new job http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/9625/all en-US 6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000061725250_Large.jpg" alt="staying calm to ace her job interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Next time you have a job interview, take a few deep breaths before walking in. Research shows that anxious candidates perform at a lower level in interviews than their relaxed peers. And not only are you stressed to the point of distraction about the interview, but the simple fact you're nervous &mdash; and probably showing it with sweaty palms and jittery energy &mdash; might mean that things won't work out for you, creating the worst sort of vicious circle.</p> <p>Don't let your interview nerves sabotage your chances. Use these tips to make sure you get the big break you deserve &mdash; and give interview anxiety the boot.</p> <h2>1. Recognize the Telltale Signs</h2> <p>The emotional twitchiness that comes with interview nerves quickly translates into physical symptoms, which can undermine your confidence and also indicate your level of anxiety to the interviewer. Whether it's feeling flushed, avoiding eye contact, or fiddling with your clothing, we all have our own personal range of mannerisms that come out when we are feeling the heat.</p> <p>Understanding how you tend to react when anxious is key. If you're not already aware, ask colleagues, family, or friends what they think. Chances are, they've noticed the small nervous ticks you turn to, even if you have not.</p> <p>Interestingly, research shows that speed of speech &mdash; speaking unnaturally slowly &mdash; is the only indicator that both interviewers and candidates agree is a <a href="https://www.springer.com/gp/about-springer/media/springer-select/interview-blues---anxious--slow-talkers-often-do-not-get-the-job-/55382?token=prtst0416p">telltale sign of nerves</a>. All other habits tend to be a personal cocktail of small things that vary among individuals. So if you're facing an interview and not sure where to start, then practicing pacing your speech in answers can help you overcome this most common of giveaways.</p> <h2>2. Harness the Jitters</h2> <p>Feeling nervous, to a certain extent, is actually a massive advantage to you. As long as your anxieties don't become so severe they're paralyzing, you can use the nervous energy to focus on preparation for your big day.</p> <h2>3. Do Your Research</h2> <p>If you already have an interview lined up, find out how many interviewers there will be, and whether there will be any pre-work or exercises to complete on the day. If you can find out the interviewer's name, then Google them. Knowledge is always power. Learn all you can about the company, including what others in the same field &mdash; industry insiders and the trade press &mdash; think of the business, for a balanced view. Simply following the right people on Twitter will glean you a whole lot of information that might come in handy.</p> <h2>4. Plan Your Answers</h2> <p>Learn how to answer some of the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">most common interview questions</a>, to make sure you're feeling confident. The STAR technique is useful for planning out answers to <a href="http://theinterviewguys.com/behavioral-interview-questions-and-answers-101/">behavioral questions</a>, as it forces you to think of the Situation, Task, Actions, and Results of any given example you might choose. Draft a list of the questions you might predict, and sketch out answers, including the relevant examples you might share. And plan how you might phrase any less-than-perfect experiences you've had along the way.</p> <h2>5. Practice!</h2> <p>You have your answers scoped out, now you just need to get them into your head. Try posting the key questions and your possible answers in places you will see them often. Think about the inside of your fridge door, or the bathroom mirror. Then start using your down time to run through your answers. Do them in your head if you have to, but out loud is far better. If you're in the shower, or in your car, talk an answer through.</p> <h2>6. Keep a Sense of Perspective</h2> <p>And finally, cut yourself a break. Everyone sits in an interview <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-scary-thoughts-everyone-has-during-a-job-interview">thinking scary thoughts</a>. Pretty much everyone has interview nerves, and learning to cope is a useful skill that pays dividends outside of the interview room, too. Ask yourself: <em>What is the worst that can happen?</em> And consider whether anything that comes to pass today will still feel important in 10 years time, to get your fears in perspective. Most importantly, take a deep breath, and keep smiling. You'll knock 'em dead!</p> <p><em>How do you get over your interview jitters? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks Job Hunting calm your nerves interview jitters Job Interview job search nerves nervous new job Thu, 12 May 2016 09:30:24 +0000 Claire Millard 1708049 at http://www.wisebread.com 15 Great Jobs That Don't Pay Much http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000019714598_Large.jpg" alt="A DJ is a great job that doesn&#039;t pay much" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Can money buy happiness? Should you spend years in a job you don't like? Or, are you better off working at a job you really love, even if you don't make a pile of money? If you are an average American, you'll work for for 90,000 hours over your career lifetime. If you have a &quot;happiness in my job is more important&quot; mindset, here are 15 jobs you might really like &mdash; even if they don't pay much. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor?ref=seealso">6 Ways That Job You Hate Keeps You Poor</a>)</p> <h2>1. Cruise Ship Bartender</h2> <p>Right out of school, my high-school classmate, Luci, went to work on a cruise ship. As soon as she was able, she became a bartender for the cruise line. At our 10th reunion, she announced that she was retiring from cruise ship bartending, and moving to Kauai to work a small farm she had purchased. Yes, she had lived frugally, and also saved her tips. It paid off. Today's ship bartenders earn between $2,200&ndash;$3,600 per month (depending on the size of ship and gratuities from passengers).</p> <h2>2. EMT</h2> <p>Every time I read the average hourly wage for EMTs and paramedics &mdash; $31,700 per year, or around $16 an hour &mdash; I'm shocked. How can this be? These folks are brave, strong, quick-witted, personable, and caring. I'll never understand why they don't make more, but I'm extremely glad that there are people who are drawn to this career.</p> <h2>3. Roadie</h2> <p>I always thought being a roadie would be <a href="http://www.yesandyes.org/2013/07/true-story-im-roadie.html">a ridiculously fun job</a> to have &mdash; and from this funny interview, I was right. Sometimes glamorous, sometimes not... but if you abhor sitting behind a desk and love music, maybe it would be a good choice. What does a roadie make? It varies. If the band for whom you are working is enormously popular, that apparently makes a big difference. One source quoted around $200 to $400 per day, but become a successful tour manager, and you may expect to make $1,500 to $2,000 per week.</p> <h2>4. Massage Therapist</h2> <p>While the job outlook for massage therapists is good, and the BLS reports that 2014 median pay was over $37,000 per year. If you have ever seen the movie, <a href="http://amzn.to/202F4q2">Enough Said</a>, you know one of the major drawbacks: dragging a massage table around. That's not a must, though. One of my neighbors has clients who come to her house. Others are employed by chiropractor's offices, physical therapists, spas, cruise ships, etc. I'm told it is a rewarding career, and who doesn't love a good massage? Check with your state's governing board of massage therapists to find accredited programs.</p> <h2>5. Veterinary Assistant</h2> <p>Love animals? At about $11 an hour, you really need to. It's hard work. As it turns out, most pets don't really enjoy having their blood drawn or parts poked. Prepare to get dirty, too. But it is extremely rewarding, since you'll be helping to relieve pain and heal animals. Most of the &quot;help wanted&quot; ads I viewed wanted assistants who had been through an educational program or have a college degree.</p> <h2>6. Dog Groomer</h2> <p>Would you enjoy the challenge of beautifying man's best friend? This career might be for you. Well, you'll probably start out as a dog bather, making $13&ndash;$17. Median pay for a groomer is around $20,000 annually. It's important to note that many grooming-business owners also pay commissions. It's not easy work, but again, if you'd rather spend time with animals than people, it's worth considering.</p> <h2>7. DJ</h2> <p>Got the gift of gab? Are you a natural at mashing up different songs? How about a background in journalism or communications? You might like being a DJ or radio announcer. Sometimes, they also find work as emcees at events, weddings, or at private clubs. The job outlook, sadly, is in decline at the moment; with median pay at $13.50 per hour. But serving as a freelance DJ as a side job could provide a very nice chunk of change each month. And the DJs I've followed for years on the radio seem to be very happy people who love their jobs. Test the waters using DJ software (there are many free options available) and see if this is worth exploring.</p> <h2>8. Reporter</h2> <p>A friend of mine works for a news agency. The pay is low &mdash; median pay is about $37,000 &mdash; and the hours are long. The pace is very fast, she works on deadlines, and often has to wear all the hats. The plus side is that the job is rarely boring. To get hired, you usually need a journalism or communications degree and an internship.</p> <h2>9. Private Investigator</h2> <p>I worked part-time for a P.I. for several years. As a retired policeman, he knew a remarkable number of people, and where to find a lot of the unsavory ones. It wasn't glamorous. Most of his bread-and-butter work involved serving legal papers and tracking people down. The work was on a flat-fee basis, $25 per service, or $50 per hour for research. However, he could set his own hours, take only the work he wanted, not be cooped up behind a desk, and he had a nice additional income for retirement.</p> <h2>10. Flight Attendant</h2> <p>I admit, this job doesn't have the glamour it once had. But the opportunity to travel is still intriguing. Getting a flight attendant position doesn't happen quickly, though &mdash; new flight attendants have to pay their dues before they get to go see the world. Average pay is over $42,000 a year. Job growth is slow, and it can be a challenge to get hired. Being able to speak a second language is a plus. However, according to the BLS, job prospects are better for those with college educations.</p> <h2>11. Model</h2> <p>Nice work, if you can get it. The competition is fierce. Very few make it to the &quot;supermodel&quot; level, but there is work, if you are prepared to be creative. Joining a website such as Model Mayhem is a good start. Photographers often want to build their portfolios and will exchange good photos for modeling work. Sometimes, budding fashion designers will trade clothes for modeling time. If a model is versatile, there are more possibilities out there. Initially, look for low pay &mdash; as low as $10 an hour &mdash; but if a model catches on and has a good work ethic, the day rate is usually about $100 to $400. Yeah, not great. &quot;Fit&quot; models make more, but they need to be very strict about maintaining their size. So why do it? Well, it's fun, and glamorous.</p> <h2>12. Tour Guide</h2> <p>Enjoy meeting people? Do you like to talk and answer questions? Maybe you'd be a good tour guide. In my town, there are museum tour guides, historical town tours, tours to national parks, and all-day driving tours. Often, it will help if you speak a second language, particularly the one with the greatest influx of tourists. You need to have a friendly, yet &quot;take-charge&quot; personality, be quick on your feet, and be gregarious. Pay ranges from $11 to almost $17 per hour.</p> <h2>13. Professional House-Sitter</h2> <p>We employ a wonderful lady to house and pet-sit when we go away, and we have to book her months in advance because she's<em> that good</em>. We pay a daily rate, plus tip. You can find house-sitters on TrustedHousesitters, or similar sites. If you are considering going into the business, because getting paid to hang out in someone's home sounds like a stellar gig, you should look into getting bonded, and you'll need impeccable references. Being able to watch pets is a bonus.</p> <h2>14. Brewmaster</h2> <p>If you love beer, why not become a brewmaster? <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Brewmaster/Salary">Pay is pretty good</a> for brewmasters at about $46,000 a year. You might try making beer at home first &mdash; which is fun and rewarding &mdash; then consider working in a pub or brewery. The next step would be taking an official course and getting the proper credentials at a brewing academy.</p> <h2>15. Event Planner</h2> <p>For some, the logistics involved in planning a wedding, a business conference, or meetings are cringe-worthy. Fortunately, there are people who are pleasantly challenged by these logistics and thrive on getting even the smallest details organized. During events, expect to work long, grueling days. But growth in the field of event planning is faster than average; expect to earn over $45,000 annually. A Bachelor's degree is helpful, as is experience working in the field.</p> <p>Note: All data via the <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/">Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook</a>, which is a terrific resource for job searchers and the career-curious.</p> <p><em>Do you have a job you love that doesn't pay very much? What is it? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-entry-level-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries">12 Entry Level Jobs With Surprisingly High Salaries</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting career goals job search new job salary side job Mon, 18 Jan 2016 12:00:03 +0000 Marla Walters 1638731 at http://www.wisebread.com The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_using_laptop_000053433486.jpg" alt="Woman learning the best times of year to start her job search" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>So, you're ready to search for a new job. The good news? One of the best times to job hunt is coming soon.