10 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a>)</p> <p>Kingman suggests using the S.T.A.R. method when asked to discuss previous work accomplishments. Describe the Situation you were in; the Task you were assigned; the Action you took; and the positive Result of your contribution.</p> <p>Last but not least, do a thorough <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-clean-up-your-image-on-social-media" target="_blank">social media cleanup</a>. Get rid of unflattering photos, questionable text posts, and anything else inappropriate. Double check your privacy settings, and then view your profiles as an outsider to see what's still visible. Social media searches are a fast way for a company to get an instant feel for your moral character and &quot;real&quot; personality &mdash; don't let a few drunk selfies derail your chance at your dream gig.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview">10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/video-resumes-and-5-other-cool-tricks-to-land-the-job">Video Resumes and 5 Other Cool Tricks to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting dream company dream job getting hired interviewing new job research social media strategies techniques Mon, 05 Jun 2017 08:30:13 +0000 Mikey Rox 1955702 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Deal When You Hate Your New Job http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-529254969.jpg" alt="Man learning how to deal when he hates his new job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 1994, I started a new job in an entirely new field. The gig seemed perfect: It was a step up financially, it was ripe with opportunity &hellip; and it was a complete disaster.</p> <p>Within days, I had a sinking feeling that my new dream job was actually a nightmare. But I was stuck. Without a clear plan, I stayed in that job for two years and hated nearly every minute of it. If your new job feels like a bad dream, here are seven things you can do.</p> <h2>1. Determine if it's the job or the transition</h2> <p>Starting a new job is a huge change, and one that can be very stressful. It's easy for that stress to be misinterpreted and misplaced. Ask yourself, &quot;Is it the job I hate, or is it the transition?&quot; Many times, once we settle into a new job, get acquainted with co-workers, and begin to understand the expectations, that &quot;nightmare job&quot; becomes just a job.</p> <h2>2. Focus on the good</h2> <p>OK, so you've determined that it's the job &mdash; not the transition itself &mdash; that's the nightmare. Now what? At the risk of sounding like a blind optimist, focus on the good. It can help you tolerate a job when there are no other options immediately available. What duties do you enjoy? Are there co-workers that make the day-to-day grind easier to manage? Is there a nearby coffee shop or park where you can unwind for a few minutes every afternoon? All of those things, even though small, are positives you can look forward to.</p> <h2>3. Retreat</h2> <p>Sometimes the smartest strategy is a hasty retreat. Contact the supervisor of your previous job and explain the circumstances &mdash; you made a career misstep and would like the opportunity to return to your old job. If you left on good terms, if the position is still open, and if you're willing to eat a little crow, this tactic just might work.</p> <h2>4. Set a deadline</h2> <p>Toiling away at a job you hate year after year can sap your motivation and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor?ref=internal" target="_blank">keep you poor</a>. If you have a financial cushion, don't stay in a nightmare job one minute longer than necessary. Set a deadline for your departure and stick to it. In the meantime, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=internal" target="_blank">polish your resume</a>, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired?ref=internal" target="_blank">build a better LinkedIn profile</a>, and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-come-up-with-1000-in-the-next-30-days?ref=internal" target="_blank">save aggressively</a> so you can weather gaps in employment.</p> <h2>5. Work your network</h2> <p>There's a kernel of truth to the adage, &quot;It's not what you know, it's whom you know.&quot; If you need to find a new job quickly, tap into the power of your professional network. To avoid the deadly &quot;job hopper&quot; wrap, frame your situation carefully but honestly. Be ready to explain to potential employers why your new job is a bad fit, what you learned from the experience, and how you're applying those lessons in your current job search. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40</a>)</p> <h2>6. Be willing to take a step backward</h2> <p>Even if going back to your old job is out of the question, be willing to take a temporary step backward. Though it may bruise your ego, a strategic step down the career ladder allows you to regroup, plan your next move, and build additional experience in a more positive environment.</p> <h2>7. Once you're back on track, purge it from your resume</h2> <p>Mistakes happen, but there's no need to document each one permanently on a resume. If your nightmare job was short-lived, don't include it in your work history. Instead, own the mistake on a personal level. Use it to learn more about yourself, improve how you research new career opportunities, and &mdash; perhaps most importantly &mdash; make sure all your future jobs are nightmare-free.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-ways-to-leave-your-job">10 Fun Ways to Leave Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job">5 Things You Must Do Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-super-cool-ways-people-have-quit-their-jobs">6 Super-Cool Ways People Have Quit Their Jobs</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income bad job employment job offers networking new job quitting resumes Fri, 31 Mar 2017 08:30:31 +0000 Kentin Waits 1915859 at http://www.wisebread.com New Job? Don't Make These 7 Mistakes With Your Benefits http://www.wisebread.com/new-job-dont-make-these-7-mistakes-with-your-benefits <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/new-job-dont-make-these-7-mistakes-with-your-benefits" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_shaking_hands_77096849.jpg" alt="Woman making mistakes with new job benefits" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In September 2016, total nonfarm payroll employment in the U.S. <a href="http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm">rose by 156,000</a>. If you were among those Americans who recently landed a new gig &mdash; or plan on landing one within the near future &mdash; congratulations! But as you get your benefits and retirement planning set up at your new workplace, don't make these seven mistakes.</p> <h2>1. Not Setting Up Your New Retirement Account Before December 31st</h2> <p>Make to sure to set up your new employer-sponsored retirement account before December 31st. Otherwise, you won't be able to reduce your 2016 taxable income by making contributions before Tax Day (April 17th, 2017) or the day you file your federal tax return, whichever is earlier. If you wait until the new year to set up your retirement account, any contributions made before Tax Day will reduce your 2017 taxable income &mdash; and you'll lose the opportunity to reduce your 2016 AGI (Adjusted Gross Income) by any contributed amount.</p> <h2>2. Not Completing a 401K or IRA Indirect Rollover</h2> <p>If you had a balance of less than $5,000 in your previous job's 401K or IRA plan, there is a good chance that you received an automatic cashout with a 20% withholding from your employer for applicable taxes. From the last day of your employment, you have 60 days to put the entire balance of the previous retirement account (including the mentioned 20% withholding!) into a new employer-sponsored retirement account that accepts rollovers. This process is known as an indirect rollover.</p> <p>You'll get that 20% withholding money back from the IRS in next year's tax return. In the event that your new employer's retirement account doesn't accept a rollover from your previous account, consider opening an IRA with a local financial institution before the 60-day deadline. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-guide-to-rolling-over-all-of-your-401ks-and-iras?ref=seealso">A Simple Guide to Rolling Over All of Your 401Ks and IRAs</a>)</p> <h2>3. Leaving W-4 Forms Alone</h2> <p>Depending on a variety of factors, your old W-4 tax withholdings may not cut it at your new gig. To figure out whether you're withholding too much (or too little), grab all of your latest pay stubs, find a copy of last year's tax return, and visit the online <a href="https://www.irs.gov/individuals/irs-withholding-calculator">IRS Withholding Calculator</a>.</p> <p>After punching in your data, this tool will provide recommendations on how to adjust your W-4 with your new employer to make sure that you meet your tax liability and minimize your refund. There's no sense in over-withholding and expecting a large refund, since the IRS doesn't pay interest while it sits on excess withholdings. That's money better kept in a savings or retirement account, where it can gain interest and compound over time.</p> <h2>4. Missing the Deadline to Make an Additional Estimated Tax Payment</h2> <p>If the IRS Withholding Calculator were to tell you that you're seriously behind your tax liability, you'll probably need to make amends <em>pronto, </em>lest you end up owing Uncle Sam at tax time. It's to your benefit to make an additional estimated tax payment to reduce or eliminate such a liability. For example, in the event that you know that there is an end-of-year bonus or commission check arriving before January 17, 2017, you have the option to use part of that check to make an estimated tax payment with <a href="https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f1040es.pdf">Form 1040-ES</a>.</p> <p>Make sure to use the IRS Withholding Calculator to estimate the right amount to mail to the IRS with Form 1040-ES and keep a photocopy of both the form and check for your own records.