city life http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/9861/all en-US The 15 Worst Cities for Frugal People http://www.wisebread.com/the-15-worst-cities-for-frugal-people <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-15-worst-cities-for-frugal-people" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000047146032_Large.jpg" alt="woman hailing cab" title="woman hailing cab" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Frugal living can be a challenge anywhere, but in some corners of the globe it takes exquisite talent. Especially when basic staples like milk and bread are expensive enough to make your jaw drop. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-of-americas-awesomest-cheap-cities?ref=seealso">10 of America's Awesomest Cheap Cities</a>)</p> <p>Read on for our roundup of the worst cities for living on a budget. (Read: Avoid, unless you're prepared to splurge!)</p> <h2>1. Hong Kong</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5123/hong%20kong%20boat.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>The people of Hong Kong enjoy one of the highest per capita incomes in the world. Apparently it's large enough that they can afford a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mercer.com/content/mercer/global/all/en/newsroom/cost-of-living-survey.html">$6.64 cup of coffee</a>, because that's the average price of a cup of joe in this Chinese hub.</p> <h2>2. Paris</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5123/paris%20eiffel%20tower.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>The City of Love might also be called The City of Highway Robbery. It costs $21 to see a movie here, nevermind the popcorn. For perspective's sake, consider that a family of three could go to the movies in the U.S. for that same price.</p> <h2>3. New York</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5123/new%20york%20city%20sunset.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>There are lots of frugal ways to enjoy the City That Never Sleeps. Just don't move there. The average monthly rent in New York City&nbsp;is $3,017. That's about triple the average monthly rent nationwide.</p> <h2>4. Moscow</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5123/moscow%20snow%20cathedral.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>In Russia's capital, an unfurnished two-bedroom apartment will set you back more than $4,600 a month. Even a gallon of milk &mdash; averaging more than $7.50 &mdash; doesn't come cheap.</p> <h2>5. San Francisco</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5170/san_francisco_golden_gate_bridge.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>Fog City might be better characterized by the outrageous monthly rent than its gloomy weather conditions. Late last year this northern California hub officially became the&nbsp;<a href="http://blog.zumper.com/2014/09/us-average-rent-august-2014/">most expensive American city</a>&nbsp;to rent a one-bedroom apartment. The average price? A whopping $3,100. That's enough to rent out four apartments in Kansas City and still have $180 leftover for utilities.</p> <h2>6. London</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5170/london_big_bed.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>A&nbsp;<a href="http://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/city_result.jsp?country=United+Kingdom&amp;city=London&amp;displayCurrency=USD">pack of cigarettes</a>&nbsp;in London costs about $12.40 &mdash; more than double the average price of a pack of smokes in the U.S. But this city's high prices aren't just problematic for smokers. London is also one of the most expensive places to get around, with a walk-up ticket for a short-journey <a href="http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/cost-living-how-prices-uk-2859861">ride on the Tube</a>&nbsp;costing more than $6.</p> <h2>7. Los Angeles</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5170/downton_los_angeles.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>The <a href="http://www.kiplinger.com/slideshow/real-estate/T006-S001-most-expensive-u-s-cities-to-live-in/index.html">cost of living</a>&nbsp;in the City of Angels is more than 30% higher than the rest of the country, yet the average household income here is 6.6% below the national level. It's no wonder more than 21% of the population is living in poverty, compared with an average of 15% across America.</p> <h2>8. Boston</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5170/boston.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>You don't have to actually live in Boston to suffer from its high prices. A one-night stay in America's Walking City will do just fine. A new study from the travel planning website GoEuro found that Boston is the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/travel/2014/12/11/the-high-price-visit-boston/At3b1APl1KUuGqumlRhKgL/story.html">sixth most expensive city</a> in the world for accommodations, and the third most expensive in the U.S. A five-star hotel room here ($252) will cost you more than a room in Melbourne ($206), Barcelona ($242), Stockholm ($184), or Vienna ($233). But what'll really suckerpunch you are the soaring Airbnb rates. At $274 a night, Boston is the most expensive Airbnb city, easily topping New York ($231) and London ($176).</p> <h2>9. Zurich</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5170/zurich.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>The average price of a pair of blue jeans in this Swiss banking hub is a staggering $156. Even the typical fast food hamburger meal is ridiculously priced at $15.