Family https://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4566/0 en-US How to Prepare for Unpaid Maternity Leave https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-for-unpaid-maternity-leave <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-prepare-for-unpaid-maternity-leave" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mother_kissing_her_child.jpg" alt="Mother kissing her child" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Back in 2008, when my husband and I were newlyweds just starting to think about having children, I was still working as a high school English teacher. Another teacher in my department had a baby that year, and I was horrified to discover that our school district did not offer paid maternity leave. Instead, my friend had to save up all her sick days and personal days to equal the amount of time she wanted to take off.</p> <p>Fast forward to 2010, when I was pregnant with our first child. I found it was exceedingly difficult to save up sick time and personal time, what with all of the prenatal appointments I needed to go to, only some of which I was able to schedule for after school.</p> <p>Though it's been eight years since I had my first baby, the options available for paid maternity leave are no better than they were a decade ago. Women are still stuck either returning to work long before they have fully physically recovered, or they must take unpaid time off after their babies are born.</p> <p>While it's a crying shame that new parents are in this tough situation in the United States, it's still on individual mothers to figure out a way to pay for maternity leave. Here is what you need to know about preparing for unpaid maternity leave. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-financial-reasons-paid-parental-leave-is-essential-for-moms-and-dads?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Financial Reasons Paid Parental Leave Is Essential for Moms and Dads</a>)</p> <h2>Understanding FMLA</h2> <p>The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 offers new parents (mothers and fathers) up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave to care for a newborn or newly adopted child. FMLA also allows caregivers to take the same amount of time off to help out with aging parents or other family members with a medical need.</p> <p>What this law does is ensure that your job or an equivalent job will be held for you during your time away to care for a new baby. However, ensuring that you will not be fired for taking maternity leave is the barest minimum of job protection &mdash; and fewer people are covered by FMLA than you might realize.</p> <p>Workers only qualify for FMLA leave if they have worked for the company for more than 12 months, have logged at least 1,250 hours in the past year, and are employed at a location where their company has 50 or more staffers within 75 miles. Only 60 percent of employees meet the criteria and eligibility for leave under FMLA regulations.</p> <p>Expecting mothers need to make sure they understand whether or not they can even take FMLA leave based on these criteria. Your human resources department can help you determine whether or not your leave will be covered by FMLA.</p> <p>Even if you are not covered by FMLA, there is no need to panic. Many employers will be happy to let you take the time you need and hold your job for you, even if you are not covered by FMLA. Talk with your employer so you know what to expect. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-29-companies-with-the-best-maternity-benefits?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 29 Companies With the Best Maternity Benefits</a>)</p> <h2>Paying for maternity leave</h2> <p>Few people can afford to take 12 weeks off work without pay, so planning ahead for an extended leave can mean the difference between having time to bond with your baby and having to get back to work before you're ready. Here are a few ways you can afford your maternity leave. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moves-to-make-when-you-find-out-youre-pregnant?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Money Moves to Make When You Find Out You're Pregnant</a>)</p> <h3>1. Short-term disability insurance</h3> <p>If you know that you plan to get pregnant within the next couple of years, short-term disability insurance can provide you with the financial cushion you need during your maternity leave. Pregnancy and postpartum recovery are common &quot;disabilities&quot; that can be covered by such insurance. Of course, the catch with this kind of insurance is the fact that you have to sign up for it before you get pregnant, which can make this option a non-starter for anyone who has an unplanned pregnancy.</p> <p>If you are able to take advantage of short-term disability insurance, you can typically expect your disability payments to begin as of the day you deliver, although you may have to wait for a short period of time (known as the elimination period) before receiving payments. The insurance will generally cover between six and eight weeks of pay at some portion of your regular salary.</p> <p>You will have to pay the premiums for your short-term disability policy, so factor that in to your pre-baby budget.</p> <h3>2. Save up your paid time off</h3> <p>If your employer allows you to roll over sick days, personal days, and vacation days from one year to the next, saving up your paid time off can be one of the best ways to ensure that you keep your regular paycheck coming while you're at home with the baby.</p> <p>For instance, if you receive 15 vacation days, five sick days, and two personal days each year, saving them up for two years can provide you with 44 paid days off &mdash; or the equivalent of nearly nine weeks.</p> <p>One important caveat to this plan is the fact that you will want to save some sick days or vacation days for after the baby arrives. There will be times when your little one is too sick to go to day care, and you will have to use a sick day or take an unpaid day off to stay home with baby.</p> <h3>3. Take as much overtime as you can</h3> <p>If your employer offers overtime, you can try to volunteer for as much as you can while you're preparing for the baby. You can either bank the extra money in a savings account you'll live off while you are on maternity leave, or you can ask to use the overtime as flex time, so that your extra hours now will give you paid time off later.</p> <h3>4. Reduce your retirement contributions</h3> <p>Though saving money for retirement is very important, it's better to reduce (or eliminate) your retirement contributions in order to pay for your maternity leave than tap your retirement accounts if you run out of money. For this strategy, either reduce or eliminate the amount of money you send to your retirement fund each paycheck, and instead put that money aside in a savings account to use for living expenses while you are on leave. Once you get back to work, however, make sure you put your retirement contributions back to their previous level. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-its-okay-to-delay-retirement-savings?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Times It's Okay to Delay Retirement Savings</a>)</p> <h3>5. Take out a small personal loan</h3> <p>If you have good credit and feel comfortable taking on a little more debt, taking out a personal loan could be a way to bridge the income gap while you are on maternity leave. Such a loan could replace your income while you are on leave, and you could plan to repay the loan once you have returned to work.</p> <p>This is a potentially risky option, however, if there is any possibility your employer will not hold your job for you while you are on leave. In addition, make sure the repayment plan is one you can easily afford once you are back to work. You would hate to have the stress of paying off your loan on top of the other stresses of new parenthood. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-need-to-know-before-taking-out-a-personal-loan?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Things You Need to Know Before Taking Out a Personal Loan</a>)</p> <h2>Making time for maternal bonding</h2> <p>Until our society as a whole decides to provide maternity leave across the board, it will be up to individual families to find the money to afford time off work for recovery and bonding. Though it can be an uphill battle to figure out how to afford your maternity leave, it is possible for new moms to find the money they need to afford their leave.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-prepare-for-unpaid-maternity-leave&amp;media=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Prepare%2520for%2520Unpaid%2520Maternity%2520Leave.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Prepare%20for%20Unpaid%20Maternity%20Leave"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Prepare%20for%20Unpaid%20Maternity%20Leave.jpg" alt="How to Prepare for Unpaid Maternity Leave" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-for-unpaid-maternity-leave">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-essential-money-moves-for-new-parents">7 Essential Money Moves for New Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/can-you-afford-to-have-a-baby">Can You Afford to Have a Baby?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-money-lessons-kids-can-learn-from-the-tooth-fairy">7 Money Lessons Kids Can Learn From the Tooth Fairy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/dont-start-a-family-before-reaching-these-5-money-goals">Don&#039;t Start a Family Before Reaching These 5 Money Goals</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family Family and Medical Leave Act fmla maternity leave new baby new parents paid time off parenthood pregnancy saving money Tue, 10 Jul 2018 08:00:10 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 2153221 at https://www.wisebread.com 9 Essential Personal Finance Skills to Teach Your Kid Before They Move Out https://www.wisebread.com/9-essential-personal-finance-skills-to-teach-your-kid-before-they-move-out <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-essential-personal-finance-skills-to-teach-your-kid-before-they-move-out" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mother_and_daughter_embracing_while_sitting_on_a_bench.jpg" alt="Mother and daughter embracing while sitting on a bench" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your child is on the verge of moving out and living on their own. Are they prepared?</p> <p>Arming them with the right personal finance knowledge will give them a strong foundation to go and achieve many of their life goals. If their understanding of personal finance is lacking, they could begin their independent life on the wrong foot (and they may even come back home).</p> <p>Consider these ways that you can help your child build a base of financial knowledge before they move out.</p> <h2>1. Show them how to budget</h2> <p>Perhaps the most important personal finance skill is consistently spending <em>less </em>than you earn. There are a million different ways to budget, and whatever works for you may not work for your child. But encourage them to develop a system to track and categorize spending and then compare those expenses to their income. Of course they'll need to account for housing, food, and utilities but also let them know it's OK to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-need-fun-money-in-your-budget?ref=internal" target="_blank">include &quot;fun money&quot; in their budget</a>. It will help them stay motivated to stick to their budget. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-kid-build-their-first-budget?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Help Your Kid Build Their First Budget</a>)</p> <h2>2. Teach them how retirement plans work</h2> <p>If your child is moving out, they likely have some earned income. That means they can start contributing to a Roth individual retirement account. They may scoff at the notion of saving for retirement so early, but if you help them open a Roth IRA and demonstrate how much money they can accrue over time, they'll get on board. Urge them to save as much as they can each month, invest in simple things like index funds, and simply watch their account balance grow over time through compounding.</p> <p>If they have a 401(k) plan through an employer, take time to review the plan document with them and encourage them to contribute as much as they can. Be sure to explain the advantages of getting a company match on contributions, if one is offered. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-basic-questions-about-retirement-saving-everyone-should-ask?ref=seealso" target="_blank">11 Basic Questions About Retirement Saving Everyone Should Ask</a>)</p> <h2>3. Explain bank interest rates</h2> <p>Chances are, your child already has a savings account. But it's still helpful to explain that they don't necessarily need to put their money in the first bank they see. Show them how interest rates can vary, and that it's OK to shop around for the best rates so they can earn a little extra money. Explain terms like APR and APY, and the factors that impact whether rates go up or down.</p> <p>Also outline the pros and cons of placing money in certificates of deposit. These days, it's also helpful to explain that while interest rates are rising, they're still quite low, and that it might make sense to invest some funds in ways that generate a higher return than savings account interest. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-places-to-keep-your-money-safe-and-growing?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Places to Keep Your Money Safe &mdash; And Growing</a>)</p> <h2>4. Tell them about bank fees</h2> <p>Once your child understands how bank interest rates work, they'll need to know about the tendency banks have to charge fees to account holders. These fees could be for anything from low balances to the use of paper checks. Tell your child how they can avoid these fees by researching the best bank accounts and reading the fine print. Let your kids know that if a bank is charging too many fees, it's OK to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-signs-its-time-to-find-a-new-bank?ref=internal" target="_blank">switch to another bank</a> that doesn't. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-paying-these-6-unfair-banking-fees?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Paying These 6 Unfair Banking Fees?</a>)</p> <h2>5. Teach them the pros and cons of credit cards</h2> <p>Credit cards can help a person establish credit, and that's important when you are starting out. And some credit cards offer nice benefits, such as cash back on purchases or travel rewards miles.</p> <p>You can help your kid apply for a card, but it should come with a series of warnings. Young people must know that credit card balances should be paid off in full each month whenever possible. Show your child that credit card interest rates can be exorbitant, and that high balances can lead to a debt spiral from which they may never escape. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-your-first-credit-card-and-build-credit?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Get Your First Credit Card and Build Credit</a>)</p> <h2>6. Outline the pain of debt</h2> <p>Arguably the most important lesson you can teach your children before they leave the nest is that debt is not a good thing. Take time to explain the basics of borrowing so they understand how expenses can continue to increase if debt is not paid off. Show them calculations with interest rates for credit cards, auto loans, student loans, personal loans, and mortgages. Give them an understanding of debt-to-income ratios, and what that means in the context of their financial well-being. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-common-causes-of-debt-and-how-to-avoid-them?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Common Causes of Debt &mdash; And How to Avoid Them</a>)</p> <h2>7. Explain the concept of net worth</h2> <p>When your child leaves home, they may be focused on finding a job that pays a high income. That's fine, but it's important for them to understand that income alone is not what generates financial security. It's more crucial to acquire assets that increase in value, while eschewing things that will decrease in value or be a drain on your finances.</p> <p>This means saving money and investing it. It means avoiding debt. It means purchasing a home instead of renting, if possible. Your net worth &mdash; that is, the total value of your assets minus your debts &mdash; is the true indicator of your financial well-being. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-moves-to-make-if-your-net-worth-is-negative?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Money Moves to Make If Your Net Worth Is Negative</a>)</p> <h2>8. Urge them to shop for value</h2> <p>Saving money isn't always about spending as little as possible. It's also about spending your money wisely and getting the most bang for your buck. For example, if your child needs to purchase a refrigerator for their apartment, convey to them that they should seek out the best quality model at a price that fits their budget.</p> <p>Shopping for value involves understanding quality and longevity of products, and knowing what features matter and which don't. It also involves doing extensive research of products and prices before you buy. Shopping for value is a skill that can be learned, and one that could save your child a considerable amount of money over time. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-shop-with-purpose-and-save-more-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Shop With Purpose &mdash; And Save More Money</a>)</p> <h2>9. Teach them basic car maintenance</h2> <p>You don't need to teach your child how to replace a catalytic converter, but it helps if they have a decent foundation of car knowledge. Teach them how to put air in a tire and change the tire. Demonstrate how to swap out a headlight bulb and replace a hubcap. Urge them to read the car's manual and learn what all of those warning lights mean. Get them in the habit of changing the oil every few thousand miles.</p> <p>Finally, teach them how to research the cost of car repairs, so they don't get ripped off at the mechanic. Your child won't be able to avoid car repair expenses, but they'll know enough to avoid getting stranded on the side of the road. Moreover, these basic maintenance efforts could help prevent the need for a major repair later. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bookmark-this-save-money-with-an-easy-to-follow-car-maintenance-checklist?