</p> <h2>5. Not Enrolling in a New FSA Plan Within 30 Days</h2> <p>You have up to 30 days from your hire date to enroll in an employer's flexible spending account (FSA). If you miss that deadline, you'll have to wait until your company renews its FSA plan, your plan administrator announces an open enrollment period, or you have a qualifying life event, such as changing marital status or having a baby.</p> <h2>6. Forgetting About Balances in Previous FSA Accounts</h2> <p>You may be so busy training at your new job and completing paperwork that you forget about remaining benefits at your previous employer. Check the rules from your previous FSA account regarding the expiration date of available money once you separate from your old employer. Most FSA plans provide a grace period to use the money, but some of those deadlines may be as early as the end of the month in which you separate from your employer. Unless you use your FSA funds in full by the applicable deadline, you'll lose them all.</p> <h2>7. Going More Than Two Months Without Health Coverage</h2> <p>As you're transitioning from one job to the other, keep an eye on the start and end dates of previous and current health plans. Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), better known as Obamacare, you owe a fee for any period greater than two months in which you, your spouse, or your tax dependents don't have qualifying health coverage. In most cases, the penalty fee is 1/12 per month of <a href="https://www.healthcare.gov/fees/fee-for-not-being-covered/">2.5% of your household income</a> or $695 per adult, whichever is higher.</p> <p>Being uncovered for only one to two months, qualifies you for a <a href="https://www.healthcare.gov/exemptions-tool/#/results/2015/details/short-gap">short gap exemption</a> and you're not liable for the fee. Find out whether or not you're able to claim a health coverage exemption with <a href="https://www.healthcare.gov/exemptions-tool/#/">HealthCare.gov's Exemption Screener</a>.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/new-job-dont-make-these-7-mistakes-with-your-benefits">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-health-insurance-if-you-missed-the-open-enrollment-deadline">How to Get Health Insurance If You Missed the Open Enrollment Deadline</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-one-question-you-need-to-answer-to-choose-the-best-health-care-plan">The One Question You Need to Answer to Choose the Best Health Care Plan</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-health-insurance-benefits-youre-probably-not-using">6 Health Insurance Benefits You&#039;re Probably Not Using</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/going-without-health-insurance-in-2015-heres-what-itll-cost-you">Going Without Health Insurance in 2015? Here&#039;s What It&#039;ll Cost You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/still-without-health-insurance-here-s-how-much-the-penalties-will-cost-you">Still Without Health Insurance? Here’s How Much the Penalties Will Cost You</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Insurance Retirement 401 k affordable care act benefits employers flexible spending health care IRA medical insurance new job obamacare rollovers taxes Mon, 31 Oct 2016 10:00:07 +0000 Damian Davila 1822947 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways That Better Paying Job Out of State May Cost You http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-better-paying-job-out-of-state-may-cost-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-that-better-paying-job-out-of-state-may-cost-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_85520231_MEDIUM.jpg" alt="taking a higher-paying job out of state may cost you" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>On the market for a new, higher paying job? Have you expanded your job search across state lines? When contemplating a job that would require you to move to a new state, part of the decision process should be determining how the local costs, public infrastructure, and local school system will affect your financial bottom line.</p> <p>In some areas of the United States, the increase in salary the job offers might not be enough to offset the added potential living expense. Here are some things to consider.</p> <h2>1. Cost of Living</h2> <p>Before accepting a job in another state, it's essential you don't assume that a higher salary offer in another state will lead to a larger disposable income. Each state has a slightly different cost of living. When you move from one state to another, you can expect slightly different housing, food, utility, healthcare, transportation, and healthcare costs.</p> <p>If the new job offer is from a state with a significantly higher cost of living, the &quot;raise&quot; might:</p> <ul> <li>Not be as extensive as you expect</li> <li>Be an equivalent wage</li> <li>Be a pay decrease.</li> </ul> <p>For example, a $25,000 salary in Boise, Idaho is comparable to a $47,274 salary in Brooklyn, New York. In order to really be considered a raise, individuals that move from Idaho to New York should expect at a little more than a salary of $47,274 a year.</p> <p>Before accepting any jobs out of state, check this<a href="http://money.cnn.com/calculator/pf/cost-of-living/"> cost of living calculator</a> to ensure that you are actually receiving a raise.</p> <h2>2. Housing</h2> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/whats-a-fair-relationship-between-salary-and-rent">Housing costs, rent</a>, and home ownership can differ significantly from state-to-state. You will want to evaluate how the expected rent or mortgage rates (lower, higher, the same) will affect your potential disposable income.</p> <p>Moving from Idaho to New York, for example, can lead to a steep increase in potential rent or mortgage costs. Average rent cost increases from $995 (Idaho) to $3,295 (New York).</p> <h2>3. Transportation</h2> <p>Moving from an area with a good public transit system could significantly increase your expenses. According to the<a href="http://mbaonline.pepperdine.edu/evolution-of-the-daily-commute/"> <em>Evolution of the Daily Commute</em></a>, car bound commuters will spend $1,129 dollars in gas annually to travel to and from work. A good subway, bus, or train system can be significantly cheaper due to the fact you're potentially trading gas and parking expenses for a reasonably priced ticket.</p> <p>If you are unavoidably car bound, you might consider how the<a href="http://money.cnn.com/news/storysupplement/economy/gas_prices_by_state/"> difference in gas prices between states</a>&nbsp;will affect your finances. Moving from Oklahoma to California for example, would increase the amount you pay for gas from $1.39 a gallon to $2.47 a gallon. That can lead to a large extra expense.</p> <p>In addition, each state has different average insurance rates due to state regulations, and the percentage of uninsured drivers on the road. Moving from a state with low insurance rates to a state with high insurance rates might mean that you won't have as much extra money from that raise as you expect.</p> <h2>4. Quality of K-12 Schools</h2> <p>The quality, success, and financial stability of the local K-12 public schools are not uniform across state or county lines. Depending on where you move, your children could be facing a potential downgrade in the quality of their education and an unexpected extra financial expense that could counteract the positive effect of your raise.</p> <p>Parents can check out the quality of local schools:</p> <ul> <li>By searching for news of any potential school and school district in Google.</li> <li>By evaluating the statistic, reviews, and polls of any potential school with&nbsp;<a href="https://k12.niche.com/">Niche's 2016 K-12 School and District Rankings</a>.</li> </ul> <p>Moving to an area where the public schools are failing could inevitably lead families to make the hard decision to either gamble on the poor educational institution or invest time and potentially money to enroll students in a more favorable environment.</p> <h2>5. Quality of Local Colleges</h2> <p>College is expensive. In-state college tuition can be a real money saver. How much college costs&nbsp;<a href="https://trends.collegeboard.org/college-pricing/figures-tables/2015-16-state-tuition-and-fees-public-four-year-institutions-state-and-five-year-percentage">depends on the state that you live in</a>. Moving from Wyoming to New Hampshire, for example, could mean that in-state college tuition is suddenly around $10,000 more expensive. Even with a raise, that might be too big of a price hike to reasonably handle.</p> <p>As an added concern, you should evaluate whether or not you're moving into an area with too many colleges on rocky financial standing. These colleges and universities tend to hike tuition rates, cut back on other amenities, and possibly declare bankruptcy.</p> <p>Bankruptcy, in particular, can be costly for current students. It can lead to red marks on their official transcripts (if the school closes mid-semester), forcing students to go through another college application process, and face the reality that many of the classes and credits earned won't be recognized by the new college.</p> <h2>6. State Regulatory Guidelines (For Your Industry)</h2> <p>Professional standards are often set not on a federal level, but on a state level. Moving to a new state can either create new opportunities, or limit the opportunities available to you and your significant other. The most far reaching differences can be found in the medical field.</p> <ul> <li>Twenty-two states&nbsp;<a href="http://onlinenursingdegrees.maryville.edu/the-states-that-allow-nurse-practitioner-autonomy/">grant Nurse Practitioners full autonomy</a> to diagnose and treat patients without supervision from physicians. This can allow NPs to open private clinics or grants the ability to apply for a broader range of jobs.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Twenty-five states have entered into a&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsbn.org/nurse-licensure-compact.htm">Nurse Licensure Compact</a> (NLC) that allows nurses to practice in any other state that has agreed to join the compact. This can allow individuals to engage in travel nursing or telemedicine. Moving out of or into an NLC state could either shrink or increase professional opportunities.