</p> <h2>10. Sydney</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5170/sydney_opera_house.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>The price of a loaf of bread in Australia's capital city? $5. Take a moment to catch your breath before we rattle off a few others: A bottle of table wine will set you back $25, and a brand-name pack of cigarettes will eat up almost $16.</p> <h2>11. Stamford</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5170/stamford_connecticut.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>Stamford is perhaps very fittingly dubbed Connecticut's &quot;City That Works.&quot; Clearly, you've got to work pretty hard to afford these prices. Exhibit A: This small city 30 miles outside Manhattan has one of the highest concentrations of millionaire households in the nation. Housing costs here are more than double the national average.</p> <h2>12. Honolulu</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5170/waikiki_bach_honolulu.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>It may be paradise, but it comes at a cost. Last year the U.S. Department of Agriculture named Honolulu the nation's&nbsp;<a href="http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/26322563/honolulu-named-second-most-expensive-city-to-raise-a-child">second-most expensive city</a>&nbsp;to raise a child. When considering housing, childcare, and education from birth through age 17, the estimated cost for parents is $430,000.</p> <h2>13. Geneva</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5123/geneva%20city.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>According to a study by Hotels.com that uses a club sandwich index to determine how affordable different international cities are for tourists, the classic sandwich of turkey, mayo, and bacon costs nearly $23 on&nbsp;<a href="http://press.hotels.com/en-gb/press/hotelsdotcomuk_csi2013/">hotel restaurant menus in Geneva</a>. If you want to wash that down with a swig of water, consider drinking from the tap. A standard .33 liter sized bottle of water in this Swiss city costs close to $4.</p> <h2>14. Tokyo</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5123/tokyo%20shibuya%20square.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>In Japan's capital, <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/the-outrageous-cost-of-living-in-tokyothe-most-expensive-city-in-the-world-2012-6#pizza-hut-isnt-cheap-either-a-pie-in-tokyo-costs-close-to-25-compared-to-15-in-manhattan-8">dinner at Pizza Hut</a> isn't exactly a cheap date. A pie here costs close to $25. The cab ride home will also cost you, too. A three km ride in Tokyo is $14.15, 150% of what you would pay in New York City.</p> <h2>15. Rio De Janeiro</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5170/rio_de_janeiro.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>The dark side of Brazil's global investment boom is that daily life in the big cities has become unreasonably expensive, even when compared to other metropolises known for unaffordability across the globe. For example, purchasing an international newspaper in Manhattan will set you back $2.50. But that&nbsp;<a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/outrageous-prices-living-brazil-2011-9#if-you-pick-up-an-international-newspaper-in-manhattan-it-will-set-you-back-250-the-same-paper-in-rio-costs-959-3" style="text-decoration:none;">same paper in Rio De Janeiro</a>&nbsp;will cost you $9.59. Another illustration: a summer dress that costs $38 at an American outpost of the international affordable clothing chain H&amp;M would be priced at $76 in Rio.</p> <p><em>How pricey is your city (or town, village, or burg)?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-15-worst-cities-for-frugal-people">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-starbucks-drinks-you-can-easily-make-yourself">4 Starbucks Drinks You Can Easily Make Yourself</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-gluttony-is-keeping-you-poor">6 Ways Gluttony Is Keeping You Poor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-cheap-exercise-tools-for-a-killer-workout">10 Cheap Exercise Tools for a Killer Workout</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/18-clever-ways-to-reuse-your-plastic-shopping-bags">18 Clever Ways to Reuse Your Plastic Shopping Bags</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/37-brilliant-ways-to-reuse-an-empty-milk-jug">37 Brilliant Ways to Reuse an Empty Milk Jug</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living city life expensive cities where to live Mon, 16 Feb 2015 16:00:08 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1289616 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Unexpected Things You Should Consider When Picking Where You Retire http://www.wisebread.com/10-unexpected-things-you-should-consider-when-picking-where-you-retire <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-unexpected-things-you-should-consider-when-picking-where-you-retire" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/senior-couple-touring-166160155-small.jpg" alt="senior couple touring" title="senior couple touring" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Retirement often brings about relocation &mdash; possibly to a warmer area, a place with better health care, a quieter community, or just wherever Sal and Judy ended up. What a nice couple!