</p> <p>January happens to be one of the best times to begin a job search. As massive jobs site Monster.com said in a recent feature story, winter is the time of year when the greatest number of decision makers are in the office at the same time, because these key people are done with the vacations so many of them take during the winter holidays. And this is important, because these decision makers often work as teams when making hiring choices.</p> <p>At the same time, January is when office work at many companies tends to pick up again after a slowdown in December. Some companies still mostly shut down during the last two weeks of the year. These firms won't be making any hiring decisions around the holidays.</p> <p>Then the best time to get your resume out there would be right after the New Year's holiday, when hiring managers are back at work and no longer thinking of holiday parties, gift-giving, and ski vacations.</p> <p>There's a financial reason for the new hiring, too. Many companies get their new yearly budgets in January. Once they have these in place, they can then make hiring decisions with confidence.</p> <h2>The Early Fall Rush</h2> <p>The beginning of the new year isn't the only good time to start a job search. Career advice site Career Sidekick recommends, too, that job hunters send out resumes and cover letters during the early fall, especially in September and October.</p> <p>The holiday season plays a role again. Companies often want to make hiring decisions before the winter holidays and the year-end lull. If you want to catch businesses when they are shifting into hiring mode, the early fall months are a good choice.</p> <p>It's not just that hiring managers don't focus on work during the holiday season. As Career Sidekick writes, it's easier for them to schedule interviews and complete the hiring process during the fall months when they don't have to schedule them between the days off and vacation time that other key managers are taking.</p> <h2>Summer Can Be Rough</h2> <p>There is also one time of year that is a particularly slow period for hiring, and that's summer. Again, this often has to do with the number of vacation days that key managers take. Those managers who don't take time off during the end-of-the-year holidays often do it instead in June, July, or August. This is a particularly busy time for family vacations.</p> <p>This makes it difficult for hiring managers to schedule a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">series of interviews</a> with job candidates who have to earn the approval of several key office personnel. If you're searching for a job in the summer, it might be a while before you actually hear back.</p> <p>There is an exception here, though. Recent college graduates applying for more entry-level positions might find better luck applying for jobs in the summer. That's because hiring managers expect to see these resumes during this time of year.</p> <p>It's also easier to hire recent college graduates because they are usually applying for lower-level jobs. They don't need to meet with as many key decision makers before they are hired. Summer vacations don't play as big a role in these interviews.</p> <h2>Find the Right Time for You</h2> <p>It's important to remember that these are just rough guidelines. The best time to look for a new job is often when you make the decision to take on a new challenge, no matter what time of year it happens to be.</p> <p>And the best time to job-hunting might also be when your life has slowed down enough. If you're in the middle of moving to a new home, if you're planning a wedding, or if you've returned to graduate school, this might not be the best time to hunt for a new job, even if it is early fall or the beginning of a new year.</p> <p>You need the time and energy to run a successful job search. If you're bogged down with too many big responsibilities, it might be best to wait before sending out those resumes, no matter what the calendar says.</p> <p><em>What time of year have you had the most luck in finding jobs? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-6-craziest-things-people-have-done-to-land-a-job">The 6 Craziest Things People Have Done to Land a Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-words-you-need-to-delete-from-your-resume-right-now">12 Words You Need to Delete From Your Resume Right Now</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting job hunt job search new job resume unemployed Tue, 15 Dec 2015 10:00:07 +0000 Dan Rafter 1621148 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_hiding_desk_000052944964.jpg" alt="Woman learning ways to job hunt without getting caught" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Applying for a new job is often a Catch-22: You've got to put yourself out there as a candidate, but you don't want to get caught by your current employer for fear of being prematurely fired. Yes, it's a fine line to walk for career advancement, but you can totally perfect this skill with these nine ways to conduct a stealthy job search.</p> <h2>1. Keep Your Social Media Profiles Current at All Times</h2> <p>If you're active on social media in general, your various profiles are probably up-to-date on the regular. If they're not, and you update them out of the blue, it could raise suspicions, particularly on LinkedIn and if you're connected to coworkers &mdash; which you probably are.</p> <p><a href="http://alexandermannsolutions.com/about-alexander-mann-solutions/our-talent/key-person/ian-cluroe">Ian Cluroe</a>, director of global brand and marketing for Alexander Mann Solutions, warns against this sudden attention to your social media profiles.</p> <p>&quot;Keeping your social profiles up-to-date ensures that you don't raise flags when you're the one actively searching, and enables you to be found by sources who may have an opportunity that you're the perfect person for but you would have otherwise known nothing about because your outdated profile made you impossible to find,&quot; he says.</p> <h2>2. Don't Send Resumes to Blind Ads Online</h2> <p>If you don't know who the recipient of your resume is, do not send it. I repeat, DO NOT SEND IT. You don't know who is on the other end, and serendipity has a way of biting you in the butt for not being careful.</p> <p>&quot;A woman once told me that her coworker responded to a blind ad and then was confronted a short while later by someone in the company from Human Resources,&quot; reveals certified career coach <a href="http://www.calltocareer.com/about/">Cheryl E. Palmer</a>. &quot;The HR professional asked her if she was looking for another job. The woman lied and said no. The HR professional responded, &quot;I got your resume.&quot; It turned out that the job that this woman had unwittingly applied for was at her own company.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Be Cautious When You're Networking</h2> <p>Of course you have to network when you're searching for a new position &mdash; just be smart about it. Be very careful to whom you're telling your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-low-key-jobs-for-people-who-hate-stress">plans to switch jobs</a>, because you never know who you're talking to. As a rule, don't go to networking events at a bar where you're going to have a couple drinks and become less inhibited. That's a recipe for certain disaster.</p> <h2>4. Don't Let Your Attire Give It Away</h2> <p>Here's a prime example of amateur tactics that absolutely raise red flags: When your everyday work attire is chinos and a button-down and you all of a sudden show up to work in a suit and tie. The jig will be up immediately, and you're better than that, bro.</p> <p>&quot;Dressing up more than normal can be a real giveaway that you are interviewing for another position,&quot; says Palmer. &quot;To avoid suspicion, put your interview clothes in your car and change in a discreet location before the interview. It's also a good idea to schedule interview appointments during times when your absence won't raise questions. Taking too much time off from work can signal that you are interviewing at other companies.&quot;</p> <h2>5. Don't Tell Your Coworkers That You're Looking</h2> <p>I'm sure there are coworkers you trust to keep the secret that you're looking for a new job, but my life motto has fared me well so far &mdash; trust no one, and fear everyone. Besides, you don't know what plans they have in mind for their own career advancement. They may view your undercover search as an opportunity to swoop in and take your job right out from under you. And if that happens, you'll kick yourself for being so loose-lipped. Ruthless comes in all shapes, sizes, and smiles.</p> <h2>6. Consider Having an Executive Recruiter on Your Side</h2> <p>If you're afraid of getting caught searching for a job (and you should be), there are ways to ease your anxiety. Hiring an executive recruiter is one such solution, and it won't even cost you. Recruiters are paid by employers, and their fees are usually based on your starting salary. Depending on the type of job you're seeking &mdash; like CEO or VP of Somethingorother &mdash; working with a recruiter is often the only way to go.</p> <p>Zach Brown, a senior sourcing recruiter for David Brown International, details a few of the benefits of using a recruiter.</p> <p>&quot;A skilled recruiter can leverage their network and industry connections to get your resume and portfolio in front of employers in your field that are looking for top talent,&quot; he explains. &quot;Going this route will get you exposure with the right companies without having to post your resume everywhere for all to see. Look for an established recruiter that specializes in your career field and has worked with the types of organizations that you are interested in working for.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Keep Your Search Quiet, Especially on Social Media</h2> <p>As a professional, you should be mindful of what you're posting to social media, in general &mdash; no more drama! &ndash; but you should particularly be conscious to keep your job search updates off Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other sites. Even if you're not connected to your boss or coworkers online, what you post has a mysterious way of popping up in places you don't want it to be seen &mdash; security settings, be damned.</p> <h2>8. Don't Use Anyone at Your Current Job as a Reference</h2> <p>If you don't want to raise a red flag that you're looking for a new job, WHY would you use one of your coworkers as a reference? Surely you have three other people with whom you're not currently working who can vouch for you, no?</p> <h2>9. Search for Your New Job on Your Own Time and Equipment</h2> <p>And, finally, don't be sketchy and use company time to search for a position with another company. That's not only dumb, but also disloyal and rude. Use your own computer and other resources on your own time. Get caught and you're likely to get fired on the spot. The only silver lining is that it will seriously speed up your job search. You don't want it to go down like that.</p> <p>Palmer says, &quot;You should never put your work email or work phone number on your resume. Also, you should use a personal email address that sounds professional &mdash; i.e., ralph.smith@[emailservice].com, not wonderboy@[emailservice].com &mdash; and list your cell phone number so that communication with potential employers will remain private. In addition, you should use your computer at home to send emails to hiring managers. Using the computer at work is risky since many companies monitor their employees' computer use.&quot;</p> <p><em>Do you have tips on how employees can search for a new job without raising a red flag? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting boss Job Interview job search new job resume Thu, 12 Nov 2015 11:15:12 +0000 Mikey Rox 1606587 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_packing_000031078772.jpg" alt="Woman learning what to do on the first day of her new job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As Plato wrote in 380 B.C., &quot;The beginning is the most important part of the work.&quot; It's a truth that still stands today: How you begin a new job sets the tone for how the rest of your work days will go. If you make the right impression, you can achieve faster, stress less, and gain a general sense of respect from your brand new peers. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-things-successful-people-do-every-morning?ref=seealso">13 Things Successful People Do Every Morning</a>)</p> <p>Read on for our roundup of the top tips and tricks on starting a new gig off right.</p> <h2>1. Be Prompt</h2> <p>The fact that your employer wants you to arrive on time for work shouldn't shock you out of your seat. But considering nearly 20% of Americans are habitually late for work, it's worth rehashing: Supervisors perceive prompt workers to be more conscientious, responsible, and productive. If you're a few minutes early &mdash; even better. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-do-before-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">5 Things to Do Before Your First Day on a New Job</a>)</p> <h2>2. Shake Hands With Your New Colleagues &mdash; Every Last One of Them</h2> <p>New neuroscience research has confirmed the power of a handshake: Strangers who meet really do <a href="http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/jocn_a_00295?prevSearch=authorsfield%253A%2528Sung%252C%2BKeen%2529&amp;searchHistoryKey=&amp;#.VW1K_WRViko">form a better impression</a> of one another if they shake hands while greeting. &quot;Be aware of the power of a handshake,&quot; says Sanda Dolcos, postdoctoral research associate for the Beckman Institute Department of Psychology. &quot;We found that it not only increases the positive effect toward a favorable interaction, but it also diminishes the impact of a negative impression. Many of our social interactions may go wrong for a reason or another, and a simple handshake preceding them can give us a boost and attenuate the negative impact of possible misunderstandings.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Project High Energy</h2> <p>Allow yourself to exhibit your true zest for the work you're doing. The most successful employees have a real love for the work, so act like it! Not only that, but happy employees lead directly to better performance and higher profits. Bottom line: you'll fare well to show your enthusiasm.