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Bookmark This: Save Money With an Easy to Follow Car Maintenance Checklist</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-essential-personal-finance-skills-to-teach-your-kid-before-they-move-out&amp;media=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520Essential%2520Personal%2520Finance%2520Skills%2520to%2520Teach%2520Your%2520Kid%2520Before%2520They%2520Move%2520Out.jpg&amp;description=9%20Essential%20Personal%20Finance%20Skills%20to%20Teach%20Your%20Kid%20Before%20They%20Move%20Out"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20Essential%20Personal%20Finance%20Skills%20to%20Teach%20Your%20Kid%20Before%20They%20Move%20Out.jpg" alt="9 Essential Personal Finance Skills to Teach Your Kid Before They Move Out" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/9-essential-personal-finance-skills-to-teach-your-kid-before-they-move-out">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/are-you-putting-off-these-9-adult-money-moves">Are You Putting Off These 9 Adult Money Moves?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know">9 Family Money Matters Your Kids Don&#039;t Need to Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-to-make-as-soon-as-the-kids-move-out">7 Money Moves to Make as Soon as the Kids Move Out</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-increase-your-net-worth-this-year">10 Ways to Increase Your Net Worth This Year</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family budgeting debt financial literacy interest rates investing kids moving out net worth personal finance skills retirement saving Fri, 06 Jul 2018 09:00:10 +0000 Tim Lemke 2150089 at https://www.wisebread.com 5 Smart Money Moves Your Kids Can Make Over Summer Vacation https://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-money-moves-your-kids-can-make-over-summer-vacation <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-smart-money-moves-your-kids-can-make-over-summer-vacation" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/little_girl_sitting_behind_her_lemonade_stand.jpg" alt="Little girl sitting behind her lemonade stand" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Summer vacation when you're a kid means endless days of bike riding, swimming, playing video games, and fighting over who gets the last purple Popsicle in the freezer.</p> <p>It's not nearly as idyllic for Mom and Dad. Not only do parents need to line up (and pay for) alternate child care for the kids during the summer months, but they also have to worry about Junior and Sis spending their allowances on Dilly bars and Star Wars sunglasses that break immediately, only to ask for more money to go to the movies every weekend.</p> <p>That's why summer is a perfect opportunity to teach your kids about money management. Not only will these money moves help to improve your kids' money skills, but it will also help them to retain the math and reading skills they might not otherwise be practicing while school is out.</p> <p>Here are five great money activities your kids can enjoy this summer vacation.</p> <h2>1. Lemonade stand</h2> <p>There's a reason why this classic introduction to entrepreneurship is a perennial favorite. Encouraging your kids to set up a lemonade stand gives them an opportunity to think about all the aspects of making a business successful, including venue, startup costs, pricing, advertisement, and signage.</p> <p>Your kids will learn all sorts of important lessons about economics through this summer project. For instance, they can charge a higher price for homemade lemonade made from real lemons as compared to lemonade mixed from a powder &mdash; but they have to do more work to make the more expensive product. Is the increased price worth the increased work for these budding business owners?</p> <p>In addition, your kids can learn that choosing a popular spot on a hot day will increase their sales, as opposed to setting up shop on a quiet street on a cooler day.</p> <p>The one caveat about lemonade stands is the potential legal aspect of this kind of business. There are laws in many parts of the country that prohibit these kinds of sidewalk businesses without a permit, even when such businesses are run by adorable 10-year-olds. Help your child research the local laws before she sets up shop.</p> <h2>2. Investment club</h2> <p>Have your older kids form an investment club together. This club will invest a hypothetical $1,000 in whatever stocks the kids decide on together. Encourage them to choose stocks from companies that they already have a relationship with, like McDonald's, Facebook, Disney, Coca-Cola, Nike, Apple, or Microsoft. Remind them of what Warren Buffett says: Invest in what you understand. Their understanding of these brands will make them better investors than if they try to just pick something they are unfamiliar with.</p> <p>Once they have &quot;invested&quot; their money, ask them to provide a weekly report on how their investments are doing. They will need to track the prices of their stocks and record those prices, which means they will learn how to look up stock information online. They can even make charts plotting the movement of their stock choices, so that they can have a good visualization of what their money is doing.</p> <p>This project will help to encourage them to think of investing as something that anyone can do, even a kid, and can get them excited about potentially investing some of their real allowance money rather than spending it on Legos. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-investing-lessons-you-must-teach-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Investing Lessons You Must Teach Your Kids</a>)</p> <h2>3. Grocery store math</h2> <p>When you take your child with you to the grocery store, put him in charge of keeping track of how much you have spent. For each item that you place in the cart, ask your child to write down the cost, which he will add to a running tally. Not only will this help him practice his math skills, but it will also give him an opportunity to do price comparisons, learn how pricing works for loose items like produce, and offer you a chance to talk about sales tax and how that affects your total at the cash register. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-fun-games-that-teach-your-kids-about-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Fun Games That Teach Your Kids About Money</a>)</p> <h2>4. Create a practice budget</h2> <p>One way of doing a practice budget is with a toy catalog. If you can't find one in print, check online, as many retailers upload versions of their toy catalog digitally. Tell your kids they have $50 to &quot;spend&quot; in the catalog, and let them go through the pages circling or noting what they are interested in. Then, ask them to add up the costs of all the items they circled to see if they stayed within their budget. Depending on the age of your kids, this can be a tough exercise, since they may be overwhelmed with how much they want.</p> <p>For younger kids, another practice budget exercise is to take them to a dollar store and give them $5 each to spend. While they will be able to pick out at least a few items each, they will need to do some important thinking about which things they want most. This will help them understand opportunity cost &mdash; buying one item means you have less money available to buy a different item.</p> <p>Similarly, if you have an older kid who loves video games that offer in-app purchase upgrades, ask them to list the cost of all the upgrades they want. These types of purchases tend to be low dollar amounts, but they add up quickly &mdash; and asking your kid to do the math on how much all of the character upgrades will cost can be very eye-opening. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-kid-build-their-first-budget?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Help Your Kid Build Their First Budget</a>)</p> <h2>5. Save up for a trip to a theme park</h2> <p>Going to an amusement park is a great family outing, but such day trips can be expensive. Between the price of tickets, the cost for things like ride photos and other souvenirs, extras like face painting, and the high markup on food, a family can drop quite a lot of money in a single day at a theme park.</p> <p>Have your kids plan the budget for your trip to their favorite amusement park. Ask them to research how much entrance tickets cost and if there are ways to lower those costs. For instance, there are often reduced rates for purchasing tickets online as compared to at the gate, and amusement parks will often pair up with major retailers or brands to offer promo codes to reduce rates even further.</p> <p>Let the kids know how much of the trip you will pay for, and ask them to cover any extras. For instance, you might offer to pay for half the cost of the admission, and will help them pack food for the trip. The kids will have to cover the rest of the admission price, as well as any extras or food purchased on site. This will help them figure out the best ways to budget, and determine whether having Dippin' Dots or a souvenir from the park is more important to them. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-affordable-amusement-parks-that-are-just-as-fun-as-disney?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Affordable Amusement Parks That Are Just as Fun As Disney</a>)</p> <h2>It's summertime, and the money lessons are easy</h2> <p>This summer, help your kids learn how to make responsible choices with money. These fun activities will ensure they go back to school in the fall with a clearer understanding of economics, budgeting, wants versus needs, and money management.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-smart-money-moves-your-kids-can-make-over-summer-vacation&amp;media=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Smart%2520Money%2520Moves%2520Your%2520Kids%2520Can%2520Make%2520Over%2520Summer%2520Vacation.jpg&amp;description=5%20Smart%20Money%20Moves%20Your%20Kids%20Can%20Make%20Over%20Summer%20Vacation"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Smart%20Money%20Moves%20Your%20Kids%20Can%20Make%20Over%20Summer%20Vacation.jpg" alt="5 Smart Money Moves Your Kids Can Make Over Summer Vacation" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-money-moves-your-kids-can-make-over-summer-vacation">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-13"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-money-lessons-kids-can-learn-from-the-tooth-fairy">7 Money Lessons Kids Can Learn From the Tooth Fairy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/should-you-make-your-young-kids-pay-rent">Should You Make Your Young Kids Pay &quot;Rent?&quot;</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/8-best-sites-to-help-your-kids-learn-about-money">8 Best Sites to Help Your Kids Learn About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family children investing kids lemonade stand math money lessons price comparisons summer vacation teaching Thu, 05 Jul 2018 09:00:11 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 2153116 at https://www.wisebread.com Should You Get Life Insurance for Your Kids? https://www.wisebread.com/should-you-get-life-insurance-for-your-kids <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/should-you-get-life-insurance-for-your-kids" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/happy_family_in_sunset.jpg" alt="Happy family in sunset" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>My father was a financial planner, and he got his start by selling insurance. That meant Dad had some very strong opinions about insurance in general, and life insurance in particular. He was not shy about sharing those opinions with a captive audience &mdash; aka, his daughter.</p> <p>Even though I heard Dad opine (and rant!) on any number of finance-related subjects, the viewpoint that stuck with me most was Dad's stance on life insurance for children.</p> <p>&quot;There is no reason whatsoever to ever buy such a product,&quot; he told me on more than one occasion. &quot;Life insurance is for income replacement. Policies for children are morbid.&quot;</p> <p>While part of Dad's objection to life insurance for kids stemmed from the exploitative practices you can find among disreputable insurance salespeople, he was also quick to admit that his own superstitions about tempting your children's fate added to his distaste for the products.</p> <p>Though dear old Dad was right more often than not, I have come to see much more value in children's life insurance than he did. Here are some compelling things to consider before purchasing life insurance for your child. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/term-vs-whole-life-insurance-heres-how-to-choose?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Term vs Whole Life Insurance: Here's How to Choose</a>)</p> <h2>Funeral expenses</h2> <p>The average funeral in America costs about $10,000. Financial experts (including my father) might say that parents needing to pay such expenses for a child should use their savings to do so. But considering the fact that half of all Americans couldn't come up with $400 in an emergency, the expert opinion may not match most people's financial reality.</p> <p>My dad did have an answer to this objection, however. There are many funeral homes that will offer their services free of charge for families who cannot afford the burial costs of losing a child.</p> <p>That means parents who are considering life insurance for their children just because of the potential cost of final expenses might not actually need a policy. Not only is it unlikely that you will ever need the insurance payout, since it's relatively rare for children to die, but you will likely be able to find financial help or free-of-cost services if the worst should happen.</p> <h2>Income replacement</h2> <p>Dad made it clear that he believed life insurance was for income replacement only. So unless you're raising a child star, there is no reason to purchase a policy for your kid. (And you didn't want to get Dad started on parents who pushed their kids into show business.)</p> <p>However, Dad's view didn't consider <em>whose</em> income will need to be replaced after the death of a child. The majority of children do not have an income, of course &mdash; but it's important to remember the very real cost of grief. Heartbroken parents may find themselves paralyzed by their grief and unable to work.</p> <p>Having a financial cushion can help keep a family afloat during a terrible time when work may be the last thing on anyone's mind. If you absolutely have to bring in every cent of your paycheck to manage your family's finances, a life insurance policy for your kids could potentially protect you all from the devastating costs of grief.</p> <h2>Coverage protection</h2> <p>Something that never came up in Dad's comments about children's life insurance was the importance of future insurability. While a child's life insurance policy is generally much smaller than those purchased by adults, they will often include a rider known as the guaranteed additional purchase (GAP) that a child can rely on once he or she reaches adulthood. This GAP rider will allow the child to purchase additional coverage as an adult without medical questions or underwriting.</p> <p>I have seen firsthand just how important such coverage protection can be. My best friend's son was diagnosed with autism at 15 months of age. My friend had not purchased a life insurance policy for her baby, even though she had intended to do so.</p> <p>Unfortunately, this means her son is now permanently ineligible for life insurance because of his autism diagnosis. Once he reaches adulthood, he will not be able to purchase a policy for himself. And autism is only one of several juvenile medical diagnoses &mdash; including diabetes, severe asthma, cancer, or a heart condition &mdash; that can render a child ineligible for life insurance in the future.</p> <p>This is why my friend now recommends that every parent buy life insurance for their children when they are still babies. At the very least, it will allow the child to have coverage throughout his or her life, no matter what medical surprises may be in store.</p> <h2>Don't fall for the &quot;investment&quot; promises</h2> <p>Many children's life insurance policies provide an option to cash out the policy once the child reaches adulthood. There is nothing wrong with this &mdash; unless you are worried your kids will cash out the policy and go on a shopping binge &mdash; but it is hardly the &quot;investment&quot; that it is often touted to be. (In fact, you could make Dad go purple with outrage just by mentioning it.)</p> <p>For instance, the Gerber Grow-Up Plan, one of the most commonly advertised life insurance products for children, promises that &quot;each time you make a monthly premium payment for your [policy], Gerber Life sets aside a small amount of money. Over time, this becomes the cash value of your policy. It represents how much your policy is worth at any given point in time.&quot;</p> <p>However, the cash value can potentially be less than the amount you have paid in premiums, since only a portion of your premiums are set aside. And the cash value will certainly be less than you would have earned through a traditional investment had you invested the premiums instead.</p> <p>While there are legitimate reasons for choosing a life insurance policy for your child, the investment strategy is not one of them.</p> <h2>Buying life insurance for your kids is a personal decision</h2> <p>Despite my about-face on children's life insurance, my two sons are still uninsured. Dad's superstition about tempting fate has stuck with me &mdash; and my husband and I are lucky enough to be in a financial situation where we could handle the monetary costs if something terrible should happen. My only big concern is if either of my kids receive a diagnosis that will make them ineligible for future insurance. But we have decided to live with that risk.</p> <p>It's important that all parents think through the full consequences of buying or not buying life insurance for their children. It is a distressing train of thought, but a necessary one. No matter what you choose, a well-thought out decision will lead you to what's best for your family.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fshould-you-get-life-insurance-for-your-kids&amp;media=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FShould%2520You%2520Get%2520Life%2520Insurance%2520for%2520Your%2520Kids_.jpg&amp;description=Should%20You%20Get%20Life%20Insurance%20for%20Your%20Kids%3F"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Should%20You%20Get%20Life%20Insurance%20for%20Your%20Kids_.jpg" alt="Should You Get Life Insurance for Your Kids?" