Career Building https://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4814/all en-US 10 Ways to Improve Your Company's Culture, Even If You Aren't the Boss https://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-improve-your-companys-culture-even-if-you-arent-the-boss <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-ways-to-improve-your-companys-culture-even-if-you-arent-the-boss" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/design_team_planning_for_a_new_project.jpg" alt="Design team planning for a new project" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you work for a company, you soon get to know its culture. Sometimes it's fantastic; everyone gets along great, and you pinch yourself to see if you're dreaming. Most of the time, however, company culture is in need of some improvement, if not a complete overhaul.</p> <p>This is where you can help. Even if you're not the one in the corner office, you can still have a positive impact on your work environment and company culture. Here's how.</p> <h2>1. Don't help the gossip spread</h2> <p>One of the worst aspects of any company culture is the rumor mill. Almost every place of employment has it. If you're not the boss, and it's not your place to put your foot down about stopping the spread of gossip, you can at least do your part to limit how far it goes.</p> <p>The best way to do that is to stop feeding into it yourself. Don't lean in at the water cooler when voices turn to whispers and someone is talking about a co-worker. Don't engage. Simply say you're not interested, and walk away. You may not be able to wipe it out entirely, but by becoming a positive influence, you may inspire others to avoid it as well. (See also: <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Career Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up</a>)</p> <h2>2. Look at &quot;bad&quot; projects with a fresh perspective</h2> <p>Something I have personally learned from my 20+ years working in advertising is that there aren't bad accounts. What happens is that the people working on them become jaded, relationships are strained, and they become awful to work on. Then, a new hire comes in and suddenly that account is turned around for the better, simply because the newcomer had no history with it. Use this perspective to your advantage.</p> <p>What projects are just awful? Which tasks are dreaded? Which people seem to just collapse when they hear the name of a certain client or account? Take a look at it with fresh eyes. Why is it bad? Are people actively making the situation worse with a negative attitude? What can you do in the next week to turn that ship around?</p> <h2>3. Get in earlier and leave a little later</h2> <p>Remember the zip and zeal you had for the job when you first arrived? You couldn't wait to get to your desk and dig into the work day. After a while, that get-up-and-go has got up and left, and you're probably like most other people now. The same routine. The same habits. Why not change it up and go back to the attitude you had during the first few weeks?</p> <p>Get in earlier, and be the first one to make the coffee for everyone. Do the rounds and say hi to other people as they come in (it's amazing what a friendly smile can do to lift anyone's spirits). Hang out a little later than usual, and when you do leave, do so with some pep in your step. You'll be surprised at how infectious your new lease on life will be. (See also: <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-small-gestures-that-go-a-long-way-at-work?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Small Gestures That Go a Long Way at Work</a>)</p> <h2>4. Strive for the culture you want to have</h2> <p>You know that adage, &quot;Dress for the position you want?&quot; Well, the same applies to company culture. Rather than accepting that this is the way it is, make your actions fall in line with the culture you'd rather have.</p> <p>Admittedly, it'll be baby steps at first. You can't suddenly start working from home three days a week when the policy is dead set against it. But you can make small changes that can incrementally lead to bigger ones.</p> <p>For instance, some places like to get all the employees together on a Friday evening to mingle, with drinks and snacks provided. Why not ask if you can start something like that? Get people interested in providing refreshments as a group effort. Do it after everyone's work is done. This simple act of togetherness could impact the morale and thinking of the whole company.</p> <h2>5. Provide solutions, don't just point out problems</h2> <p>It's incredibly easy to voice a negative opinion about something. How many times have you seen a political party rant and rave about a policy they don't like, but come up with empty rhetoric when asked to give a real solution? As we all know, building something up is way harder than knocking it down, so don't bring a sledgehammer to the debate.</p> <p>Instead, look at what you think is wrong and find ways to give solutions to the people at the top. This could be through your manager, human resources, or even a company suggestion box. Writing, &quot;The dress code here sucks&quot; is nowhere near as effective as writing, &quot;Let's dress in casual clothes, but have a smart outfit on hand in case of client meetings.&quot;</p> <h2>6. Don't go it alone</h2> <p>There is strength in numbers, and that could not be more true for shifting the corporate culture. If one person comes to the boss asking for more paid sick leave, it's just one voice. If it's half the company, the boss will sit up and take notice.</p> <p>Find people who believe in the same changes and improvements you do, and get organized. Make regular petitions to the boss for small but important changes that would improve the morale of the whole company. When the boss gets the chance to make everyone happy and look good, without forking over an arm and a leg, they'll do it.</p> <h2>7. Never make it personal</h2> <p>This ties in nicely with the last point, but it's worth noting that your own bugbears are not going to be a good enough reason to make any significant changes. Maybe you loved working remotely two days a week at your last job, but if this current company doesn't allow that for anyone, they're not going to make an exception just to please you. Saying, &quot;I work better with music&quot; is not going to fly if no one else wants to hear music all day. Instead, find a way to make your personal case one that doesn't require big changes &mdash; like, for example, asking if you can wear headphones.</p> <h2>8. Acknowledge any effort management makes to change</h2> <p>The first time you cook any kind of meal, it's not going to turn out perfect. Imagine your reaction if the person you made it for said, &quot;This is dry, has way too much salt, and it took you hours to get it done!&quot; Chances are, you're not cooking for that person again any time soon.</p> <p>It's the same with management. They're people, not faceless entities. When they see a problem and do what they can to try and make it even a little better, let them know. Sure, the pot luck was poorly organized, few people came, and there wasn't enough time to enjoy it. Praise the positives, with suggestions on how it can be even better when they try again. Encouragement goes much further than scorn.</p> <h2>9. Work your magic with people who have influence</h2> <p>You're not the boss. You may not even speak to the boss on a weekly basis. However, you will almost certainly know someone that does, and you can use that to your advantage.</p> <p>When you see them in the break room, make time to sit down and have a chat. Talk about what you would do to make things better if you had the boss's ear. Provide suggestions that this contact can use as his or her own, and in turn relay them to the decision makers. It doesn't matter who takes credit for a better culture. The reward is the culture itself &mdash; not the accolade of changing it.</p> <h2>10. Know why the culture changes you want are required</h2> <p>Some of the greatest company cultures in the world are envied by us all. However, they're not appropriate or doable for every company, and asking for something totally out of reach could sink any chances you have for small successes.</p> <p>For example, Walt Disney Parks and Resorts regularly makes the list of one of the top places to work in the world. Remember though, they are in the business of happiness and fantasy, and many of their company policies are not going to go over well in a manufacturing plant or accountancy firm.</p> <p>Look at your business and see what can be done to improve things for good reason. A generous vacation policy is valuable everywhere, as is an on-site gym, corporate discounts, and 401(k) matches. If you say you want all-you-can-drink soda and snacks for free, and a massive entertainment system in the break room, you better be able to back that up with more than &quot;Because it would be cool.&quot; (See also: <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-employee-perks-are-good-for-business?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Ways Employee Perks Are Good for Business</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F10-ways-to-improve-your-companys-culture-even-if-you-arent-the-boss&amp;media=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F10%2520Ways%2520to%2520Improve%2520Your%2520Company%2527s%2520Culture%252C%2520Even%2520If%2520You%2520Aren%2527t%2520the%2520Boss.jpg&amp;description=10%20Ways%20to%20Improve%20Your%20Company's%20Culture%2C%20Even%20If%20You%20Aren't%20the%20Boss"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/10%20Ways%20to%20Improve%20Your%20Company%27s%20Culture%2C%20Even%20If%20You%20Aren%27t%20the%20Boss.jpg" alt="10 Ways to Improve Your Company's Culture, Even If You Aren't the Boss" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-improve-your-companys-culture-even-if-you-arent-the-boss">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-you-might-be-sabotaging-your-job">5 Ways You Might Be Sabotaging Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-smooth-over-a-work-disagreement">10 Ways to Smooth Over a Work Disagreement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-things-your-boss-wishes-youd-tell-them">7 Things Your Boss Wishes You&#039;d Tell Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-unmistakeable-signs-youre-slacking-at-work">5 Unmistakeable Signs You&#039;re Slacking at Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building co-workers company culture compromise gossip management morale solutions Thu, 12 Jul 2018 08:00:25 +0000 Paul Michael 2154844 at https://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways to Stay Focused in an Open Office https://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-stay-focused-in-an-open-office <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-to-stay-focused-in-an-open-office" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businesswoman_in_office_with_her_colleagues.jpg" alt="Businesswoman in office with her colleagues" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Believe it or not, open office layouts were created with good intentions. The idea behind the open floor plan is to encourage collaboration and teamwork among employees, rather than having walls that literally divide people. The design also helps companies save on the amount of office space needed to accommodate everyone. Individual offices take up much more space, and therefore cost companies more money to rent and fill.</p> <p>While some people love working in an open office layout, it certainly isn't a fit for everyone. Some people thrive among the constant chatter and collaboration of coworkers, while others find it distracting.</p> <p>If an open office setting is preventing you from accomplishing your to-do list each day, there are ways you can make it easier on yourself. Here are six simple ways to stay focused while working in an open office.</p> <h2>1. Get some fresh air</h2> <p>When the office is full of distractions, it is sometimes best to walk away for a minute to clear your mind. The best way to do this is to step outside for some fresh air. A deep breath of nature can restore the mind from the mental fatigue of work, allowing you to return to your tasks with a fresh perspective and decreased stress.