</p> <h2>4. Clear Your Desk of Clutter</h2> <p>If your new desk is housing old materials &mdash; outdated paperwork, that stack of memos from last week &mdash; throw it out. Studies show that a cluttered workspace actually hinders our ability to process information and concentrate. We aren't aware of it, but <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21228167">clutter competes for our attention</a> in much the same way as a whining child or a barking dog does.</p> <h2>5. Write Tomorrow's To-Do List</h2> <p>You'll save yourself time on morning number two if you scribble down the next day's to-dos before heading home on day one. That way when you arrive at your desk the next day, you'll have a list of tasks all ready to focus on. Experts say it's best when we begin the work day by&nbsp;<a href="http://hbr.org/tip/2012/12/19/create-rituals-to-get-more-done">crossing off tasks with a single focus</a> &mdash; something we can truly feel accomplished about. So take some time to identify what that task might be and put it at the top of your list.</p> <h2>6. Say Goodbye</h2> <p>&quot;We tend to think about the importance of checking in and saying good morning to kick off the day,&quot; international business speaker Michael Kerr told Forbes, &quot;but we forget that it can be just as important, and make us feel good as well, to say a friendly and proper goodbye to everyone rather than just silently drift off into the night. This is triply important if you are the supervisor.&quot;</p> <p><em>What do you do on your first day on the job?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-transition-to-a-new-career-after-30">6 Ways to Transition to a New Career After 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-do-before-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">5 Things to Do Before Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building employment first day hired new job Office working Tue, 16 Jun 2015 09:00:15 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1454553 at http://www.wisebread.com Help! I Lost My Job! http://www.wisebread.com/lost-my-job-tips-for-the-recently-laid-off <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/lost-my-job-tips-for-the-recently-laid-off" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/lost-job-iStock_000007173144_Small.jpg" alt="man lost job" title="man lost job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Here are tips and resources to help if you have just been laid off or you suspect that you will soon be laid off. Check our other guides to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-tips">job hunting</a>, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/making-extra-cash">earning extra income</a>, and ways to cope if you <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/i-hate-my-job">hate your job</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lose-your-job-without-losing-your-identity"><strong>Lose Your Job Without Losing Your Identity</strong></a><br /> Getting a pink slip can cause more distress than just a shrinking income. Here are three effective schools of thought for keeping your sense of self (long after the paychecks quit coming).</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/seven-tips-for-the-newly-unemployed"><strong>Seven Tips for the Newly Unemployed</strong></a><br /> The unemployment rate in California surged to 6.9%, and that is equivalent to the rate in early 2003. Most news reports say that unemployment will probably go up a bit more in the short term as our economy deals with the credit crisis. Personally, I am seeing some friends and family deal with unemployment right now, and here are some tips that could be helpful for those in this situation.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/laid-off-what-to-do-before-plunging-into-the-job-search"><strong>Laid Off? What To Do Before Plunging Into The Job Search</strong></a><br /> You've been laid off. What&rsquo;s next? What should you do&hellip;before updating your resume, tapping into your professional network, and looking for a job?</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/laid-off-make-sure-you-get-your-unemployment"><strong>You May Have to Fight for Your Unemployment Benefits</strong></a><br /> If you've recently been laid off, you may have to fight for your right to collect unemployment from the government. You probably know that if you are fired, you can't collect unemployment from the government. Although qualifications can vary from state to state, generally, only people who are laid off from their jobs will qualify for unemployment benefits. But did you know that, even if you are laid off, your employer can challenge your right to receive benefits?</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-1-losing-a-job"><strong>Getting By Without a Job, Part 1 - Losing a Job</strong></a><br /> Losing a job is always tough. During hard economic times &mdash; when it may not be possible to find another job as good as the one you've lost &mdash; it's even tougher. Here are a few steps you can take right after losing a job to make sure that your financial house is in order, so that you can focus on your job search.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-2-boost-income"><strong>Getting By Without a Job, Part 2 - Boost Income</strong></a><br /> If there's one fundamental rule for financial success, it's &quot;spend less than you earn.&quot; That rule applies whether you have a job or not. But, if you're used to having a job, the adjustments to getting by without one are going to be huge. It can be done, though. I suggest a three-pronged strategy, the first prong being to boost your income.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-3-cut-spending"><strong>Getting By Without a Job, Part 3 - Cut Spending</strong></a><br /> With the economy tanking, more and more people will be not just losing their job, but will be finding themselves without one for an extended period. When that happens it's not good enough to just cut back a little and use debt to make ends meet until the economy recovers. Getting by without a job is possible, even for an extended period &mdash; but it requires taking drastic measures to cut spending, and it requires taking them early, while you've still got some cash.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-4-get-free-stuff"><strong>Getting By Without a Job, Part 4 - Get Free Stuff</strong></a><br /> There are all kinds of ways to get stuff without money. You can grow it in a garden, gather it from the wild, make it yourself, get it as a gift, scavenge it from trash, or get it free from someone who hopes to sell you something else. All of these generally involve spending time instead of spending money &mdash; but someone who's getting by without a job probably has some time to spend.r</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emergency-belt-tightening"><strong>Emergency Belt-Tightening</strong></a><br /> Typical personal finance advice would have you divide your budget categories into two groups:&nbsp; Your fixed expenses and your discretionary expenses.&nbsp; I generally don't like that distinction much &mdash; how is your power bill more fixed than your grocery bill?&nbsp; When you reach the point of emergency economizing, though, it's a useful way to structure your thinking.</p> <p>We've got more great job articles in our <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/career-and-income">Career and Income</a> section.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lost-my-job-tips-for-the-recently-laid-off">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/i-hate-my-job">I Hate My Job! Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-unique-ways-to-score-a-job-interview">12 Unique Ways to Score a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting finding a job lost job new job Thu, 21 May 2015 23:03:49 +0000 Amy Lu 1432684 at http://www.wisebread.com I Hate My Job! Now What? http://www.wisebread.com/i-hate-my-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/i-hate-my-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/hate-job-iStock_000032969296_Small.jpg" alt="stressed woman" title="stressed woman" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You hate your job, but what can you do about it? First, assess your situation to determine what your next step should be. Learn how to survive at a job you hate, how to get out without hurting your career, and what you can do to <em>not</em> hate your next job. Use these links to jump ahead to any section.</p> <ul> <li><a href="#assess">Assessing Your Situation</a></li> <li><a href="#changes">Making Changes at Work<br /> </a></li> <li><a href="#out">Getting Out of the Job</a></li> <li><a href="#happy">Finding a Job that Makes You Happy</a></li> </ul> <p>If you recently lost your job, take a look at Wise Bread's collection of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lost-my-job-tips-for-the-recently-laid-off">tips and resources for the recently laid off</a>.</p> <h2><a name="assess"></a></h2> <h2>Assessing Your Situation</h2> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-your-job-might-be-worth-staying-at"><strong>10 Important Signs Your Job Might Be Worth Staying At</strong></a><br /> Think you hate your job? Before you jump ship, see if your current job has the qualities that makes it worth staying at. Your situation may be better than you thought.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks"><strong>10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</strong></a><br /> You're miserable at work, but do you hate it enough to leave? Here are 10 ways to tell if your job really sucks &mdash; and how you can fix it.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-three-f-rule-can-lead-you-to-happiness"><strong>The Three F Rule Can Lead You to Happiness</strong></a><br /> The Three F Rule is a simple formula that keeps you sane and makes sure your working life doesn't go off the rails. If you don't want to hate your job, make sure you have at least two of these: fun, fame, and fortune.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-what-you-love-idealistic-nonsense-or-good-advice"><strong>Do What You Love: Idealistic Nonsense Or Good Advice?</strong></a><br /> Get some advice from Gary Vaynerchuk on why everyone needs to do what they love.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-afford-to-follow-your-dreams-can-you-afford-not-to"><strong>Can you afford to follow your dreams? Can you afford NOT to?</strong></a><br /> When you hate your job, maybe it's time for a change. Maybe it's time to follow your dreams, instead &mdash; but the prospect of such a major change can be intimindating. Sarah Winfrey and commenters discuss the pursuit of dreams and risks it involves.</p> <h2><a name="changes"></a></h2> <h2>Making Changes at Work</h2> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-survive-and-thrive-in-a-job-you-hate"><strong>How to Survive (and Thrive!) in a Job You Hate</strong></a><br /> Sometimes, leaving a job you hate may not be an option. However, there are ways to survive and thrive in jobs you don't like. Here are 9 secrets to making that hated job easier.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-getting-what-you-want-at-work"><strong>How to Get What You Want at Work</strong></a><br /> Even if you hate your job, you can still try to improve your work situation by having a meeting with your boss. Here are some tips on how to turn the meeting to your advantage and get what you want at work.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-behaviors-and-attitudes-that-can-drive-workplace-success"><strong>14 Behaviors &amp; Attitudes That Can Drive Workplace Success</strong></a><br /> If you hate your job because you don't seem to be getting anywhere, changing how you behave at work and re-evaluating your attitude towards the job might do the trick. Here are some ways to achieve workplace success.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-a-lousy-job-can-lead-to-a-bright-future"><strong>Why a Lousy Job Can Lead to a Bright Future</strong></a><br /> Hating your job doesn't mean you shouldn't try to excel at it. In fact, doing well at a lousy job can help your prospects in future employment opportunities.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-new-ways-to-hack-your-boss-without-a-machete"><strong>5 Ways to Make Your Boss Love You</strong></a><br /> Tips on navigating office politics and dealing with your boss.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/quit-wasting-your-lunch-hour-on-lunch-or-how-you-can-change-your-life-in-just-45-minutes-a-day"><strong>How You Can Change Your Life in Just 45 Minutes a Day</strong></a><br /> You might hate your job, but there is still that hour in the middle of the day that's all yours (usually). Those 45 minutes every day can be the time you need to make some major changes in your life.</p> <h2><a name="out"></a></h2> <h2>Getting Out of the Job</h2> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming"><strong>20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</strong></a><br /> So you hate your job and you'd rather not have anything to do with it. Still, that's no excuse to let a pink slip catch you by surprise. Answer these questions to see if it's time to start the job search in earnest.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/walking-away-from-a-job-that-s-going-away-on-your-terms"><strong>Walking Away (From a Job That's Going Away) on Your Own Terms</strong></a><br /> Even if you hate your job, you should still look after your interests before walking away. Here is a plan to exit a bad work situation without burning yourself.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-laid-off-a-step-by-step-guide"><strong>How to Get Laid Off</strong></a><br /> Hate your job but don't want to quit on your own? Being laid off is a better option, but it can be difficult if you've been doing everything right. Here are some ways to get out of a job you hate without destroying your career.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-buy-your-way-out-of-the-rat-race"><strong>Can You Buy Your Way Out of the Rat Race?</strong></a><br /> What are the chances that you leave a job you hate, get a new job, then find that you hate your new job, too? Theoretically, you can exit the rat race altogether if you have enough capital saved or invested to live off of. The reality, however, is not so simple; it's actually really hard to buy your way out. So what can you do instead?