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/should-you-get-life-insurance-for-your-kids">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-money-moves-your-kids-can-make-over-summer-vacation">5 Smart Money Moves Your Kids Can Make Over Summer Vacation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-money-moves-every-single-parent-should-make">5 Money Moves Every Single Parent Should Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/6-fun-games-that-teach-your-kids-about-money">6 Fun Games That Teach Your Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know">9 Family Money Matters Your Kids Don&#039;t Need to Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-estate-planning-questions-everyone-should-ask">5 Estate Planning Questions Everyone Should Ask</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Insurance children coverage funerals gap coverage income replacement kids life insurance pre existing conditions Thu, 21 Jun 2018 09:00:27 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 2149477 at https://www.wisebread.com 5 Money Moves Every Single Parent Should Make https://www.wisebread.com/5-money-moves-every-single-parent-should-make <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-money-moves-every-single-parent-should-make" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mother_at_home_with_baby_working_on_laptop.jpg" alt="Mother at home with baby working on laptop" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Parenting comes with a deep sense of responsibility for your children and a lifetime of having to make difficult decisions. Raising kids in a two-parent household can be stressful enough; being a single parent can be downright overwhelming.</p> <p>When it comes to managing household finances, being a single parent isn't necessarily different from any other household with children. Instead, there just may not be a lot of financial flexibility &mdash; so there's more pressure to get things right early on. Take a breath and work toward reaching these financial markers to give you peace of mind.</p> <h2>1. Prepare your estate planning documents</h2> <p>People tend to procrastinate about getting their estate paperwork in place, but it's a smart idea for everyone to make it a priority. Experiencing a major life event, like having a child, should prompt you to either update your old documents or establish an estate plan.</p> <p>Unless you're comfortable leaving your personal and financial decisions up to state officials, it makes sense to sit with an attorney to discuss your wishes should you pass away or become incapacitated and unable to make financial and health decisions for yourself. Since minor children cannot take control of inheritance money or make legal decisions, listing them as direct beneficiaries on your accounts and assuming that will accomplish your goals may not be the case. Every parent should also have guardianship papers in place, especially if they are raising children alone. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-happens-if-you-dont-leave-a-will?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Here's What Happens If You Don't Leave a Will</a>)</p> <h2>2. Purchase life insurance</h2> <p>Generally, if someone is dependent on your income, you probably need life insurance. While you'll want to sit with a financial adviser or life insurance agent to discuss how much insurance you need, some factors to consider are how much it will cost to raise your children and send them to college, as well as to protect certain assets and pay off debt. You'll also want to consult an attorney or financial professional about properly selecting a policy beneficiary. While there are various types of life insurance, a term life insurance policy can be an affordable and efficient way to protect your family. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/term-vs-whole-life-insurance-heres-how-to-choose?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Term vs Whole Life Insurance: Here's How to Choose</a>)</p> <h2>3. Fund an emergency savings account</h2> <p>Having a fully funded cash reserve on hand is a critical component of everyone's personal financial health. In a one-income household with children, it's recommended to work toward having <em>at least</em> six months' worth of monthly bills and expenses saved and set aside. Once you reach six months' worth, aim for a year's worth. In a two-parent household, one adult may be able to cut back on essentials in the case of a job loss, but when children are financially dependent on you and <em>only</em> you for everything, that can be difficult to manage without a padding of emergency cash. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-minute-finance-start-an-emergency-fund?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5-Minute Finance: Start an Emergency Fund</a>)</p> <h2>4. Contribute to a retirement account</h2> <p>After fortifying your financial house with savings and the proper risk management documents in place, you should focus on saving for your own retirement. As a parent, you naturally put your children's needs and wants before your own, and there is nothing wrong with that. But it's also important to recognize that your early working years are critical to your retirement savings goals. There are no do-overs when it comes to saving for retirement, and every year you don't save is a year lost.</p> <p>If you have access to a retirement plan at work such as a 401(k), strive to save 15 percent of your total income. If money is tight and your employer offers a match, start by contributing just enough to earn the full match. Over time, you can gradually increase your own contributions. If you don't have access to a workplace retirement plan (or in addition to one), you should open an IRA, which you can do at a discount brokerage firm or bank. For 2018, anyone with earned income under the age of 50 can contribute the lesser of $5,500 or their total yearly income. Make this a priority and make this a habit. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a>)</p> <h2>5. Open a 529 account</h2> <p>A 529 plan is a tax-favored education savings account that allows individuals to save for future qualified education costs. Contributions are made on an after-tax basis, and the money grows tax-free. Distributions for qualified education expenses are also tax-free. Once you set up an account, anyone can make contributions to it; for example, grandparents could contribute on behalf of a grandchild. Even if you don't have enough money in your current budget to make regular contributions, saving your child's birthday, holiday, or other gift money they receive throughout the year can be a helpful way to see your funds grow.</p> <p>Covering the entire cost of your child's (or children's) college education is a difficult task for any set of parents, so don't feel guilty about what you may or may not be able to accomplish with this account. Every little bit helps. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-state-529-college-savings-plans?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 9 Best State 529 College Savings Plans</a>)</p> <p>Being a single parent can sometimes make you feel as if you need to overcompensate in certain areas when it comes to raising your children, but it's important to not lose sight of building a strong financial foundation for your family and also for your own future.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-money-moves-every-single-parent-should-make&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Money%2520Moves%2520Every%2520Single%2520Parent%2520Should%2520Make.jpg&amp;description=5%20Money%20Moves%20Every%20Single%20Parent%20Should%20Make"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Money%20Moves%20Every%20Single%20Parent%20Should%20Make.jpg" alt="5 Money Moves Every Single Parent Should Make" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/alicia-rose-hudnett">Alicia Rose Hudnett</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-money-moves-every-single-parent-should-make">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/are-you-putting-off-these-9-adult-money-moves">Are You Putting Off These 9 Adult Money Moves?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know">9 Family Money Matters Your Kids Don&#039;t Need to Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-late-starters-can-save-for-their-kids-education">Here&#039;s How Late Starters Can Save for Their Kids&#039; Education</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-estate-planning-questions-everyone-should-ask">5 Estate Planning Questions Everyone Should Ask</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family 529 plans children estate planning life insurance one income household raising kids retirement single parents Thu, 14 Jun 2018 09:00:31 +0000 Alicia Rose Hudnett 2148276 at https://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways to Find Child Care While Traveling https://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-find-child-care-while-traveling <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-to-find-child-care-while-traveling" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/father_and_son_taking_a_selfie_in_venice.jpg" alt="Father and son taking a selfie in Venice" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Being able to afford a family vacation may give you a sense of pride and joy &mdash; especially if you had to save for a while. There's something magical about splurging for a week away to try new activities with the kids. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-affordable-family-travel-is-possible?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Yes, Affordable Family Travel Is Possible</a>)</p> <p>No dishes. No bills. No work calls or meetings with the boss. Just you and your kids enjoying life. We all need a break from the minutiae of daily life, right?</p> <p>Still, traveling with kids isn't all rainbows and cupcakes; it's also notoriously exhausting. Sleeping in a hotel room with children can be a challenge on its own, but there are also nap times, snack times, and meltdowns to deal with. It helps if the parents get a break every now and then.</p> <p>The ideal scenario is one where you travel with kids but also have a baby sitter on hand. You may not need full-time help, but even an hour or two each day can give you some space to relax in your own way. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-you-must-do-if-youre-traveling-with-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Things You Must Do If You're Traveling With Kids</a>)</p> <p>If you are someone who loves the idea of having child-care on a family vacation, consider these strategies.</p> <h2>1. Plan a vacation with built-in child-care</h2> <p>There are a few trips you can book where child-care is ready and waiting for you, the first of which is all-inclusive resorts. Many of these resorts are on the beach in destinations like the Caribbean and Mexico, and they offer your food, drink, lodging, and entertainment for one price.</p> <p>The majority of all-inclusive resorts also offer dedicated kids' clubs where you can drop your kids off for a few hours or the entire day. Some only allow you to drop off your kids for a few hours at a time, while others are open from morning until night.</p> <p>There are some <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/all-inclusive-resorts-you-can-book-for-free-with-points?ref=internal" target="_blank">all-inclusive resorts you can book with points</a> as well. The Hyatt Ziva Rose Hall in Montego Bay, Jamaica, for example, costs just 25,000 points per night (double occupancy) plus a 12,500 point per night supplement for each child. This resort includes food, drink, and fun, plus a kids' club that is open all day.</p> <h2>2. Book a cruise</h2> <p>Cruises are notorious for offering family-friendly (and affordable) fun, but part of that is the fact they have on-site child-care. The vast majority of major cruise lines offer some kind of kids' club that is open most or all of the day. Some cruise lines will even watch your child while you leave the ship at your cruise stop for the day.</p> <p>Many onboard kids' clubs offer much more than baby-sitting as well. On the MSC Divina, for example, kids participate in language lessons, crafts, games, and trivia. Not only are you getting child-care, but you're giving your children a unique experience of their own.</p> <h2>3. Travel with another family and swap baby-sitting</h2> <p>Imagine your family decides to rent a beach house with another family. You may save money by splitting the costs, and it can be convenient to have more adult eyes on all the kids. If you swap a night or two of baby-sitting, everybody wins.</p> <p>Still, this scenario won't always work. You would have to be able to settle on a place to stay with another family, and you would need to get along reasonably well to avoid conflict. Having access to child-care wouldn't be worth it if your family was miserable, so you would need to choose your tripmates wisely. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/beyond-disney-8-affordable-family-destinations-in-the-us?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Beyond Disney: 8 Affordable Family Destinations in the U.S.</a>)</p> <h2>4. Book child-care through your hotel</h2> <p>While some hotels offer kids' clubs, there are just as many that offer child-care you can book separately from your room rate. If you stay at select Walt Disney Resorts, for example, you can book in-room baby-sitting starting at $18 per hour for one child ($21 for two; $24 for three; $26 for four). It's not cheap by any means, but it can give you a break to go out to dinner or enjoy some quiet time.</p> <p>Many Omni hotel properties also offer kids' clubs and baby-sitting for a fee. At the Omni Homestead Resort in Hot Springs, Virginia, a full day of child-care with lunch costs $77 for the first child and $57 for each additional child, for example.</p> <h2>5. Bring a vacation nanny on your trip</h2> <p>If you're taking a special trip and don't mind splurging, you can also bring a vacation nanny along. This might work best if someone you know is able to travel and care for your children. You would need to pay all their travel expenses at the very least, and you will likely need to pay them a daily rate as well.</p> <p>You could also <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-affordable-vacations-to-please-every-age-group?ref=internal" target="_blank">plan a multigenerational trip</a>, potentially bringing a grandparent or set of grandparents along. You may secure some child-care that way, although you should ask ahead of time to make sure your expectations will be met.</p> <p>If you don't know anyone who would work, you can also use a service to hire a vacation nanny. For example, NannyPoppinz.com makes it easy to hire vetted nannies that will travel where you are and provide child-care during your trip.</p> <p>For this to work, however, you would need to feel comfortable spending your vacation with a stranger. You would also need to have a relatively large vacation rental (suite, rental condo, rental home, etc.) so your nanny could have their own space. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Travel Internationally With Your Kids</a>)</p> <h2>6. Use child-care websites to find sitters nearby</h2> <p>If none of the above scenarios work for you, consider hiring as-needed baby-sitting in the destinations where you're traveling. Care.com and SitterCity.com are good resources when it comes to finding baby-sitting wherever you plan to be.</p> <p>According to Care.com, vacation baby sitters are paid an average rate of $12.50 per hour. The website makes it possible to browse options in your destination, read over caregiver qualifications, and ask questions.</p> <p>Ideally, you'll find someone who can baby-sit while you enjoy a dinner out, a daylong snorkeling trip, or a special event. You can even book a travel nanny for several days or nights during your vacation.</p> <p>When Mom and Dad are exhausted, it's more difficult to have the vacation of a lifetime. With child-care included, on the other hand, everyone gets the break they need.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-ways-to-find-child-care-while-traveling&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Ways%2520to%2520Find%2520Child%2520Care%2520While%2520Traveling.jpg&amp;description=6%20Ways%20to%20Find%20Child%20Care%20While%20Traveling"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Ways%20to%20Find%20Child%20Care%20While%20Traveling.jpg" alt="6 Ways to Find Child Care While Traveling" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/holly-johnson">Holly Johnson</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-find-child-care-while-traveling">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/yes-affordable-family-travel-is-possible">Yes, Affordable Family Travel Is Possible</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family">How to Travel Internationally With Your Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-save-on-a-european-getaway-with-kids">7 Ways to Save on a European Getaway With Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-to-make-family-camping-easy">20 Ways to Make Family Camping Easy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-a-family-of-4-can-see-italy-for-1000-or-less">How a Family of 4 Can See Italy for $1,000 or Less</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Travel affordable travel child-care family travel family vacation travel tips traveling with kids Thu, 14 Jun 2018 08:30:42 +0000 Holly Johnson 2148579 at https://www.wisebread.com The 5 Best Board Games for Children https://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-board-games-for-children <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-5-best-board-games-for-children" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/kids_board_game_466367920.jpg" alt="Kids playing board game on the floor" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Board games are an enjoyable, affordable way to pass the time with your family. Games can also be educational for children, teaching them critical thinking, reading, and even money skills.</p> <h2>What are board games for children?</h2> <p>Board games for kids are usually easier to play than adult games. They include a board and several game pieces to play with, along with rules on how to win the game. They are classic fun and can keep your child away from their electronics for hours.</p> <h2>Top 5 board games for children</h2> <h3>HedBanz</h3> <p><a href="https://amzn.to/2Moyn1c" target="_blank"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/hedbanz.jpg" width="200" height="245" align="right" alt="" />HedBanz</a> is a fast-paced game that the whole family can take part in. Players ask yes or no questions to figure out the character displayed on their headband. The game has a simple premise and encourages creative critical thinking skills. It includes 74 cards, 24 chips, six headbands, a timer, and rule sheet. Part of Amazon's Summer Toy List, the award-winning educational game is also an Amazon's Choice item, an Amazon best-seller, and a &quot;Best Rated&quot; item. It has more than 1,500 five-star reviews on Amazon and is recommended by Consumer Search and Heavy.com.</p> <p><a href="https://amzn.to/2Moyn1c" target="_blank"><em>Currently $12.99 on Amazon</em></a></p> <h3>Hasbro Connect 4</h3> <p><a href="https://amzn.to/2JGsD0L" target="_blank"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/connect%204.jpg" width="228" height="245" align="right" alt="" /></a>Amazon's #1 best-seller in board games, <a href="https://amzn.to/2JGsD0L" target="_blank">Hasbro Connect 4</a> is designed for two players. The goal is to connect four discs in a row. The game of strategy can be played quickly and learned easily. It includes the vertical board, 21 red discs, 21 yellow discs, and instructions. It has more than 2,300 five-star reviews on Amazon and is recommended by NYMag and Heavy.com. It is also one of the &quot;Most Wished For,&quot; &quot;Best Rated,&quot; and top &quot;Gift Ideas&quot; on Amazon.