</p> <p>In fact, Steve Jobs of Apple was notorious for holding walking meetings in order to spend more time outdoors. (See also: <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-bedtime-routines-of-famous-financial-gurus?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Bedtime Routines of Famous Financial Gurus</a>)</p> <h2>2. Invest in headphones</h2> <p><a href="https://amzn.to/2KtocXM" target="_blank">Noise-canceling headphones</a> are a lifesaver when it comes to eliminating distractions. Not only do they help drown out office chatter, but they also signify to others that you're trying to work. People tend to interrupt you less if they see that you're wearing headphones and are in work mode.</p> <p>Further, <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/1610.04255" target="_blank">research conducted Cornell University in 2016</a> shows that &quot;streamlined&quot; music can help improve your focus at work, and your mood &mdash; giving you all the more reason to crank your favorite tunes. (See also: <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/this-is-the-best-music-to-listen-to-if-you-want-to-be-productive?ref=seealso" target="_blank">This Is the Best Music to Listen to If You Want to Be Productive</a>)</p> <h2>3. Establish boundaries</h2> <p>Perhaps the best open office survival tip is to establish boundaries with those around you. There's no shame in letting people know how you work best. You're there to do a job, and if the open office layout is becoming a distraction, it's up to you to find a way to make it work.</p> <p>Block off an hour or two a day on your calendar that is strictly dedicated to working on your own. Share your calendar with others so they know when you are or aren't available. And chances are, you aren't the only person in your office struggling with the open concept. Lead the charge by creating an office plan of how to let one another know when you're busy. Perhaps you put a do not disturb sign up while you are occupied, or you ask everyone on your team to coordinate an hour of distraction-free work. Whatever the case, find something that works for you and your coworkers.</p> <h2>4. Ask for emails</h2> <p>How can anyone get anything done when coworkers are constantly stopping by or pinging you on Slack? The truth is, it's difficult for anyone to work with constant interruptions.</p> <p>Fortunately, there's another form of communication can help prevent interruptions: email. Most things aren't urgent, so it's okay to ask your coworkers to email you instead of verbally asking you, or messaging you. By requesting emails, you can respond when it works for you and better establish your priorities. Plus, you can close your email when you're working to eliminate yet another distraction. If someone really needs to speak with you, encourage them to email you and setup a time to speak later in the day. (See also: <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-easy-ways-to-declutter-your-digital-life?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Easy Ways to Declutter Your Digital Life</a>)</p> <h2>5. Find an alternative workspace</h2> <p>Sometimes, it may be impossible to accomplish your objectives in an open office atmosphere. If this is the case, talk to your boss about finding an alternative workspace to use when you seriously need to concentrate. Whether you need a private conference room for a few hours or the chance to work from home once a week, come up with a few options to present to your manager.</p> <p>If all else fails, you can always ask to move to a cubical that faces the wall. These are often less distracting since you don't see everyone in the office while you work. (See also: <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/14-reasons-your-boss-should-let-you-work-from-home?ref=seealso" target="_blank">14 Reasons Your Boss Should Let You Work From Home</a>)</p> <h2>6. Practice tolerance</h2> <p>After setting some established boundaries, your coworkers should better be able to accommodate your need for privacy. However, no one is perfect. Respect and tolerance goes both ways in the workplace.</p> <p>While it might not be an ideal situation for you at all times, try to see the benefit of your office layout. Understand that no matter your work setup, everyone you work with communicates differently. By practicing tolerance, you can focus your energy back onto your work.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-ways-to-stay-focused-in-an-open-office&amp;media=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Ways%2520to%2520Stay%2520Focused%2520in%2520an%2520Open%2520Office.jpg&amp;description=6%20Ways%20to%20Stay%20Focused%20in%20an%20Open%20Office"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Ways%20to%20Stay%20Focused%20in%20an%20Open%20Office.jpg" alt="6 Ways to Stay Focused in an Open Office" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/rachel-slifka">Rachel Slifka</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-stay-focused-in-an-open-office">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-deal-when-youre-way-behind-at-work">6 Ways to Deal When You&#039;re Way Behind at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/the-7-best-free-tools-to-improve-your-work-performance">The 7 Best Free Tools to Improve Your Work Performance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/shhhhh-how-to-block-out-noise">Shhhhh: How to Block Out Noise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-get-more-out-of-business-trips">10 Ways to Get More Out of Business Trips</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-46-easy-ways-to-be-more-productive">Flashback Friday: 46 Easy Ways to Be More Productive</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Productivity co-working space get work done open office shared workspace startup stay focused Tue, 03 Jul 2018 09:00:10 +0000 Rachel Slifka 2153206 at https://www.wisebread.com 6 Times You Should Insure Your Side Gig https://www.wisebread.com/6-times-you-should-insure-your-side-gig <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-times-you-should-insure-your-side-gig" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/happy_professional_cleaning_team.jpg" alt="Happy professional cleaning team" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>About two years ago, I launched a small side hustle dog-sitting for neighbors. It was a profitable side gig that allowed me to earn extra cash in my spare time. But one of the things I hadn't prepared for when budgeting my startup costs was insurance for my business.</p> <p>I quickly found out it was necessary. My good friend who had encouraged me to take up pet-sitting was watching a dog for a client. She must not have closed the dog's crate all the way, because he escaped one night and destroyed the owner's expensive silk Oriental rug. The owners took her to court, and she ended up owing them over $30,000. Because she didn't have insurance, she was on the hook for the replacement cost herself.</p> <p>Unfortunately, my friend's story isn't that uncommon. Many side hustlers run businesses without insurance, leaving them at risk if there's ever an accident or error.</p> <p>Whether you're a freelance graphic designer, dog-sitter, baker, ride-share driver, or housekeeper, insurance can be an essential safeguard for your business. You might think insurance is unnecessary because your gig is too small, or perhaps you work solely from home. However, mistakes and accidents happen all the time in all industries. Here are five times you need an insurance policy.</p> <h2>1. You have customers visit your place of business</h2> <p>If you have customers visit your home or store &mdash; maybe you opened a hair salon, or you run child care services out of your house &mdash; there's a chance your customer could get injured on the premises. The client could sue you for damages, leaving you on the hook for tens of thousands of dollars (if not millions!). An insurance policy can protect you from this liability.</p> <h2>2. You spend time in a customer's home</h2> <p>Maybe you're a personal assistant or you run a housekeeping business, and your client trusts you to work in their home. Even if you're careful, it's all too easy to knock over a precious heirloom or spill a drink on a designer sofa. Without insurance to cover your mistake, you might have to compensate the owner for the damage on your own.</p> <h2>3. You work with children or animals</h2> <p>Children and animals present unique challenges, because they can be unpredictable and have a knack for getting into mischief. Whether it's an incident while baby-sitting a child or dog-walking, you could be held responsible for legal or medical fees. It's important that you insure yourself to cover these bases.</p> <h2>4. You're trusted with sensitive or proprietary information</h2> <p>If you're a graphic designer, bookkeeper, or writer, you might not think you need insurance. However, your clients likely entrust you with company information that is sensitive or confidential. If your computer is stolen or you're hacked, that information could be compromised, and your clients could take legal action against you.</p> <h2>5. You couldn't cover the cost of legal fees and settlements</h2> <p>As a business owner or side hustler, there's always a chance of a vendor or client suing you for some discrepancy or issue. If you don't have enough money in the bank to cover typical legal fees or settlement costs, you likely need insurance coverage. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-times-to-hire-a-lawyer-immediately?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Times to Hire a Lawyer Immediately</a>)</p> <h2>6. You're driving people around</h2> <p>Uber and Lyft offer their independent contractors supplemental insurance in addition to requiring them to have their own auto insurance policies. However, don't think that means you're completely in the clear. Often, the company-supplied insurance has strict limitations and is inadequate.</p> <p>For example, if you're a driver with Uber, you have third-party liability coverage of at least $1,000,000, uninsured or underinsured motorist bodily injury coverage of at least $1,000,000, and contingent collision and comprehensive coverage with a $1,000 deductible <em>only</em> when you're on your way to pick up a rider and until you drop them off.</p> <p>If you have the app on and are waiting for a request, your coverage becomes much more limited: $50,000 per person or $100,000 per accident for bodily injury, and $25,000 per accident for property damage (such as a damaged fence). If you wreck your car, or if you damage another vehicle, you'll likely have to handle the repairs on your own. Because you were working for a ride-sharing app at the time of the accident, your personal auto insurance policy may not cover it, either. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-kind-of-auto-insurance-do-uber-drivers-need?ref=seealso" target="_blank">What Kind of Auto Insurance Do Uber Drivers Need?</a>)</p> <p>The lesson here is that even if the side gig company offers some sort of supplemental insurance coverage, it's probably not comprehensive enough to cover all of your bases. It's a good idea to look for your own supplemental policy to ensure you're fully covered.</p> <h2>Where to find insurance</h2> <p>In many industries, you can get an insurance policy for under $500 per year. If you're not sure where to start, contact your personal insurance agent to see if they offer business policies. If not, you can also use <a href="https://www.insuramatch.com/learning-center/when-your-side-hustle-requires-insurance" target="_blank">InsuraMatch</a> to find out what insurance you need and get quotes for the necessary policies.