</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/on-choosing-temporary-freedom"><strong>On Choosing Temporary Freedom</strong></a><br /> If you had the option to switch back and forth between freedom and a regular job, you might not hate your job quite so much. Here's an introduction on the concept of temporary freedom and how you can work it into your life.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-honesty-always-the-best-policy"><strong>Is Honesty Always the Best Policy?</strong></a><br /> If you're leaving a job you hate for something better, it's definitely time to celebrate. But if you're too enthusiastic, that might turn off your ex-coworkers/-bosses and burn some bridges you'd rather keep intact. Ask yourself these three questions to help you figure out how best to break it to your colleagues.</p> <h2><a name="happy"></a></h2> <h2>Finding a Job that Makes You Happy</h2> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/avoiding-grass-is-always-greener-syndrome"><strong>Avoiding Grass-is-Always-Greener Syndrome</strong></a><br /> It's easy to imagine that working anywhere else would be better than at the job you hate now. However, if you really want to be happy at the next job, you need to identify your pet peeves and make sure they're not waiting for you at the new job, too. Here's how.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/find-your-passion"><strong>Find Your Passion</strong></a><br /> You can lower the odds of hating your next job by following your passion, but what if you don't know what your passion is?&nbsp; Here are some ways to find what it is that you would love to do.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/find-work-worth-doing"><strong>Find Work Worth Doing</strong></a><br /> Simply doing work that you feel is worth the energy you put in can go a long way towards being happy, whether at your job or in your daily life. Start by making the distinction between work and a job.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/for-love-or-money-must-it-be-one-or-the-other"><strong>For Love or Money: Must It Be One or the Other?</strong></a><br /> In further examining the intricacies of love and money, here are some concepts that further deepen the debate.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-first-step-to-finding-your-dream-job"><strong>The First Step to Finding Your Dream Job</strong></a><br /> You've left the job that you hate; now, it's time to find one that you'll love. The first step to finding your dream job is to define what it is. Define your dream job by taking these steps.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/location-independent-career-basics"><strong>Location Independent Career Basics</strong></a><br /> If you hated your job because of its location, you can eliminate the issue by working at home &mdash; or anywhere you want. A location independent career gives you the freedom to work where you want to. Here's what you need to know about location independent careers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/non-traditional-jobs-how-bibliophiles-and-film-fanatics-can-find-success"><strong>How Bibliophiles and Film Fanatics Can Find Success</strong></a><br /> If you've hated all the jobs you've had, it may be time to look at non-traditional avenues of income: writing reviews. Here is how book lovers and movie fanatics can make money off their hobbies.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/could-online-teaching-be-for-you"><strong>Could Online Teaching Be For You?</strong></a><br /> Not sure what you want to do after you've left the job you hate? Why not teach classes online? See if online teaching should be the next step in your career.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/i-hate-my-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lost-my-job-tips-for-the-recently-laid-off">Help! I Lost My Job!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting career advice lost job new job Thu, 21 May 2015 22:29:16 +0000 Amy Lu 1432656 at http://www.wisebread.com What You Should Do If You're Stumped During an Interview http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman-job-interview-Dollarphotoclub_54828193_1.jpg" alt="woman job interview" title="woman job interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you don't know how to answer a question during an interview, the silence can seem excruciating. You might even wish the floor would open up and swallow you whole. Not to worry, though &mdash; keep these tips in mind the next time you're strapped for an answer.</p> <p>RELATED: <a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Dos-Donts-Job-Interviews-34040192">16 Major Dos and Don'ts at a Job Interview</a></p> <h2>1. Calm Down</h2> <p>First of all, the most important thing to do is stay calm. If you start freaking out, your body will begin reacting physiologically. For example, your blood pressure will start rising, and your heart may race. Once you start a stress response, you won't be thinking clearly, and you may throw out answers without thinking. Take deep breaths, and tell yourself that it's OK to not know the answer to the question. You'll just have to work through it; there's nothing you can do to change things, but you need to stay calm to find the right answer.</p> <h2>2. Don't Say &quot;I Don't Know&quot; Off the Bat, and Don't Make Stuff Up</h2> <p>You should not tell the interviewer you don't know the answer without mulling it over. Then again, be careful not to<a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Can-I-Lie-Interviewer-22943027"> make stuff up</a>, because your interviewer can see right through that.</p> <h2>3. Ask Questions</h2> <p>Maybe it's the question you don't understand. Ask your interviewer to clarify what she said. Go deeper into the question to see if you can get more details that will help you figure it out.</p> <h2>4. Tell Your Interviewer What You Do Know</h2> <p>If you do have some knowledge of the question, then take the time to tell your interviewer what you do know of the situation. Saying everything out loud can start you on the process of figuring out the problem.</p> <h2>5. Tell Them How You Would Find the Answer</h2> <p>Even if you don't know what the answer is, you can tell the interviewer the steps you would take to figure out the problem. Interviewers ask you hard questions because they want to see what your thought process is. Sometimes, the thought process may be more important than the actual answer. They want to see that you can take initiative and have the resources to come up with a solution on your own, instead of needing someone to hold your hand through problems. While you're trying to find the solution, you can admit to not knowing certain parts; this way, you come off as being honest, and the hiring manager will know you are not trying to fake it. For example, if you need to calculate something and you're not good at math, you can respond with &quot;I can't do the calculations off the top of my head, but I think these calculations will give me the answer. And what I can do is use a calculator to find that answer.&quot; Showing a little honesty shows vulnerability and transparency. It also makes you more likable.</p> <h2>6. Know the Right Time to Come Clean</h2> <p>Although we mentioned not admitting to the interviewer that you don't know the answer, there is an exception to this rule. If the answer is something that you will only know through memorization, such as a definition of the word, then it's probably best to admit that you don't know the answer, as it may be impossible to figure it out independently. Here's what you can tell the interviewer: &quot;It's a good question, but I'm sorry, I don't have the answer off the top of my head. I will be sure to follow up with the answer after the interview.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Send a Follow-Up Email</h2> <p>The <a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Interview-Follow-Up-Email-Template-19179139">follow-up email for an interview</a> could become your second chance. Try to talk about the answer you were stumped on, but be smooth when you're talking about it. And make sure you're only naming the mistakes your interviewer caught and not drawing attention to the ones she did not catch. Don't say something like &quot;I'm sorry I did not know the answer to that question.&quot; Instead, tell her that after more time and thought, you managed to come up with a couple of solutions that could work for the problem.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-blog-teaser"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Your resume worked and you landed an interview! Don&#039;t blow it now with a bad answer to a tough question. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p style="text-align:center;"><a style="border:none;" href="http://www.savvysugar.com"><img style="height:95px; width:300px" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u921/POPSUGARrgb.jpg" alt="" /></a></p> <p><em>This is a guest contribution from our friends at </em><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/"><em>POPSUGAR Smart Living</em></a><em>. Check out more useful articles from this partner:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Typical-Job-Interview-Questions-Answers-20280663#photo-20280663">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Good-Questions-Ask-During-Interview-33652741">7 Questions That Will Knock the Socks Off Your Interviewer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Save-Money-Trader-Joe-35589009">9 Ways to Save Major Money at Trader Joe's</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/popsugar-smart-living">POPSUGAR Smart Living</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview">Using Times New Roman on Your Résumé Is Like Wearing Sweatpants to an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building General Tips Job Hunting hiring interview new job resume Fri, 30 Jan 2015 10:00:18 +0000 POPSUGAR Smart Living 1282663 at http://www.wisebread.com Got a New Job? Here's Your Financial To-Do List http://www.wisebread.com/got-a-new-job-heres-your-financial-to-do-list <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/got-a-new-job-heres-your-financial-to-do-list" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman-working-office-469651683-small.jpg" alt="woman working office" title="woman working office" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>So you're changing jobs. Congratulations on making the next big step up the career ladder! But besides taking on new job duties, there are also some important financial decisions and major money moves to make. Some you'll need to handle before leaving your former employer, others you must manage as soon as you join your new one. But once you tackle them, you'll be in a more secure position financially &mdash; and to pay more attention to winning over your new boss and co-workers. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-hidden-costs-of-a-new-job?ref=seealso">12 Hidden Costs of a New Job</a>)</p> <p>Here's an easy to-do list to follow once you decide to make your career move.</p> <h2>Before You Leave Your Old Job</h2> <p>Aside from the niceties of leaving on a positive note, make sure you get your financial ducks all in a row before you go, too.</p> <h3>Schedule a Meeting With HR</h3> <p>After your Human Resources representative asks the exit questions, it's time to ask about your financial considerations. Calculate the unused vacation, sick pay, and other compensation that may be due to you. If you're vested in stock options, ask how much time you have to exercise them. Find out when your final paycheck will arrive, and what it will contain. And save all documents related to leaving your former employer, just in case loose ends are left untied after you leave.</p> <h3>Figure Out Your Health Insurance</h3> <p>If you lack health insurance at your new job (or it doesn't kick in right away), determine when your former employer's insurance coverage will expire. If there's a gap of time when you'll be uninsured, explore health options such as COBRA or plans on your state's Affordable Care Act health exchange, to see which one offers the best coverage and price for your needs. <a href="https://www.healthcare.gov/unemployed/cobra-coverage">Healthcare.gov</a> offers a good primer on these two choices.</p> <h3>Roll-Over Your 401(k) Into an IRA</h3> <p>When changing jobs, it's tempting to cash out your employer-sponsored retirement plan, but don't! Yes, it seems like a financial windfall, but if you cash out before age 59-&frac12;, you pay income taxes and early withdrawal penalties, and any benefits of letting that money compound tax-deferred will vanish.</p> <p>Another option is to leave your money where it is, but you won't be able to contribute any more to the plan. Also, many former employees like to look ahead, not behind, so leaving your 401(k) as is could affect your future balance, because you may be less likely to pay attention to it, and you have less control over how it's managed.</p> <p>The surest way to avoid any financial drawbacks is to roll over your funds into an individual retirement account. In a direct IRA rollover, your 401(k) funds are sent straight into an IRA without you touching the funds. Then you have a bigger sandbox of investments to play in.</p> <h3>Are You Making a Move Geographically?</h3> <p>If you moved for your new job, your moving expenses may be tax-deductible. That doesn't mean moving across town, though &mdash; the distance between your former residence and your new job must be at least 50 miles farther than your old job was (so if your old commute was five miles, your new commute must be at least 55 miles from your former place of residence). If you meet that test, you can deduct a lot of moving expenses that you paid for, such as hiring movers and renting a van. If you are driving in your own car, you can deduct gas, parking fees, tolls, and lodging en route. You can even include the cost of renting a storage unit for up to 30 days if you're not immediately able to move into your new place. The IRS lets you claim the deduction in the year you move, so if you're kicking off the New Year by starting a new job in a new place, unfortunately you can't claim it until you file taxes in 2016.</p> <h2>Starting Your New Job</h2> <p>Start your new job off right by making sure you understand all of your compensation and benefits &mdash; in detail.