</p> <p>Retirees often focus on things like hospitals, access to national parks, closeness to family, or an established community of senior citizens &mdash; and rightly so. Yet, while these factors will play a major part in the quality of a retiree's life, they aren't the only ones that should be considered.</p> <p>What about other factors that we don't immediately associate with where we're going to retire? Are we being too minimal when we consider the &quot;ideal&quot; location? Perhaps there should be a more comprehensive list of considerations when it comes time to choose the ideal retirement spot. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-incredible-places-to-retire-abroad-that-anyone-can-afford?ref=seealso">5 Incredible Places to Retire Abroad That Anyone Can Afford</a>)</p> <p>In essence, your retirement location should consider need, but it should also consider preferences and personality. What do you enjoy doing and what kind of atmosphere do you feel the most relaxed in?</p> <p>Here are a few things that if given some forethought, might impact where you decide to settle.</p> <h2>1. Tax Friendliness for Retirees</h2> <p>Tax policies for retirees (and in general) differ from state to state, so if you're on the fence about which part of the country you want to live in, this might be enough to tip you one way or the other. For example, <a href="http://www.kiplinger.com/slideshow/retirement/T006-S001-10-most-tax-friendly-states-for-retirees/">Florida and Alaska</a> have no state income tax, inheritance tax, or estate tax. There are also some helpful exemptions for retirees depending on the state.</p> <h2>2. Airport Proximity</h2> <p>If you plan to do a lot of traveling, consider the proximity of where you live to a larger airport. You can view all of the United State's airport locations on the <a href="http://www.ncdot.gov/travel/airports/">NCDOT website</a>.</p> <h2>3. Access to the Big City</h2> <p>Most retirees prefer to have some separation from big city life. If you do plan to live in a more quiet and rural area, consider how often you might want to visit a bigger city for entertainment, shopping, and just getting out. If you think you'll make that drive frequently, look for the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-of-americas-awesomest-cheap-cities">best rural spots</a> that give you easy driving access to a bigger city.</p> <h2>4. The Restaurant Scene</h2> <p>An active and diverse restaurant scene can really improve your retirement experience, giving you a variety of places to eat and plenty of excuses to have a night out. You'll need to do some local research to find the more unique places. The <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/restaurant-finder/id324540243?mt=8">Restaurant Finder app</a> will allow you to search areas ahead of time.</p> <h2>5. The &quot;Tourism Factor&quot;</h2> <p>A lot of places that are retiree friendly (take <a href="http://www.thevillages.com/">The Villages</a> in Florida for example) are also active tourist destinations. While some people are attracted to that atmosphere, others prefer to avoid it.</p> <h2>6. Projected Town Growth</h2> <p>Small towns can grow quickly these days as communities that were once little more than a road and woods have become busy streets lined with businesses. If this is something you want to avoid, it can be tough to predict, though targeting more rural areas that are a sizeable distance from bigger cities is a good way to start. You can also do some research on sites like Forbes to get a feel for projected <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/joelkotkin/2013/09/04/a-map-of-americas-future-where-growth-will-be-over-the-next-decade/">population growth and development</a> over the next few years.</p> <h2>7. Agriculture</h2> <p>Farmer's markets and access to fresh food are good for your health and offer a small town sense of community. Some places are known for their agricultural prowess, so perhaps they should be on your short list.</p> <h2>8. Traffic</h2> <p>You've spent your entire life dealing with an awful commute, so do you really want it to continue when you retire? The best way to know for sure is by visiting a place during the busy driving times (Friday night, Saturday, holiday weekends), and by simple word of mouth.</p> <h2>9. Weather</h2> <p>With extra time to get out and do some sightseeing you wouldn't want those activities being constantly hampered by extreme temperatures or bad weather. Consider places with more yearly warm weather or a more moderate climate.</p> <h2>10. Availability of Part-Time Work</h2> <p>An increasing number of retirees are opting to continue working in a part time job. This is often to continue in a profession, put in the time, or to supplement retirement savings. Whatever your reasoning, if you plan to work part time it may have a big impact on where you retire.</p> <h2>A Comprehensive Approach</h2> <p>It's important to take your time when you're choosing a retirement location and to be sure you've got a list of considerations that encompasses everything that's going to impact your lifestyle as a retiree; In other words, a comprehensive approach.</p> <p>Family, health and finances are certainly the core issues, but don't dismiss your own preferences and what your day-to-day life is going to look like. Those things will matter, so take the time to get them right.</p> <p><em>Did you retire to a different area? What factors played a role in the decision-making process? If you're currently weighing your options, what factors are you considering? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-unexpected-things-you-should-consider-when-picking-where-you-retire">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-tax-moves-you-need-to-make-right-now">6 Tax Moves You Need to Make Right Now</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/if-you-want-your-401k-to-grow-stop-doing-these-6-things">If You Want Your 401K to Grow, Stop Doing These 6 Things</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-worst-states-for-retirees">The 10 Worst States for Retirees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-tell-if-your-401k-is-a-good-or-a-bad-one">How to Tell if Your 401K Is a Good or a Bad One</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-poor-health-kill-your-retirement-fund">Don&#039;t Let Poor Health Kill Your Retirement Fund</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement city life retirement retirement community taxes Fri, 25 Jul 2014 13:00:02 +0000 Mikey Rox 1167640 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Places It Pays to Relocate To http://www.wisebread.com/6-places-it-pays-to-relocate-to <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-places-it-pays-to-relocate-to" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/2547556622_a81c9d9f8a_o.jpg" alt="Empty moving van at dusk." title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Across the country, there are a lot of cities (and states) that want you to move there for one reason or another. Some of the cities want you to move to some of the more &ldquo;affected&rdquo; places &mdash; regions riddled with bad reputations and high crime rates. This isn&rsquo;t because the city doesn&rsquo;t care about you and your safety; they&rsquo;re looking for a way revitalize formerly thriving neighborhoods. Some want you to move closer to downtown (if you're already working and living there). And there are some that are just really, really small and want new blood (don't worry; <a href="http://trueblood.wikia.com/wiki/Bon_Temps,_Louisiana">Bon Temps</a> is not on this list).</p> <p>Check out the list below, and maybe you&rsquo;ll find a new place to live and earn some extra money, too. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-safest-cities-in-america-from-natural-disasters">Natural Disasters: 10 Safest Cities in&nbsp;America</a>)</p> <h2>1. Niagara Falls, New York</h2> <p>I&rsquo;m sure you&rsquo;ve seen the recent headlines: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/13/niagara-falls-to-pay-student-debt_n_1594040.html?utm_hp_ref=college">Niagara Falls wants to pay off your student loan debt</a>. The city is looking for some fresh blood to move to town and take advantage of all they have to offer. They want you so bad, in fact, they're willing to pay you $3,500 per year for up to two years (if you've graduated in the past two years), with all money to be used toward <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-ways-to-pay-back-student-loans-faster">paying off student loan debt</a>. Check out the program, and if you think you stand a chance, apply!</p> <h2>2. Rural Kansas</h2> <p>Although not a specific city per se, most of rural Kansas offers former students <a href="http://kansascommerce.com/index.aspx?nid=320">a similar program</a> to Niagara Falls&rsquo; student loan debt program. They also offer tax waivers to new residents. To be eligible, you must live in a &ldquo;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.kansascommerce.com/index.aspx?NID=385">Rural Opportunity Zone</a>&rdquo; (there are about 50 counties to choose from). For students, you must establish residency after July 1, 2011 and have an associate's, bachelor's, or post-graduate degree. You could receive up to $15,000 in student loan repayments. The requirements for tax waivers are an established residency after July 1, 2011, having lived outside of Kansas for five or more years, and having earned less than $10,000 in Kansas Source Income in each of the five years leading up to establishing residency.</p> <h2>3. Milnor, North Dakota</h2> <p>OK, some of my research turned up some weird results. For instance, <a href="http://www.milnornd.com/incentives_21.html">Milnor, North Dakota</a>, a sprightly town of 700 people, wants a few more people to add to their welcome sign. This town offers some interesting deals (if you&rsquo;re looking for that small town approach, of course): $500 toward the new construction cost of installing sewer and water lines; free minimum on water, garbage, sewer, and vector control for two years; an individual or family swimming pool pass; golf membership; and a school activities pass for one year.</p> <h2>4. Detroit, Michigan</h2> <p>Detroit has a bad reputation. I mean, it is widely regarded as one of the most dangerous cities in the country and the poster child for the decline of American manufacturing... but it has some positives. After all, it&rsquo;s where the auto industry thrives still, the Detroit Tigers were just in the World Series (although they lost rather quickly), and a ton of amazing musicians are either from there or got their start there. And the incentives to move there are pretty great, too. If you work in Southeast Michigan for one of <a target="_blank" href="http://www.downtowndetroit.org/why-downtown/live-downtown-program/">five companies</a>, the city wants to offer you some incentives for either <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-you-should-and-shouldnt-rent">renting or owning</a> downtown, from forgivable mortgages to funding for the first and second year&rsquo;s rent. There is a similar program for one of three companies in <a href="http://www.livemidtown.org/">midtown</a>.