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-times-you-should-insure-your-side-gig&amp;media=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Times%2520You%2520Should%2520Insure%2520Your%2520Side%2520Gig.jpg&amp;description=6%20Times%20You%20Should%20Insure%20Your%20Side%20Gig"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Times%20You%20Should%20Insure%20Your%20Side%20Gig.jpg" alt="6 Times You Should Insure Your Side Gig" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/kat-tretina">Kat Tretina</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/6-times-you-should-insure-your-side-gig">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/15-surprising-insurance-policies-you-might-need">15 Surprising Insurance Policies You Might Need</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/3-things-you-should-know-about-rental-car-insurance">3 Things You Should Know About Rental Car Insurance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-the-right-rv-and-vehicle-insurance-protects-your-summer-fun">Here&#039;s How the Right RV and Vehicle Insurance Protects Your Summer Fun</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-times-you-shouldnt-file-an-insurance-claim">7 Times You Shouldn&#039;t File an Insurance Claim</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/should-you-get-life-insurance-for-your-kids">Should You Get Life Insurance for Your Kids?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Insurance accidents business insurance coverage damages liability protection risk side gigs supplemental insurance Mon, 02 Jul 2018 08:30:11 +0000 Kat Tretina 2152196 at https://www.wisebread.com 8 Networking Tips for Introverts https://www.wisebread.com/8-networking-tips-for-introverts <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-networking-tips-for-introverts" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/partnering_together_to_achieve_their_greatest_success_yet.jpg" alt="Partnering together to achieve their greatest success yet" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Ask most people what an introvert is, and they'll describe someone who's shy, doesn't like being around people, and is very quiet and aloof. Well, that's not always accurate. Some introverts love social gatherings and can be very talkative. However, they tend to find the experience draining and need alone time to get their energy back.</p> <p>Knowing that, networking can be a daunting and overwhelming experience for most introverts. So, whether you are shy in social situations, or just find the whole experience exhausting, here's what you can do to make networking a success. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-high-paying-jobs-for-introverts?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 10 Best High Paying Jobs for Introverts</a>)</p> <h2>1. Know before you go</h2> <p>Anyone who is shy, or has social anxiety, will find the unknown to be the most daunting part of the networking experience. Who's going to be there? What's the place like? Will there be music? Will I have to interact with a lot of people, or play those networking games?</p> <p>Much of this anxiety can be reduced by researching the event before you step foot in the building. Send emails to the organizers and ask about the setup. If they have held this meeting before, see if you can find pictures and videos of it online. These days, it's easy to find a record of any kind of event like this thanks to Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. If you do your research, you can dull that anxiety down to just some mild jitters. And once you're there, you'll be much more at ease.</p> <h2>2. Consider volunteering at the event</h2> <p>This may seem like the worst kind of advice for an introvert, but as I'm one myself, I can tell you it really works. If you volunteer to actually do something at the event &mdash; be it handing out name badges, taking coats, or helping serve food &mdash; having something specific to do stops that horrible feeling of being forced to interact with people without having a good reason.</p> <p>&quot;I can't just go up and talk to that person&quot; becomes &quot;I'll see if that person wants another drink, and maybe we can have a quick chat as well.&quot; Plus, if you have a job to do, it's very easy to escape the conversation you're having if it's all getting to be too much. Personally speaking, I was dreading going to San Diego Comic Con to network for my company; then they asked me to staff the booth. I was so busy handing out goodies and answering easy questions that I forgot I was networking at the same time. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-benefits-of-volunteering?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Unexpected Benefits of Volunteering</a>)</p> <h2>3. Have a prepared opener for introductions</h2> <p>Another way to make the event go smoothly is to know what you're going to say to people before you get face to face. The most important thing to remember with an introduction is that you are not trying to cram everything into a few opening sentences. You simply want an easy way to start the conversation without coming across as either pushy or &quot;used car salesman.&quot; Go for something easy to remember, and universal.</p> <p>Phrases like, &quot;So, what brings you here today?&quot; or, &quot;How often do you come to these networking events?&quot; are good because they're open-ended questions (asking a question with a yes or no answer can be a conversation killer) and they also put the focus on the other person. Let them talk about themselves for a while. Of course, if you're asked the same kind of question, be prepared with a brief sales pitch.</p> <h2>4. Practice your sales pitch</h2> <p>You've been asked the question you were going to ask: &quot;So, what brings you here today?&quot; The last thing you want to do is freeze like a deer in the headlights, or stumble over something that leaves a tepid first impression. You need something short and snappy that gets across who you are, what you do, and most importantly, why you do it.</p> <p>It should not feel over-rehearsed and robotic. It should not be full of industry jargon, or go on and on about aspects of your industry that only the most die-hard professionals will love. Go for a 20 to 30 second explanation, checking off the most important and memorable aspects of you and your business. Give the other person some meaty facts that they can respond to. Then, practice this with friends and co-workers. Practice a lot. You will want this to feel natural. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-everybody-needs-an-elevator-pitch-even-you?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Reasons Everybody Needs an Elevator Pitch &mdash; Even You!</a>)</p> <h2>5. Bring some moral support</h2> <p>Often the reason networking events can be so off-putting is knowing that you will have to spend hours talking to strangers. You can almost eliminate that part of the challenge by bringing along a friend, relative, or co-worker you trust, and most importantly, with whom you have a great relationship. They will be your emotional crutch for the event, as long as you tell them beforehand that you're relying on them for that. You don't want them wandering off after 10 minutes while you're stuck in a crowd.</p> <p>Your partner in crime can be there to help you field difficult questions, and if they're more of a people person, they can even introduce you and do some bragging on your behalf. Talking about yourself like you're awesome can sound egotistic. But when someone else does it, you're a star.</p> <h2>6. A few conversation-starter props can help</h2> <p>If you're one of those people that has trouble keeping the conversation going, why not bring a few props that you can bring out when you start having trouble? A fun business card is perhaps the easiest and most convenient one to bring along. I, myself, have used cards printed on wood, cards that expand to 10 times their original size, and even one that had a joke embedded in a sound chip.</p> <h2>7. Arrange small one-on-one meetings</h2> <p>If you are not good in crowds, avoid them. Sure, there are plenty of big events and meetings around, but you can also arrange to meet people one-on-one for coffee or lunch. Seek out people you want to meet with in online forums and through LinkedIn, which has become one of the best ways for anyone to find and engage with new contacts. Get the conversation started online, then ask to take it into the real world with a meeting. This is also great for easing tensions because you already know a little about each other, and know that you are both interested in talking further. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-social-situations-all-introverts-fear?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Social Situations All Introverts Fear</a>)</p> <h2>8. Avoid meeting in person altogether</h2> <p>If all else fails to work for you, you can avoid in-person meetings completely. This isn't ideal &mdash; you eventually need to get your face out there and shake hands with people that can help your career. But if you just can't do that right now, use technology to help you out.</p> <p>There are instant messengers and emails. You can also try a few webinars that allow you to chime in without actually being in the room. You can use Skype and video conferencing to connect with people in your city, or halfway around the world. And guess what? Your smartphone actually allows you to <em>call</em> someone. To be fair, I hate talking on the phone these days as much as everyone else &mdash; however, if it saves you from an in-person meeting, especially with a big crowd, it's definitely the lesser of two evils.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-networking-tips-for-introverts&amp;media=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Networking%2520Tips%2520for%2520Introverts.jpg&amp;description=8%20Networking%20Tips%20for%20Introverts"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Networking%20Tips%20for%20Introverts.jpg" alt="8 Networking Tips for Introverts" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/8-networking-tips-for-introverts">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-freelancers-and-telecommuters-can-make-friends-and-network">11 Ways Freelancers and Telecommuters Can Make Friends and Network</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-a-professional-association-can-boost-your-career">11 Ways a Professional Association Can Boost Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-everybody-needs-an-elevator-pitch-even-you">5 Reasons Everybody Needs an Elevator Pitch — Even You!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-set-career-goals-when-you-lack-direction">How to Set Career Goals When You Lack Direction</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40">The 10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building business conversation starters elevator pitch events introductions introverts meeting new people networking Thu, 28 Jun 2018 09:01:10 +0000 Paul Michael 2149526 at https://www.wisebread.com How to Survive and Thrive as a Young Boss https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-survive-and-thrive-as-a-young-boss <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-survive-and-thrive-as-a-young-boss" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/young_business_woman_in_a_conference_room.jpg" alt="Young business woman in a conference room" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I work in the world of digital marketing &mdash; a decidedly youth-obsessed field where being in your 20s is considered a tactical advantage (for me, an advantage that expired about two decades ago). But the blush of youth isn't always so welcome, especially if you're gunning for a manager's position and the corner office.</p> <p>Some fields are filled with traditionalists who may only see you as a pair of skinny jeans with a fast metabolism and good hair. But fear not! Here's how to overcome the skeptics and thrive as a young boss.</p> <h2>Learn the ropes</h2> <p>Every workplace is unique and every job is different. Take time to learn about the processes and expectations of your new position or new employer. That means showing interest, engaging with staff, and demonstrating a willingness to absorb information before making any big changes. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-ways-to-make-a-fantastic-first-impression?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Simple Ways to Make a Fantastic First Impression</a>)</p> <h2>Own your knowledge</h2> <p>The best way to thrive as a young boss is to own your knowledge and stop apologizing for it. Realize that very few companies give promotions by accident or hire without reason. Strike a balance between healthy self-confidence and a level of modesty that keeps you accessible, open to new ideas, and willing to work hand-in-hand with your team.