</li> </ul> <p>There are a lot of financial factors that should be evaluated when changing jobs within the same state. When moving out of state, there are even more factors that could affect how the new higher paying jobs will negatively or positively affect your net worth.</p> <p><em>Have you taken a job in another state? What was your experience?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-better-paying-job-out-of-state-may-cost-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-websites-that-will-pay-you-to-write-for-them">22 Websites That Will Pay You to Write for Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-free-accommodations-and-paid-jobs-on-boats">How to Get Free Accommodations (and Paid Jobs) on Boats</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/18-cool-jobs-for-fashion-lovers">18 Cool Jobs for Fashion Lovers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-part-time-jobs-to-do-while-your-kids-are-at-school">17 Part-Time Jobs to Do While Your Kids Are at School</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Extra Income Job Hunting cost of living gas prices housing new job public transportation states tickets tuition Thu, 08 Sep 2016 09:30:33 +0000 Samantha Stauf 1788318 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_80119927_LARGE.jpg" alt="asking questions before accepting a job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A job offer is exciting. It can mean new opportunities, more money, a move to a new city or state, and a big promotion. But wait just a second. Before you hurriedly take that offer and sign your name on the dotted line, you need to ask the following 12 questions. They can be the difference between a good job, a great career, and a position you don't actually want at all. Remember, with a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">job offer</a>, the ball is in your court. They want you. You hold the power, and you should make sure you get exactly what you want.</p> <h2>1. How Many Vacation, Personal, and Sick Days Do I Get?</h2> <p>You cannot assume you will get the same vacation package you got with a previous employer. In fact, if you are moving to America from another country, you may be in for quite a nasty surprise. For instance, the UK mandates <a href="https://www.gov.uk/holiday-entitlement-rights/entitlement">28 days of paid vacation every year</a>, and this does not include public holidays. There are no such rules in the U.S., and most people are lucky to get 10 paid vacation days per year when starting a new job. So, ask, and see if it's negotiable.</p> <p>You also want to find out if these allowances increase over time. Some employers will add an additional five paid days after three and five years of continuous employment. Or, paid days off may increase with a promotion. You also want to ask about personal days, which have different conditions than vacation days (personal days may not be allowed to carry over). Is there a maximum amount of days that can be carried over before you stop accruing? These will all be outlined in the contract you sign, but you want clarification long before it is printed up.</p> <h2>2. What's Included in the Benefits Package?</h2> <p>Benefits cost employers a great deal of money, and so they are seen as a big incentive when hiring a new employee. The biggest cost is health insurance, and there will be options there, too. Some employers have a sliding scale of insurance options, including HMO, PPO, EPO, and HAS plans, and all will cost different amounts and have varying degrees of cover. Aside from health insurance, ask about other kinds of insurance, too. Are vision and dental included? Is life insurance included, or long and short-term disability? These options, if offered at no charge to you, can add up considerably to the basic pay package you are being offered. This is why a site like Salary.com will list base salary, and salary plus benefits. The latter can be a lot more. And if there is a bonus, ask about that. How much, what do you have to do to get it, and when is it paid?</p> <h2>3. What's the Parking Situation?</h2> <p>Parking can be a big deal in some cities, especially New York and L.A. If the company has a lot set aside for employee parking, you're usually in great shape. Is the parking offered close to the building, or is it quite a walk? Your personal safety may be an issue here. If you have to find your own parking, things can start getting tricky, and costly. Does the company cover employee parking costs, and if so, how much do they cover? For instance, you may be covered for street parking, but not a covered lot, and if you are worried about hail or other weather conditions, that can be a deal breaker. Does the company have a discount plan on public transportation? This can be a better option for some, as parking and gas money can be too expensive.</p> <h2>4. What Are the Actual Hours?</h2> <p>Depending on the industry in which you work, this can greatly <a href="http://www.calculators.org/savings/wage-conversion.php">impact your hourly wage</a>. If you are offered a starting salary of $60,000 per year, and work 40 hours per week, you're getting roughly $29/hour. If you work 60 hours per week with no overtime, that drops to less than $20/hour. So, ask for realistic working conditions. If you are going to be stuck in the office nights and weekends, you may want to negotiate your base pay, or ask for additional vacation and personal days. Your hiring manager may paint a very rosy picture of the conditions, so ask people whom you'll be working with. Be informed. You do not want to find out you just quit a $50,000 job working 40 hours per week for a $60,000 job working 60 hours per week.</p> <h2>5. When Am I Expected to Start?</h2> <p>It may seem like a no brainer, but some people get bitten badly by not asking this question before accepting the job. Then, they're in sticky mud when they realize the start date is too far away to make ends meet, or too soon to allow relocation, or finishing up a position at another firm. Although most employers will give you two weeks, it's possible you need more time than that to get your affairs in order. If you're moving across the country (or from another country), it can take months to find a new place and get situated. On the other hand, it may be that the position needs to be filled immediately, and your contract with your current employer demands two weeks' notice. Whatever the conditions, you need to know the start date. You can always negotiate coming in later, or earlier, or it may be that you cannot accept the job at all based on the start date offered. You do not want to find this out after you have resigned from your current position.</p> <h2>6. What Are the Promotion Opportunities?</h2> <p>In a fantastic episode of <em>The Office (UK)</em>, Tim says &quot;It's better to be at the bottom of a ladder you want to climb, than halfway up one you don't.&quot; This is very good advice, and something you must keep in mind when you are considering the new job. You may not be happy at your current job, but there may be more promotion opportunities than at the company you're thinking of moving to.</p> <p>Even worse, you may find out that it is impossible to get promoted out of the department you're applying for. Suddenly, you have gone from climbing a ladder, to hitting a glass ceiling. So, examine the organizational structure (ask for a company org chart if you can). See who is above you, and below you. Find out how quickly you can get promoted if you work hard. It may be that the starting salary is not ideal, but that the opportunities for promotion are excellent. And of course, the reverse may be true&hellip; you do not want a job that pays well now, but goes absolutely nowhere.</p> <h2>7. Will There Be Considerable Travel Involved?</h2> <p>For some people, travel is a perk that they cannot wait to take advantage of. For others, travel means valuable time away from family and friends, and the hassle of living out of suitcases and hotels. Wherever you stand on this, you should know beforehand what the travel expectations are. Some jobs will actually list it in the ad (20% travel required). Others will play it by ear, but tell you that some travel each month will be happening.</p> <p>On the other hand, some will tempt you with travel opportunities, but they are empty promises and you will actually be chained to your desk, year in, year out. Get this knowledge up front. Can you talk to the person you are replacing? What was their specific experience of travel like? If you enjoy traveling on the company dime, and walk away from a job that gives you such a benefit, you want to make sure you are getting it from the new position.</p> <h2>8. Is There a High Turnover Rate Here?</h2> <p>A revolving door is not a good sign, and if people are constantly leaving, that is a sign of systemic issues plaguing the company. Usually, the biggest reason for high turnover is poor working conditions. This could mean very long hours, oppressive management, favoritism, low pay, or the lack or promotion opportunities. The company could also have a history of hiring and firing people on demand for projects. Whatever the reason, high turnover is a huge red flag. The hiring manager may well be reluctant to give you this information, so ask other employees. Or better yet, take a look at Glassdoor.com and see what former employees are saying. If there is a pattern there, especially for harassment or abuse, you know what to avoid.</p> <h2>9. What Is the Onboarding Process Like?</h2> <p>Onboarding is a buzzword term that means &quot;the mechanism through which new employees acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, and behaviors to become effective organizational members and insiders.&quot; In short, how long you will be given to get up to speed on the job, the daily duties, and the projects you are given. If they are going to give you extensive training and a grace period, that's worth knowing. If they expect you to hit the ground running, you need to know this beforehand. You do not want to take a job for which you are not yet qualified if they expect instant results. That will show quickly, and you could be laid off after a month or two.</p> <h2>10. What's the Company Culture Like?