</p> <p><a href="https://amzn.to/2JGsD0L" target="_blank"><em>Currently $8.77 on Amazon</em></a></p> <h3>Hasbro Candy Land the World of Sweets</h3> <p><a href="https://amzn.to/2JBuAjh" target="_blank"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/candy%20land.jpg" width="245" height="158" align="right" alt="" />Hasbro Candy Land the World of Sweets</a> is an oldie, but a goodie. There is no reading or strategy involved, so it's ideal even for preschool-aged children. It includes a game board, four gingerbread pawns, 22 cards, and instructions. The colorful game board features a rainbow path that players race to finish first. It can help teach children color recognition and matching. The Amazon's Choice item is an Amazon best-seller, has more than 900 five-star reviews on Amazon, and is recommended by Heavy.com.</p> <p><a href="https://amzn.to/2JBuAjh" target="_blank"><em>Currently $12.99 on Amazon</em></a></p> <h3>Hasbro Monopoly Junior</h3> <p><a href="https://amzn.to/2JFQHkt" target="_blank"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/monopoly.jpg" width="245" height="228" align="right" alt="" />Hasbro Monopoly Junior</a> has a kid-friendly vibe, with fun properties like an ice cream parlor and skate park. It also has single dollar bills and easy rules for simple gameplay. The property trading game can help kids learn the value of money and property. It includes a game board, four tokens, 20 Chance cards, 48 Sold signs, 90 bank notes, four character cards, and a die. There are a number of different Monopoly editions available now, so getting your kids hooked on the game from a young age can be a great way to keep them interested in the game as they grow up. It has over 900 five-star reviews on Amazon and is recommended by Ranker.</p> <p><a href="https://amzn.to/2JFQHkt" target="_blank"><em>Currently $13.59 on Amazon</em></a></p> <h3>Hasbro Scrabble Junior</h3> <p><a href="https://amzn.to/2l5v9D7" target="_blank"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/scrabble.jpg" width="245" height="195" align="right" alt="" />Hasbro Scrabble Junior</a> is an educational word game with colorful picture clues and letter matching. It's great for kids just learning to read. The best part is once you flip the game board, there is an advanced level on the opposite side, where players can create their own words, so your child can continue to be challenged as they age. The crossword game includes a two-sided game board, 105 letter tiles, four character tokens, and a game guide.</p> <p><a href="https://amzn.to/2l5v9D7" target="_blank"><em>Currently $13.97 on Amazon</em></a></p> <p>And those are our recommendations for the best board games for children. As always, be sure to check <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/buying-calendar" target="_blank">Wise Bread's Buying Calendar</a> to learn when and how to buy just about anything!</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthe-5-best-board-games-for-children&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThe%25205%2520Best%2520Board%2520Games%2520for%2520Children.jpg&amp;description=The%205%20Best%20Board%20Games%20for%20Children"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/The%205%20Best%20Board%20Games%20for%20Children.jpg" alt="The 5 Best Board Games for Children" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-board-games-for-children">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/top-five-economy-based-board-games-that-make-you-think">10 Economy-Based Games That Make You Think</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/8-amazing-board-games-you-can-diy">8 Amazing Board Games You Can DIY</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-board-games-for-adults">The 5 Best Board Games for Adults</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-infant-nail-clippers">The 5 Best Infant Nail Clippers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-waterproof-bluetooth-speakers">The 5 Best Waterproof Bluetooth Speakers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Entertainment Family Shopping 5 best activities for kids board games game night games for kids product reviews Thu, 14 Jun 2018 08:00:27 +0000 Andrea Cannon 2148929 at https://www.wisebread.com 28 Free Ways to Entertain Your Kids This Summer https://www.wisebread.com/28-free-ways-to-entertain-your-kids-this-summer <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/28-free-ways-to-entertain-your-kids-this-summer" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/father_and_daughter_baking_and_having_tea_party.jpg" alt="Father and daughter baking and having tea party" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Making memories with your kids this summer doesn't have to drain your bank account. Your children just want to enjoy time together, and there are plenty of ways to do that on a budget. Here are 28 free ways you can have a blast with them.</p> <h2>1. Head to the library</h2> <p>The library is a great resource for free books, and you can make your trip even more enjoyable by letting your kids pick out any books that interest them or by using a <a href="https://www.freekidscrafts.com/printable-library-scavenger-hunt/" target="_blank">printable library scavenger hunt</a> to discover new reads. It will keep them busy, they'll have tons of fun, and they'll end up with new books to enjoy. Check your library's calendar for fun activities and story times as well. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-modern-reasons-to-visit-your-local-library-today?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Modern Reasons to Visit Your Local Library Today</a>)</p> <h2>2. Turn your backyard into a water park</h2> <p>Turn on the sprinklers, have your kids change into swimsuits, and allow them to run wild. You can also add a tarp and some dish soap for a DIY slip and slide. It's really the perfect way to keep cool on a hot summer day.</p> <h2>3. Host a family game night</h2> <p>Pull out your board games and dedicate a whole night to playing a game together as a family. If you have a big family, you can play the games as teams and compete for a prize like, the winner gets to pick the movie on movie night, or the last place team has to do the dusting for the next week. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-fun-games-that-teach-your-kids-about-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Fun Games That Teach Your Kids About Money</a>)</p> <h2>4. Let them play dress up in your clothes</h2> <p>Who needs fancy dress up costumes when Mom and Dad have dresses and suits to throw on? See what funny combos your kids can come up with and even organize a mock fashion show.</p> <h2>5. Create a fort in the living room</h2> <p>Hunkering down inside a homemade fort is a fun activity for kids and adults alike. All you need is a few chairs, some sheets or blankets, and a lot of comfy pillows to make the perfect indoor fort.</p> <h2>6. Have a camp out in the backyard</h2> <p>A camping trip won't always fit your schedule or budget, but you can still enjoy the experience by pitching a tent in the backyard. Roast hot dogs and s'mores outdoors with a grill or fire pit, tell ghost stories, and sleep under the stars. And make sure to use bug spray!</p> <h2>7. Bake some sweet treats</h2> <p>On a rainy day that can't be spent enjoying the summer sun, stay in and whip up some treats. Scour Pinterest for fun baking recipes to try out. What kid wouldn't want to make <a href="http://www.lordbyronskitchen.com/unicorn-poop-cookies/" target="_blank">unicorn poop cookies</a> or <a href="https://thedecoratedcookie.com/rainbow-smores-dip/" target="_blank">rainbow s'mores dip</a>?</p> <p>Or you can turn a regular meal into a game by letting the kids make funny food art. My girls always love when I turn their pancake breakfast into a dog, cat, or something holiday themed, like a turkey or Santa.</p> <h2>8. Have a picnic</h2> <p>Take meal time out in the fresh air with a picnic blanket and paper plates. Enjoy your family picnic at the park, in your backyard, or even in your living room if the weather isn't cooperating.</p> <h2>9. Make bath time extra fun</h2> <p>A bath with glow sticks, extra bubbles, or a few drops of food coloring can make tub time a blast. You can even add new toys or bring in water toys for the special occasion. Or you take bath time outside by filling a kiddie pool with bubble bath solution and letting kids get clean in their swimsuits.</p> <h2>10. Go hiking</h2> <p>A family hiking trip can be a wonderful bonding experience, especially if there is a lot of wildlife and plants to see along the way. Get kids more involved in the hike by making it a scavenger hunt or by bringing binoculars so they can birdwatch. <a href="https://www.americantrails.org/resources/statetrails/" target="_blank">American Trails</a> lists hiking and equestrian trails available in each state. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-most-breathtaking-day-hikes-in-the-us?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Most Breathtaking Day Hikes in the U.S.</a>)</p> <h2>11. Have a spa day</h2> <p>Everyone loves a little pampering from time to time. Whip up DIY face masks for you and your kids from ingredients in the kitchen, like yogurt or avocado. Enjoy a bath with a homemade bath bomb or treat yourself and the kiddos to a mani/pedi and let them pick their own colors &mdash; even if it's a different color on each nail. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-spa-treatments-you-can-do-at-home?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Spa Treatments You Can Do at Home</a>)</p> <h2>12. Conduct a science experiment</h2> <p>No need to make your kids sit through a dull science lesson. Get them interested in the subject by trying fun experiments that will blow their minds like making <a href="https://science.howstuffworks.com/innovation/edible-innovations/ice-cream3.htm" target="_blank">homemade ice cream</a>, <a href="https://www.wikihow.com/Make-Rock-Candy" target="_blank">rock candy</a>, or creating <a href="http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/experiments/invisibleink.html" target="_blank">invisible ink</a> for writing secret messages.</p> <h2>13. Hold an impromptu dance party</h2> <p>When your kids are complaining that they're bored or are fighting with each other, turn up the music and just start dancing. Watch the anger or antsiness fade into endorphins as they enjoy a subtle workout.</p> <h2>14. Visit Petsmart or Petco</h2> <p>My kids love going to the pet store just to walk around and look at the animals who've come in with their owners, and the smaller pets like fish that are available for adoption. Some locations have dog and cat adoption days on the weekends, so the kids can meet and pet four-legged friends, too!</p> <h2>15. Turn your garage into a roller skating rink</h2> <p>Clear out the garage, put on your skates, and blast some tunes for a fun DIY roller skating party. If you have a disco light, even better!</p> <p>You can also check out <a href="https://kidsskatefree.com/locations/" target="_blank">Kids Skate Free</a> to find free skating rink passes in your area.</p> <h2>16. Write and star in your own movie</h2> <p>Want your kids to take a break from the screen? Encourage them to make a movie or show of their own. If you don't have a video camera, you can use your smartphone and upload clips to a free movie editor, such as Blender or iMovie, to add special effects and cut and paste scenes.</p> <h2>17. Throw a tea party</h2> <p>Serve herbal tea, cookies, and tea sandwiches on your fanciest plates and drink with your pinkies up. Talk in accents or listen to a narrated audiobook like the <em>Harry Potter</em> series while you and your kids fancily dine.</p> <h2>18. Blow some bubbles</h2> <p>Bubbles are not just for babies and toddlers. Older kids (and even adults) love them, too! Create giant bubbles with this <a href="https://happyhooligans.ca/homemade-giant-bubbles/" target="_blank">homemade recipe</a> or <a href="http://www.housingaforest.com/giant-ghost-bubbles-homemade-gak-recipe/" target="_blank">reusable bubbles</a> with items you already have on hand.</p> <h2>19. Try geocaching</h2> <p>Geocaching is where you hunt for a hidden object through GPS coordinates. Many people around the world have made the experience a thrilling one for families with kids to enjoy. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-outdoor-adventures-that-dont-cost-a-dime?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Outdoor Adventures That Don't Cost a Dime</a>)</p> <h2>20. Go bowling</h2> <p>Who doesn't love using a giant heavy ball to knock down several pins at once? Bowling is great for kids and adults, and it doesn't have to cost you a thing. Get free bowling passes through <a href="https://www.kidsbowlfree.com/" target="_blank">Kids Bowl Free</a> or see if your local bowling alley gives away free games for good grades or birthdays.</p> <h2>21. Start a kids book club</h2> <p>Invite your children's friends over once a week for a book club meeting and read something that everyone will enjoy. Make themed snacks, crafts, or have the kids re-enact their favorite scenes.</p> <h2>22. Paint outside</h2> <p>Get creative without the mess. Use paint that you have on hand and make masterpieces on paper, rocks, or old shirts. You can even lay down an old bed sheet and let the kids paint with odd objects around the house, like a whisk or straw.</p> <h2>23. Set up a scavenger hunt</h2> <p>Hide a prize, such as a pan of brownies, and write and hide clues all over the house. They will have a blast solving riddles and trying to guess what the ultimate prize is. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-free-ways-to-entertain-kids-for-an-afternoon?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Free Ways to Entertain Kids for an Afternoon</a>)</p> <h2>24. Host family Olympic Games</h2> <p>Inspire some friendly competition among your family members by holding your own Olympic Games. If you have enough people to split into teams, you can even make your own uniforms with old T-shirts. Try fun games like a three-legged race, carrying an egg on a spoon, and water balloon toss.</p> <h2>25. Tour museums for free</h2> <p>Sign up for your local museum's mailing list to get notifications of free events and fee-free admission days. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-visit-museums-for-free?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Visit Museums for Free</a>)</p> <h2>26. Take a factory tour</h2> <p>Give your kids an inside look at people hard at work in various industries. Search <a href="http://www.factorytoursusa.com/" target="_blank">FactoryToursUSA</a> under your state to discover free factory tours near you. There are 565 tours listed, and many of them with free or little admission cost.</p> <h2>27. Sign up for a free class</h2> <p>Many stores offer free classes for children. Check with your local library, bookstores, schools, and community center for more offerings.</p> <p>Here is a short list of free classes to get you started:</p> <ul> <li> <p>The <a href="https://www.americangirl.com/retail/" target="_blank">American Girl Store</a> occasionally offers free events and crafts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a href="http://www.michaels.com/classes" target="_blank">Michael's Craft store</a> offers free craft activities along with $2 and $5 craft classes.</p> </li> <li> <p>The <a href="https://shop.lego.com/en-US/minibuild-registration?ShipTo=US&amp;ShipTo=US&amp;_requestid=5506530&amp;_requestid=665480" target="_blank">LEGO store</a> allows children to complete a free mini-build once a month.</p> </li> <li> <p><a href="https://www.homedepot.com/workshops/?AID=11210757&amp;PID=8259874&amp;SID=103604X1560189X1bbde55f30fefa894195b95140e495a8&amp;cm_mmc=CJ-_-8259874-_-11210757&amp;cj=true#store/6651" target="_blank">HomeDepot</a> does a free workshop for kids each month.</p> </li> </ul> <h2>28. Visit a nearby farm</h2> <p>It's so important for kids to see where their food comes from, and visiting a local farm is the perfect way to show them. Use <a href="https://www.localharvest.org/" target="_blank">LocalHarvest</a> to find nearby farms and free events. You can also connect to pick-your-own farms near your area. Check to see if admission is free and if you can walk and picnic on the farm for free.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F28-free-ways-to-entertain-your-kids-this-summer&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F28%2520Free%2520Ways%2520to%2520Entertain%2520Your%2520Kids%2520This%2520Summer.jpg&amp;description=28%20Free%20Ways%20to%20Entertain%20Your%20Kids%20This%20Summer"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/28%20Free%20Ways%20to%20Entertain%20Your%20Kids%20This%20Summer.jpg" alt="28 Free Ways to Entertain Your Kids This Summer" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/28-free-ways-to-entertain-your-kids-this-summer">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-books-that-will-get-your-kids-excited-about-money">10 Fun Books That Will Get Your Kids Excited About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-board-games-for-children">The 5 Best Board Games for Children</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-essential-money-moves-for-new-parents">7 Essential Money Moves for New Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-kid-build-their-first-budget">How to Help Your Kid Build Their First Budget</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Entertainment Family activities for kids free fun for kids fun activities kids parenting tips saving money Mon, 11 Jun 2018 09:00:24 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 2147652 at https://www.wisebread.com How to Talk to Mom and Dad About Their Money https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-talk-to-mom-and-dad-about-their-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-talk-to-mom-and-dad-about-their-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/happy_family_breakfast.jpg" alt="Happy family breakfast" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Good ol' Mom and Dad. Many of us can remember our parents complaining that money didn't grow on trees and grumbling over wasted money every time we left a light on or took too long in the shower. As our parents get older, however, roles and responsibilities start to switch. Eventually, a time comes when we have to have the talk about money with our parents.</p> <p>Sharing financial advice with your parents can be challenging and uncomfortable, but it is an essential talk to have. Here's how you can go about discussing money with your aging parents in both a respectful and productive way.</p> <h2>Set up a meeting</h2> <p>It can be hard to talk seriously when kids are running around or when the family is supposed to be enjoying a fun night together. Don't put a damper on a family get together by blindsiding your parents with bank statements. Instead, arrange to talk over coffee or breakfast, or even agree to meet with a financial adviser or estate planner if you think that will make the meeting go smoother. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-talk-to-friends-and-family-about-money-without-making-everyone-mad?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Talk to Friends and Family About Money (Without Making Everyone Mad)</a>)</p> <h2>Don't point fingers</h2> <p>If you start a conversation with your parents saying something like, &quot;You don't have enough saved for retirement &mdash; what are you going to do?&quot; they are going to be quick to put up a wall. From your perspective, it might seem like your parents have been careless with finances, but there is a chance that you don't know the whole story. Instead, approach them on mutual grounds.</p> <p>Instead of being accusatory, invite discussion. Start off the conversation with something like, &quot;I would love to discuss what you would you want me to do if there comes a time that I need to be your full-time caregiver,&quot; or, &quot;I know you mentioned that you wanted to set aside money for your grandkids' education, and I would love to know more about it so that it is done in a way that the kids aren't penalized if they need to apply for financial aid later on.&quot;</p> <h2>Offer help</h2> <p>Ask Mom and Dad if there is anything you can do to help lighten their load. They might need someone to teach them how to access their bank info online, do their taxes, or help them prepare a will. Sometimes parents feel embarrassed about asking their kids to take over financially, and may not be ready to hand over the reins right away. You can still extend the invitation by saying something like, &quot;If there ever comes a time where you don't want to deal with budgeting/paying bills/etc., let me know and I will gladly help out as much as possible.&quot;</p> <h2>Ask for access to their important financial information</h2> <p>There are no guarantees in life. You never know when your parents will pass away or become fully dependent on you. It is important to have a list of their financial information so that you can access it when the time comes. Here are some important things to know:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Social Security numbers.</p> </li> <li> <p>Financial information for each bank, investment, retirement, and debt account.</p> </li> <li> <p>All insurance information, including health, long-term care, and life insurance.</p> </li> <li> <p>Estate planning documents such as will, trust, and power of attorney.</p> </li> <li> <p>Real estate papers, such as deed and title.</p> </li> <li> <p>Contact information for all financial advisers, accountants, lawyers, etc.</p> </li> </ul> <h2>Create a future plan</h2> <p>According to AARP, 30 million households care for an adult over 50, and that number is expected to double in 25 years. Share that statistic with your parents and explain to them that while you don't like imagining them getting older, that is going to happen regardless &mdash; and you want their guidance and advice before that time comes. Ask them what living arrangements they want when they can't care for themselves and how they want their finances, assets, and property dealt with after passing. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-financial-steps-to-take-when-your-aging-parents-move-in?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Financial Steps to Take When Your Aging Parents Move In</a>)</p> <h2>Make sure everything is up to date</h2> <p>Ask your parents if their important financial and legal documents are up to date. Does their will and power of attorney for health and finances reflect what they want it to reflect? If not, encourage them to update these legal documents as soon as possible. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-youll-encounter-when-taking-over-a-loved-ones-finances?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Things You'll Encounter When Taking Over a Loved One's Finances</a>)</p> <h2>Have patience and get the family involved</h2> <p>Don't expect to conquer your parents' financial future in one go. Depending on how complicated their finances are, it might take several talks and several prompts of encouragement to get things on the right track. If possible, have other siblings get involved in these financial conversations. Show siblings that if they keep borrowing money from Mom and Dad, they will drain them of essential money needed to pay for health care and living expenses down the road.</p> <p>Talking about money is already an uncomfortable and unpopular topic. Add your parents to the mix, and things can get hairy and emotional quick. Remember to go slow and come from a place of love. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-the-sandwich-generation-can-get-ahead?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways the Sandwich Generation Can Get Ahead</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-talk-to-mom-and-dad-about-their-money&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Talk%2520to%2520Mom%2520and%2520Dad%2520About%2520Their%2520Money.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Talk%20to%20Mom%20and%20Dad%20About%20Their%20Money"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Talk%20to%20Mom%20and%20Dad%20About%20Their%20Money.jpg" alt="How to Talk to Mom and Dad About Their Money" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-talk-to-mom-and-dad-about-their-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-money-moves-every-single-parent-should-make">5 Money Moves Every Single Parent Should Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/are-you-putting-off-these-9-adult-money-moves">Are You Putting Off These 9 Adult Money Moves?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents">How to Save for Retirement While Caring for Kids and Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/12-financial-moves-to-make-when-a-loved-one-dies">12 Financial Moves to Make When a Loved One Dies</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/9-money-moves-youre-never-too-old-to-make">9 Money Moves You&#039;re Never Too Old to Make</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family aging parents caregiving estate planning financial planning money talk retirement sandwich generation wills Tue, 05 Jun 2018 08:00:29 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 2145220 at https://www.wisebread.com How to Entertain Your Grandkids Without Going Broke https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-entertain-your-grandkids-without-going-broke <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-entertain-your-grandkids-without-going-broke" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/grandfather_carries_grandson_on_shoulders.jpg" alt="Grandfather Carries Grandson On Shoulders" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Having the grandkids over is great. It can also be expensive. A trip to the movies for a family of four can easily set you back $80 or more after the tickets and snacks. Entrance fees to water parks and amusement parks are just as expensive, and even a meal at a local restaurant can empty your wallet. But if you get creative, you can give the grandkids a great time without fretting about the cost.</p> <h2>1. Head to McDonald's</h2> <p>There's always an outcry from a select set of people when you mention McDonald's. Whatever you think of the golden arches franchise, it's hard to deny the convenience and wonder of the PlayPlace. It's completely free, it's well-maintained, and the kids <em>love</em> it. It's bright, it's full of other excited kids, and grandparents can watch the grandkids from a comfy bench. You don't even have to order a meal to access it. Split a coffee or bottle of water and watch the kids have a blast.</p> <h2>2. Check out a local playground</h2> <p>Most suburban housing areas have a Homeowners' Association (HOA) that takes care of garbage, snow removal, and the upkeep of a safe, secure playground. They usually have some kind of climbing frame, swings, monkey bars, and lots of room to play.</p> <p>You can often find several of these playgrounds within a few minutes' drive from each other, so take the kids on a kind of playground treasure hunt. Drive around the neighborhoods, and when they find a park they like, go play! There are usually benches right there at the park for the parents and grandparents to take a load off while the kids run around.</p> <h2>3. Visit the local public library</h2> <p>Your taxes have paid for this essential resource, and over the years public libraries have become modernized multimedia learning centers. You'll find all kinds of books, movies, and CDs that the kids will enjoy. Libraries also offer free activities for children, including readings by authors, movie screenings, puppet shows, crafts, science corners, and even poetry jams. Many libraries also offer refreshments at very reasonable prices, and have used books, DVDs, and CDs for sale at low prices. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-modern-reasons-to-visit-your-local-library-today?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Modern Reasons to Visit Your Local Library Today</a>)</p> <h2>4. Take advantage of free days at national parks</h2> <p>While it usually costs a small fee, either per car or per person, visiting a national park on certain days of the year is actually free. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/planyourvisit/fee-free-parks.htm" target="_blank">Those days in 2018</a> are January 15, April 21, September 22, and November 11. So pack a picnic and go see the sights at a national park for $0. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-on-national-park-visits-in-2018?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Save on National Park Visits in 2018</a>)</p> <h2>5. Try a free craft session at Home Depot or Lowe's</h2> <p>Hardware stores know that by offering these free crafts for the kids, the parents will visit the store and end up making a purchase. But you don't have to buy anything. Simply visit your nearest <a href="https://www.homedepot.com/workshops/#change_store" target="_blank">Home Depot</a> or <a href="https://www.lowes.com/cd_Childrens+Corner+and+Gifts+at+Lowes_751688466_" target="_blank">Lowe's</a> when they next have a kid's craft session, and watch the grandkids have an awesome time assembling a bird feeder, or wooden car, or play with sand and special tools. Whatever the grandkids make, they get to keep and bring home. It's a fun, free activity that takes up a few hours, usually on a Saturday morning.</p> <h2>6. Take them to a free concert</h2> <p>Free summer concerts are usually hosted by counties looking to help increase trade at malls, farmers markets, or other shopping venues, and it works. People come out for the free music, and spend money on food trucks, toys, rides, and more. Again, you don't have to spend any money if you don't want to. Get online and search for &quot;free concerts near me&quot; and just watch the results come flooding in. They're usually outdoor, rain-or-shine events, and you will have to provide your own seats and blankets. But it's a great way to spend a few hours watching the grandkids dance and have fun, while getting involved in something positive for your community.</p> <h2>7. Go bowling for free</h2> <p>Bowling centers in towns and cities all across America are participating in a program called <a href="https://www.kidsbowlfree.com/" target="_blank">Kids Bowl Free</a>. Register your grandkids and they will each receive two free games of bowling each day over the summer, a giveaway valued at over $500 per child. Find out which centers near you are involved in the initiative. If you want to join in, many bowling centers offer discounted rates for seniors, and you can also find great deals on sites like Groupon and LivingSocial.</p> <h2>8. Have a picnic</h2> <p>Kids spend way too much time indoors these days, so get them outside to a local park for a family picnic. You don't have to do anything fancy, all you need are a few blankets, folding chairs, some snacks, and maybe a few balls and Frisbees for the kids to throw around.</p> <p>Before you head out, have the grandkids help with the food preparation. It's a great way to get them feeling more independent, and they'll be invested in the whole experience. Making sandwiches, bagging up fruits and veggies, and making lemonade or ice water is another fun activity for them. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-cheap-fun-things-to-do-this-summer?ref=seealso" target="_blank">20 Cheap, Fun Things to Do This Summer</a>)</p> <h2>9. Visit a museum on a free day</h2> <p>Kids hear the word &quot;museum&quot; and they think of dusty sculptures, old paintings, and tired fossils. However, modern museums are jam-packed with the most incredible interactive exhibits, often showcasing great pop culture events. The recent <a href="http://www.powerofcostume.si.edu/" target="_blank"><em>Star Wars</em> and the Power of Costume</a> traveling exhibit from the Smithsonian was a smash hit, and kids everywhere flocked to the museums with their parents and grandparents.</p> <p>Most museums offer free days, and offer discounts for seniors, so plan a trip to a museum (they get busy on free days, so go early) and introduce your grandkids to the many wonders of the world. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-visit-museums-for-free?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Visit Museums for Free</a>)</p> <h2>10. Get them working in the garden</h2> <p>Don't make them do backbreaking work, but the kind of fun gardening that kids love to do. Have them help pulling weeds, plant flowers, prune bushes (with adult supervision), water the plants, and other gardening tasks that can be a chore for you, but a good time for them. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-simple-gardening-skills-anybody-can-master?ref=seealso" target="_blank">13 Simple Gardening Skills Anybody Can Master</a>)</p> <h2>11. Turn the sprinklers on</h2> <p>While you're out in the garden, if it's a nice sunny day and the watering restrictions in your area allow it, get the sprinklers going. The grandkids can put on their swimsuits and run around in the water for hours. You can find cheap attachments at most major stores for hoses that are specifically designed to sprinkle out water in fun patterns, and you can also pick up a <a href="https://amzn.to/2LcHCAI" target="_blank">Slip 'n' Slide</a> for about $20.</p> <h2>12. Go fly a kite</h2> <p>Make a kite, and then go and fly it with the grandkids. There are instructions online for many different types of kites that you can make for pennies, using items you'll find around the house, or, you can pick up cool and <a href="https://amzn.to/2IR2JKE" target="_blank">colorful kites</a> for $10-$20. Then, go to a local park or a place that has plenty of space, and watch the grandkids go berserk when the kite hits new heights.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-entertain-your-grandkids-without-going-broke&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Entertain%2520Your%2520Grandkids%2520Without%2520Going%2520Broke.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Entertain%20Your%20Grandkids%20Without%20Going%20Broke"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Entertain%20Your%20Grandkids%20Without%20Going%20Broke.jpg" alt="How to Entertain Your Grandkids Without Going Broke" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-entertain-your-grandkids-without-going-broke">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/8-amazing-board-games-you-can-diy">8 Amazing Board Games You Can DIY</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-board-games-for-children">The 5 Best Board Games for Children</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/free-and-cheap-things-to-do-in-seattle">Free and Cheap Things to Do in Seattle</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/28-free-ways-to-entertain-your-kids-this-summer">28 Free Ways to Entertain Your Kids This Summer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/25-ways-to-entertain-your-child-for-free-or-cheap">25 Ways to Entertain Your Child for Free or Cheap</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Entertainment Family affordable activities baby-sitting cheap activities free fun grandkids grandparents watching the kids Tue, 29 May 2018 09:00:28 +0000 Paul Michael 2143391 at https://www.wisebread.com 20 Ways to Make Family Camping Easy https://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-to-make-family-camping-easy <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/20-ways-to-make-family-camping-easy" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/family_camping_outdoors_in_forest.jpg" alt="Family camping outdoors in forest" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I like camping with my kids, but I don't like working hard at it. I try to keep the whole trip easy, from the planning, to the packing, to the sitting around the campfire. Of course, there are always trade-offs; you can spend more time preparing at home and put in less effort while on the trip, or vice versa. I like to find that sweet spot where work is minimized at every stage. Most of that has to do with relaxing some of the standards I adhere to back in civilization. Here's how I make family camping a cinch, and how you can, too!</p> <h2>1. Camp locally</h2> <p>When I was a kid, some of my happiest camping memories were made at a place in central Texas called Jellystone Park, less than an hour's drive from my house. In the mornings, my dad would drive to work, while my mom, brother, and I made jars of colored sand and took turns going down the waterslide at the pool.</p> <p>An eight-hour drive to a national park might be what you dream of when planning summer camping, but if your family is new at it, start with a state park or a private campground within an hour or two of home. This way, you'll be able to make a quick getaway if there's a storm or someone gets sick. You can even run home if you forget something. And if one parent can't take the whole time off work, you can do like my dad did and head to the office from the campground. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/camping-for-a-week-is-only-160-at-these-national-parks?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Camping for a Week Is Only $160 at These National Parks</a>)</p> <h2>2. Camp near a town</h2> <p>Some families strap on backpacks and hike miles into the woods before setting up camp. That's admirable, but that ain't my family, at least at this point in our lives. Some of our most enjoyable camping trips have been on the outskirts of small towns, where we could walk or take a short drive to the store to stock up on necessities. This way, you won't have to plan all your meals in advance, and you don't have to bring as many coolers or as much ice, because you can buy a day's worth of groceries at a time.