</p> <p>Be conscious of subtle ways you may be contributing to negative perceptions about your age. Uptalking is one of the most pervasive. <em>Uptalk</em> or <em>upspeak</em> is the tendency to end declarative statements with a slight vocal lift (which makes statements sound like questions). This linguistic habit suggests you're unsure of what you've said and are looking for approval.</p> <h2>Exercise diplomacy</h2> <p>Diplomacy is a valuable skill for any employee in any job, but for young bosses, it's absolutely essential. Realize that many of your co-workers were likely vying for the very position you now hold. Tread lightly while the dust settles. Pay attention to office politics (they're an inevitable part of every work environment) and be transparent as you build your team and work to make your mark as a manager. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-soft-skills-every-employer-values?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Soft Skills Every Employer Values</a>)</p> <h2>Focus your energy</h2> <p>Young bosses are anxious to prove themselves, but there's risk in taking on too much too soon. Your eagerness may be interpreted as insecurity, as one-upmanship, or as blatant brown-nosing. Even worse, overextending yourself can lead to costly mistakes or early burnout &mdash; both bad ways to earn respect. Focus your energy and talents on those duties you were hired to perform. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-tricks-to-avoid-workout-burnout?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Tricks to Avoid Workout Burnout</a>)</p> <h2>Delegate wisely</h2> <p>Now that you're focused on the most crucial parts of your job, delegate other duties strategically. But choose your resources carefully. Match the task to the talents of the individual and set clear expectations about timing and results. Remember, delegating not only helps you, it allows those around you to develop new skills and demonstrate professional growth. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-delegate-at-work-and-at-home-in-4-easy-steps?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Delegate at Work and at Home in 4 Easy Steps</a>)</p> <h2>Nurture careers</h2> <p>It's one of the most profound duties of being a good boss: supporting the career growth of the people you manage. Though you may still be trying to sort out your own professional path, don't forget about your employees. Find the strengths in each of your team members and help them use those strengths to take their next career steps. When people see you're genuinely committed to career development, they'll have a whole new level of respect for you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-survive-and-thrive-as-a-young-boss&amp;media=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Survive%2520and%2520Thrive%2520as%2520a%2520Young%2520Boss.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Survive%20and%20Thrive%20as%20a%20Young%20Boss"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Survive%20and%20Thrive%20as%20a%20Young%20Boss.jpg" alt="How to Survive and Thrive as a Young Boss" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-survive-and-thrive-as-a-young-boss">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-underrated-skills-that-will-help-you-in-any-job">7 Underrated Skills That Will Help You in Any Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/12-subtle-signs-youd-make-a-good-boss">12 Subtle Signs You&#039;d Make a Good Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/create-a-reverse-bucket-list-to-improve-your-money-management">Create a Reverse Bucket List to Improve Your Money Management</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/15-soft-skills-every-employer-values">15 Soft Skills Every Employer Values</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-your-customer-service-job-can-help-you-win-at-life">8 Ways Your Customer Service Job Can Help You Win at Life</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building advice burn out delegating empathy learning manager motivation promotion soft skills young boss Wed, 27 Jun 2018 09:00:10 +0000 Kentin Waits 2152288 at https://www.wisebread.com 7 Underrated Skills That Will Help You in Any Job https://www.wisebread.com/7-underrated-skills-that-will-help-you-in-any-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-underrated-skills-that-will-help-you-in-any-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_with_a_tablet_in_her_hands.jpg" alt="Woman with a tablet in her hands" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When it comes to employment, degrees, training, and experience matter. Still, not everything employees have to offer was learned behind a desk. There are soft skills and subtle personality traits that can enrich and transform any workplace &mdash; from a basement bike shop, to a billion-dollar investment firm. Though they're tough to list on a resume, here are seven underrated skills that will help you no matter what your job. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-soft-skills-every-employer-values?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Soft Skills Every Employer Values</a>)</p> <h2>1. Empathy</h2> <p>It's a fact we sometimes forget: The world of work is populated by <em>humans</em>. Sure, we all strive to appear cool and collected, but sometimes the veneer cracks. People who are able to listen, understand, and offer empathy bring real value to the workplace. These folks tend to be expert communicators (especially across cultural barriers). When managing people, they often develop a loyal following that improves teamwork and productivity. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-skill-can-make-you-a-better-boss?ref=seealso" target="_blank">This One Skill Can Make You a Better Boss</a>)</p> <h2>2. Patience</h2> <p>In our competitive culture, aggression is usually considered an indispensable business skill. But there's something to be said for those of us who don't live on hyper-drive. Patience gives us room to weigh options, consider outcomes, and develop strategies that are based on real information instead of reflex. For managers, patience helps build a healthy team atmosphere and nurture employee talent.</p> <h2>3. Eloquence</h2> <p>Eloquence is the art of expressing thoughts and ideas clearly. Beyond demonstrating intelligence and insight, it's an essential part of tact and diplomacy. Knowing what to say and how to say it can help you navigate the choppy waters of office politics, avoid unnecessary conflict, and calm irate customers. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-ways-to-communicate-better-today?ref=seealso" target="_blank">25 Ways to Communicate Better Today</a>)</p> <h2>4. Curiosity</h2> <p>Why is curiosity so powerful? Because it's only satisfied by acquiring more knowledge. Curiosity keeps us asking &quot;Why?&quot; and inspires us to look for smarter solutions to everyday problems. Curious employees are more inclined to take initiative, seek out additional training, and pursue professional development opportunities.</p> <h2>5. Creativity</h2> <p>Creativity makes innovation possible. In every job, creative thinking can help you spot (and correct) inefficiencies, develop smarter (and cheaper) processes, and design new products and services that improve lives. That's not just a soft-skill; it's a hard asset that every employer is hungry for. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/boost-your-creativity-9-surprising-ways-to-generate-new-ideas?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Boost Your Creativity: 9 Surprising Ways to Generate New Ideas</a>)</p> <h2>6. Adaptability</h2> <p>No matter what your career path, one thing is certain: The road won't always be smooth. Companies reorganize, technologies change, and old industries are constantly disrupted. Embrace the chaos. Being adaptable helps you survive &mdash; and sometimes even thrive &mdash; in this new reality.</p> <h2>7. Good etiquette</h2> <p>In the nation that invented informality, good manners get noticed. Making proper introductions, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/reclaiming-etiquette-dining-basics-for-young-professionals" target="_blank">practicing basic dining etiquette</a>, ensuring that every email contains a salutation and a closing, and silencing electronic devices during meetings &mdash; these small overtures demonstrate a level of professional refinement that can win over new clients and advance your career.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-underrated-skills-that-will-help-you-in-any-job&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Underrated%2520Skills%2520That%2520Will%2520Help%2520You%2520in%2520Any%2520Job.jpg&amp;description=7%20Underrated%20Skills%20That%20Will%20Help%20You%20in%20Any%20Job"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Underrated%20Skills%20That%20Will%20Help%20You%20in%20Any%20Job.jpg" alt="7 Underrated Skills That Will Help You in Any Job" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-underrated-skills-that-will-help-you-in-any-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/12-subtle-signs-youd-make-a-good-boss">12 Subtle Signs You&#039;d Make a Good Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/15-soft-skills-every-employer-values">15 Soft Skills Every Employer Values</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-survive-and-thrive-as-a-young-boss">How to Survive and Thrive as a Young Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/do-you-have-these-key-character-traits-for-investing-success">Do You Have These Key Character Traits for Investing Success?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-your-customer-service-job-can-help-you-win-at-life">8 Ways Your Customer Service Job Can Help You Win at Life</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building creativity curiosity empathy job hunting patience personality traits soft skills success Tue, 19 Jun 2018 08:30:25 +0000 Kentin Waits 2149478 at https://www.wisebread.com 10 Ways to Smooth Over a Work Disagreement https://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-smooth-over-a-work-disagreement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-ways-to-smooth-over-a-work-disagreement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/angry_woman_with_megaphone_shouting_at_scared_man.jpg" alt="Angry woman with megaphone shouting at scared man" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Conflicts in the workplace are tough. They can lead to a very stressful work environment, a lot of sleepless nights, and some people even quit their jobs over the issue. But if you approach the disagreement calmly, it should not be something that ever gets you to the point of quitting or taking time off. You can get past this. Here's how.</p> <h2>1. Give each other time to calm down</h2> <p>Nothing good ever comes from a conversation that happens in the heat of the moment. Tempers are flared, egos are bruised, and both of you may say things you later regret (or that could impact your position at the company).</p> <p>Whatever the situation, agree to take a time out from each other for at least 24 hours so that you can sleep on the issue and perhaps talk to someone about it. You will both come back to the table a lot calmer, perhaps with some insights into how and why the disagreement happened in the first place, and what you can do to smooth things over and get back to work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-avoid-confronting-a-coworker?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Times You Should Avoid Confronting a Co-Worker</a>)</p> <h2>2. Look at the issue from their perspective</h2> <p>It's easy to get self-centered when you have a disagreement. You know you're not the one at fault, and you sure aren't about to change your mind. But putting yourself in the shoes of the other person can be tremendously helpful, especially if you're convinced that this is all on them.