</p> <h3>Review Your New Company's Benefits</h3> <p>According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, around 30% of your total compensation is made up of employee benefits, so sign up for as many offerings as you can. Besides health insurance and the retirement plan, there are plenty of other benefits &mdash; from gym membership discounts and paid education to childcare and commuter savings &mdash; that add up to a lot of financial value. So go through the big package HR gives you on day one and read details of your benefits &mdash; including their respective sign-up dates.</p> <h3>Find Out When Your Benefits Start</h3> <p>Some companies don't start new employees in health care plans right away. Find out when your new plan begins, and if there's a waiting period, look into short-term coverage options. It's also good to know when you'll start accruing sick time and vacation days.</p> <h3>Decide Between an HSA and a FSA</h3> <p>Based on what kind of health plan you sign up for, health savings accounts (HSAs) and flexible spending accounts (FSAs) are both great ways to sock away pre-tax dollars for future medical costs.</p> <ul> <li>To be eligible for an HSA, you must be in a high-deductible plan, meaning a minimum deductible of $1,250 for just you, or $2,500 for a family. If you meet that criteria, you can funnel a designated amount of every paycheck into it &mdash; up to $3,300 a year if it's just you, or $6,550 for your family. An added plus: The funds roll over year-to-year, so you never lose the money. Even if you don't typically have high medical expenses, you can use an HSA as a way to build up savings and reduce taxable income &mdash; think of it as a medical IRA during your time on the job.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>An FSA is your option if you pay a higher premium and lower deductible. It works the same as an HSA, but you can only contribute $2,500 a year, and the funds don't roll over if you don't use them. To make it work best for you, have a good estimate of what that year's out-of-pocket health care expenses will be and just contribute no more than that amount.</li> </ul> <p>Both an FSA and HSA will pay off when it comes to your taxes. Just remember that money in both ultimately must be used for medical expenses &mdash; you suffer a 20% tax penalty if you spend them on expenses the IRS doesn't consider as health-related.</p> <h3>Don't Forget Other Types of Insurance</h3> <p>You may think, &quot;Oh, I don't need those right now,&quot; but disability and life insurance are not just fringe benefits. If disease or injury disables you early in your working life, your lost wages can be massive, and Social Security disability may not cover all expenses. That's why disability insurance is worth having.</p> <p>Employers typically offer an affordable group plan, but benefits could vary greatly &mdash; they may only cover 60% of your full paycheck, and the maximum time frame could be as little two years &mdash; so read the fine print. If you don't like what you're offered, shop around for individual coverage, or supplemental coverage that can bridge the financial gap.</p> <p>Basic employer-provided life insurance is low-cost or free, and that might be sufficient if you're single, child-free, or have a spouse who isn't dependent on your income to cover household expenses. But if your untimely death would be a burden to your family, that policy's face value may not be high enough. Employer-sponsored life insurance coverage typically equals one to two times your annual salary, but experts recommend getting coverage worth at least five times your salary. Most group plans will let you buy a certain amount of additional coverage, four to six times the annual salary, but for someone with a spouse, kids and a sizable mortgage, even that might not be enough.</p> <p>Like with disability insurance, you can purchase more coverage through your company, buy supplemental life insurance on the open market, or both. But first you should determine how much life insurance you really need. Find an experienced insurance broker that will do a needs analysis with you, then you can decide whether you should purchase beyond what your company is offering.</p> <h3>Re-Evaluate Your Tax Withholding</h3> <p>If you've regularly received a hefty IRS check after doing taxes, don't pat yourself on the back: It's not a gift from the government; it's your own money being sent back to you that the Treasury Department kept for most of the year as an interest-free loan. Change all that when HR gives you IRS Form W-4 form to fill out. The amount of income tax withheld from your paychecks by your employer depends on how you filled it out.</p> <p>Ideally, your withholding should equal the exact amount of your tax liability, or only a very small tax refund. But pay too little and you'll owe interest and penalties.</p> <p>Whether you're starting a new job, or already well into it, it's important to redo your Form W-4 if there is a major life change that will affect the amount of tax you'll owe for the year. Besides starting a new job with a higher salary, examples include marrying or divorcing, getting a second job, losing a job, buying a new home, and having or adopting a baby. To determine the right withholding level, use the <a href="http://apps.irs.gov/app/withholdingcalculator">IRS's easy calculator</a>.</p> <h3>Decide on Your 401(k) Deductions</h3> <p>If your company doesn't automatically enroll you in its 401(k) plan, do so right away. Then figure out how much you're allowed to save each year. Starting in 2015, the limit goes up to $18,000 ($24,000 if you're 50 or older), but some employee plans may restrict you to a lesser amount. Ideally, you will save as much as you can &mdash; the $18,000 maximum or your employers' maximum &mdash; but if you don't think you can swing that, financial planners typically recommend you save at least 10% of your annual salary.</p> <p>Next find out if your employer offers matching contributions, i.e., free money. A typical match is 50 cents for every dollar you contribute, up to 6% of your salary. Try to contribute at least enough to get the full match. And be sure to ask about the vesting schedule, the amount of time you must work there before you can leave with 100% of your matching contributions.</p> <h3>Look at Your 401(k) Asset Allocation</h3> <p>A new job may mean a higher pay grade, so take another look at how you're investing for the long haul. When deciding where to invest your 401(k) funds, figure out what asset allocation works right for you now &mdash; what's the mix of stocks, bonds and cash that's a good fit for your age, income level and risk tolerance? If you have 20-plus years till retirement, you can afford to have a higher percentage of stocks in your portfolio than if you were two years away from retiring.</p> <p>Now you're ready to review the mutual fund offerings in your 401(k) plan. Besides looking for funds boasting good returns, low fees and solid management, look for a diverse mix of funds. Don't over-invest in just the technology sector, or put all your funds into growth stocks. And don't overload on your employer's stock, either. Spread your bets so that you lower your investment risk.</p> <p>Even if you're not wowed by the funds offered in your 401(k), still consider putting money in it: The tax break and free money you're getting from your employer are bonuses you won't get elsewhere.</p> <h3>Ask for Direct Deposit</h3> <p>If your employer offers direct deposit for your paychecks checks, accept heartily. Many banks offer free or lower-cost checking if you direct-deposit into their account, saving you a few fees. Direct deposit also makes paying bills online a whole lot easier, because you'll know just when your earnings will arrive in your account. Then you can schedule automatic bill payments for added convenience, and ensure your bills are never late.</p> <h3>Track Expenses for the First Few Months</h3> <p>Check your outside-of-work expenses for a few months. You may be surprised how a new job can affect your spending. If you've earned a salary increase, you may forget that amount is a gross figure &mdash; not your net pay. And when you feel flush, you may be inclined to start spending your gross pay when pulling out your debit card, without considering what your take-home pay will be in the next paycheck. By tracking your expenses, you can see if they've gone up alongside your wage increase. If the ratio is high, then aim to cut back on the spending, ideally getting back to the level you were at before you started the bank new job.</p> <h3>Buttress Your Emergency Fund and Get Educated</h3> <p>While you should congratulate yourself on landing the new job, don't assume a &quot;happily ever after&quot; ending for it. That's why an emergency fund is key for life's unexpected surprises like losing that job, receiving a whopping hospital bill, a major home or car repair bill. Relying on credit cards will simply compound the problem. If you've got a salary increase, use some of that to start your emergency fund. Financial planners agree that you should keep around six months' (some even recommend a year) worth of living expenses put in an easy-to-access account. If you lose that job, it may take a few months to find another good one.</p> <p>If your employer offers education benefits or specialized training for your occupation, take it. Use that, plus any new skills gained or big achievements made on the job, to keep your resume sharp and up to date. The Bureau of Labor Statistics states that the average American changes jobs an average of nine times before the ripe old age of 34. With a big emergency fund, and a sharp resume, you won't need to fear the future, because there won't be time for the dust to settle.</p> <p><em>What steps do you take when starting a new job?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/vanessa-richardson">Vanessa Richardson</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/got-a-new-job-heres-your-financial-to-do-list">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-hidden-costs-of-a-new-job">12 Hidden Costs of a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-7-companies-have-the-craziest-employee-perks">These 7 Companies Have the Craziest Employee Perks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-biggest-mistakes-freelancers-make">The 5 Biggest Mistakes Freelancers Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-29-companies-with-the-best-maternity-benefits">The 29 Companies With the Best Maternity Benefits</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-15-coolest-silicon-valley-job-perks-you-wish-you-had">The 15 Coolest Silicon Valley Job Perks You Wish You Had</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income 401(k) benefits compensation new job taxes Fri, 05 Dec 2014 14:00:05 +0000 Vanessa Richardson 1264073 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Reasons You Deserve to Get Fired http://www.wisebread.com/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/fired-businesswoman-78749363-small.jpg" alt="fired businesswoman" title="fired businesswoman" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The recession might be over, but that doesn't mean any of us can afford to be passive about holding onto our jobs. If you think you may soon be having an uncomfortable conversation with HR, it's time to find out why. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-tips-for-the-recently-fired-and-some-for-the-rest-of-us-too?ref=seealso">Job Hunting Tips for the Recently Fired</a>)</p> <p>Here are 12 reasons you're getting fired.</p> <h2>1. Social Media SNAFU</h2> <p>Venting about your employer, boss, or co-workers on Twitter, Facebook, or any other social media site can get you fired. Avoid other career-killing <a href="http://www.pcworld.com/article/206359/6_Facebook_Twitter_Mistakes_That_Can_Get_You_Fired.html">social media mistakes</a> and remember &mdash; six degrees of separation is about one and a half degrees online.</p> <h2>2. Refusing to Play the Game</h2> <p>I don't know what the game is where you work, but I know there is one &mdash; and I bet there are a lot of folks playing their hearts out. The game usually involves demonstrating your passion for the work, coming in early and staying late, and working to impress the right people without falling all over yourself. Call me cynical and old-fashioned, but if you haven't learned how to play the game, you haven't really learned how to stay employed.</p> <h2>3. Not Giving Your All</h2> <p>Those cheesy motivational posters are wrong; it's impossible to give 110%. But consistently settling for 70% is a bad strategy if want to duck and weave past a pink slip. Doing a bit more than required, volunteering for a committee or two, and diplomatically making recommendations for process improvements adds value to what you do and can help secure your employment long-term</p> <h2>4. Clicking on Caps Lock</h2> <p>TYPING IN ALL CAPS READS LIKE YOU'RE SHOUTING and shows a fundamental lack of professional etiquette and insight. It may be trivial, but people get fired for trivial things every day. Cut it out.</p> <h2>5. Skipping the Finer Points of Good Etiquette</h2> <p>Good business etiquette is both valuable and rare, especially if your job involves direct work with clients or partners. Not grasping the finer points of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/reclaiming-etiquette-dining-basics-for-young-professionals">dining</a>, interview, or meeting etiquette can jeopardize business relationships, flag you as inexperienced, and kill a career.</p> <h2>6. Making Yourself Non-Essential</h2> <p>If you're not actively looking for new ways to add value to the company you work for, you may be inadvertently planting the seeds for your own dismissal when there's a hiccup in the market. Besides being first-rate at your job, look for those tasks that no one else wants to do and position yourself as the go-to person for each.</p> <h2>7. Mixing Your Personal and Professional Life</h2> <p>When it comes to job security, it's good policy to save the drama for your mama. Allowing personal issues to consistently affect your work erodes your professional image and can make letting you go as easy as switching off a bad reality show.</p> <h2>8. Getting Embroiled in Office Politics</h2> <p>Some work environments can be as political as a swing state in late October. Diving in headfirst and picking sides gives you a 50% of being right and a 100% chance of showing how easily distracted you are. Learn how to <a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Ways-Beat-Office-Politics-1108688">beat office politics</a> and still get ahead.