</p> <h2>5. Alaska</h2> <p>So it&rsquo;s a state, not a city, but you can move pretty much anywhere in Alaska and get paid by the government. However, you have to wait around a year in Alaska to get the check. This particular program is called the <a target="_blank" href="http://pfd.alaska.gov/">Permanent Fund Dividend</a>. To be eligible for the PFD, you must be a resident of Alaska for a full calendar year, have the intent to remain an Alaskan resident indefinitely, not be a felon, and <a href="http://pfd.alaska.gov/Eligibility/EligibilityRequirements">a few other things</a>. And I&rsquo;m sure some of you are hesitant, because Alaska is so darn far away, but I&rsquo;ll tell you &mdash; I&rsquo;ve been there, and it&rsquo;s a lovely state filled with lovely people. I almost moved there myself. Go for it.</p> <h2>6. Chattanooga, Tennessee</h2> <p>Last but not least, Chattanooga is offering geeks the chance to relocate to a city known for its outdoor activities, and of course, the iconic song by the Glenn Miller band. The initiative, called the &ldquo;<a target="_blank" href="http://thegigcity.com/geekmove">Geek Move</a>,&rdquo; is targeted toward developers and system administrators who move to Chattanooga and offers a $10,000 forgivable second mortgage and $1,250 for relocation expenses. There is a similar program for police officers to move into certain areas, called the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.cneinc.org/programs-and-services/home-purchase/police-fund/">Police Fund</a>.</p> <p><em>These are just some of the great places to live throughout the country, what does your town offer?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jennifer-holder">Jennifer Holder</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-places-it-pays-to-relocate-to">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/moving-dont-skimp-on-these-critical-expenses">Moving? Don&#039;t Skimp on These Critical Expenses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-cities-for-starting-over">The 5 Best Cities for Starting Over</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/self-employed-heres-how-to-get-your-apartment-application-approved">Self-Employed? Here&#039;s How to Get Your Apartment Application Approved</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-you-should-always-hire-a-moving-company">6 Reasons You Should Always Hire a Moving Company</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-tourist-towns-that-are-actually-great-to-live-in">6 &quot;Tourist Towns&quot; That Are Actually Great to Live In</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Real Estate and Housing city life moving relocation Wed, 21 Nov 2012 11:00:36 +0000 Jennifer Holder 955476 at http://www.wisebread.com City Shopping: Finding Your New Frugal Home http://www.wisebread.com/city-shopping-finding-your-new-frugal-home <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/city-shopping-finding-your-new-frugal-home" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/2236929389_14e65a75e2_z.jpg" alt="looking at a map" title="looking at a map" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Living frugally means more than paying attention to the small details of our financial lives. Sometimes the broad brushstrokes we make can affect our lifestyles more than anything else. People seldom talk about how the place we choose to live can add to &mdash; or detract from &mdash; our frugal goals. Besides the obvious factors like job opportunities, proximity to family, and property prices, what are some other things we should consider when exploring cities and deciding where to make a new frugal home? (See also:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/live-where-its-cheap">Live Where It's Cheap</a>)</p> <h2>Cost of Living</h2> <p>Typically, when we think of cost of living, we look at things like the prices of property, food, and education. But some other costs have a way of sneaking up on you.</p> <p><strong>Property Tax/County Tax</strong></p> <p>When I moved from Chicago to Portland, Oregon I didn&rsquo;t realize there was a temporary county tax in place. Though it only lasted a few years, I hadn&rsquo;t budgeted for it, and it was an unpleasant surprise. Research property tax rates and special taxes imposed by the country that might affect your bottom-line.</p> <p><strong>Climate/Weather</strong></p> <p>Harsh winters and brutal summers can add up to high energy bills. Consider how typical weather patterns year-round will affect your budget &mdash; especially if you&rsquo;re moving from a temperate climate to one with bigger seasonal extremes.</p> <p><strong>Transit Options</strong></p> <p>Transportation costs can be a budget-buster. Communities without bike lanes, a well-organized mass transit system, or pedestrian-friendly streets mean you&rsquo;ll be depending on your car almost exclusively. Don&rsquo;t forget to look at airport options for longer trips too. Is there a regional hub nearby? The size of the airport often dictates what airlines service the area, how often flights leave, and how expensive tickets will be.</p> <h2>Community</h2> <p>A lively and engaged community can be a boon to savers. Strong communities mean neighbors help neighbors and interact with each other through a wide range of social and commercial activities.