</p> <p>Advertising legend Bill Bernbach used to carry around a small piece of paper in his pocket. On it were three words: &quot;Maybe he's right.&quot; Maybe you did something that led to choppy waters. Even if you didn't, what is the other person going through right now? Is there trouble at home? Did they get handed a lot of responsibility in a short amount of time? Are they in fear of losing their job? By switching roles in the disagreement, you will have a better understanding of it. And hopefully, the other person is doing the exact same thing.</p> <h2>3. Don't play the blame game</h2> <p>Finger-pointing is for the playground. In a professional working environment, trying to throw all of the blame onto someone else is not going to go over well. For a start, even if it really is all on the other person, you're going to be perceived by others as unreasonable. What's more, coming to an accord is going to be almost impossible if you don't bring some kind of concession to the table.</p> <p>Imagine for a second that this happened because of a mistake you made. If the conversation starts with, &quot;This is all your fault and you know it,&quot; how open will you feel to talking this through? Put aside the blame, and instead focus on the issue at hand, rather than the person who started it. What's the problem, how do you solve it, and how do you do it in a way that both parties can agree upon? Any meeting of the minds that starts with a pointed finger is not going to end well.</p> <h2>4. Stay focused on the issue</h2> <p>It happens in disagreements at home all the time, and it's not helpful. You start off arguing about one thing, and before you know it, you've lost your temper and it's become a character assassination. Don't let this happen at work.</p> <p>If the other person is constantly late, and it impacts your projects, find out why. Saying, &quot;You're late because you're disorganized and lazy&quot; is an attack that leads to greater conflict. Instead, talk calmly about the situation and offer advice that could help. Maybe it's simply a case of downloading a few organization apps that can keep that person on schedule. If the other person keeps making mistakes, look at the cause. Are they stressed about something? Were they never shown the correct procedure? Was their training rushed, or was it given by someone who made the very same mistakes? Stay laser-focused on the issue, and a resolution will be reached much more quickly.</p> <h2>5. Don't ignore it and hope it will go away</h2> <p>It won't. Well, not unless that person is fired or has a life-changing epiphany. By ignoring it, you're both letting it fester. The issue will always be there, like an inactive volcano, and all it takes is one push to make it explode. You can paint on a smile, you can pretend everything is peachy, but you'll both eventually combust.</p> <p>It's far better to get everything out in the open as soon as you can, talk about it, and find a solution. It's more difficult to tackle it than it is to ignore it, but the outcome is way better for everyone involved. You may even find that after the issue is resolved, you become good friends.</p> <h2>6. Establish ground rules for a conversation</h2> <p>There should be rules you both agree on before talking it out, and they can be very helpful in alleviating some natural tensions. For starters, you should both agree not to attack the other person's character. You may want to have a rule that allows either person to step away for a few minutes if things get heated or they're having a hard time concentrating. Perhaps you want a third party there to take notes and keep everyone honest. As long as you both agree on these rules before you begin, you should make significant progress.</p> <p>When you're done, agree to shake hands, put the incident behind you, and focus on the future. This is not something anyone wants shoved back in their face the second some other disagreement happens.</p> <h2>7. Don't go negative</h2> <p>If you've ever had a disagreement with a romantic partner, you know how quickly it can derail when things turn negative. You go from talking, to screaming, to not speaking to each other at all. And after a period of not talking, it can take longer to recover from that argument than the issue it was actually about.</p> <p>The same applies to a workplace disagreement. Do not go into the negative aspects of the issue. Avoid hostility, bitterness, and resentment. If your co-worker starts wandering into that territory, be the bigger person and steer them back to positive ground. Remember, you're both working for the same company, and you should both want each other to do well. When you're successful at your roles, the company benefits and everyone's a winner. So, stay positive. If you have things to say that may sound negative, how can you frame them in a better way? What good can come of this? What can you both learn?</p> <h2>8. Help the other party offer up a reasonable solution</h2> <p>This works well with most disagreements. If you come to the table with a solution already figured out, the other person will feel like you've bulldozed over them. Why should they take the solution you've offered? Does it benefit you more than them?</p> <p>Instead, after you have both talked about the disagreement, ask them to consider what could be done to make the situation better for both of you, and maybe hint at solutions. For example, if they have been playing their music excessively loud, you could mention that the company pays for certain accessories that are helpful to create a harmonious working environment. That may be all the other person needs to suggest that he or she wears headphones. And if the company doesn't pay, why not offer to go halves, or pay yourself? If it leads to a happier life for you, it's money well spent. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-driving-your-coworkers-insane?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Ways You're Driving Your Co-workers Insane</a>)</p> <h2>9. Find a mediator</h2> <p>If the situation warrants it, and things have devolved into a situation that is unproductive, consider bringing in a mediator to help with the dispute. It could be another person from your department, a manager, or maybe just someone in the company who is known to be a people person. Don't bring in someone from human resources unless you want to make this official (more on that in a moment), and don't ask someone clearly biased to one of you.</p> <p>Explain the situation to the mediator, and have the other person do the same. You are both going to have your own version of the story &mdash; if the mediator only hears one side of it, this will not work. Sit down and discuss things rationally. The mediator can help you both avoid going into a negative place, and can also explain things to each of you that may not come across the right way from either party, for obvious reasons.</p> <h2>10. Take it to human resources</h2> <p>As a last resort, and if you have tried all other avenues, you should both raise the issue with your human resources department (if you have one). When HR gets involved, you are shedding light on an issue that could have serious implications for both parties, so make sure you know what you're getting into.</p> <p>You both may have to take some conflict resolution classes, and it's possible the incident could go into your employee record. That in turn could impact raises, bonuses, and other work-related benefits if it is seen that you cannot work out a disagreement amiably with each other. Human resources will keep the peace, but remember HR is there first and foremost to protect the company, not the employees. Everything will be put in writing, and if this is very serious, such as a disagreement based on race, age, gender, harassment, whistle-blowing, or favoritism, HR has the power to take action that could lead to dismissal and even criminal charges.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F10-ways-to-smooth-over-a-work-disagreement&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F10%2520Ways%2520to%2520Smooth%2520Over%2520a%2520Work%2520Disagreement.jpg&amp;description=10%20Ways%20to%20Smooth%20Over%20a%20Work%20Disagreement"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/10%20Ways%20to%20Smooth%20Over%20a%20Work%20Disagreement.jpg" alt="10 Ways to Smooth Over a Work Disagreement" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-smooth-over-a-work-disagreement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-improve-your-companys-culture-even-if-you-arent-the-boss">10 Ways to Improve Your Company&#039;s Culture, Even If You Aren&#039;t the Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters">The Ugly Truth of Workplace Success: Popularity Still Matters</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-grow-your-solo-business-without-hiring-employees">How to Grow Your Solo Business Without Hiring Employees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-bounce-back-after-a-work-mistake">6 Ways to Bounce Back After a Work Mistake</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building arguments compromise human resources office politics professionalism smoothing over work disagreements working it out Wed, 06 Jun 2018 09:00:17 +0000 Paul Michael 2146693 at https://www.wisebread.com How to Prepare When Your Unemployment Is Ending https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-when-your-unemployment-is-ending <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-prepare-when-your-unemployment-is-ending" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/young_man_handled_household_expenses.jpg" alt="Young man handled household expenses" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Losing a job can be devastating. It can throw your life into a tailspin and severely delay or even kill your progress and plans for the future. Once you receive a little help through unemployment compensation, you may find yourself right back where you started when the benefit ends.</p> <p>You may have been blindsided when you first lost your job, but losing unemployment before you've found a replacement job can also be a sucker-punch. As difficult as it all is, you still have to will yourself into being proactive. Here are a few things you should do to prepare for the end of unemployment compensation.</p> <h2>Begin with the end in mind</h2> <p>The best thing to do immediately after you receive your first unemployment check is to plan on not receiving it. It is a great aid that can help keep you afloat until you find work. But, you must keep the fact that it is only temporary in the forefront of your mind. During normal economic times, unemployment lasts 26 weeks, or six months. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-long-can-you-really-live-on-unemployment?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Long Can You Really Live on Unemployment?</a>)</p> <p>Reduce your spending and live off as little as possible. And do your best not to depend on the benefit. The benefit itself makes this easier because it usually isn't enough to cover all of your living expenses. It is only assistance &mdash; similar to someone helping you up when you trip and fall. They help you to your feet. They don't carry you.</p> <p>You have to find a way to cover the shortfall and generate your own income as quickly as possible. Put yourself on a shoestring budget. Establish spending and payment priorities, because some things may have to go unpaid. Call your creditors now and alert them to the situation and try to maintain a good relationship with them throughout the process. Downsize. Sell stuff. Get a side gig and do odd jobs. Unemployment can temporarily stop or at least slow the bleeding, but remember &mdash; it's only temporary. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-budget-overhaul-tricks-for-the-recently-unemployed?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Budget Overhaul Tricks for the Recently Unemployed</a>)</p> <h2>Make getting a job your top priority</h2> <p>Job loss is so devastating because it is a loss &mdash; economically and emotionally. Dealing with the hurt, betrayal, and disappointment is a massive task by itself. Add to that coping with money issues and the instability it causes, and you've got a deep hole to climb out of. This can make looking for another job seem like a herculean effort. Try and view your unemployment compensation as a safety net and springboard. It helps ease the financial burden and it should propel you to action.