</p> <h2>3. Choose an easy campground and campsite</h2> <p>National forest campgrounds are cheap and often easy to book. It's even possible to camp in the wilderness, find your own water source, and just dig a hole for your bathroom needs. But if you have young children and little appetite for roughing it, look for a campground with an on-site store, showers, laundry, and even a pool or an indoor activity room. Kampgrounds of America (KOA) offers hundreds of private campground options that often provide these types of amenities. They cost a little more than public campgrounds, but KOAs delight my kids with their pancake breakfasts and mini-golf courses.</p> <p>Another thing to keep an eye out for is whether you get to park right by your campsite or you have to carry your belongings from a parking lot to your site. If you have big kids this may not be a problem, but with toddlers or babies, it can be tough to ferry gear back and forth while keeping track of the little ones.</p> <p>Once the campground is chosen, you're not done. Study the campground map. (<a href="https://www.reserveamerica.com/outdoors/tent-camping.htm" target="_blank">ReserveAmerica</a> has maps for state parks and some other camping areas.) I like to pick sites near enough to the bathrooms that my kids can visit them alone. If water spigots or electric outlets are only available at some sites, I get one of those.</p> <p>On the flip side, if there is a lazy river or pond in the campground, you want to be far away from that because that's where the mosquitoes will be. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-simple-all-natural-bug-and-mosquito-repellents?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Simple All Natural Bug and Mosquito Repellents</a>)</p> <h2>4. Lower your beauty standards</h2> <p>We don't pack that much in the way of beauty and hygiene products. A hairbrush and toothbrush for each kid, some toothpaste and hand towels to share, a beach/shower towel for each person, some soap and deodorant, and we're good to go. The most important personal care products you will bring are your sunscreen and bug spray.</p> <p>I don't bring stuff like shampoo, conditioner, makeup, or razors because I greatly lower my beauty standards in the woods. Showering or bathing every other day might be a firm rule at home, but while camping, I'm fine with my kids going the whole week without a shower if they want. I do, however, try to keep them brushing their teeth twice a day while camping. That has to do with health, not necessarily beauty.</p> <h2>5. Load up on baby wipes</h2> <p>Even if you no longer have babies, these things are clutch for camping. If you don't have access to a shower, <a href="https://amzn.to/2rScFJm" target="_blank">baby wipes</a> will be your hygiene go-to. Even at campgrounds with showers, wipes can come in handy for cleaning kids' grubby hands before a snack without hiking to the bathrooms. And if anyone gets car sick on the way there, you're ready for cleanup.</p> <h2>6. Bring all kinds of lighting</h2> <p>It's important to have a light source that doesn't need to be handheld. We have some tabletop lanterns with handles that can be hung inside the tent or from a clothesline as needed. Other handy lights are headlights and small <a href="https://amzn.to/2Iw6O3k" target="_blank">LED flashlights</a> that can be slipped into pockets. These tend to disappear as a trip goes on, so buy lots of inexpensive lights and scatter them everywhere. <a href="https://amzn.to/2KxU2lF" target="_blank">Glow stick bracelets</a> or necklaces are also an affordable way to keep track of your kids in the dark.</p> <h2>7. Don't skimp on sleeping arrangements</h2> <p>After trying a number of camping products, I have become resigned to the fact that I was not built to rough it when it comes to sleeping. I can easily go a week without makeup, but I'm not happy if I try to sleep on a foam pad on the ground.</p> <p>Last summer, my family bought a big <a href="https://amzn.to/2LbjSNr" target="_blank">Aerobed</a>, and we used the electrical outlet in our car to blow it up. I slept like a baby, and will bring it on every camping trip from now on. The only other thing that has given me serious comfort during camping is a <a href="https://amzn.to/2rQYYdu" target="_blank">hammock</a> &mdash; which is a lot cheaper and easier to pack, if you don't get too cold at night. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-air-mattresses?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 5 Best Air Mattresses</a>)</p> <h2>8. Bring easy activities</h2> <p>My kids spend a lot of time playing in the woods and making up games involving their favorite trees, but everyone should have a book with them for quiet times, and bringing a board game is always a good idea.</p> <p>You can certainly implement a no-gadget rule, but if one of your kids is driving you crazy, you could always give them some tablet time alone in the tent or car.</p> <h2>9. Pack firemaking tools</h2> <p>I am a Girl Scout leader and I know how to construct a killer fire with a single match, but I'm also not above starting with a <a href="https://amzn.to/2Gv4CYk" target="_blank">Duraflame log</a> if I don't feel like working at it. A box of long stick matches is also helpful.</p> <h2>10. Bring all the baby gear you need</h2> <p>If you're camping with a baby, you already get a medal. You don't need to rough it by going without the things you rely on at home to keep baby safe and happy. I'm not saying you have to bring all 1,000 pieces of baby equipment in your house, but if you think you might need something and you have room in the car, don't deny yourself.</p> <p>Bringing a portable playpen could literally be a lifesaver, because an air mattress is not a safe surface for a baby to share. When we camped with our babies, I really appreciated having a safe place to stash the baby when I was cooking. Some <a href="https://amzn.to/2IylIq6" target="_blank">portable playpens</a> even have changing table attachments, which is great because no one really wants you to change the baby on the picnic table.</p> <h2>11. Bring a huge tent</h2> <p>You'll already be dealing with more togetherness than anyone is used to while on a family trip. Don't feel bad about getting a huge tent so that sleeping bags don't have to be crowded up against each other. Or if the kids want their own tent, you can bring a small one just for them and let them set it up themselves.</p> <p>Bonus: You won't have to step over their mess in your own tent.</p> <h2>12. Pack with clear tubs</h2> <p>Clear plastic storage containers allow you to see everything you brought without having to unpack everything. They will keep everything dry and if the containers have a good latch, they&rsquo;ll prevent animals from getting into anything. You can even stack them to make a temporary work surface at the campsite.</p> <p>When you're done with your trip, store your camping supplies in the same tubs, labeled, to make packing for the next trip a breeze. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-storage-products-as-recommended-by-organization-pros?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 9 Best Storage Products as Recommended by Organization Pros</a>)</p> <h2>13. Consider renting a specialty vehicle</h2> <p>The closest my family has gotten to renting an RV for camping is renting a Jucy &mdash; a minivan converted for camping use &mdash; and we loved it so much that the kids are begging to do it again this summer. The beauty of a converted van is that it drives like an ordinary passenger vehicle, but it has a little kitchen in the back with a mini-fridge, sink, drawers, and a stove. These things come with all your silverware and dishes. You also have a pop-up tent with a padded floor on the roof, allowing you to go camping with very little preparation.</p> <p>The Jucy made days at the beach during our trip a breeze, since we had cold food waiting for us in our fridge in the parking lot. I also loved stopping at a grocery store and loading my purchases directly into the fridge in the back of the van. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-easiest-ways-to-save-on-your-next-rv-camping-trip?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Easiest Ways to Save on Your Next RV Camping Trip</a>)</p> <h2>14. Arrive before dark</h2> <p>Last summer, my family went on a camping trip and it was lovely &mdash; except the first night, when we arrived after sundown and struggled to put up two large tents on an unfamiliar, irregularly-shaped site.</p> <p>When you're on a weekend trip, it can be tempting to leave after work on a Friday to get the most camping time in, but if there's a chance that traffic or a delayed start might land you there after dark, think twice.</p> <p>You should also stop for a meal on the way to the site, so you don't have to worry about cooking while also setting up the tents the moment you arrive.</p> <h2>15. Make your kids help</h2> <p>After a long drive, your kids will want to run around and play. Let them do this, but only for five minutes. Then put them to work. Everyone above the age of infant should have a job when you pull into the campsite. Little kids can set up their own camp chairs and hold onto the bag of stakes while the tent is going up. At ages eight, 11, and 14, my kids can now set up the tent with little adult help.</p> <h2>16. Put up clothes lines</h2> <p>Having somewhere off the ground to hang everything, from damp towels to clothing to sleeping bags that need airing out, is really handy. It's also a great place to clip a lantern after dark to add more lighting to your campsite.</p> <h2>17. Don't try to be a fancy chef</h2> <p>I like to keep camping meals really simple. At home, we make pancakes from scratch, but at the campground, I've been known to bring the kind of pancakes you spray out of a can. I get precooked meats wherever possible because I've experienced the kind of mess you can make if a package of raw ground beef leaks in a cooler. And canned soup and boxed macaroni and cheese are lunchtime favorites.</p> <p>Simple also means fewer dishes to wash. I confess that I resort to a lot of individual packaging when camping. I've purchased those individual boxes of cereal, which the kids <em>love</em>, and cases of granola bars and canned sparkling water are my best friends.</p> <p>If you want to avoid waste, there are a lot of ways to prepackage things using upcycling. Don't want to buy ready-made pancake batter? You can make it at home and package it in a ketchup bottle for the same ease with less waste. Instead of individually packaged granola bars, you can make granola at home and store it in an empty coffee creamer bottle for easy snacking.</p> <p>Pre-measuring ingredients such as flour, spices, etc., allows you to both throw together meals more easily and pack less, since you only bring as much as you need of each ingredient.</p> <p>Or you can go all out at home and cook the whole dish, then freeze it to reheat at the campground. My mom would often make a big pot of chili or spaghetti sauce before we went camping. If you have leftovers already stored in your fridge, you're all set to grab and go. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-tips-for-camping-cooking?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Tips for Camping Cooking</a>)</p> <h2>18. Bring your cooking gadgets &mdash; or not</h2> <p>If you like to pack less, try to get a campsite with a grill or a grate that goes down over the fire and bring a bag of charcoal. On one trip last summer when we forgot to pack our camp stove, we managed to cook all kinds of meals, including bratwurst, eggs, and grilled cheese, right over the fire with little hassle.</p> <p>But if you have a campsite with electrical hookups &mdash; or even a converter to plug into your car for electricity &mdash; you can use all your gadgets to make cooking easier at the campground. Folks are bringing their <a href="https://amzn.to/2s1ih3T" target="_blank">Instant Pots</a> camping, and I may just try it this summer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-instant-pot-recipes-that-will-save-you-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Instant Pot Recipes That Will Save You Money</a>)</p> <h2>19. Try to get everything dry before packing up</h2> <p>Sweep or use a portable vacuum cleaner on the inside of the tent and wipe any dew off the sides before packing it up. If you can't get it clean and dry &mdash; like if it's pouring out during your departure &mdash; you'll have to set the tent up again in your yard when you get home in order to prevent mold from forming. To make your next trip easy, double check for moisture or any odors in the bins, your tent bag, and sleeping bags before storing them.</p> <p>For me, the exception to this is dishes. Although I like to keep a dedicated bin of cooking utensils and dishes for camping, I do run them through the dishwasher when I get home before repacking them. I wash the dishes at camp before heading home, but I don't pay too much attention to how they get thrown in the bin since I know I'll be redoing it in the comfort of my kitchen.</p> <h2>20. Keep all your camping gear in the same place</h2> <p>Stack all those clear bins full of clean, dry, ready-to-go camping gear in the same area of your garage or crawl space, so that next time, you can throw them in the car and go. If you need to replace or repair something, do it now instead of putting it off until you're getting ready for your next trip. If you make a habit of having everything ready before you store it, you won't have to waste time going through everything before the next trip.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F20-ways-to-make-family-camping-easy&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F20%2520Ways%2520to%2520Make%2520Family%2520Camping%2520Easy.jpg&amp;description=20%20Ways%20to%20Make%20Family%20Camping%20Easy"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/20%20Ways%20to%20Make%20Family%20Camping%20Easy.jpg" alt="20 Ways to Make Family Camping Easy" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-to-make-family-camping-easy">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-find-child-care-while-traveling">6 Ways to Find Child Care While Traveling</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family">How to Travel Internationally With Your Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/yes-affordable-family-travel-is-possible">Yes, Affordable Family Travel Is Possible</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-a-family-of-4-can-see-italy-for-1000-or-less">How a Family of 4 Can See Italy for $1,000 or Less</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-affordable-vacations-to-please-every-age-group">5 Affordable Vacations to Please Every Age Group</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Travel camping camping tips family camping family travel travel tips traveling with kids Fri, 25 May 2018 08:00:21 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2143389 at https://www.wisebread.com 5 Questions to Ask Before Sending Your Child to Private School https://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-sending-your-child-to-private-school <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-questions-to-ask-before-sending-your-child-to-private-school" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/pupils_in_science_lesson_studying_robotics.jpg" alt="Pupils In Science Lesson Studying Robotics" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Parents consider sending their children to private school over public school for several reasons, and while a private school setting might be best for your child's learning style, you need to evaluate the decision carefully before signing up. Here are five questions to ask yourself before deciding on private school for your child. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-times-you-should-choose-private-school-over-public?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Times You Should Choose Private School Over Public</a>)</p> <h2>1. Can I afford it?</h2> <p>Before you even consider how great a certain school is, you have to know whether you can afford it or not. Will you have to get another job? Will sending your child to this school put unnecessary financial stress on your family? What will you sacrifice to send your child to private school?</p> <p>The national average private school tuition is about $10,302 per year, according to Private School Review, but of course this cost varies drastically depending on the area. For example, the average price of a private school in Iowa is almost $5,000, but over $16,000 in New York. Most private high schools cost more than private elementary schools, as well, so your cost will go up if you keep your child enrolled throughout their school life.</p> <p>Yes, this school might be an amazing opportunity for your child, but is the cost truly worth it? I'm not talking about just the sticker price of the school. You also have to weigh the cost of working longer hours and spending less time with your family in order to make it work. Really consider if you can afford the school and the sacrifices you might have to make along with it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-late-starters-can-save-for-their-kids-education?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Here's How Late Starters Can Save for Their Kids' Education</a>)</p> <h2>2. What are the hidden costs?</h2> <p>Unfortunately, the costs of sending your child to a private school don't stop at the monthly tuition bill. There could be several other hidden costs as well, such as the cost of uniforms, expensive textbooks, fundraising fees, field trips, and other special events. Of course, don't forget about sports, elective classes, or after school activities. If the tuition bill is already tipping your budget into the negative, then the extra fees might be too much for your family to handle. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-money-on-kids-activities?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Save Money on Kids' Activities</a>)</p> <h2>3. How does it compare to the other schools nearby?</h2> <p>There must be a reason why you're considering a private school rather than a public one, so make a list of those reasons. Is it because of safety? A particular sport your child plays? Is it because of your religion? Or perhaps because private schools tend to look better on college applications?</p> <p>Once you have those written down, find out all you can about the private school versus the public schools in your area. For example, if safety is a main priority for you, find out how the private school maintains a safer campus than the other schools. What safety protocols do they have in place? How many incidents have there been in the past five years?</p> <p>It's important to dig deeper into these issues because you might discover that behind the high price tag and fancy test scores, the private school you had your eye on isn't much safer or better at getting students accepted to top colleges than you thought. On the other hand, the private school you're interested in might have a huge lead over other schools in athletics or academics, which makes the tuition easier to justify.</p> <h2>4. What will this school do for my child?