</p> <h2>9. Snoozing or Boozing</h2> <p>No surprises here. Sneaking a nap or a nip at work is usually an epically bad idea. And with office holiday parties coming up, sticking to a moderate personal drink limit will help you avoid those regretful lampshade-on-the-head moments that leave you red-faced Monday morning.</p> <h2>10. Stealing</h2> <p>Hey, Sticky Fingers, it may feel like a fringe benefit, but few companies see it that way. If you're tempted to pocket random goodies from your employer, it may be a sign that you feel stuck or that you're not being fairly compensated. Be proactive about both issues or move on.</p> <h2>11. Sleeping In</h2> <p>Who hasn't woken up feeling like a sack of wet concrete? These are the moments when we suddenly tap deep reserves of creativity to craft the most elaborate excuses for being late or taking a half-day. But as our inner storytellers dream, our careers can get creamed. Wake up, slam a double espresso, and defend your professional turf.</p> <h2>12. Playing Hooky</h2> <p>It might not have been a big deal in sixth grade, but playing hooky in your professional life can have lasting consequences. Don't assume (cough, cough) taking sick days when you're feeling great, ducking out early, or adding 15 minutes to your lunch hour is going unnoticed.</p> <p>If you're guilty of multiple axe-worthy offenses, it might be time to hope for the best and prepare for the worst by keeping an eye out for <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">signs you're about to get fired</a>. If you make the cut, wipe the sweat from your brow and let 2015 be the year you turn over a new leaf. Like much of life, our professional lives can be reinvented with focus, discipline, and the right motivation.</p> <p><em>Have you ever been fired? Did the experience change how you approached your next job? Share your favorite stories below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-laid-off-a-step-by-step-guide">How to Get Laid Off: A Step-By-Step Guide</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-not-to-answer-10-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How NOT TO Answer 10 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building fired job hunt job loss new job pink slip Wed, 03 Dec 2014 11:00:09 +0000 Kentin Waits 1262734 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Hidden Costs of a New Job http://www.wisebread.com/12-hidden-costs-of-a-new-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-hidden-costs-of-a-new-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessman-night-driving-462208251-small.jpg" alt="businessman night driving" title="businessman night driving" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>So, you just got a new job offer? Congratulations! But before you accept it, here are some hidden costs you might not have considered. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-to-make-when-you-get-a-new-job?ref=seealso">7 Money Moves to Make When You Get a New Job</a>)</p> <h2>1. Uncompensated Training</h2> <p>This happens frequently in tech jobs, but also in healthcare and a few other fields &mdash; you get hired with the understanding that, within a set period of time, you will complete a set of training courses or exams. In most cases, your employer will be paying for these courses, but you might want to check to see if you are going to be compensated for the time spent on the education, especially if the training course takes place outside of work hours.</p> <h2>2. Relocation Costs</h2> <p>It used to be standard for companies to pay for a new hire to relocate, but no longer.</p> <p>How much relocation will cost you depends a great deal on your living situation and your personal life. If you are single and living in a month-to-month leased apartment, moving across the country might be a bit less daunting. If you are moving back to your hometown, or relocating to a city where you already have quite a few social or familial connections, this can ease the burden as well. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-save-on-a-move?ref=seealso">9 Ways to Save on a Move</a>)</p> <p>However, if you own a home (that you have to sell) and have to move a spouse, kids, pets, and furniture more than a couple of dozen miles, then relocation can run you tens of thousands of dollars.</p> <p>Related to relocation are any cost-of-living increases that come from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-minimize-the-cost-of-living-when-moving-the-cost-of-living-myth">moving from a less expensive area</a> to a more expensive one. If you are moving to a pricier locale, make certain that either the salary or the opportunity is worth the added cost of housing, groceries, and child care.</p> <h2>3. Longer Commute</h2> <p>Easily the most common cost associated with a new job is a new commute. If you've recently upgraded to a job with a shorter (or non-existent commute), then you are awesome and an example to us all.</p> <p>If, however, you recently moved to the outskirts of town, only to find that all the jobs you qualify for are relocating to the center of the city, well, you are looking at some increases in costs.</p> <h3>Fuel, Wear and Tear, Parking</h3> <p>These might seem like obvious costs to calculate, but in addition to mileage, you need to consider how many hours you will spend on the road. Is your route to work a daily traffic jam, or are you lucking into a reverse commute? Consider not just distance, but time spent in the car.</p> <p>If you are driving to work, is parking provided or do you have to pay for it?</p> <h3>Increased Fares</h3> <p>If you are lucky enough to live in an area that has reliable public transportation, but now have a longer commute, you might be surprised at how much more a round trip train ride can cost.</p> <h3>Extended Child Care or Pet Care</h3> <p>Do you have kids in daycare or pets that need to be let out of the house? Is a longer commute going to extend the number of hours you have to spend away from them? Consider these costs when looking at the big picture.</p> <h3>Take Out</h3> <p>Some people are really good at planning meals and having them ready to eat by the time dinner rolls around, but if you just spent two hours in the car driving home from work, you might be too tired to cook. Take-out pizza, anyone?</p> <h2>4. Health Insurance Changes</h2> <p>Yay, your new employer offers health insurance, right? Is it an HMO or a PPO? Are the premiums or deductibles higher than what you are currently paying? Is your current medical provider covered?</p> <h2>5. Reduced Benefits</h2> <p>Does your new employer offer the same kind of vacation package that your old one did? Does your new employer offer other benefits, like a 401(k) with matching? If you already had perks like these, make sure that your new employer has a similar benefits package (or at the very least, that the job itself is worth a cut in benefits). If you want to determine solid numbers to represent your total compensation package, you can use the <a href="http://www.calcxml.com/calculators/total-compensation">CalcXML Total Compensation calculator</a> to determine the difference between your current job and a prospective new one.</p> <h2>6. Increased Travel Requirements</h2> <p>If you work in a field that requires extensive travel, you already know the drill of expensing travel costs and getting your per diem. But increased travel, even when reimbursed in a timely manner, can come with other hidden costs. Do you need a house sitter or pet sitter?</p> <h2>7. Outside-of-Work Networking</h2> <p>Some jobs or industries require plenty of off-the-clock networking. Attending social events that aren't reimbursed can eat into your paycheck, but avoiding the kinds of networking events that your coworkers (or competitors) attend can also damage your career.</p> <h2>8. New Wardrobe</h2> <p>If you are changing careers or physical locations, it could be that your business casual wardrobe no longer cuts it. For instance, if you are moving from a tech job in a San Francisco start-up to a tech job with an investment bank in New York City, you may be expected, if not required, to wear much more formal work clothing. Outside of the office environment, some workplaces require you to wear clothing that they don't pay for. (For instance, my first job ever was at a Denny's that required me to purchase two neckties, at $30 a pop, out of my first paycheck.)</p> <p>Get an early handle on the expected daily attire for a new job, and budget accordingly.</p> <p><em>Have you ever taken a new job, only to be shocked by a hidden cost associated with the new job? Tell us about it in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-hidden-costs-of-a-new-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-besides-salary-to-negotiate-at-work">10 Things Besides Salary to Negotiate at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/got-a-new-job-heres-your-financial-to-do-list">Got a New Job? Here&#039;s Your Financial To-Do List</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-entry-level-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries">12 Entry Level Jobs With Surprisingly High Salaries</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-29-companies-with-the-best-maternity-benefits">The 29 Companies With the Best Maternity Benefits</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income benefits commuting hidden costs new job salary Mon, 01 Dec 2014 11:00:11 +0000 Andrea Karim 1260450 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways to Discover Your Dream Career http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-discover-your-dream-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-to-discover-your-dream-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/office-worker-thinking-516681649-small.jpg" alt="office worker thinking" title="office worker thinking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you're flailing, facing layoffs, or otherwise feeling unfulfilled at work, it might be time to reconsider your calling. Job researchers report that <a href="http://online.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052748704206804575468162805877990">the average American changes jobs seven times</a> in his or her lifetime, most often in pursuit of better job satisfaction or financial stability. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today?ref=seealso">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a>)</p> <p>But it's not always easy to know what direction to take. That's because we're prone to define who we are by what we do to make a living. So when there's opportunity to trade our profession for something completely new, it often feels like we're faced with the unsettling task of altering the basic building blocks of who we are as human beings. But it can be done, and <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2011/03/03/how-loving-your-job-helps-you-succeed">the payoff can be spectacular</a>.</p> <p>Read on for our roundup of the best ways to go about recreating your career and finding your true calling. (You can thank us when you're blissfully employed in your brand new niche).</p> <h2>1. Be a Skill-Shifter</h2> <p>Reflect on all of your skills &mdash; not just the ones you acquired in the workforce &mdash; and think about all the creative ways you can apply them to new careers or business ventures. What skills have you picked up from volunteering, coaching soccer, raising your children, paying off your credit card debt, or gardening in the backyard? How might those techniques serve you in the working world?</p> <p>&quot;<a href="http://blog.ctnews.com/connecticutpostings/2010/10/16/recreate-your-career-take-or-leave-a-tip/">Don't limit your job search or career possibilities</a> to the exact field you have been in or with the same field on your educational degree,&quot; advises Dr. Stuart Sidle, an industrial organizational psychologist. The idea is to identify your most outside-the-box strengths and passions, and then play to them.</p> <h2>2. Unearth a Childhood Dream</h2> <p>Many people think childhood dreams are just dreams. Yet one in four working Americans are employed in the job or career field they dreamed about as kids, according to a survey by LinkedIn. People who work in a field they once dreamed about tend to be successful because <a href="http://press.linkedin.com/News-Releases/150/Cool-Careers-LinkedIn-Research-Reveals-Data-About-the-Top-Childhood-Dream-Jobs">their job is on the same playing field as their passions</a>. When you do something you're passionate about, you're bound to do it well.</p> <p>&quot;The dream jobs we aspire to as children are a window into our passions and talents,&quot; says Nicole Williams, LinkedIn's career expert. &quot;Identifying and understanding those passions are key to improving our performance and enjoyment&hellip;&quot;</p> <h2>3. Try It Out</h2> <p>A restaurant chef might seem like the ultimate occupation, but how often does the average chef have the opportunity to experiment with flavors and create new dishes for the dinner menu? There's only one way to find out: Network with people in your desired field, find opportunities to shadow people working in your desired role, and ask a lot of questions. When possible, try out the work for yourself on a limited, exploratory basis to see if it's really for you.</p> <p>&quot;Making a major career change is not simply about picking up new technical skills and repackaging one's image and resume,&quot; writes Herminia Ibarra in her book, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1591394139/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=1591394139&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=MUC7F2E4CCXNBERS">Working Identity: Unconventional Strategies for Reinventing Your Career</a>. &quot;It is also about finding people we want to emulate and places where we want to belong.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Future-Proof Yourself</h2> <p>It's not a bad idea to <a href="http://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_table_103.htm">go where the growth is</a>. So you might want to jot down these fastest-growing occupations:</p> <ul> <li>industrial-organizational psychologist</li> <li>personal care aide</li> <li>home health aide</li> <li>mechanical insulation worker</li> <li>interpreters and translators</li> <li>diagnostic medical sonographers</li> <li>brickmasons</li> </ul> <p>These fields of the future are less likely to be affected by a shrinking economy or other setbacks. And they're more likely to provide workers with opportunities for growth and promotion. They may not be the sexiest of jobs, but there's certainly something to be said for stability.