</p> <p>As the six-month period begins winding down, try adjusting your employment search to include jobs you wouldn't normally consider. Think outside the box. You may even have to get two jobs temporarily to help stay afloat. The closer you get to the benefit expiration date, the less picky you should become. Get training, attend job fairs, and leverage your networks and professional relationships to assist you during your hunt. You have to be aggressive, persistent, and diligent. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-networking-tips-for-the-recently-unemployed?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Networking Tips for the Recently Unemployed</a>)</p> <h2>Get help</h2> <p>Federal and state-funded assistance programs are available specifically to help you through this period. Sadly, these programs' processes can be slow, bureaucratic, and inefficient, which is why it is imperative that you start the process ASAP. Benefits and programs vary by location, so be sure to check with your state's local agencies to understand requirements and procedures.</p> <h3>Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)</h3> <p>Formerly known as the Food Stamp Program, <a href="https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program-snap" target="_blank">SNAP</a> provides food purchasing assistance to families in need. The amount you receive is based on your household size, income, and expenses. If you qualify, this could be a great way of ensuring your family is fed. It can also free up some cash enabling you to repurpose the grocery money and use it for another need. The benefit can be used at a host of traditional grocery stores, convenience stores, and even at your local farmers market.</p> <h3>Self-Employment Assistance Program (SEAP)</h3> <p>Have you ever heard the saying, &quot;If you can't find a job, create one?&quot; That's exactly what SEAP is designed to help you do. <a href="https://workforcesecurity.doleta.gov/unemploy/self.asp" target="_blank">SEAP</a> is a state-funded grant program specifically designed to train individuals receiving unemployment the basics of launching their own small business. And the best part about this program is that in most states, participants are not required to look for a job. The training program is your employment seeking activity. To find out if you qualify, check with your local unemployment office.</p> <h3>Housing assistance</h3> <p>If you foresee yourself struggling to pay rent or your mortgage, help is available. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) offers a number of <a href="https://www.hud.gov/topics/rental_assistance" target="_blank">rental assistance programs</a> including the Housing Choice Voucher Program. This voucher program provides assistance by paying all or a portion of your rent, if you qualify. Most states also have some sort of Emergency Rental Assistance Program which provides short-term, income-based assistance. And the federal government offers assistance to those in rural areas through its <a href="https://www.benefits.gov/benefits/benefit-details/396" target="_blank">Rural Rental Assistance Program</a>.</p> <p>If you are struggling to make mortgage payments, the <a href="https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/mortgage-assistance-relief-services-rule-compliance-guide" target="_blank">Federal Trade Commission</a> offers protection for distressed homeowners from predatory and unscrupulous lending practices. There are a lot of private and nonprofit agencies that can help you refinance, negotiate a short sale, and/or keep your home if you fall behind. The key is to do your research. Understand what you are signing. And don't make decisions out of fear or under pressure. You have options. Breathe, consult an objective expert, and move forward with what works best for your situation.</p> <h3>Nonprofit and social service agencies</h3> <p>Every state has a different suite of services and resource offerings for those in need. Finding those resources can be difficult &mdash; especially when you don't know where to look. <a href="http://www.211.org/" target="_blank">211.org</a> was established to address this need. It is a repository of information containing resource offerings for every state and parts of Canada. It is a free service that can help you find federal, state, local, nonprofit, and (small) fee-for-service assistance. It doesn't matter if you get help from family and friends, your church, or a federal or state source, as long as you get help.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-prepare-when-your-unemployment-is-ending&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Prepare%2520When%2520Your%2520Unemployment%2520Is%2520Ending.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Prepare%20When%20Your%20Unemployment%20Is%20Ending"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Prepare%20When%20Your%20Unemployment%20Is%20Ending.jpg" alt="How to Prepare When Your Unemployment Is Ending" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/denise-hill">Denise Hill</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-when-your-unemployment-is-ending">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-a-sudden-loss-of-income">How to Handle a Sudden Loss of Income</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-you-can-and-cant-buy-with-snap">Here&#039;s What You Can (And Can&#039;t) Buy With SNAP</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-laid-off-a-step-by-step-guide">How to Get Laid Off: A Step-By-Step Guide</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building aid assistance benefits expenses food stamps job loss loss of income mortgage assistance rent assistance snap unemployed unemployment Mon, 21 May 2018 08:31:21 +0000 Denise Hill 2140345 at https://www.wisebread.com 3 Online Businesses You Can Launch In No Time https://www.wisebread.com/3-online-businesses-you-can-launch-in-no-time <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-online-businesses-you-can-launch-in-no-time" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/staying_online_up_to_date_and_productive_0.jpg" alt="Staying online, up to date and productive" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The opportunities for making money online are endless in this digital age. I'm not talking about creating the next Google or Facebook, and I'm definitely not suggesting that there are any get rich quick schemes that will land you thousands for just a few hours of work. But there are plenty of full-time businesses, as well as lucrative side hustles, that can be set up relatively quickly with little to no upfront investment.</p> <p>It takes a lot of hard work and dedication to get a business off the ground. There are lots of things to consider before even launching, such as what the business will provide, who the customers will be, what your pricing structure is, and what you're going to call it.</p> <p>Stuck for ideas? These business ideas will enable you to get set up and ready to go in 24 hours or so. Here are three online businesses you can jump-start in no time. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-anyone-can-make-money-online?ref=seealso" target="_blank">11 Ways Anyone Can Make Money Online</a>)</p> <h2>Virtual assistant</h2> <p>The role of the virtual assistant is completely open-ended, and the tasks can vary wildly depending on whom you're assisting. Assignments could be anything from replying to emails and updating social media, to editing spreadsheets and coordinating your client's schedule. If you're organized and are happy taking on smaller tasks for other people, then you can make money from anywhere in the world by being a virtual assistant.</p> <p>Timothy Ferriss's <em>The Four-Hour Work Week</em> helped to create an emerging market for virtual assistants with individuals and small companies looking to outsource the menial tasks that take up the majority of their time. This allows them to focus on growing their businesses. Once you've decided on the skillset you're going to offer, there are several ways of kick-starting your new business online.</p> <p>You can apply for a job with a virtual assistant agency and once you're hired, you'll already have a client or list of clients waiting to be connected with an assistant. This is how many VAs start, but you may also find jobs through word of mouth or from former employers. Social media is a free and easy way to advertise your services, too, and just a few posts to your professional profiles, particularly LinkedIn, can get the ball rolling. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-find-a-legit-virtual-assistant-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Find a Legit Virtual Assistant Job</a>)</p> <h2>Social media manager</h2> <p>Social media management has become so crucial to the success of businesses that for most companies, it pays to have someone in charge of their accounts who really understands the ins and outs of all the social media platforms. Though most people have personal accounts on at least a couple of the big platforms, social media for businesses is an entirely different animal. That said, in order to prove you have what it takes to help a business with their accounts, you'll undoubtedly need to have built a significant presence of your own online.</p> <p>Social media management involves building thriving communities for your clients, which ultimately generates extra revenue for them. It can involve writing and scheduling engaging content, running advertising campaigns, and replying to queries or complaints. You're probably also going to be in charge of a budget dedicated to social media growth, and therefore should know how best to spend it for the highest returns.</p> <p>Similarly to virtual assistant positions, there are online agencies where you can find social media management jobs. However, once you have some experience under your belt, it may be worth pitching clients directly. Though it can be scary at first, it's an invaluable skill to learn and gives you much greater control over your rates and schedule. It's easy to assess whether you think you can help a client by simply looking at their social media content and engagement. Then you can put a plan together for how you will quickly improve it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-make-extra-money-using-social-media?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways to Make Extra Money Using Social Media</a>)</p> <h2>Online tutor</h2> <p>If you enjoy teaching and have in-depth knowledge of a particular subject, then online tutoring could be a reliable moneymaker for you. Where previously, tutoring was all done face-to-face and relied on finding students in your local area, the internet has made it global. Thanks to video calls and online teaching programs, you can tutor anyone anywhere in the world, <em>from</em> anywhere in the world, with just a laptop and a decent internet connection.</p> <p>Languages are a fantastic starting place, as you don't necessarily need qualifications. Often, you don&rsquo;t even need to speak the student&rsquo;s native tongue, as you&rsquo;re encouraged to teach only in the language being learned.</p> <p>But tutoring is not limited to language instruction. The most open sector in tutoring is for school-aged children, and math and science tend to be subjects that children require help with. Around exam times when many parents want to give their kids a boost, tutors can be extremely busy, and you can adjust your rates accordingly to meet that demand.</p> <p>More often than not, tutoring positions are relatively short-term, so you'll likely have to continually be looking for new gigs. There are many online platforms that connect tutors to students, such as Tutor.com and Chegg.com. Apply online and set up a profile to begin finding jobs. You can also market yourself online using social media platforms, free classified ads on sites like Craigslist, online teaching directories, and even your own website or blog. Once you've successfully tutored some students, the best way to get new business is to ask for referrals, as it's likely that they know other people looking for similar help. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-earn-1000-a-month-or-more-as-an-online-tutor?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Earn $1,000 a Month or More as an Online Tutor</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F3-online-businesses-you-can-launch-in-no-time&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F3%2520Online%2520Businesses%2520You%2520Can%2520Launch%2520In%2520No%2520Time.jpg&amp;description=3%20Online%20Businesses%20You%20Can%20Launch%20In%20No%20Time"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;<img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/3%20Online%20Businesses%20You%20Can%20Launch%20In%20No%20Time.jpg" alt="3 Online Businesses You Can Launch In No Time" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/nick-wharton">Nick Wharton</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/3-online-businesses-you-can-launch-in-no-time">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/the-three-f-rule-can-lead-you-to-happiness">The Three F Rule Can Lead You to Happiness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/35-resources-for-female-entrepreneurs">35 Resources for Female Entrepreneurs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/16-ways-to-get-money-for-your-business">16 Ways To Get Money For Your Business</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/8-life-skills-every-freelancer-needs">8 Life Skills Every Freelancer Needs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-grow-your-solo-business-without-hiring-employees">How to Grow Your Solo Business Without Hiring Employees</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Entrepreneurship Wed, 09 May 2018 08:30:20 +0000 Nick Wharton 2139675 at https://www.wisebread.com 9 Ways Work-At-Home Seniors Can Master Work-Life Balance https://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-work-at-home-seniors-can-master-work-life-balance <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-ways-work-at-home-seniors-can-master-work-life-balance" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mature_woman_working_on_computer_0.jpg" alt="Mature woman working on computer" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You're retired, but maybe you still want to keep a hand in your old business. Or maybe you love consulting, or you want some extra cash, or you don't like having too much idle time on your hands. No matter the reason, working from home can be a great way for retirees to earn an income without being subject to the daily commute and grind of a traditional 9-to-5.</p> <p>Remote work can be highly rewarding and even fun. Here are some ways to keep your work-life balance while working from home in retirement.</p> <h2>1. Look for a flexible schedule</h2> <p>One of the great benefits of retiring is being able to do what you want, when you want. Don't lose that completely by ending up with a rigid work schedule. Sure, you'll need to be there for your new employers or clients some of the time, but make sure you have the flexibility to take time off for the things that matter most to you.</p> <h2>2. Start small</h2> <p>It may be tempting to jump right into a new job. However, working from home is different from going to work at a company. If you've never done it before, it can be overwhelming at first to be self-directed and spend so much time alone.</p> <p>If you think you want to work from home, start by taking on a project or two, or working a few hours a week. If you like it and can still do all of the other things that you want to do with your retirement, you can look for a more permanent gig.</p> <h2>3. Make time for family</h2> <p>Many retirees make the jump into retirement at least in part so they can spend more time with their families. If this is you, ensure that your new job doesn't interrupt this time. Even if you work from home, it's important to put child care obligations or family days on the calendar early, and make sure your new employer knows you won't be available at those times. You can keep your family first even if you're going back to work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-your-work-life-balance-is-off?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Signs Your Work-Life Balance Is Off</a>)</p> <h2>4. Unplug yourself</h2> <p>Whether you're old or young, it's easy to get sucked into the internet. You may find yourself surfing Facebook for pictures of your grandchildren, looking up decorating ideas on Pinterest, or getting lost in a sea of YouTube videos.</p> <p>Time spent online is often little more than a distraction. Ultimately, it isn't very satisfying, and it often takes you away from the things you really want or need to be doing. Limit your time online, especially when you're away from work, so you can really engage with the people and the experiences around you. If you're glued to your desk all day, you probably won't be enjoying your retirement to its fullest.</p> <h2>5. Plan vacations ahead of time</h2> <p>Some retirees enter retirement with the intention to travel. You can still do this while working from home. Make sure you get your vacations on the calendar early so your employer knows when you won't be available. This helps ensure that you'll have the free time you need to fully embrace your travel, even if you have to get right back to work when you get home.</p> <h2>6. Exercise</h2> <p>Exercise makes us feel better. It gets the blood flowing and helps boost our mood. Both of these will go far toward helping you feel like your life is in balance. When you make time for exercise, you're making time for yourself. You're also prioritizing your health, as exercise can help you live longer and avoid or minimize many of the physical problems that plague people in retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-smart-ways-to-invest-in-your-health?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Smart Ways to Invest in Your Health</a>)</p> <h2>7. Meditate</h2> <p>Make time to meditate. Clear your head. If you don't like meditation, get a journal and spend a few minutes every day writing down your thoughts. Giving yourself this space helps you remember what's important to you, and that your stated priorities are actually prioritized in your real life. It also gives you the mental clarity to fully engage with work when you're working, and with other people and things when you're outside of work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-meditation-alternatives-for-people-with-busy-minds?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Meditation Alternatives for People With Busy Minds</a>)</p> <h2>8. Walk every hour</h2> <p>When you're on the clock, make sure you stay moving. Get up every hour and take a short walk, even if it's just down the hall and back. This not only fights the dangers of a sedentary lifestyle, but it also helps you stay focused.</p> <h2>9. Schedule time to give back</h2> <p>If one of your retirement goals was to give back to the community, rest assured that you can still do that while you're working from home. Make volunteering a priority by scheduling it in your calendar, getting the time off or clearing your client list for the day, and helping out however and wherever you like. Giving back will offer a sense of fulfillment, and it will also remind you of the things that are truly important. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-benefits-of-volunteering%20?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Unexpected Benefits of Volunteering</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-ways-work-at-home-seniors-can-master-work-life-balance&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520Ways%2520Work-At-Home%2520Seniors%2520Can%2520Master%2520Work-Life%2520Balance.jpg&amp;description=9%20Ways%20Work-At-Home%20Seniors%20Can%20Master%20Work-Life%20Balance"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20Ways%20Work-At-Home%20Seniors%20Can%20Master%20Work-Life%20Balance.jpg" alt="9 Ways Work-At-Home Seniors Can Master Work-Life Balance" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-work-at-home-seniors-can-master-work-life-balance">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-find-your-new-identity-after-retirement">How to Find Your New Identity After Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-keep-anxiety-from-ruining-your-budget">5 Ways to Keep Anxiety From Ruining Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-live-a-retired-life-before-retirement">How to Live a Retired Life Before Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-splurges-that-are-worth-every-penny">7 Retirement Splurges That Are Worth Every Penny</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-travel-full-time-for-17000-a-year-or-less">How to Travel Full-Time for $17,000 a Year (or Less!)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Lifestyle Retirement down time exercise family meditating telecommuting volunteering work-life balance working from home Fri, 04 May 2018 09:00:08 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 2131865 at https://www.wisebread.com 9 Smart Moves to Make After Getting a Raise or Promotion https://www.wisebread.com/9-smart-moves-to-make-after-getting-a-raise-or-promotion <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-smart-moves-to-make-after-getting-a-raise-or-promotion" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/nothing_can_break_our_team.jpg" alt="Nothing can break our team" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You've worked hard, and you've impressed the boss: You've been rewarded with a raise, promotion, or both. That's great news.</p> <p>The worst mistake you could make right now is to use this time as an excuse to slack off at work or spend more money. Your new challenge is to figure out how to handle your new responsibilities and your new money in a way that will help you continue to succeed.</p> <p>Here are some smart career and money moves to make after your employer rewards you with a raise or promotion.</p> <h2>After a promotion</h2> <p>Getting a promotion is a sign that you've been a hardworking, valuable employee. You should pat yourself on the back for your achievement.</p> <p>But, promotions can also prove stressful. You may be managing people for the first time, or maybe you'll be taking on more responsibilities. Regardless, there are a few key things you should do immediately following a promotion. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Signs You're Making All the Right Career Moves</a>)</p> <h3>1. Be confident, but humble</h3> <p>There's a reason you earned that promotion. There's something that your employer values about you, your decision-making, and your leadership. It's great to feel confident, but don't let this make you cocky.</p> <p>You still have a lot to learn after a promotion. You'll be taking on new duties. Your job description might have swelled. You might even be overseeing others for the first time. Remain humble, grateful, and don't alienate your peers. It's harder to reach your new goals if your co-workers don't like you.</p> <h3>2. Ask plenty of questions</h3> <p>Questions are your friend after a promotion. You want to make sure that you understand all that is required of you in your new position. If you have any doubts or confusion on this matter, get concrete expectations and instructions from your superiors.</p> <p>You also want to come up with as many good ideas for improving your company's performance as you can get. Ask your co-workers &mdash; even if you are now managing them &mdash; for their input on what steps the company can take to improve morale, boost productivity, and compete more successfully in the marketplace.</p> <h3>3. Get ready to work hard</h3> <p>You'll want to reassure your boss that they made the right decision when they promoted you, so put in the hours necessary to show them how dedicated you are to your company. Now is not the time to take extra days off or leave the office early. Instead, work even harder than you did before you earned your promotion.