</p> <p><strong>Like-Minded Neighbors</strong></p> <p>Every town is different. Though it might be hard at first, try to get a read on the local vibe. Do neighbors seem to congregate together or go solo? Are there clubs, coffee shops, or organizations where people connect with each other to explore interests or network professionally? A strong community can help frugal folks meet, encourage each other, and exchange ideas.</p> <p><strong>Resale Environment</strong></p> <p>Thrift stores, charities, yard sales, and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-not-to-buy-at-a-farmers-market">farmers markets</a> help make up the fabric of a local community. Do a bit of exploring and find out if your new town has any thrift stores, encourages yard sales, or hosts farmers markets. All are great venues for finding bargains or making a few bucks on the side.</p> <h2>Entertainment/Activities</h2> <p>Well-designed communities don't forget about play. Opportunities to enjoy nature, explore, meet your neighbors, and be engaged culturally are important parts of a well-rounded frugal life.</p> <p><strong>Colleges and Universities</strong></p> <p>The presence of colleges or universities may be the single biggest clue about what frugal resources can be found in a community. Colleges host symposiums, lectures, plays, debates, concerts, and authors from around the world. These cultural events are often free for students and open to the broader community for a nominal fee. Besides these formal events, college campuses bring energy and liveliness to a town that&rsquo;s hard to match in any other way.</p> <p><strong>Parks and Natural Attractions</strong></p> <p>Sure, sometimes it&rsquo;s great to splurge on a movie. But communities that lack public spaces, parks, hiking trails, or natural attractions make movies the only option. Explore what <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/50-ways-to-have-free-outdoor-fun">destinations or activities you can find that are nearby and free</a>.</p> <p>Choosing a new place to call home is a big decision. How a city or town is designed to support a thrifty lifestyle is just one piece of a much bigger puzzle. But many of the qualities outlined above go far beyond simple frugality; they&rsquo;re also important parts of rich civic life &mdash; and that&rsquo;s hard to put price on.</p> <p><em>Have you made a major move recently? How has your new town helped or hurt your frugal pursuits? Were there any pleasant surprises that ended up saving you some serious cash?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/city-shopping-finding-your-new-frugal-home">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-items-city-dwelling-dudes-should-keep-in-their-bags">9 Items City-Dwelling Dudes Should Keep in Their Bags</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-places-it-pays-to-relocate-to">6 Places It Pays to Relocate To</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-practically-free-ways-to-make-new-friends">10 Fun, Practically Free Ways to Make New Friends</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-live-in-a-big-city-on-a-small-town-budget">How to Live in a Big City on a Small-Town Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/who-moved-my-stuff-0">Who Moved My Stuff?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Lifestyle city life moving new homes small town Tue, 22 May 2012 09:36:36 +0000 Kentin Waits 929268 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Items City-Dwelling Dudes Should Keep in Their Bags http://www.wisebread.com/9-items-city-dwelling-dudes-should-keep-in-their-bags <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-items-city-dwelling-dudes-should-keep-in-their-bags" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mikey_man_bag.jpg" alt="Man wearing a bag" title="Man wearing a bag" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Every urban guy who counts on public transportation &mdash; and his own two feet &mdash; to get from point A to B knows that a good satchel is essential.</p> <p>Granted, carrying that bag around day in and day out can be a nuisance, but it&rsquo;s required, if only because we no longer have the luxury of junking up the back seat of our SUVs like our suburban buddies.</p> <p>Which type of bag you choose &mdash; backpack, one-shoulder, murse &mdash; is up to you, but the contents should remain the same: practical, no-nonsense items that can stop the bleeding, feed the beast, and help you avoid the walk of shame. Even in the rain.</p> <h3>Umbrella</h3> <p>I&rsquo;ve been caught in a storm plenty of times, and it never fails that I forgot my umbrella. Frankly, that's the last thing I think to bring along when I&rsquo;m cross-checking my bag. Having learned my lesson again and again, now I keep a small pocket umbrella tucked away in the bottom of my attaché. Better safe than soggy.</p> <h3>Dining/Activity Coupons</h3> <p>This might sound silly to some, but I keep a whole slew of <a href="http://www.restaurant.com">Restaurant.com</a> gift certificates and clipped coupons from the <a href="http://www.entertainment.com/discount/home.shtml">Entertainment Book</a>&nbsp;on hand. It&rsquo;s very convenient to choose a place to eat or relax after a long day of traveling the city when there&rsquo;s 50% off or buy one, get one free at my fingertips.</p> <h3>Snacks (Non-Chocolate, Non-Crushable)</h3> <p>You&rsquo;ll save money if you pack your own snacks, because you won&rsquo;t be tempted to indulge as you pass the newsstands or convenience stores on every corner. A dollar here and a dollar there really adds up. Hard and gummy candies and other sturdy snacks (they should be able to withstand the wear and tear of travel) are also great while you&rsquo;re waiting, like in the doctor&rsquo;s office or, say, when the subway shuts down and you&rsquo;re trapped for a few hours. It happens &mdash; and you&rsquo;ll never be hungrier than in those ostensibly life-or-death first moments.