</p> <h2>5. Be Honest &mdash; Are You Up to the Challenge?</h2> <p>&quot;Much more than transferring to a similar job in a new company or industry, or moving laterally into a different work function within a field we already know well, a true change of direction is always terrifying,&quot; writes Ibarra in her book.</p> <p>That's why Dr. Stuart Sidle, an industrial organizational psychologist, recommends asking yourself these questions before <a href="http://blog.ctnews.com/connecticutpostings/2010/10/16/recreate-your-career-take-or-leave-a-tip/">embarking on any major career shift</a>:</p> <ul> <li>Do you have the passion to do the hard work that goes along with succeeding in the field?<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Is your choice practical?<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Are you taking a path because you believe it is a great option for you, or are you simply avoiding something, such as discomfort or fear?</li> </ul> <p>If your honest answer to any of these key considerations is &quot;No,&quot; you might want to consider making a trip back to the drawing board.</p> <p><em>Have you relaunched a career? How'd you do? Please share in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-discover-your-dream-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/starting-a-new-job-3-rules-to-live-by">Starting a New Job: 3 Rules to Live By</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired">12 Reasons You Deserve to Get Fired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview">What You Should Do If You&#039;re Stumped During an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career choice new career new job Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:00:07 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1245696 at http://www.wisebread.com Master These 15 Interview Questions http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/master-these-15-interview-questions" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/job-interview-152981657-small.jpg" alt="job interview" title="job interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>First impressions are everything, and making a good one during a job interview can very well snag you the job of your dreams. Interviews can be nerve-racking, especially if it's for a job you really want. The only way to calm your nerves is to do a lot of prep beforehand so you'll be ready for your interview. Read on for 15 common interview questions.</p> <p>RELATED: <a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/What-Your-Biggest-Weakness-Interview-Question-33900029">4 Rules for Answering the Weakness Question</a></p> <h2>1. Tell Me About Yourself</h2> <p>This question usually takes about one to two minutes to answer and will be your elevator pitch. You want to give them a brief rundown of who you are as a person and show how you articulate you are. Don't start rambling on about your personal history. Talk about highlights from job positions or schooling and how you can contribute to the company with your background and experiences.</p> <p>Know what the company is looking for. If it prizes technical skills, play those up. Showcase the qualities needed for the job you're interviewing for.</p> <p>Before the interview, write down two to three notable achievements, and be sure to bring them up during your elevator pitch.</p> <h2>2. What Are Your Strengths and Weaknesses?</h2> <p>Think about what others have said about you when you're trying to come up with a list of your strengths. Remember, always back up your points with an example.</p> <p>Pick strengths that align with the company's culture and goals. If you're applying to a scrappy start-up, highlight your ability to multitask and to take initiative.</p> <p>The most important factor when choosing which strengths to highlight is to make sure they relate to the position your applying to. For example, if you're applying for a human resources position, talk about your interpersonal skills.</p> <p>The weakness question is always the hardest to answer. Don't give a clichéd answer such as you work too hard or you're too much of a perfectionist. Try your best to stick to the truth and make sure you mention the steps you take to counter the weakness. Don't disclose anything that will make you look like an incompetent employee, such as not meeting deadlines and getting into conflicts with co-workers. Put a positive spin on the weakness but make sure it doesn't sound too practiced. An example of weaknesses can be impatience, which can mean that you want to get the job done. Another weakness can be time management but make sure you name the steps you take to beat that problem. You will look like a problem solver when you show them what you did to fix a flaw.</p> <h2>3. What Salary Are You Looking For?</h2> <p>You don't have to answer this question at the interview, and you can try to deflect this question until you've received an offer. Tell the interviewers that you want to hold off on salary talk until the both of you know that you're right for the job.</p> <h2>4. Why Do You Want to Work for Us?</h2> <p>Read up everything you can about the company, including the website, news articles, profiles of employees, and any tidbits on LinkedIn. If you or your friends know employees at the company, ask if they can speak to you about what the company is like.</p> <p>Try to get a sense of what the company culture is and what its goals are. Once you've done your homework, you need to figure out how the company ties into your own career path and future.</p> <h2>5. Where Do You See Yourself in a Few Years?</h2> <p>Think about how you can move forward from the position you're eyeing. Figure out the natural career track and tailor your answer to the company. Try to be honest but not to the point where you make yourself look like an unattractive candidate, such as saying you want to work for their competitor or something too personal like becoming a mom. Stick to professional examples; they don't want to hear about your personal life plan.</p> <h2>6. Are You Interviewing With Other Companies?</h2> <p>Try not to spend too much time on this question and answer briefly. A simple yes and mentioning the fact that you're open to opportunities will do the trick. You can also say that this particular job is your first choice. Remember, honesty is always the best policy, and don't lie and say you're interviewing at certain companies when you're not.</p> <h2>7. What Can You Do for This Company?</h2> <p>There are several versions of this question, which also includes, &quot;What will you do when you're at [job position x]?&quot; When you're preparing for the interview, think about why you would do a good job at the position and what steps you would take to achieve that.</p> <p>Bring in new ideas and examples of what you have done in the past that has benefited your previous companies. One trick that will help the company visualize you in the position is to tell them exactly what you'd do in the first two weeks at the job. Be specific about what you'd like to accomplish, so it's more believable and impressive.</p> <h2>8. Why Do You Want to Leave or Why Did You Leave Your Current Job?</h2> <p>It's understandable if you were laid off given the rocky economy. You don't have to share the dirty details, but you should be truthful and mention that your company had to let go of X number of people or the department was being restructured.</p> <p>If you are leaving because of a negative situation, be sure not to badmouth your old company or boss. It just reflects badly on you if you do. You can focus on the fact that you're looking for growth and that you feel this company feels like the step in the right direction.</p> <h2>9. Do You Have Any Questions for Me?</h2> <p>Asking good questions can reveal a lot of your personality and can be the most important part of the interview. Take some time into crafting very personal, well thought-out questions that require more than a &quot;yes&quot; or &quot;no&quot; answer.</p> <p>Don't ask questions that seem to be too assuming and that make you sound like you think you got the job. Don't try to focus on pay, benefits, and getting promoted. Focus more on what you can do for the company and not what the company can do for you.</p> <p>Use your judgement during the interview on how many questions are appropriate.</p> <h2>10. When Did You Have to Deal With Conflict in the Office, and How Did You Resolve It?</h2> <p>Be careful when you're addressing this question and make sure that you're not bitter or negative in your answer. You should always be positive because this reflects the fact that you take conflict well. Talk about a problem you faced (preferably not something you created), and detail the steps you proactively took to resolve the problem. The best examples will come from your past experiences.</p> <h2>11. Testing Your Knowledge and Experience</h2> <p>Make sure what you can live up to your claims in your résumé and cover letter, because your interviewer may try to test your knowledge and experience.</p> <p>For example, he might ask you questions in your field or get your professional opinion on some current events happening in your expertise. Another way to test your knowledge is to walk you through a sample scenario you might face in this new job, and ask you how you would solve the issue.</p> <p>The best way to prepare for these questions is to read up as much as you can about industry that you're applying to, and brush up on items in your past. Give yourself time to think about how you would tackle the problem they present to you, and don't rush your explanation. Even if you don't arrive at the conclusion the hiring manager is looking for, they may be impressed by your thought process.</p> <h2>12. Tell Me About Your Achievements</h2> <p>It's your time to shine when you talk about your achievements. Make sure you're preparing ahead of time for the achievement question.</p> <p>Write down three possible past wins relevant to the company and position you're applying to, and practice articulating your answers. Do your best to be specific and possibly throw in numbers to really back up your answers. For example, saying something like &quot;As a result of achievement x, revenue numbers increased by x percent year over year.&quot; This will really show your hiring manager how you added value to your past company's growth and reveal your worth as an employee.</p> <h2>13. Tell Me About Your Failures</h2> <p>Be careful when picking which failures to talk about because it can either be a hit or miss answer.</p> <p>Be honest in your answer. Don't pick a weak example, where the failure wasn't truly a flop. It's very telling if you're uncomfortable with the question. The interviewer may see you as someone who can't take responsibility for her mistakes and grow from it.</p> <p>You want to make sure that whatever you mention, you're able to explain how you bounced back stronger than ever and how you took steps to make sure that the mistake never happened again.</p> <h2>14. How Would Your Co-Workers Describe You?</h2> <p>It's time to talk yourself up! Highlight your positive traits, and make sure you're not bringing up your flaws. You should only bring up negative things if you're asked to do so.</p> <p>Think back on what your co-workers and bosses have said about you in your past reviews. This will help you formulate your answer.</p> <h2>15. What Was Your Last Salary?</h2> <p>Remember, you don't have to reveal anything you're not comfortable with to the hiring manager. You can answer this question indirectly by giving the interviewer a range you're expecting.</p> <p>Liz Ryan, CEO of consulting firm The Human Workplace, writes in a <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20131217070749-52594-how-to-answer-the-question-what-was-your-last-salary?trk=tod-posts-post1-ptlt">LinkedIn post</a>, &quot;When we call the plumber because our tub drain is clogged, we don't ask, 'What did you charge the guy down the block to unclog his drain last week?' If we do, the plumber is going to say, 'My rate is $95 an hour. Do you want me to come over or not?'&quot;</p> <p>She suggests responding to this salary question with &quot;In this job search, I'm looking for jobs in the $95,000 to $100,000 range. Is that in the ballpark?&quot;</p> <p>The best way to prepare for this question is to figure out how much salary you want to be paid. <a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/How-Much-Salary-Should-I-Ask-17873128">Here's how</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-blog-teaser"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Land a job interview? Great. Now seal the deal by learning how to answer these 15 common job interview questions. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p style="text-align:center;"><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com" style="border:none;"><img alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u921/POPSUGARrgb.jpg" style="height:95px; width:300px" /></a></p> <p><em>This is a guest contribution from our friends at </em><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/"><em>POPSUGAR Smart Living</em></a><em>. Check out more useful articles from this partner:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Cover-Letter-Introduction-Templates-31929718">How to Start Off Your Cover Letter Right</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Interview-Follow-Up-Email-Template-19179139">Follow Up After a Job Interview With This Email</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Follow-Up-After-Interview-24541874">5 Rules For Following Up After the Interview</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/popsugar-smart-living">POPSUGAR Smart Living</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-should-do-if-youre-stumped-during-an-interview">What You Should Do If You&#039;re Stumped During an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> General Tips Job Hunting interview Job Interview job search new job Fri, 03 Oct 2014 21:00:05 +0000 POPSUGAR Smart Living 1221623 at http://www.wisebread.com The 10 Things You Need to Do If You Want to Quit Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-things-you-need-to-do-if-you-want-to-quit-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-10-things-you-need-to-do-if-you-want-to-quit-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/quitting-job-97430116-small.jpg" alt="quitting job" title="quitting job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Recent data shows that <a href="http://www.marketwatch.com/story/americans-less-likely-to-change-jobs-now-than-in-1980s-2014-01-10">Americans stay at a single job for an average of 4.6 years</a>. If a career lasts 40 years, that means we're destined for roughly 10 job changes, so you better get good at saying goodbye.