</h2> <p>Is it a fun place to work? Is there a strict dress code? Is there a great social life outside of the office? Are the hours somewhat flexible, or do you have to be there exactly at 9 a.m., and leave at 5 p.m.? Is lunch a strict one-hour affair, or is there wiggle room? Are there office parties, and gift exchanges? Is the office full of cliques that make it difficult to fit in and make friends? You want to know as much about the culture as you can. You spend more time at the office than you do at home, so it should be a place you enjoy working at.</p> <h2>11. Who Will Be My Supervisor?</h2> <p>A name is just a name if you're new to a company, but you can easily research that person with the availability of information on LinkedIn and social sites. Is it someone who is a go-getter, driven to get results, with high expectations of every team member? Is it someone with a lot of experience that you can learn from, and grow? Is it someone who hates competition, especially from subordinates? Find out who you will be reporting to, because a bad manager is one of the biggest reasons people quit their jobs.</p> <h2>12. Where Will I Be Working?</h2> <p>If you're taking a position as a mechanic, you're working in the garage. But if it's an office job, this could make a big difference for you. Right now, you may have an office, and the new job comes with a cubicle, or a desk in an open plan facility. This could be a deal breaker. Do you have a window? Again, for some people it's not important, but for others, natural light and a view is a must. If you can, ask to see the space and if it's not good enough, ask for something better. You want to get this nailed, possibly in writing, before you start.</p> <p><em>What other questions should you ask before taking a job offer? Share with us!</em></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F12%2520Questions%2520to%2520Ask%2520Before%2520You%2520Take%2520a%2520Job%2520Offer.jpg&amp;description=12%20Questions%20to%20Ask%20Before%20You%20Take%20a%20Job%20Offer"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/12%20Questions%20to%20Ask%20Before%20You%20Take%20a%20Job%20Offer.jpg" alt="12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">6 Things You Must Do After the Interview to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting important questions Job Interview job offer job search job seeker new job Wed, 29 Jun 2016 09:30:28 +0000 Paul Michael 1740968 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000061725250_Large.jpg" alt="staying calm to ace her job interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Next time you have a job interview, take a few deep breaths before walking in. Research shows that anxious candidates perform at a lower level in interviews than their relaxed peers. And not only are you stressed to the point of distraction about the interview, but the simple fact you're nervous &mdash; and probably showing it with sweaty palms and jittery energy &mdash; might mean that things won't work out for you, creating the worst sort of vicious circle.</p> <p>Don't let your interview nerves sabotage your chances. Use these tips to make sure you get the big break you deserve &mdash; and give interview anxiety the boot.</p> <h2>1. Recognize the Telltale Signs</h2> <p>The emotional twitchiness that comes with interview nerves quickly translates into physical symptoms, which can undermine your confidence and also indicate your level of anxiety to the interviewer. Whether it's feeling flushed, avoiding eye contact, or fiddling with your clothing, we all have our own personal range of mannerisms that come out when we are feeling the heat.</p> <p>Understanding how you tend to react when anxious is key. If you're not already aware, ask colleagues, family, or friends what they think. Chances are, they've noticed the small nervous ticks you turn to, even if you have not.</p> <p>Interestingly, research shows that speed of speech &mdash; speaking unnaturally slowly &mdash; is the only indicator that both interviewers and candidates agree is a <a href="https://www.springer.com/gp/about-springer/media/springer-select/interview-blues---anxious--slow-talkers-often-do-not-get-the-job-/55382?token=prtst0416p">telltale sign of nerves</a>. All other habits tend to be a personal cocktail of small things that vary among individuals. So if you're facing an interview and not sure where to start, then practicing pacing your speech in answers can help you overcome this most common of giveaways.</p> <h2>2. Harness the Jitters</h2> <p>Feeling nervous, to a certain extent, is actually a massive advantage to you. As long as your anxieties don't become so severe they're paralyzing, you can use the nervous energy to focus on preparation for your big day.</p> <h2>3. Do Your Research</h2> <p>If you already have an interview lined up, find out how many interviewers there will be, and whether there will be any pre-work or exercises to complete on the day. If you can find out the interviewer's name, then Google them. Knowledge is always power. Learn all you can about the company, including what others in the same field &mdash; industry insiders and the trade press &mdash; think of the business, for a balanced view. Simply following the right people on Twitter will glean you a whole lot of information that might come in handy.</p> <h2>4. Plan Your Answers</h2> <p>Learn how to answer some of the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">most common interview questions</a>, to make sure you're feeling confident. The STAR technique is useful for planning out answers to <a href="http://theinterviewguys.com/behavioral-interview-questions-and-answers-101/">behavioral questions</a>, as it forces you to think of the Situation, Task, Actions, and Results of any given example you might choose. Draft a list of the questions you might predict, and sketch out answers, including the relevant examples you might share. And plan how you might phrase any less-than-perfect experiences you've had along the way.</p> <h2>5. Practice!</h2> <p>You have your answers scoped out, now you just need to get them into your head. Try posting the key questions and your possible answers in places you will see them often. Think about the inside of your fridge door, or the bathroom mirror. Then start using your down time to run through your answers. Do them in your head if you have to, but out loud is far better. If you're in the shower, or in your car, talk an answer through.</p> <h2>6. Keep a Sense of Perspective</h2> <p>And finally, cut yourself a break. Everyone sits in an interview <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-scary-thoughts-everyone-has-during-a-job-interview">thinking scary thoughts</a>. Pretty much everyone has interview nerves, and learning to cope is a useful skill that pays dividends outside of the interview room, too. Ask yourself: <em>What is the worst that can happen?</em> And consider whether anything that comes to pass today will still feel important in 10 years time, to get your fears in perspective. Most importantly, take a deep breath, and keep smiling. You'll knock 'em dead!</p> <p><em>How do you get over your interview jitters? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-not-to-answer-10-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How NOT TO Answer 10 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks Job Hunting calm your nerves interview jitters Job Interview job search nerves nervous new job Thu, 12 May 2016 09:30:24 +0000 Claire Millard 1708049 at http://www.wisebread.com 15 Great Jobs That Don't Pay Much http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000019714598_Large.jpg" alt="A DJ is a great job that doesn&#039;t pay much" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Can money buy happiness? Should you spend years in a job you don't like? Or, are you better off working at a job you really love, even if you don't make a pile of money? If you are an average American, you'll work for for 90,000 hours over your career lifetime. If you have a &quot;happiness in my job is more important&quot; mindset, here are 15 jobs you might really like &mdash; even if they don't pay much. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor?ref=seealso">6 Ways That Job You Hate Keeps You Poor</a>)</p> <h2>1. Cruise Ship Bartender</h2> <p>Right out of school, my high-school classmate, Luci, went to work on a cruise ship. As soon as she was able, she became a bartender for the cruise line. At our 10th reunion, she announced that she was retiring from cruise ship bartending, and moving to Kauai to work a small farm she had purchased. Yes, she had lived frugally, and also saved her tips. It paid off. Today's ship bartenders earn between $2,200&ndash;$3,600 per month (depending on the size of ship and gratuities from passengers).</p> <h2>2. EMT</h2> <p>Every time I read the average hourly wage for EMTs and paramedics &mdash; $31,700 per year, or around $16 an hour &mdash; I'm shocked. How can this be? These folks are brave, strong, quick-witted, personable, and caring. I'll never understand why they don't make more, but I'm extremely glad that there are people who are drawn to this career.</p> <h2>3. Roadie</h2> <p>I always thought being a roadie would be <a href="http://www.yesandyes.org/2013/07/true-story-im-roadie.html">a ridiculously fun job</a> to have &mdash; and from this funny interview, I was right. Sometimes glamorous, sometimes not... but if you abhor sitting behind a desk and love music, maybe it would be a good choice. What does a roadie make? It varies. If the band for whom you are working is enormously popular, that apparently makes a big difference. One source quoted around $200 to $400 per day, but become a successful tour manager, and you may expect to make $1,500 to $2,000 per week.</p> <h2>4. Massage Therapist</h2> <p>While the job outlook for massage therapists is good, and the BLS reports that 2014 median pay was over $37,000 per year. If you have ever seen the movie, <a href="http://amzn.to/202F4q2">Enough Said</a>, you know one of the major drawbacks: dragging a massage table around. That's not a must, though. One of my neighbors has clients who come to her house. Others are employed by chiropractor's offices, physical therapists, spas, cruise ships, etc. I'm told it is a rewarding career, and who doesn't love a good massage? Check with your state's governing board of massage therapists to find accredited programs.