</p> <h3>Pens/Pencils</h3> <p>Seems obvious, right? It is. Which might be why I pull my hair out every time I can&rsquo;t find one. The worst is when I get to the ATM to make a deposit and all the chained-to-the-desk pens are missing. Now I store five or six at a time in my bag. Gotta put that money in the bank, folks.</p> <h3>Clean Underwear</h3> <p>Two reasons: A) after the gym, and B) the morning after. We never seem to think those situations through, do we?</p> <h3>Business Cards</h3> <p>An extra stash means that you won&rsquo;t miss out on important opportunities, potential new clients, and impressing that hot guy or girl you&rsquo;ve got your eye on at the end of the bar. Think about it this way, too: You come across rather unprofessional when someone asks for a card and you can&rsquo;t come up with one. Makes you look like an amateur in a room full of power players.</p> <h3>Antibacterial Wipes</h3> <p>Roll your eyes all you want, but I promise you this is the single most important part of a properly packed carryall. I use mine after meals, when I&rsquo;m sweaty, and to sanitize after a subway ride, among other things; they instantly make me feel fresh and clean when no restroom is available to wash up. I buy mine in packs of five 48-count cylinders for about $10 at my local wholesale club, but space-saving options (smaller packs) are available at your nearest convenience or grocery store.</p> <h3>First-Aid Supplies</h3> <p>You&rsquo;d be surprised how many situations require rubber gloves and Band-Aids. I&rsquo;ve been in circumstances where people are bleeding, and I often need adhesive bandages to relieve the chafing that the backs of my shoes cause when I don&rsquo;t wear socks. It&rsquo;s just good form to be prepared. Your first-aid kit doesn&rsquo;t have to take up a lot of space, either. Just throw a few necessities in a Ziploc bag and tuck it away. Hopefully you&rsquo;ll never need it, but if you do, it&rsquo;ll save the day.</p> <h3>Extra Phone Charger</h3> <p>My phone dies at the most inopportune times &mdash; like right when I&rsquo;m supposed to meet my husband at a crowded place &mdash; so I&rsquo;m sure yours does, too. It&rsquo;s the one thing that throws me into a panic because I don&rsquo;t want people to think I stood them up, or worse, that something has happened to me. Now I keep an extra USB charger in my bag, so I can plug in wherever I&rsquo;m at, and I carry a rechargeable battery to juice up even quicker. Expect your friends to pat you on the back too when you save their hides from lack of power. What a guy.</p> <p><em>What item(s) do you keep in your bag at all times &mdash; and why? Let me know in the comments section.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-items-city-dwelling-dudes-should-keep-in-their-bags">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-rid-of-your-junk">How to Get Rid of Your Junk</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-easy-way-to-cure-chronic-procrastination-you-should-try-now">The Easy Way to Cure Chronic Procrastination You Should Try Now</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-sell-your-crap-a-book-review-and-tips">How to Sell Your Crap: A Book Review and Tips</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/city-shopping-finding-your-new-frugal-home">City Shopping: Finding Your New Frugal Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-live-in-a-big-city-on-a-small-town-budget">How to Live in a Big City on a Small-Town Budget</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Lifestyle Organization bags city life preparedness Mon, 24 Jan 2011 00:01:05 +0000 Mikey Rox 470797 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Live in a Big City on a Small-Town Budget http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-live-in-a-big-city-on-a-small-town-budget <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-live-in-a-big-city-on-a-small-town-budget" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/2143600908_65f05aaebd_z.jpg" alt="Times Square" title="Times Square" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="186" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Many young professionals and recent college grads dream of moving to the big city. Big cities offer excitement, culture, and activities that are hard to match in smaller locales. Plus, there are oodles of other young people to meet for the single set. But big cities are also known for their high cost of living, and if you don't have an equally high salary (something that is hard to come by in the current economy), you may have a hard time living your dreams. However, even with higher prices, you can get by in a big city with these helpful tips:</p> <h3>Choose your city wisely</h3> <p>You may dream of New York, L.A., or San Francisco, but there are many other big cities that offer the culture and entertainment benefits of these metropolises for less &mdash; especially if you are willing to venture away from the coasts. Chicago is a great example. As the third-largest city in America, it offers the amenities of its rivals at a fraction of the living expenses. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/city-shopping-finding-your-new-frugal-home" title="City Shopping: Finding Your New Frugal Home">City Shopping: Finding Your New Frugal Home</a>)</p> <h3>Get a roommate (or two or three)</h3> <p>You&rsquo;ll save a ton on rent and utilities. Also, 2+ bedroom rentals are much less in demand in many big cities, since young singles often opt for their own places. You&rsquo;ll get a bigger, nicer place and for much less. Plus, it can be fun to hang out with <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-have-a-good-roommate-relationship" title="How to Have a Good Roommate Relationship">roommates</a> &mdash; just make sure you live with like-minded people.</p> <h3>Pick an inexpensive neighborhood</h3> <p>Some neighborhoods that are a bit off the beaten path can be great places to live and save. Look for where the artistic/creative set is flocking to, and follow. However, make sure you feel safe in the neighborhood. You don&rsquo;t want to end up somewhere you are afraid to leave your apartment.</p> <h3>Ditch the car</h3> <p>You don't need a car in most cities. Use public transit, bike, or walk. If you have to have a car, remember to get something older, since you will likely need to park on the street, and dents and scratches are common. Or, look into car share services like <a href="http://www.anrdoezrs.net/click-2822544-11220075">ZipCar</a> for short trips and shopping.</p> <h3>Save on restaurants and events</h3> <p>Restaurants and events are one of the big appeals of living in a large city, and while budgeting is great, sometimes you need to splurge. Save on dinners out by using sites like <a href="http://www.restaurant.com/">Restaurant.com</a> or <a href="http://www.dpbolvw.net/click-2822544-10817658">Groupon</a> to buy gift certificates. Also, consider BYOBs that allow you to bring your own drinks and save. Groupon and <a href="http://www.livingsocial.com/">Living Social</a> can also be great places to save on tickets to shows and sporting events or other activities like yoga and rock climbing.</p> <h3>Share the groceries</h3> <p>Consider ethnic stands for buying produce and organize trips to the &quot;burbs&quot; to stock up on non-perishables with your friends. Split the cost of a warehouse membership, buy in bulk, and divide essentials to help save.</p> <h3>Host your own parties and get-togethers</h3> <p>Stay away from expensive social gatherings at bars and restaurants by hosting your own parties and get-togethers. Ask friends to bring their own refreshments or food. Plus, you&rsquo;ll be known as a planner/connector, a great way to boost your social life.</p> <h3>Shop at thrift stores</h3> <p>This is a no-brainer, but a lot of big cities have great thrift stores where you can find clothes, appliances, and furniture. With large populations, these stores frequently get new items. Plus, the retro look is in, and you'll look cool in your young hipster neighborhood.</p> <h3>Forget the gym</h3> <p>Big city gyms can be expensive. Take advantage of city parks and limited urban sprawl. Walking or biking to work and errands can keep you in as good shape as a gym. Or check out the Y, which offers discounted memberships, and consider splitting a membership with a roommate or significant other.</p> <h3>Use the library</h3> <p>Most big cities have extensive library networks to rent movies, books, and even music. They also generally offer free Wi-Fi to help you save on Internet.</p> <p>These are just some ways to help you fulfill your dreams of the bright lights in the big city without bankrupting your future. Saving money is important, but so is living your life.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This is a guest post by Jesse Lynch. Jesse is a Chicago-based marketing professional and freelance writer. When not plotting ways to save money, he writes for his food blog <a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.fastfoodreviewed.com&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNHBAUBShaX79wIma26u8XecRzQrWA">Fast Food Reviewed</a> and his <a href="http://www.jessemlynch.com/">personal blog</a>. Read more by Jesse:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.ehow.com/how_5716102_advertising.html">How to Get Into Advertising</a></li> <li><a href="http://fastfoodreviewed.com/in-n-out-vs-five-guys/">East Coast vs. West Coast Burger Throw Down. In-N-Out Burger vs. Five Guys Burgers and Fries</a></li> <li><a href="http://fastfoodreviewed.com/burger-wars-burger-kings-1-double-cheese-burger-vs-mcdonalds-mcdouble-throw-down/">Burger Wars! Burger King&rsquo;s $1 Double Cheeseburger vs. McDonald&rsquo;s McDouble Throw Down</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jesse-lynch">Jesse Lynch</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-live-in-a-big-city-on-a-small-town-budget">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-free-accommodations-and-paid-jobs-on-boats">How to Get Free Accommodations (and Paid Jobs) on Boats</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-items-city-dwelling-dudes-should-keep-in-their-bags">9 Items City-Dwelling Dudes Should Keep in Their Bags</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-do-the-chinese-spend-money-on">What Do the Chinese Spend Money On?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-create-a-speculative-bubble-and-profit">How to create a speculative bubble and profit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-not-buy-something-just-because-you-can-afford-it">Do not buy something just because you can afford it</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Lifestyle car sharing city life housing Thu, 04 Nov 2010 14:00:08 +0000 Jesse Lynch 280245 at http://www.wisebread.com