</p> <p>Leaving with grace is imperative to build your network, and you never know how your path will cross with former colleagues, because again, everyone's constantly shifting around!</p> <p>Here are 10 things you should do to leave a job on a high note.</p> <h2>During the Job Search</h2> <p>The key here, obviously, is to keep your job search activities on the down low. You may not find your next position for months. Meanwhile, you owe it to your current employer (and yourself!), to maintain your professionalism and productivity throughout.</p> <h3>1. Do Your Research</h3> <p>Be diligent about researching potential jobs and companies, so you don't waste time applying for jobs that won't work for you in the long run. You will only have limited time to apply and interview since you have a job already, so you don't want to waste it on companies and roles that you could have ruled out with a bit of research.</p> <h3>2. Get Out Your Personal Calendar</h3> <p>Whenever possible, schedule your job search time on your personal calendar to maintain focus, much less get caught on search sites like <a href="http://www.indeed.com/">Indeed</a> and <a href="http://www.theladders.com/">The Ladders</a>. You never know how your computer is being monitored by your company or who may drop by your desk unexpectedly. Plus, you're being paid by your current employer to do your work, not find a new job. Job search on your time, not theirs. When you begin to book interviews, use vacation time or personal days if possible.</p> <h3>3. Tap Your Networks With Care</h3> <p>Networking is great, but be cautious about using any methods that might alert your current employer to your search.</p> <ul> <li>Checking the box on LinkedIn that you're interested in learning about new opportunities is safe because it's ambiguous, below the fold on your profile, and every profile I've ever seen has it checked.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Posting on Twitter that you're looking for a new job is much too conspicuous because Twitter is a very public platform.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Posting on Facebook could be safe provided that none of your current colleagues are your friends and you post only to friends, not to the general public.</li> </ul> <p>In short, exercise caution about tapping networks and when you do so make sure to only use connections whom you truly trust to keep your confidence.</p> <h3>4. Grab Your Portfolio Now</h3> <p>Before you even have an offer, decide which pieces of your portfolio you can and want to take with you when you leave. Capture them either electronically or in hard copy now before the pressure's on to do so. Also, once you give notice, some companies may lock you out of your accounts and prevent access to what you've created. And if you've signed an NDA or go work for a competitor, you may be required to leave your current employer as soon as you give notice.</p> <h3>5. Read Your Employee Handbook</h3> <p>Know your HR policies. Do you have to give a minimum amount of notice? Did you sign an NDA on non-compete agreement? Are there any restrictions on stock options or awards you've received? This is all valuable and necessary data to have as you look for new opportunities.</p> <h2>Accepting an Offer and Giving Notice</h2> <p>Your search went well and you've landed an offer for the new gig. What's next?</p> <h3>1. Respond to the Offer</h3> <p>Thank the prospective employer for the offer and ask any questions you may have including how long you have to make a decision and a potential start date.</p> <p>Don't accept on the spot: You may want to consider negotiating with the employer on salary, vacation time, benefits, start date, etc., and you'll want to get the complete offer in writing. The last thing you want is to have an offer rescinded or have it turn out to be different than what was promised. Asking an employer to put an offer in writing eliminates a good deal of that risk. You should also accept in writing and have an agreed upon start date before putting together your resignation letter.</p> <h3>2. Resign Gracefully</h3> <p>Once you decide to accept the new job, give notice to your current supervisor verbally and in writing, preferably at the same time. Keep the letter simple. Give them an end date and thank them for the opportunity you've had in your current role.</p> <p>Verbally, you can provide a bit more detail. When you speak to your supervisor, be honest about where you're going and why. <em>But leave the emotion out of it and stick to the facts</em>. It may be tempting to point out every unpleasant aspect of your current job, particularly if you've been unhappy for a while and have raised these issues with your supervisor only to have them fall on deaf ears. Instead, highlight why this new role at a new company is a good fit for you. And you never know; perhaps now that you've given notice your existing employer will make you a counteroffer that's worth your consideration.</p> <h3>3. Tell Your Team</h3> <p>Now that you've talked to your supervisor, it's time to tell your team. Make sure you stick to the same reasoning that you gave your supervisor. Don't go into intense detail with colleagues about the negative aspects of your job that drove you out the door. You don't want your departure to take on any scandalous aspects, nor do you want that information to get back to your supervisor. Save the gossip and emotion for your friends at happy hour!</p> <h3>4. Don't Throw In the Towel</h3> <p>Prior to your departure, don't slack off on the job. Continue to uphold your responsibility, work on a transition plan with your supervisor, and leave detailed notes on your current projects for the team members who will take over your projects. No sabotage!</p> <h3>5. Connect With Colleagues</h3> <p>Connecting with your colleagues through in-person meetings and online on sites such as LinkedIn is as critical as capturing your portfolio items. These connections, when forged authentically, will serve you well down the line in your personal and professional life. I've made some of the best friends of my life through my jobs. When I left my last corporate job prior to starting my own business, I was shocked by how inspired my colleagues were by my choice. It was the best ending I could have asked for and they have continued to be an incredible part of my life!</p> <p>The most important things to focus on when you leave a job are integrity, integrity, and integrity. Maintain your dignity during the search process and in the way you transition out of your job. It will pay off many times over. People may not remember everything you did while they worked with you, but they will always remember how you left.</p> <p><em>How have you gracefully left one job for another? Please share your experience in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/christa-avampato">Christa Avampato</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-things-you-need-to-do-if-you-want-to-quit-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income job offer job search new job quitting a job resigning Thu, 14 Aug 2014 11:00:03 +0000 Christa Avampato 1183632 at http://www.wisebread.com Leave Town Fast: Essentials for Making a Last-Minute Move http://www.wisebread.com/leave-town-fast-essentials-for-making-a-last-minute-move <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/leave-town-fast-essentials-for-making-a-last-minute-move" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/home-boxes-3568184-small.jpg" alt="moving" title="moving" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A cousin of mine has had just a few weeks to plan a total relocation thanks to a job offer halfway across the country. I have also relocated out of state a time or three, so I understand the confusion and chaos that can ensue during a move, especially when it&rsquo;s at the last minute. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-abc-s-of-diy-moving">The ABC&rsquo;s of DIY Moving</a>)</p> <p>Relocating to a new place can be extremely exciting but also stressful. There are the concerns of the unknown in addition to trying to pack up your life and haul it along with you. Here are seven tips to help keep you sane and safe, without going broke, during a last-minute relocation effort.&nbsp;</p> <h2>1. Set Up Several Utility Tubs</h2> <p>Invest in several plastic tubs of varying sizes. While you are packing your belongings, designate a few tubs for the most important stuff you need during your move, like paperwork, relocation information, and the things you will continue to use until you physically leave. If you put these items in a designated tub as you go, you won&rsquo;t have to go searching for them later.</p> <p>Designate a notepad for your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-ways-to-prepare-for-a-move">moving notes</a>. If you start writing down important information on scraps of paper during a move, you&rsquo;ll regret it very quickly. By keeping one notebook up to date with to-do lists, reminders, and move-related information, you&rsquo;ll always have one go-to place rather than having to spend your time searching for details you&rsquo;ve lost again. Always return the notebook to one of the tubs.</p> <h2>2. Seek Relocation Advice</h2> <p>If you are moving because of a new job, be sure to ask your new employer for any resources they have to help you relocate. They may be able to refer you to a landlord, provide you with contacts for utilities and other services, or even offer assistance with some of your relocation expenses. Even if they do not offer up the information, be sure to ask about it. Your contact at the new company likely lives in the area and can provide their own personal assistance to get you started.</p> <h2>3. Map It Out</h2> <p>Start with master list of all you have to do, and then sub-divide those tasks into daily to-do lists. By writing down all of the things you need to do and breaking it down, the tasks will be more organized and less overwhelming. You should note the things that you will need help in doing, so you can round up friends and family as soon as possible. Keep all of your to-do lists in your notebook, so you&rsquo;ll know exactly where to find them.</p> <h2>4. Take Only What You Need</h2> <p>The <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-avoid-moving-scams">cost of moving</a>, no matter what methods you are using, can be very expensive.</p> <p>Ideally, you should plan to pack up only what you need to survive until you get settled. Compare the cost of hauling your bedroom set versus buying a new one. You may find it more cost-effective to sell off what you have and start anew. You can get rid of a lot of stuff by hosting a moving sale, and the money you make can be put toward the new purchases or to help with the costs of moving.</p> <p>Anything of importance that you can&rsquo;t take with you can be put into storage until you can make further decisions. Remember that the less you store, the less the storage fee will be. Leave the key with a trusted friend or family member who can access things you may need down the road. Take an inventory of what is in your storage shed and take pictures. Take it from one who knows &mdash; even your closest relatives may find it hard to resist browsing, borrowing, or outright taking your stuff from storage.</p> <h2>5. Get Set Up Ahead of Time</h2> <p>Thanks to the advantages of technology, you may be able to set up most of the basic things you need for the new place without being there in person. If you are renting, speak to the landlord about getting services set up before you arrive. They may be willing to let service companies enter your apartment and hook up your utilities as a convenience to you. With a rush move, you can get settled in the new place a bit more quickly by having the necessities waiting for you.</p> <h2>6. Do as Much as You Can on Your Own</h2> <p>If you have a lot of things to haul with you, consider your options. You can rent a hauling truck if you plan to drive and can handle that load. If you plan to fly, you can enlist a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-know-when-renting-a-moving-truck">moving service</a> that is more reasonably priced when you pack your things yourself. <a href="http://www.abfs.com/">ABF Freight System, Inc</a>, for example, drops off a trailer for you to pack and will only charge you for the space you fill. Check out a few different companies, and compare quotes before making a decision.</p> <h2>7. Settle In One Step at a Time and On a Budget</h2> <p>You may not like living with just the bare necessities, but take your time as you settle in. Give yourself a chance to get to know the area and the people. If you rush out to the only mall you know about, you&rsquo;ll end up spending way too much for things you probably don&rsquo;t need. As soon as you start settling in, create a new budget. As money becomes available you can start adding to your new place. Be sure to save some of your money to attend to things you may have left behind such as your storage unit. Putting a few dollars away each week can help you cover the cost of having the storage items shipped to you when you are ready.</p> <p><em>How did your most recent move go?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tisha-tolar">Tisha Tolar</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/leave-town-fast-essentials-for-making-a-last-minute-move">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-places-it-pays-to-relocate-to">6 Places It Pays to Relocate To</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-you-should-always-hire-a-moving-company">6 Reasons You Should Always Hire a Moving Company</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-things-you-should-do-when-you-move-to-a-new-town">14 Things You Should Do When You Move to a New Town</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-rid-of-all-your-crap">How to Get Rid of All Your Crap</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks moving new job relocation Fri, 02 Aug 2013 09:48:39 +0000 Tisha Tolar 980738 at http://www.wisebread.com