</p> <h2>5. Veterinary Assistant</h2> <p>Love animals? At about $11 an hour, you really need to. It's hard work. As it turns out, most pets don't really enjoy having their blood drawn or parts poked. Prepare to get dirty, too. But it is extremely rewarding, since you'll be helping to relieve pain and heal animals. Most of the &quot;help wanted&quot; ads I viewed wanted assistants who had been through an educational program or have a college degree.</p> <h2>6. Dog Groomer</h2> <p>Would you enjoy the challenge of beautifying man's best friend? This career might be for you. Well, you'll probably start out as a dog bather, making $13&ndash;$17. Median pay for a groomer is around $20,000 annually. It's important to note that many grooming-business owners also pay commissions. It's not easy work, but again, if you'd rather spend time with animals than people, it's worth considering.</p> <h2>7. DJ</h2> <p>Got the gift of gab? Are you a natural at mashing up different songs? How about a background in journalism or communications? You might like being a DJ or radio announcer. Sometimes, they also find work as emcees at events, weddings, or at private clubs. The job outlook, sadly, is in decline at the moment; with median pay at $13.50 per hour. But serving as a freelance DJ as a side job could provide a very nice chunk of change each month. And the DJs I've followed for years on the radio seem to be very happy people who love their jobs. Test the waters using DJ software (there are many free options available) and see if this is worth exploring.</p> <h2>8. Reporter</h2> <p>A friend of mine works for a news agency. The pay is low &mdash; median pay is about $37,000 &mdash; and the hours are long. The pace is very fast, she works on deadlines, and often has to wear all the hats. The plus side is that the job is rarely boring. To get hired, you usually need a journalism or communications degree and an internship.</p> <h2>9. Private Investigator</h2> <p>I worked part-time for a P.I. for several years. As a retired policeman, he knew a remarkable number of people, and where to find a lot of the unsavory ones. It wasn't glamorous. Most of his bread-and-butter work involved serving legal papers and tracking people down. The work was on a flat-fee basis, $25 per service, or $50 per hour for research. However, he could set his own hours, take only the work he wanted, not be cooped up behind a desk, and he had a nice additional income for retirement.</p> <h2>10. Flight Attendant</h2> <p>I admit, this job doesn't have the glamour it once had. But the opportunity to travel is still intriguing. Getting a flight attendant position doesn't happen quickly, though &mdash; new flight attendants have to pay their dues before they get to go see the world. Average pay is over $42,000 a year. Job growth is slow, and it can be a challenge to get hired. Being able to speak a second language is a plus. However, according to the BLS, job prospects are better for those with college educations.</p> <h2>11. Model</h2> <p>Nice work, if you can get it. The competition is fierce. Very few make it to the &quot;supermodel&quot; level, but there is work, if you are prepared to be creative. Joining a website such as Model Mayhem is a good start. Photographers often want to build their portfolios and will exchange good photos for modeling work. Sometimes, budding fashion designers will trade clothes for modeling time. If a model is versatile, there are more possibilities out there. Initially, look for low pay &mdash; as low as $10 an hour &mdash; but if a model catches on and has a good work ethic, the day rate is usually about $100 to $400. Yeah, not great. &quot;Fit&quot; models make more, but they need to be very strict about maintaining their size. So why do it? Well, it's fun, and glamorous.</p> <h2>12. Tour Guide</h2> <p>Enjoy meeting people? Do you like to talk and answer questions? Maybe you'd be a good tour guide. In my town, there are museum tour guides, historical town tours, tours to national parks, and all-day driving tours. Often, it will help if you speak a second language, particularly the one with the greatest influx of tourists. You need to have a friendly, yet &quot;take-charge&quot; personality, be quick on your feet, and be gregarious. Pay ranges from $11 to almost $17 per hour.</p> <h2>13. Professional House-Sitter</h2> <p>We employ a wonderful lady to house and pet-sit when we go away, and we have to book her months in advance because she's<em> that good</em>. We pay a daily rate, plus tip. You can find house-sitters on TrustedHousesitters, or similar sites. If you are considering going into the business, because getting paid to hang out in someone's home sounds like a stellar gig, you should look into getting bonded, and you'll need impeccable references. Being able to watch pets is a bonus.</p> <h2>14. Brewmaster</h2> <p>If you love beer, why not become a brewmaster? <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Brewmaster/Salary">Pay is pretty good</a> for brewmasters at about $46,000 a year. You might try making beer at home first &mdash; which is fun and rewarding &mdash; then consider working in a pub or brewery. The next step would be taking an official course and getting the proper credentials at a brewing academy.</p> <h2>15. Event Planner</h2> <p>For some, the logistics involved in planning a wedding, a business conference, or meetings are cringe-worthy. Fortunately, there are people who are pleasantly challenged by these logistics and thrive on getting even the smallest details organized. During events, expect to work long, grueling days. But growth in the field of event planning is faster than average; expect to earn over $45,000 annually. A Bachelor's degree is helpful, as is experience working in the field.</p> <p>Note: All data via the <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/">Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook</a>, which is a terrific resource for job searchers and the career-curious.</p> <p><em>Do you have a job you love that doesn't pay very much? What is it? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-entry-level-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries">12 Entry Level Jobs With Surprisingly High Salaries</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-high-paying-jobs-that-didnt-exist-10-years-ago">9 High-Paying Jobs That Didn&#039;t Exist 10 Years Ago</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting career goals job search new job salary side job Mon, 18 Jan 2016 12:00:03 +0000 Marla Walters 1638731 at http://www.wisebread.com The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_using_laptop_000053433486.jpg" alt="Woman learning the best times of year to start her job search" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>So, you're ready to search for a new job. The good news? One of the best times to job hunt is coming soon.</p> <p>January happens to be one of the best times to begin a job search. As massive jobs site Monster.com said in a recent feature story, winter is the time of year when the greatest number of decision makers are in the office at the same time, because these key people are done with the vacations so many of them take during the winter holidays. And this is important, because these decision makers often work as teams when making hiring choices.</p> <p>At the same time, January is when office work at many companies tends to pick up again after a slowdown in December. Some companies still mostly shut down during the last two weeks of the year. These firms won't be making any hiring decisions around the holidays.</p> <p>Then the best time to get your resume out there would be right after the New Year's holiday, when hiring managers are back at work and no longer thinking of holiday parties, gift-giving, and ski vacations.</p> <p>There's a financial reason for the new hiring, too. Many companies get their new yearly budgets in January. Once they have these in place, they can then make hiring decisions with confidence.</p> <h2>The Early Fall Rush</h2> <p>The beginning of the new year isn't the only good time to start a job search. Career advice site Career Sidekick recommends, too, that job hunters send out resumes and cover letters during the early fall, especially in September and October.</p> <p>The holiday season plays a role again. Companies often want to make hiring decisions before the winter holidays and the year-end lull. If you want to catch businesses when they are shifting into hiring mode, the early fall months are a good choice.</p> <p>It's not just that hiring managers don't focus on work during the holiday season. As Career Sidekick writes, it's easier for them to schedule interviews and complete the hiring process during the fall months when they don't have to schedule them between the days off and vacation time that other key managers are taking.</p> <h2>Summer Can Be Rough</h2> <p>There is also one time of year that is a particularly slow period for hiring, and that's summer. Again, this often has to do with the number of vacation days that key managers take. Those managers who don't take time off during the end-of-the-year holidays often do it instead in June, July, or August. This is a particularly busy time for family vacations.</p> <p>This makes it difficult for hiring managers to schedule a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">series of interviews</a> with job candidates who have to earn the approval of several key office personnel. If you're searching for a job in the summer, it might be a while before you actually hear back.</p> <p>There is an exception here, though. Recent college graduates applying for more entry-level positions might find better luck applying for jobs in the summer. That's because hiring managers expect to see these resumes during this time of year.</p> <p>It's also easier to hire recent college graduates because they are usually applying for lower-level jobs. They don't need to meet with as many key decision makers before they are hired. Summer vacations don't play as big a role in these interviews.