</h2> <p>No one knows your child better than you do, so evaluate potential schools for what they will offer your child. Don't get distracted by impressive stats the school might advertise, like having an unbeatable mathletes team or having the highest number of full college scholarships for basketball players. Make a list of your child's strengths and weaknesses and discover how the school can support both. For example, if your child is naturally talented in theater arts but struggles in math, will this school give him or her unique opportunities to act and learn more about theater? Does the school offer special classes or tutoring to strengthen math skills, or will they be thrown into an advanced math class and expected to stay afloat?</p> <h2>5. What is student life like?</h2> <p>School is more than just academics; it's the place where students learn to socialize and create strong friendships. A school that boasts high test scores, but has miserable students is not a healthy environment for anyone. When evaluating the school, ask how the school gets the students involved in their local community. Are the students encouraged to partake in activities that help others outside of the school?</p> <p>You also want to learn how much time is given for breaks and socializing and how often the teachers encourage group projects and working together in the classroom. Most importantly, how does the school deal with bullying and other social behavior issues?</p> <p>There is truly no right or wrong answer when it comes to choosing a private school or a public school for your child. You know your kid best, and you know what's the best for your family.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-questions-to-ask-before-sending-your-child-to-private-school&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Questions%2520to%2520Ask%2520Before%2520Sending%2520Your%2520Child%2520to%2520Private%2520School.jpg&amp;description=5%20Questions%20to%20Ask%20Before%20Sending%20Your%20Child%20to%20Private%20School"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Questions%20to%20Ask%20Before%20Sending%20Your%20Child%20to%20Private%20School.jpg" alt="5 Questions to Ask Before Sending Your Child to Private School" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-sending-your-child-to-private-school">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/are-private-schools-worth-the-money-they-demand">Are Private Schools Worth the Money They Demand?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-essential-money-moves-for-new-parents">7 Essential Money Moves for New Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/28-free-ways-to-entertain-your-kids-this-summer">28 Free Ways to Entertain Your Kids This Summer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-frugal-living-skills-you-should-be-teaching-your-children">7 Frugal Living Skills You Should Be Teaching Your Children</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Family affordable education costs of raising a child parenting tips private school school costs school tuition Thu, 24 May 2018 08:30:47 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 2142705 at https://www.wisebread.com 10 Money Lessons Your Kids Can Learn While They Travel https://www.wisebread.com/10-money-lessons-your-kids-can-learn-while-they-travel <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-money-lessons-your-kids-can-learn-while-they-travel" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/happy_child_girl_collect_suitcase_on_vacation.jpg" alt="Happy child girl collect suitcase on vacation" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Think back to what you loved most about your latest family vacation. What's the first thing that comes to mind? Maybe you enjoyed teaching your kids about new places, new cultures, or the history of the destination you visited. Or perhaps you were just tickled to give your kids some undivided attention without work or life getting in the way.</p> <p>What you may not have considered, is the fact that any kind of travel can be a learning opportunity &mdash; even if it's not too far from home. This is particularly true when it comes to lessons about money, because travel requires so many financial decisions.</p> <p>If you're angling to broaden your children's perspectives on money, keep an eye out for learning opportunities that may be less than obvious. Here are some lessons your kids can pick up no matter where you go.</p> <h2>1. The importance of budgeting and tracking spending</h2> <p>No matter how careful you are when you set your travel budget, it's easy to let your spending get out of hand. You're away from home and on a different schedule, and you're probably around food, souvenirs, and constant temptations to spend.</p> <p>That's why a family vacation may be the perfect time to introduce your kids to the concept of tracking your daily spending &mdash; it's one of the best ways to stay within your travel budget. To get your kids into this mindset, you just need to set a daily spending limit, then clue your kids into how it works. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-fool-proof-ways-to-stay-within-your-travel-budget?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Fool-Proof Ways to Stay Within Your Travel Budget</a>)</p> <p>My husband and I typically take our kids on a three- or four-week trip to Europe every summer. On these trips, we set a daily spending limit to cover food, souvenirs, and snacks. While the spending limit depends on where we are, it's usually enough to cover one meal &quot;out&quot; per day and a daily splurge like gelato or candy. We eat the rest of our meals in our condo or hotel.</p> <p>This really annoys my kids (ages six and nine) sometimes, but I explain that we have a budget for the entire trip and the only way to stay within our budget is by breaking it down by the day. They don't always like when we're in our hotel eating sandwiches for dinner, but they do understand why we do it.</p> <h2>2. How credit works</h2> <p>Tanner Calais, founder of Cruzely.com, says cruises are another opportune time to teach kids about spending and credit, since cruise lines have you charge all your expenses to a key card tied to your account. The system is similar to credit cards in that you're using &quot;invisible money&quot; to buy things, and you pay your bill at the end of the cruise. &quot;This is a great opportunity to introduce kids to the power of credit cards and how they work,&quot; says Calais.</p> <p>For instance, it can be tough to track your spending when you don't see it because you're using a card. By forcing the kids to watch you keep track of your daily purchases with a notepad or your smartphone, you can help them see how spending can add up over time. &quot;It's also not free money simply because cash doesn't come out of your wallet when you buy something,&quot; he says. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-saving-items-to-bring-on-your-next-cruise?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Money-Saving Items to Bring On Your Next Cruise</a>)</p> <h2>3. Money doesn't grow on trees</h2> <p>Here's another lesson kids need to learn: Money is a finite resource.</p> <p>Eileen Gunn, founder of the blog Families Go Travel, says this is one lesson her child has learned by bringing her own souvenir money on vacation. Having her 10-year-old daughter bring her own stash of cash to spend has helped her learn that &quot;you can't have everything you want,&quot; says Gunn.</p> <p>For example, if she has $20 to spend on a trip and sees something she wants for $20, she has to decide whether she wants the item badly enough to spend her entire budget on it. She also has to make peace with the fact that she won't be able to afford anything else she wants for the duration of the trip.</p> <p>Gunn says she has occasionally loaned her daughter money when she was desperate to have another souvenir, &quot;but it has to be something really worthwhile.&quot; Also, Gunn makes her repay the loan as soon as they get home from their trip. The entire process &quot;makes her a more discerning consumer,&quot; says Gunn.</p> <h2>4. The power of compound interest</h2> <p>Travel blogger Kevin Payne, founder of Family Money Adventure, offers the perfect example of how you don't have to travel far to teach your kids about money and finance. Recently, part of his family had an epic staycation in their hometown of Cleveland, Ohio while his two older kids were in New York City. They visited the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, including its Learning Center and Money Museum.</p> <p>Payne says he and his children learned many money lessons during the trip, including the history of bartering and why money is a better system of exchange. But that's not all.</p> <p>&quot;I think the biggest lesson they learned was the importance of saving money and the role of interest,&quot; he says. The museum accomplishes this goal via a staircase to its second level that illustrates the power of compound interest on every step.</p> <p>&quot;Each step represented a year more of interest so the kids could see how much money they would end up with after a 20-year period of saving,&quot; says Payne. &quot;It was such a great way to illustrate how quickly savings can add up.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-investing-lessons-you-must-teach-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Investing Lessons You Must Teach Your Kids</a>)</p> <h2>5. The power of negotiation</h2> <p>In some countries, local markets provide a powerful lesson in bargaining. Travel blogger Shannon O'Donnell, founder of A Little Adrift, has had periodic custody of her niece, and she has used that time to travel with her and teach her about money.</p> <p>O'Donnell says that, while they were in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Myanmar, her then 11-year-old niece learned to critically evaluate the cost of something she wanted, plus how to respectfully bargain if she wanted a better deal.</p> <p>&quot;She would use this skill at the local markets if she wanted to buy a souvenir and became quite good at disarming them with a smile as she politely asked for better deals,&quot; says O'Donnell. &quot;Overall, by learning that some cultures bargain for better deals, it has allowed her to consider the value of her purchases and how she spends her money even when back home in the states.&quot;</p> <h2>6. How you can save money while still having fun</h2> <p>While travel isn't typically cheap, there are still plenty of ways to save. Blogger Lee Huffman of Dads Who Travel says he uses travel to teach his kids that you can save money on some aspects of your trip and still have a blast.</p> <p>One strategy he uses to impart this message is booking accommodations that have some sort of kitchen. This allows them to save money on food by buying groceries. &quot;For example, on our last trip to Orlando, we stayed at a timeshare property that offered a mini-kitchen with a fridge, microwave, and two-burner stove,&quot; says Huffman.</p> <p>They still have a boatload of fun on their trips, but he goes out of his way to explain to his kids why dining out for every meal would make each trip cost considerably more.</p> <h2>7. Be grateful for what you have</h2> <p>Corinne McDermott, founder of Have Baby Will Travel, says travel has helped her kids understand how fortunate they are. During her family's frequent trips to the Caribbean, they often talk about how people's homes are different and how the children appear to have fewer belongings. Yet, the people they meet are still happy and thriving.</p> <p>&quot;We've been fortunate to meet and socialize with many locals on our travels, and they work hard and are as proud of their homes and families as we are of ours,&quot; says McDermott. &quot;Occasionally we all need reminders to be grateful for all that we have, no matter how it compares to others next door or across the world.&quot;</p> <h2>8. Being able to travel means parents have to work</h2> <p>Family finance writer Catherine Alford agrees that travel offers an endless number of opportunities to teach your kids about money. However, the most important lesson she wants to teach her kids is that, in order to travel, Mom and Dad have to work. &quot;I've been teaching them the connection between hard work and purchases since they were babies,&quot; she says.</p> <p>When her children were two years old, Alford and her husband took them on a monthlong European vacation where they visited five different countries. Since she works remotely as a blogger and freelance writer, Alford had to work throughout the trip. &quot;I kept reminding them that we were able to travel because Mommy was working,&quot; she says.</p> <h2>9. Experiences are better than things</h2> <p>For many families, prioritizing travel means they need to cut back on other kinds of purchases in their everyday lives. Those are often sacrifices they're happy to make. Shannon Austin, senior communications director at the Center for Financial Services Innovation says one of the biggest lessons her family has learned from travel is that they can have amazing experiences if they maintain a reasonable lifestyle.</p> <p>Austin and her children had the opportunity to live in Germany for three years when her oldest was six and her youngest was two. Once they moved abroad, she says she told her kids that they planned to &quot;live small so they can experience big.&quot; Over the three years they spent in Germany, they took 36 trips to destinations including Slovenia, Croatia, Greece, Portugal, Spain, Italy, and Austria.</p> <p>&quot;My oldest delights in noticing some flowers that remind her of the plants growing over terraces in Ronda, Spain; my youngest recalls riding donkeys in Santorini. They remember filling water bottles on the roadside at a waterfall in Norway; they remember hikes in the Franconian part of Germany,&quot; says Austin. These memories are priceless, she says, but they were only possible because her family prioritized travel instead of &quot;stuff.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-you-should-splurge-on-experiences-not-things?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Reasons You Should Splurge on Experiences, Not Things</a>)</p> <h2>10. How currency exchange works</h2> <p>Travel can also help teach your kids how money works around the world. Tracey Carisch, author of the upcoming memoir <em>Excess Baggage: One Family's Around-the-World Search for Balance, </em>says her children gained firsthand experience in how currency works when they traveled nomadically for 18 months.</p> <p>Carisch says her oldest child began to understand how different types of currency work when they arrived in South Africa from Ethiopia. They found a currency exchange booth at the airport and went to exchange their remaining Ethiopian birr for South African rand. As she was talking to the cashier, she mentioned to her daughter that they made a little money on the trip due to the favorable exchange rate.</p> <p>&quot;My daughter's curiosity was piqued and she started peppering me with questions,&quot; says Carisch. &quot;Within five minutes, she understood the concept behind currency trading and cross rates. She researched it on Forex and came up with a home-school module for herself based on reading currency pairs and calculating spreads.&quot;</p> <p>Carisch also says her child &quot;doesn't even like math.&quot; This just goes to show how powerful travel can be when it comes to learning about money and math. You can learn and forget almost anything in a classroom, but real world experiences teach lessons that last a lifetime.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F10-money-lessons-your-kids-can-learn-while-they-travel&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F10%2520Money%2520Lessons%2520Your%2520Kids%2520Can%2520Learn%2520While%2520They%2520Travel.jpg&amp;description=10%20Money%20Lessons%20Your%20Kids%20Can%20Learn%20While%20They%20Travel"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/10%20Money%20Lessons%20Your%20Kids%20Can%20Learn%20While%20They%20Travel.jpg" alt="10 Money Lessons Your Kids Can Learn While They Travel" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/holly-johnson">Holly Johnson</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-money-lessons-your-kids-can-learn-while-they-travel">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family">How to Travel Internationally With Your Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare">How to Make Flying With an Infant Less of a Nightmare</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-affordable-family-getaways-when-you-dont-have-a-vacation-fund">7 Tips for Family Getaways When You Don&#039;t Have a Vacation Fund</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/yes-affordable-family-travel-is-possible">Yes, Affordable Family Travel Is Possible</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/8-great-places-to-take-the-family-for-spring-break">8 Great Places to Take the Family for Spring Break</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Travel family vacation money lessons parenting tips travel tips travel with kids vacation with kids Mon, 21 May 2018 08:31:15 +0000 Holly Johnson 2140594 at https://www.wisebread.com How to Make Flying With an Infant Less of a Nightmare https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/dad_holding_his_baby_daughter_during_flight.jpg" alt="Dad holding his baby daughter during flight" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When Jim Wang and wife Martha flew to Taiwan with their infant six years ago, they had no idea what they were in for. Their baby wasn't even a year old and hadn't yet discovered he could walk, Wang says. What was the worst that could happen?</p> <p>Unfortunately, their baby refused to sleep the entire journey, and Wang had to walk the length of the plane to keep him busy. In the meantime, he &quot;just about lost his mind.&quot;</p> <p>&quot;It was a nightmare,&quot; he said, and an extremely long one. If he had to do things over, Wang says he would have probably just stayed home.</p> <p>Skipping the entire thing may sound good if you're facing a long flight with a baby or several kids, but it's not always feasible. Maybe you're desperate for a real vacation or need to travel to see family. Whatever the reason, flying with babies is sometimes inevitable.</p> <p>Many family travel pros say your flight doesn't have to be miserable. There are strategies parents can use to make the experience relatively painless. If you know what to prepare for &mdash; and what to avoid &mdash; flying with an infant can even be seamless.</p> <h2>1. Consider buying your baby an airline seat</h2> <p>While most airlines let children ages two and under share a seat with a parent (sometimes for a small fee), you do have the option to buy them a separate seat. That's one thing Wang, who writes about personal finance and frugality at Wallet Hacks, wishes he had done differently.</p> <p>&quot;We would've considered spending the extra money to buy a seat so we could use a baby seat that he was familiar with and stood a chance at sleeping in,&quot; he says. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-southwest-airlines-is-the-best-domestic-airline-for-families?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Why Southwest Airlines is the Best Domestic Airline for Families</a>)</p> <h2>2. Bring out the screens</h2> <p>Another big fail the Wangs admit to is not bringing along any screens or digital entertainment. Yes, even a baby under the age of one may be entertained watching a movie or cartoon &mdash; at least for a while. Even if you have a &quot;no screens&quot; policy at home, a long flight is a good reason to reconsider &mdash; at least for the day and for your time in the airport.</p> <p>&quot;It's not good to put such a young kid in front of a screen, but for that special circumstance, I would've buckled,&quot; Wang says. &quot;Since it never occurred to us, we didn't have anything prepared so we couldn't even give in.&quot;</p> <p>Corinne McDermott, founder of the blog Have Baby Will Travel, agrees that technology is a must if your baby is old enough to care. &quot;The tablet is your friend,&quot; she says.</p> <h2>3. Plan your flights around the baby's sleep schedule</h2> <p>McDermott says another important consideration is what time you travel. And if you're able to pick among several different flights, you should tailor your schedule around your baby's natural rhythms.</p> <p>&quot;Try to book your flight for a time your baby is likely to sleep,&quot; she says. With this strategy, you may let your baby squeeze in their nap while you're in the air.</p> <p>You could even consider a red-eye flight that takes place overnight. But if you opt for this option, you should try to follow your baby's regular sleep schedule as much as possible. For example, have your baby change into pajamas, brush their teeth, and read them their normal bedtime stories.</p> <p>If this doesn't work, you should &quot;try to book for when your baby will be most cheerful,&quot; she says. If your baby is always crabby first thing in the morning but good by 10 a.m., for example, keep that in mind when you're booking your trip.</p> <h2>4. Bring stuff to do</h2> <p>While this might seem obvious, bringing stuff to keep your baby entertained is a stellar idea &mdash; even if you expect them to sleep. McDermott suggests stashing a few toys and books out of sight before your trip, then bringing them out on the plane as a surprise. &quot;Your baby or toddler will be happy to see old favorites while en route,&quot; she says.</p> <p>Depending on the age of your baby, old-school fun like crayons, blank sheets of paper, and a travel Etch-a-Sketch could be lifesavers. If your baby is a small infant, bring their favorite mobile, a boatload of pacifiers, board books, and whatever else your baby loves.</p> <h2>5. Dress for success</h2> <p>Since the temperature on planes can be so variable, you need to think about how you dress your baby before you leave for your trip, says writer and editor Melissa Mayer of Why Not Let's Go. Frequent flyers know that some planes tend to be hot while others can be overly cool. &quot;Babies are temperature-sensitive and you don't want to be unprepared,&quot; she says.</p> <p>The solution? &quot;Dress your baby in layers and have a blanket in your carry-on so you can cool down or warm up your baby if and when necessary,&quot; says Mayer. The blanket will also help provide comfort and block the light when it's time to sleep.</p> <h2>6. Make the airport experience as easy as possible</h2> <p>While flying with your baby is a big part of the travel experience, you'll also need to spend a few hours in the airport each way. This part of the trip can be important since it can set the tone for the rest of your journey.</p> <p>Sarah Hirsch, founder of the blog Well-Traveled Kids, says she believes upgrading to services like TSA Precheck and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-sign-up-for-global-entry?ref=internal" target="_blank">Global Entry</a> can be worth it to avoid long lines at the airport. While you can pay for these benefits outright, keep in mind that there are several travel <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-credit-cards-that-offer-tsa-pre-check-and-global-entry-reimbursement?ref=internal" target="_blank">credit cards that offer TSA Precheck and Global Entry</a> as a cardholder perk.</p> <p>Also, be prepared for TSA screening. &quot;If you are boarding with liquids for the baby, put those on the belt before your luggage so they can be tested while you are getting your bags and stroller through security,&quot; says Hirsch.</p> <p>Also, take your stroller in the airport and gate-check it before boarding the plane. This is better than checking the stroller with your luggage since you'll still have access to it while you're waiting in the terminal for boarding.</p> <h2>7. Bring a fully stocked diaper bag</h2> <p>Last but not least, make sure you are fully prepared for any typical day with your baby. This includes bringing extra clothes, bibs, diapers, diaper cream, and wipes. &quot;I've been stuck on the runway for hours and happy I had extra supplies,&quot; says Hirsch.</p> <p>You should also be prepared to change a diaper or two on the plane. This may have to go down in your seat since not all planes have a changing table. Also remember that diapers can and do fail &mdash; often at the worst times. &quot;My infant always had a blow out when the plane took off,&quot; says Hirsch. As the saying goes, better safe than sorry.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Make%2520Flying%2520With%2520an%2520Infant%2520Less%2520of%2520a%2520Nightmare.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Make%20Flying%20With%20an%20Infant%20Less%20of%20a%20Nightmare"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Make%20Flying%20With%20an%20Infant%20Less%20of%20a%20Nightmare.jpg" alt="How to Make Flying With an Infant Less of a Nightmare" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/holly-johnson">Holly Johnson</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-flying-with-an-infant-less-of-a-nightmare">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-money-lessons-your-kids-can-learn-while-they-travel">10 Money Lessons Your Kids Can Learn While They Travel</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family">How to Travel Internationally With Your Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/8-travel-must-haves-for-nursing-moms">8 Travel Must-Haves for Nursing Moms</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-find-child-care-while-traveling">6 Ways to Find Child Care While Traveling</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-romantic-getaways-any-couple-can-afford">7 Romantic Getaways Any Couple Can Afford</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Travel flying tips flying with a baby flying with kids parenting tips travel tips travel with kids Thu, 17 May 2018 08:30:20 +0000 Holly Johnson 2140430 at https://www.wisebread.com How to Travel Internationally With Your Kids https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/brothers_and_sister_sightseeing_in_pisa.jpg" alt="Brothers and sister sightseeing in Pisa" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Making the decision to go on a family vacation can be kind of terrifying, especially if it's your first time. Everything we're told about raising children revolves around the importance of routine and stability &mdash; two things you're likely to lose on a travel day.</p> <p>It can be challenging just trying to get the kids off to school in the morning, let alone taking them to a new country on a one-week vacation. Travel days will likely be your biggest challenge because once you arrive at your hotel or resort, you can mostly relax and enjoy. But you can mitigate most of the stress and chaos of long travel days by packing the right items and following a few simple rules.<span style="font-size: 13px;">&nbsp;(See also: </span><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-wisely-choose-your-next-travel-destination?ref=seealso" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">How to Wisely Choose Your Next Travel Destination</a><span style="font-size: 13px;">)</span></p> <h2>1. Choose the right destinations</h2> <p>The right destinations for you and your family will depend on a lot of factors, as there's no one-size-fits-all destination. While you don't need to rule out certain countries because you're traveling with kids, you do need to take your children's ages into consideration to find locations that will be the most suitable for kids.</p> <p>Daily adventures like long hikes may be more difficult with younger children, whereas many teenagers will need things to keep them stimulated. A good way to ensure everyone is happy is to get them involved in the decision-making. Older kids can do their own research on the internet, while younger children can be given a number of options to choose from after explaining what each has to offer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-affordable-vacations-to-please-every-age-group?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Affordable Vacations to Please Every Age Group</a>)</p> <h2>2. Book family-friendly accommodations</h2> <p>Booking the right accommodation is vital to making traveling the world with your family a success. Those with kids, particularly younger ones, will attest that a good night's sleep can mean the difference between a fun day and a nightmare. Your options are obviously more limited than when you're solo traveling or with friends, with many hostels, guesthouses, and even some hotels operating a no-children policy.</p> <p>Your best options are to stay in hotel suites, or to rent full apartments through sites like Airbnb. Privacy is a must, and it's great to have your own space to relax in, and for the kids to have room to play and run around. You can narrow the hotel options on search engines by using the sort function to filter by family-friendly properties. Airbnb also enables you to find entire houses or apartments that are family-friendly. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-hotel-booking-websites-can-save-you-money-and-headaches?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Hotel Booking Websites Can Save You Money</a>)</p> <h2>3. Pack light</h2> <p>What to pack is often at the forefront of parents' minds when they make the decision to travel with their family. Just the thought of trying to condense all of the gear &mdash; particularly associated with younger children &mdash; down to a manageable amount can be daunting. Things like strollers, car seats, and carriers all take up huge amounts of space, and that's before toys, clothes, and everything else they might need. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-families-can-travel-like-minimalists?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Ways Families Can Travel Like Minimalists</a>)</p> <p>Packing as light as possible will make moving around far easier, and will potentially save your family lots of money in excess baggage fees. As soon as your kids are old enough to carry a backpack or wheel a suitcase, it's a good idea to get them involved in the packing stage as well. They'll soon come to appreciate the importance of packing light, and will enjoy being involved in the process.</p> <p>Generally, anything that's an absolute necessity for children will be available pretty much anywhere you go, but here are a few things that you can pack to ensure that your travel day will run as smoothly as possible.</p> <h3>Baby wipes</h3> <p>There are a lot of germs on travel days and your little ones are going to be more susceptible to catching something on the road. Bring a few sanitizer or baby wipes and wipe down airplane seats, seat belts, handles and any surfaces your children may touch during the trip.</p> <h3>Comfort toy</h3> <p>Most children have some kind of toy, blanket, or pacifier that calms them down. Bring it! These simple items can be life savers.</p> <h3>Tablet</h3> <p>Load it up with all of your kid's favorite music, movies, and TV shows and let them play and watch to their heart's content. Keep in mind that while on buses and in cars, you may want to limit exposure as it can lead to motion sickness.</p> <h3>Child-sized luggage</h3> <p>Kids like to feel like adults from time to time, and by having their own carry-on luggage or backpack, not only will they feel like Mom and Dad, but they'll be able to carry some of their own things and access them when they feel like it.</p> <h3>Headphones</h3> <p>Even if you don't have a tablet or smartphone for your kids, you can usually plug in the headphones and let them watch the entertainment provided on planes and buses.</p> <h3>Lots of water</h3> <p>This is something you don't want to run out of. Bring plenty of water and have your kids carry their own bottle, either clipped to their person or onto their luggage.</p> <h3>Trash bags</h3> <p>With wet wipes, snacks, water bottles, and tissue, you're likely to have a lot of trash on travel days. Bring bags to easily store it all until you can ditch it in a proper trash bin.</p> <h3>Healthy snacks</h3> <p>Loading your kids up on sugar on travel days is just asking for trouble. Instead, pack low-sugar, healthy snacks like crackers, nuts, cheese sticks, Cheerios, and pretzels.</p> <h3>Sunscreen</h3> <p>Even if you're planning to be in the airport for most of your travel day, you never know if you'll be by the bus window on the tarmac or waiting in line to board the plane. Bring lots of sunscreen and keep everyone from getting burned. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-sunscreens?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 5 Best Sunscreens</a>)</p> <h3>Camera</h3> <p>Keep your camera somewhere that you can easily grab it at a moment's notice. Funny things happen on travel days and it's always adorable to take a photograph of your kid boarding a plane or looking out the plane window.</p> <h2>4. Slow it down</h2> <p>Though it's completely possible to move from place to place relatively quickly with a family, if you have the luxury of an extended vacation, it's a much better idea to take it slowly and spend a good amount of time in each destination. This is important for practical reasons, like not having the hassle of unpacking and repacking every few days, but it will also allow you to create routines and provide a level of stability in each place.</p> <p>Slow travel will allow you the option of booking longer-term accommodation, which is likely to bring the cost down. Rather than staying in hotel suites, you'll be able to book houses or apartments via sites like Airbnb, where hosts regularly offer long-stay discounts, or directly with local landlords.</p> <p>Moving quickly can begin to feel like a whirlwind of activity and leave no time for your children to build attachments to places. In contrast, spending a few weeks or months in one spot will allow your kids to get familiar with the people and places at the location and give them a deeper connection. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/savor-your-trip-and-save-big-with-these-5-slow-travel-tips?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Savor Your Trip and Save Big With These 5 Slow Travel Tips</a>)</p> <h2>5. Plan ahead when flying with babies</h2> <p>Generally, you won't pay for airline tickets for children under two years of age who sit in your lap, at least on domestic flights. However, you do still have to inform the airline when booking that you're traveling with a small child. You may also want to reserve a baby cot or bassinet with the airline in advance, or arrive early for those that operate on a first come, first served basis. It's generally free, but check with each airline for their individual policies.</p> <h2>6. Sign the kids up for frequent flyer miles</h2> <p>On many airlines, frequent flyer programs have no age minimum, meaning kids can earn points, as well as adults. They will have to have their own frequent flyer account in order to start accumulating the points, but that's just a matter of filling out a simple form. Pooling family members' points can be a quick way to multiply your earnings. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-frequent-flyer-miles?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Everything You Need to Know About Frequent Flyer Miles</a>)</p> <h2>7. Get a travel-friendly stroller</h2> <p>Nothing is more annoying than fumbling around with a bulky stroller while trying to check into a flight. You may want to consider an fold-up umbrella-style stroller or a lightweight, portable travel stroller. There are <a href="https://amzn.to/2K6UkQ7" target="_blank">plenty on Amazon</a> to choose from, and most stores that carry strollers will also carry umbrella strollers and other lighter-weight options.</p> <h2>8. Make sure kids sit middle or window</h2> <p>The aisle seat is a surprisingly dangerous place for little ones. With heavy metal carts and people whizzing by, I've seen many a tiny finger squished by an unsuspecting passenger, who feels awful afterward.</p> <p>To avoid a lot of tears and potentially a broken finger, always try to seat your little ones in away from the aisle.</p> <h2>9. Have a &quot;what if I get lost?&quot; plan</h2> <p>This one seems obvious, but in the rush and chaos of getting everyone to the airport on time, many parents forget to form an emergency plan with their children on travel days. Whenever you arrive in a new place, let your child know which people are security or police and who to go to in the event of splitting up.</p> <p>Also, choose a safe and secure meeting point that you can all head to if for some reason you can't find one another. If your kids are a little older, make sure everyone has their phone volume on loud and set to vibrate so that you can call each other if anyone gets lost.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Handle%20World%20Travel%20With%20Your%20Family.jpg" alt="How to Handle World Travel With Your Family" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/nick-wharton">Nick Wharton</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-world-travel-with-your-family">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/yes-affordable-family-travel-is-possible">Yes, Affordable Family Travel Is Possible</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-money-lessons-your-kids-can-learn-while-they-travel">10 Money Lessons Your Kids Can Learn While They Travel</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-a-family-of-4-can-see-italy-for-1000-or-less">How a Family of 4 Can See Italy for $1,000 or Less</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-find-child-care-while-traveling">6 Ways to Find Child Care While Traveling</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-save-on-a-european-getaway-with-kids">7 Ways to Save on a European Getaway With Kids</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Travel affordable travel family travel family vacation international travel travel tips travel with children travel with kids Tue, 15 May 2018 08:30:25 +0000 Nick Wharton 2140373 at https://www.wisebread.com