</p> <h2>Find the Right Time for You</h2> <p>It's important to remember that these are just rough guidelines. The best time to look for a new job is often when you make the decision to take on a new challenge, no matter what time of year it happens to be.</p> <p>And the best time to job-hunting might also be when your life has slowed down enough. If you're in the middle of moving to a new home, if you're planning a wedding, or if you've returned to graduate school, this might not be the best time to hunt for a new job, even if it is early fall or the beginning of a new year.</p> <p>You need the time and energy to run a successful job search. If you're bogged down with too many big responsibilities, it might be best to wait before sending out those resumes, no matter what the calendar says.</p> <p><em>What time of year have you had the most luck in finding jobs? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthe-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThe%2520Best%2520Times%2520of%2520Year%2520to%2520Start%2520a%2520Job%2520Search.jpg&amp;description=The%20Best%20Times%20of%20Year%20to%20Start%20a%20Job%20Search"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/The%20Best%20Times%20of%20Year%20to%20Start%20a%20Job%20Search.jpg" alt="The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-job-hunt">7 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-6-craziest-things-people-have-done-to-land-a-job">The 6 Craziest Things People Have Done to Land a Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-what-your-resume-should-include-in-2018">This Is What Your Resume Should Include in 2018</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting job hunt job search new job resume unemployed Tue, 15 Dec 2015 10:00:07 +0000 Dan Rafter 1621148 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_hiding_desk_000052944964.jpg" alt="Woman learning ways to job hunt without getting caught" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Applying for a new job is often a Catch-22: You've got to put yourself out there as a candidate, but you don't want to get caught by your current employer for fear of being prematurely fired. Yes, it's a fine line to walk for career advancement, but you can totally perfect this skill with these nine ways to conduct a stealthy job search.</p> <h2>1. Keep Your Social Media Profiles Current at All Times</h2> <p>If you're active on social media in general, your various profiles are probably up-to-date on the regular. If they're not, and you update them out of the blue, it could raise suspicions, particularly on LinkedIn and if you're connected to coworkers &mdash; which you probably are.</p> <p><a href="http://alexandermannsolutions.com/about-alexander-mann-solutions/our-talent/key-person/ian-cluroe">Ian Cluroe</a>, director of global brand and marketing for Alexander Mann Solutions, warns against this sudden attention to your social media profiles.</p> <p>&quot;Keeping your social profiles up-to-date ensures that you don't raise flags when you're the one actively searching, and enables you to be found by sources who may have an opportunity that you're the perfect person for but you would have otherwise known nothing about because your outdated profile made you impossible to find,&quot; he says.</p> <h2>2. Don't Send Resumes to Blind Ads Online</h2> <p>If you don't know who the recipient of your resume is, do not send it. I repeat, DO NOT SEND IT. You don't know who is on the other end, and serendipity has a way of biting you in the butt for not being careful.</p> <p>&quot;A woman once told me that her coworker responded to a blind ad and then was confronted a short while later by someone in the company from Human Resources,&quot; reveals certified career coach <a href="http://www.calltocareer.com/about/">Cheryl E. Palmer</a>. &quot;The HR professional asked her if she was looking for another job. The woman lied and said no. The HR professional responded, &quot;I got your resume.&quot; It turned out that the job that this woman had unwittingly applied for was at her own company.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Be Cautious When You're Networking</h2> <p>Of course you have to network when you're searching for a new position &mdash; just be smart about it. Be very careful to whom you're telling your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-low-key-jobs-for-people-who-hate-stress">plans to switch jobs</a>, because you never know who you're talking to. As a rule, don't go to networking events at a bar where you're going to have a couple drinks and become less inhibited. That's a recipe for certain disaster.</p> <h2>4. Don't Let Your Attire Give It Away</h2> <p>Here's a prime example of amateur tactics that absolutely raise red flags: When your everyday work attire is chinos and a button-down and you all of a sudden show up to work in a suit and tie. The jig will be up immediately, and you're better than that, bro.</p> <p>&quot;Dressing up more than normal can be a real giveaway that you are interviewing for another position,&quot; says Palmer. &quot;To avoid suspicion, put your interview clothes in your car and change in a discreet location before the interview. It's also a good idea to schedule interview appointments during times when your absence won't raise questions. Taking too much time off from work can signal that you are interviewing at other companies.&quot;</p> <h2>5. Don't Tell Your Coworkers That You're Looking</h2> <p>I'm sure there are coworkers you trust to keep the secret that you're looking for a new job, but my life motto has fared me well so far &mdash; trust no one, and fear everyone. Besides, you don't know what plans they have in mind for their own career advancement. They may view your undercover search as an opportunity to swoop in and take your job right out from under you. And if that happens, you'll kick yourself for being so loose-lipped. Ruthless comes in all shapes, sizes, and smiles.</p> <h2>6. Consider Having an Executive Recruiter on Your Side</h2> <p>If you're afraid of getting caught searching for a job (and you should be), there are ways to ease your anxiety. Hiring an executive recruiter is one such solution, and it won't even cost you. Recruiters are paid by employers, and their fees are usually based on your starting salary. Depending on the type of job you're seeking &mdash; like CEO or VP of Somethingorother &mdash; working with a recruiter is often the only way to go.</p> <p>Zach Brown, a senior sourcing recruiter for David Brown International, details a few of the benefits of using a recruiter.</p> <p>&quot;A skilled recruiter can leverage their network and industry connections to get your resume and portfolio in front of employers in your field that are looking for top talent,&quot; he explains. &quot;Going this route will get you exposure with the right companies without having to post your resume everywhere for all to see. Look for an established recruiter that specializes in your career field and has worked with the types of organizations that you are interested in working for.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Keep Your Search Quiet, Especially on Social Media</h2> <p>As a professional, you should be mindful of what you're posting to social media, in general &mdash; no more drama! &ndash; but you should particularly be conscious to keep your job search updates off Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other sites. Even if you're not connected to your boss or coworkers online, what you post has a mysterious way of popping up in places you don't want it to be seen &mdash; security settings, be damned.</p> <h2>8. Don't Use Anyone at Your Current Job as a Reference</h2> <p>If you don't want to raise a red flag that you're looking for a new job, WHY would you use one of your coworkers as a reference? Surely you have three other people with whom you're not currently working who can vouch for you, no?</p> <h2>9. Search for Your New Job on Your Own Time and Equipment</h2> <p>And, finally, don't be sketchy and use company time to search for a position with another company. That's not only dumb, but also disloyal and rude. Use your own computer and other resources on your own time. Get caught and you're likely to get fired on the spot. The only silver lining is that it will seriously speed up your job search. You don't want it to go down like that.</p> <p>Palmer says, &quot;You should never put your work email or work phone number on your resume. Also, you should use a personal email address that sounds professional &mdash; i.e., ralph.smith@[emailservice].com, not wonderboy@[emailservice].com &mdash; and list your cell phone number so that communication with potential employers will remain private. In addition, you should use your computer at home to send emails to hiring managers. Using the computer at work is risky since many companies monitor their employees' computer use.&quot;</p> <p><em>Do you have tips on how employees can search for a new job without raising a red flag? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">6 Things You Must Do After the Interview to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting boss Job Interview job search new job resume Thu, 12 Nov 2015 11:15:12 +0000 Mikey Rox 1606587 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_packing_000031078772.jpg" alt="Woman learning what to do on the first day of her new job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As Plato wrote in 380 B.C., &quot;The beginning is the most important part of the work.&quot; It's a truth that still stands today: How you begin a new job sets the tone for how the rest of your work days will go. If you make the right impression, you can achieve faster, stress less, and gain a general sense of respect from your brand new peers. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-things-successful-people-do-every-morning?ref=seealso">13 Things Successful People Do Every Morning</a>)</p> <p>Read on for our roundup of the top tips and tricks on starting a new gig off right.</p> <h2>1. Be Prompt</h2> <p>The fact that your employer wants you to arrive on time for work shouldn't shock you out of your seat. But considering nearly 20% of Americans are habitually late for work, it's worth rehashing: Supervisors perceive prompt workers to be more conscientious, responsible, and productive. If you're a few minutes early &mdash; even better. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-do-before-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">5 Things to Do Before Your First Day on a New Job</a>)</p> <h2>2. Shake Hands With Your New Colleagues &mdash; Every Last One of Them</h2> <p>New neuroscience research has confirmed the power of a handshake: Strangers who meet really do <a href="http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/jocn_a_00295?prevSearch=authorsfield%253A%2528Sung%252C%2BKeen%2529&amp;searchHistoryKey=&amp;#.VW1K_WRViko">form a better impression</a> of one another if they shake hands while greeting. &quot;Be aware of the power of a handshake,&quot; says Sanda Dolcos, postdoctoral research associate for the Beckman Institute Department of Psychology. &quot;We found that it not only increases the positive effect toward a favorable interaction, but it also diminishes the impact of a negative impression. Many of our social interactions may go wrong for a reason or another, and a simple handshake preceding them can give us a boost and attenuate the negative impact of possible misunderstandings.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Project High Energy</h2> <p>Allow yourself to exhibit your true zest for the work you're doing. The most successful employees have a real love for the work, so act like it! Not only that, but happy employees lead directly to better performance and higher profits. Bottom line: you'll fare well to show your enthusiasm.</p> <h2>4. Clear Your Desk of Clutter</h2> <p>If your new desk is housing old materials &mdash; outdated paperwork, that stack of memos from last week &mdash; throw it out. Studies show that a cluttered workspace actually hinders our ability to process information and concentrate. We aren't aware of it, but <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21228167">clutter competes for our attention</a> in much the same way as a whining child or a barking dog does.</p> <h2>5. Write Tomorrow's To-Do List</h2> <p>You'll save yourself time on morning number two if you scribble down the next day's to-dos before heading home on day one. That way when you arrive at your desk the next day, you'll have a list of tasks all ready to focus on. Experts say it's best when we begin the work day by&nbsp;<a href="http://hbr.org/tip/2012/12/19/create-rituals-to-get-more-done">crossing off tasks with a single focus</a> &mdash; something we can truly feel accomplished about. So take some time to identify what that task might be and put it at the top of your list.</p> <h2>6. Say Goodbye</h2> <p>&quot;We tend to think about the importance of checking in and saying good morning to kick off the day,&quot; international business speaker Michael Kerr told Forbes, &quot;but we forget that it can be just as important, and make us feel good as well, to say a friendly and proper goodbye to everyone rather than just silently drift off into the night. This is triply important if you are the supervisor.&quot;</p> <p><em>What do you do on your first day on the job?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-do-before-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">5 Things to Do Before Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-transition-to-a-new-career-after-30">6 Ways to Transition to a New Career After 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job">12 Things You Should Do in the First Six Months of a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career">6 Quick Ways to Retrain for a New Career</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building employment first day hired new job Office working Tue, 16 Jun 2015 09:00:15 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1454553 at http://www.wisebread.com Help! I Lost My Job! http://www.wisebread.com/lost-my-job-tips-for-the-recently-laid-off <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/lost-my-job-tips-for-the-recently-laid-off" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/lost-job-iStock_000007173144_Small.jpg" alt="man lost job" title="man lost job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Here are tips and resources to help if you have just been laid off or you suspect that you will soon be laid off. Check our other guides to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-tips">job hunting</a>, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/making-extra-cash">earning extra income</a>, and ways to cope if you <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/i-hate-my-job">hate your job</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lose-your-job-without-losing-your-identity"><strong>Lose Your Job Without Losing Your Identity</strong></a><br /> Getting a pink slip can cause more distress than just a shrinking income. Here are three effective schools of thought for keeping your sense of self (long after the paychecks quit coming).</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/seven-tips-for-the-newly-unemployed"><strong>Seven Tips for the Newly Unemployed</strong></a><br /> The unemployment rate in California surged to 6.9%, and that is equivalent to the rate in early 2003. Most news reports say that unemployment will probably go up a bit more in the short term as our economy deals with the credit crisis. Personally, I am seeing some friends and family deal with unemployment right now, and here are some tips that could be helpful for those in this situation.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/laid-off-what-to-do-before-plunging-into-the-job-search"><strong>Laid Off? What To Do Before Plunging Into The Job Search</strong></a><br /> You've been laid off. What&rsquo;s next? What should you do&hellip;before updating your resume, tapping into your professional network, and looking for a job?</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/laid-off-make-sure-you-get-your-unemployment"><strong>You May Have to Fight for Your Unemployment Benefits</strong></a><br /> If you've recently been laid off, you may have to fight for your right to collect unemployment from the government. You probably know that if you are fired, you can't collect unemployment from the government. Although qualifications can vary from state to state, generally, only people who are laid off from their jobs will qualify for unemployment benefits. But did you know that, even if you are laid off, your employer can challenge your right to receive benefits?</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-1-losing-a-job"><strong>Getting By Without a Job, Part 1 - Losing a Job</strong></a><br /> Losing a job is always tough. During hard economic times &mdash; when it may not be possible to find another job as good as the one you've lost &mdash; it's even tougher. Here are a few steps you can take right after losing a job to make sure that your financial house is in order, so that you can focus on your job search.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-2-boost-income"><strong>Getting By Without a Job, Part 2 - Boost Income</strong></a><br /> If there's one fundamental rule for financial success, it's &quot;spend less than you earn.&quot; That rule applies whether you have a job or not. But, if you're used to having a job, the adjustments to getting by without one are going to be huge. It can be done, though. I suggest a three-pronged strategy, the first prong being to boost your income.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-3-cut-spending"><strong>Getting By Without a Job, Part 3 - Cut Spending</strong></a><br /> With the economy tanking, more and more people will be not just losing their job, but will be finding themselves without one for an extended period. When that happens it's not good enough to just cut back a little and use debt to make ends meet until the economy recovers. Getting by without a job is possible, even for an extended period &mdash; but it requires taking drastic measures to cut spending, and it requires taking them early, while you've still got some cash.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-4-get-free-stuff"><strong>Getting By Without a Job, Part 4 - Get Free Stuff</strong></a><br /> There are all kinds of ways to get stuff without money. You can grow it in a garden, gather it from the wild, make it yourself, get it as a gift, scavenge it from trash, or get it free from someone who hopes to sell you something else. All of these generally involve spending time instead of spending money &mdash; but someone who's getting by without a job probably has some time to spend.r</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emergency-belt-tightening"><strong>Emergency Belt-Tightening</strong></a><br /> Typical personal finance advice would have you divide your budget categories into two groups:&nbsp; Your fixed expenses and your discretionary expenses.&nbsp; I generally don't like that distinction much &mdash; how is your power bill more fixed than your grocery bill?&nbsp; When you reach the point of emergency economizing, though, it's a useful way to structure your thinking.</p> <p>We've got more great job articles in our <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/career-and-income">Career and Income</a> section.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lost-my-job-tips-for-the-recently-laid-off">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/i-hate-my-job">I Hate My Job! Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting finding a job lost job new job Thu, 21 May 2015 23:03:49 +0000 Amy Lu 1432684 at http://www.wisebread.com I Hate My Job! Now What? http://www.wisebread.com/i-hate-my-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/i-hate-my-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/hate-job-iStock_000032969296_Small.jpg" alt="stressed woman" title="stressed woman" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You hate your job, but what can you do about it? First, assess your situation to determine what your next step should be. Learn how to survive at a job you hate, how to get out without hurting your career, and what you can do to <em>not</em> hate your next job. Use these links to jump ahead to any section.</p> <ul> <li><a href="#assess">Assessing Your Situation</a></li> <li><a href="#changes">Making Changes at Work<br /> </a></li> <li><a href="#out">Getting Out of the Job</a></li> <li><a href="#happy">Finding a Job that Makes You Happy</a></li> </ul> <p>If you recently lost your job, take a look at Wise Bread's collection of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lost-my-job-tips-for-the-recently-laid-off">tips and resources for the recently laid off</a>.</p> <h2><a name="assess"></a></h2> <h2>Assessing Your Situation</h2> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-your-job-might-be-worth-staying-at"><strong>10 Important Signs Your Job Might Be Worth Staying At</strong></a><br /> Think you hate your job? Before you jump ship, see if your current job has the qualities that makes it worth staying at. Your situation may be better than you thought.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks"><strong>10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</strong></a><br /> You're miserable at work, but do you hate it enough to leave? Here are 10 ways to tell if your job really sucks &mdash; and how you can fix it.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-three-f-rule-can-lead-you-to-happiness"><strong>The Three F Rule Can Lead You to Happiness</strong></a><br /> The Three F Rule is a simple formula that keeps you sane and makes sure your working life doesn't go off the rails. If you don't want to hate your job, make sure you have at least two of these: fun, fame, and fortune.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-what-you-love-idealistic-nonsense-or-good-advice"><strong>Do What You Love: Idealistic Nonsense Or Good Advice?</strong></a><br /> Get some advice from Gary Vaynerchuk on why everyone needs to do what they love.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-afford-to-follow-your-dreams-can-you-afford-not-to"><strong>Can you afford to follow your dreams? Can you afford NOT to?</strong></a><br /> When you hate your job, maybe it's time for a change. Maybe it's time to follow your dreams, instead &mdash; but the prospect of such a major change can be intimindating. Sarah Winfrey and commenters discuss the pursuit of dreams and risks it involves.</p> <h2><a name="changes"></a></h2> <h2>Making Changes at Work</h2> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-survive-and-thrive-in-a-job-you-hate"><strong>How to Survive (and Thrive!) in a Job You Hate</strong></a><br /> Sometimes, leaving a job you hate may not be an option. However, there are ways to survive and thrive in jobs you don't like. Here are 9 secrets to making that hated job easier.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-getting-what-you-want-at-work"><strong>How to Get What You Want at Work</strong></a><br /> Even if you hate your job, you can still try to improve your work situation by having a meeting with your boss. Here are some tips on how to turn the meeting to your advantage and get what you want at work.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-behaviors-and-attitudes-that-can-drive-workplace-success"><strong>14 Behaviors &amp; Attitudes That Can Drive Workplace Success</strong></a><br /> If you hate your job because you don't seem to be getting anywhere, changing how you behave at work and re-evaluating your attitude towards the job might do the trick. Here are some ways to achieve workplace success.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-a-lousy-job-can-lead-to-a-bright-future"><strong>Why a Lousy Job Can Lead to a Bright Future</strong></a><br /> Hating your job doesn't mean you shouldn't try to excel at it. In fact, doing well at a lousy job can help your prospects in future employment opportunities.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-new-ways-to-hack-your-boss-without-a-machete"><strong>5 Ways to Make Your Boss Love You</strong></a><br /> Tips on navigating office politics and dealing with your boss.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/quit-wasting-your-lunch-hour-on-lunch-or-how-you-can-change-your-life-in-just-45-minutes-a-day"><strong>How You Can Change Your Life in Just 45 Minutes a Day</strong></a><br /> You might hate your job, but there is still that hour in the middle of the day that's all yours (usually). Those 45 minutes every day can be the time you need to make some major changes in your life.</p> <h2><a name="out"></a></h2> <h2>Getting Out of the Job</h2> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming"><strong>20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</strong></a><br /> So you hate your job and you'd rather not have anything to do with it. Still, that's no excuse to let a pink slip catch you by surprise. Answer these questions to see if it's time to start the job search in earnest.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/walking-away-from-a-job-that-s-going-away-on-your-terms"><strong>Walking Away (From a Job That's Going Away) on Your Own Terms</strong></a><br /> Even if you hate your job, you should still look after your interests before walking away. Here is a plan to exit a bad work situation without burning yourself.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-laid-off-a-step-by-step-guide"><strong>How to Get Laid Off</strong></a><br /> Hate your job but don't want to quit on your own? Being laid off is a better option, but it can be difficult if you've been doing everything right. Here are some ways to get out of a job you hate without destroying your career.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-buy-your-way-out-of-the-rat-race"><strong>Can You Buy Your Way Out of the Rat Race?</strong></a><br /> What are the chances that you leave a job you hate, get a new job, then find that you hate your new job, too? Theoretically, you can exit the rat race altogether if you have enough capital saved or invested to live off of. The reality, however, is not so simple; it's actually really hard to buy your way out. So what can you do instead?</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/on-choosing-temporary-freedom"><strong>On Choosing Temporary Freedom</strong></a><br /> If you had the option to switch back and forth between freedom and a regular job, you might not hate your job quite so much. Here's an introduction on the concept of temporary freedom and how you can work it into your life.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-honesty-always-the-best-policy"><strong>Is Honesty Always the Best Policy?</strong></a><br /> If you're leaving a job you hate for something better, it's definitely time to celebrate. But if you're too enthusiastic, that might turn off your ex-coworkers/-bosses and burn some bridges you'd rather keep intact. Ask yourself these three questions to help you figure out how best to break it to your colleagues.</p> <h2><a name="happy"></a></h2> <h2>Finding a Job that Makes You Happy</h2> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/avoiding-grass-is-always-greener-syndrome"><strong>Avoiding Grass-is-Always-Greener Syndrome</strong></a><br /> It's easy to imagine that working anywhere else would be better than at the job you hate now. However, if you really want to be happy at the next job, you need to identify your pet peeves and make sure they're not waiting for you at the new job, too. Here's how.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/find-your-passion"><strong>Find Your Passion</strong></a><br /> You can lower the odds of hating your next job by following your passion, but what if you don't know what your passion is?&nbsp; Here are some ways to find what it is that you would love to do.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/find-work-worth-doing"><strong>Find Work Worth Doing</strong></a><br /> Simply doing work that you feel is worth the energy you put in can go a long way towards being happy, whether at your job or in your daily life. Start by making the distinction between work and a job.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/for-love-or-money-must-it-be-one-or-the-other"><strong>For Love or Money: Must It Be One or the Other?</strong></a><br /> In further examining the intricacies of love and money, here are some concepts that further deepen the debate.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-first-step-to-finding-your-dream-job"><strong>The First Step to Finding Your Dream Job</strong></a><br /> You've left the job that you hate; now, it's time to find one that you'll love. The first step to finding your dream job is to define what it is. Define your dream job by taking these steps.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/location-independent-career-basics"><strong>Location Independent Career Basics</strong></a><br /> If you hated your job because of its location, you can eliminate the issue by working at home &mdash; or anywhere you want. A location independent career gives you the freedom to work where you want to. Here's what you need to know about location independent careers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/non-traditional-jobs-how-bibliophiles-and-film-fanatics-can-find-success"><strong>How Bibliophiles and Film Fanatics Can Find Success</strong></a><br /> If you've hated all the jobs you've had, it may be time to look at non-traditional avenues of income: writing reviews. Here is how book lovers and movie fanatics can make money off their hobbies.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/could-online-teaching-be-for-you"><strong>Could Online Teaching Be For You?</strong></a><br /> Not sure what you want to do after you've left the job you hate? Why not teach classes online? See if online teaching should be the next step in your career.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fi-hate-my-job&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FI%2520Hate%2520My%2520Job%2521%2520Now%2520What-.jpg&amp;description=I%20Hate%20My%20Job!%20Now%20What%3F"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/I%20Hate%20My%20Job%21%20Now%20What-.jpg" alt="I Hate My Job! Now What?" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/i-hate-my-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lost-my-job-tips-for-the-recently-laid-off">Help! I Lost My Job!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting career advice lost job new job Thu, 21 May 2015 22:29:16 +0000 Amy Lu 1432656 at http://www.wisebread.com