</p> <p>Take the initiative at the next company meeting. Research what new skills would help you thrive in your role, and make a plan to learn them. Not only will this impress your boss, it will help you catch up more quickly with your new duties and responsibilities.</p> <h3>4. Start churning out the ideas</h3> <p>Does worker productivity at your office slump after lunch? Is employee morale low? Is a big project behind schedule? Come up with potential solutions to these problems. Crafting new ideas to solve important problems is the best way to show your supervisors that they were right in giving you that promotion.</p> <h2>After getting a raise</h2> <p>A promotion doesn't always come with a big pay boost, but if it does, it's the perfect reason to give your finances a makeover. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-get-a-promotion?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Money Moves to Make the Moment You Get a Promotion</a>)</p> <h3>5. Calculate exactly how much more you'll be getting each month</h3> <p>It's tempting to start spending your raise before it even shows up in your paycheck, but be careful: Taxes and other withholdings will eat up a portion of your raise before it even hits your bank account. Getting a $3,000 raise does not mean there will be exactly $3,000 extra dollars in your pocket at the end of the year. Wait until your salary increase is reflected in one of your paychecks before changing your saving or spending patterns. That extra chunk of change might not be as large you originally expected. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-withholding-the-right-amount-of-taxes-from-your-paycheck?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Withholding the Right Amount of Taxes from Your Paycheck?</a>)</p> <h3>6. Rework your household budget</h3> <p>Once you know exactly how much extra money you'll get with each paycheck, it's time to tweak your household budget. Your expenses should remain the same &mdash; lifestyle creep is a dangerous thing &mdash; but your monthly income, obviously, will change. What should also change? How much money you contribute each month to retirement and savings. Rework that budget to help you determine your new savings goals. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-budget-when-youre-no-longer-broke?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Budget When You're No Longer Broke</a>)</p> <h3>7. Boost your retirement savings</h3> <p>It's fun to imagine using your new funds to buy a high-end laptop, flat-screen TV, or shiny new car. While no one can stop you from buying those things, make sure to first use your extra funds to boost your retirement savings. Building a retirement nest egg should be your ultimate goal starting your very first day of work. That might not seem like a whole lot fun now, but you'll be thankful for the foresight as retirement grows closer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-meeting-the-2018-401k-contribution-limits-will-brighten-your-future?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways Meeting the 2018 401(k) Contribution Limits Will Brighten Your Future</a>)</p> <h3>8. Build your emergency fund</h3> <p>You should always have an emergency fund of savings that you can tap to cover unexpected expenses &mdash; whether it's a big vet bill for your dog or a blown gasket in your car. Having such a fund makes it less likely that you'll need to turn to credit cards to pay for an emergency.</p> <p>Financial experts recommend that your emergency fund have enough dollars in it to cover your daily living expenses for six to 12 months. If your fund isn't stocked to this level, use the extra money from your raise to hit that target. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-build-an-emergency-fund-from-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Easy Ways to Build an Emergency Fund From $0</a>)</p> <h3>9. Continue to live frugally</h3> <p>Too often, people boost their monthly spending as their income rises. They spend more on cars, clothing, entertainment, and meals. The problem is this lifestyle creep can quickly erase any added savings that come with a larger paycheck.</p> <p>Resist the temptation to overspend after earning a raise. Instead, focus on the less fun but more important task of building your savings, emergency fund, and retirement accounts. After getting a raise, don't spend more. Save more. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-one-nice-thing-can-ruin-your-whole-budget?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How One Nice Thing Can Ruin Your Whole Budget</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-smart-moves-to-make-after-getting-a-raise-or-promotion&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520Smart%2520Moves%2520to%2520Make%2520After%2520Getting%2520a%2520Raise%2520or%2520Promotion.jpg&amp;description=9%20Smart%20Moves%20to%20Make%20After%20Getting%20a%20Raise%20or%20Promotion"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20Smart%20Moves%20to%20Make%20After%20Getting%20a%20Raise%20or%20Promotion.jpg" alt="9 Smart Moves to Make After Getting a Raise or Promotion" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/9-smart-moves-to-make-after-getting-a-raise-or-promotion">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-money-goals-you-can-achieve-this-summer">5 Money Goals You Can Achieve This Summer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/money-a-mess-try-this-personal-finance-starter-kit">Money a Mess? Try This Personal Finance Starter Kit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/the-financial-basics-every-new-grad-should-know">The Financial Basics Every New Grad Should Know</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Career Building budgeting career moves emergency fund lifestyle creep money moves promotions raise retirement saving money Thu, 26 Apr 2018 08:00:13 +0000 Dan Rafter 2131008 at https://www.wisebread.com 12 Subtle Signs You'd Make a Good Boss https://www.wisebread.com/12-subtle-signs-youd-make-a-good-boss <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-subtle-signs-youd-make-a-good-boss" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/smiling_woman_in_office.jpg" alt="Smiling woman in office" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are good managers and there are bad managers. Sadly, the people who would make really great managers often don't realize their potential to lead. These subtle signs &mdash; ones that you have either overlooked or never noticed &mdash; signal that you could be a fantastic boss. Don't let others miss out on your leadership. When you've checked off enough boxes, go get that promotion!</p> <h2>1. You give constructive feedback</h2> <p>There are several ways to give feedback on a project or idea. You could simply smile and say you like it, regardless of what you really think, in fear of hurting feelings. That helps no one, especially if you see glaring errors. You could be the naysayer: Whatever the idea, and whoever the project manager is, it's awful, try again. Even if a project really is bad, that kind of feedback can stop progress in its tracks.</p> <p>Genuine, constructive feedback includes specific action items and suggestions on ways to improve or expand the idea. If you have a gift for that, and people are often asking for your opinions, well done. You've got a great managerial skill.</p> <h2>2. You're already treated like a manager</h2> <p>Some people are just natural leaders. They're the alphas in the group, and have the ability to step up and take charge when others are disappearing into the bushes like Homer Simpson. These people are magnets for co-workers. Yes, there is a boss, and they will formally go to that boss to make sure everything is done by the book &mdash; but if they're coming to you for solutions to problems, advice on projects, or mentoring of any kind, you are the manager they really want.</p> <p>Think about how many bosses you've had that never quite seemed up to the task; they were promoted through nepotism, favoritism, family ties, or pure luck. Now think about the people working under them that had it all together. You could very well be that person in your company.</p> <h2>3. You care about performance more than titles and money</h2> <p>Both money and titles are important to a certain degree. You need money to live. Titles dictate responsibility and influence. However, if you put those things second to the performance you give, that's the sign of a great manager.</p> <p>For you, it's not about peacocking around the office, sucking up to the executives, and impressing people with your shiny new company car. No, you are there to do a job, and do it well. You want to see the company grow and you want your input to have impact. When you do that, the titles and money will come to you anyway.</p> <h2>4. You're a natural listener</h2> <p>Have you ever noticed that your co-workers are inclined to tell you their problems? For some reason, you're the go-to shoulder to cry on, or you're getting that phone call at midnight from a friend who really needs your advice before an interview. You clearly have a knack for not just listening to other people's problems, but making them feel like you really hear what they're saying. This is an excellent trait for a manager. It can defuse tense situations at work and help with team-building and employee motivation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-soft-skills-every-employer-values?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Soft Skills Every Employer Values</a>)</p> <h2>5. You are a cheerleader more than a naysayer</h2> <p>Are you a stop sign or a green light? Do you build up ideas or cut them down? Are you generally more positive than negative? If you're nodding, you have the mindset that makes for a great manager. This isn't to say you have to agree with everything and bury your head in the sand when bad ideas are presented. But, you see potential when others don't. You can take the acorn of an idea and help it grow into a mighty oak. Your enthusiasm for the work and the initiatives will benefit your company, your employees, and your career.</p> <h2>6. You are always looking for ways to improve yourself</h2> <p>Self-improvement should never stop. Jim Rohn, a famous motivational speaker, once said, &quot;Work on yourself more than you do on your job.&quot; By following that advice, you will not only become a better person, but a better employee and a valuable contributor. If you have a manager that believes they know it all, that's a cause for concern. The greatest thinkers and entrepreneurs from history continued to learn and improve right up until the day they died. They were smart and humble enough to know that self-improvement is a proven path to success.</p> <h2>7. You show empathy for your teammates</h2> <p>Empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of others. It's important to know the difference between that and being sympathetic, which is an internal feeling and does not take into account someone else's emotions.</p> <p>If you are blessed with great empathy, you have the natural ability to understand what someone else is going through emotionally, and usually know just how to respond to make that person feel better. You listen, you engage, you react, and you leave someone in a better state than you found them. This is a fabulous skill for a manager for obvious reasons. From helping employees with difficult and stressful situations, to dealing with anger, disappointment, and even sorrow, your empathy will take you a long way. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-skill-can-make-you-a-better-boss?ref=seealso" target="_blank">This One Skill Can Make You a Better Boss</a>)</p> <h2>8. You don't get stressed or shaken by sudden change</h2> <p>Turbulence is not just for flights. All businesses, large or small, are going to experience ups and downs. When you're plunged into boiling water, do you go soft like a carrot, hard like an egg, or create something wonderful, like coffee? If you're the latter, you are going to excel in any kind of working environment.</p> <p>Managers that react to sudden change with professionalism, positivity, and a can-do attitude will inspire a team, solve the problem, and come out smelling of roses. What's more, this is a skill that can be learned, strengthened, and refined. So if you currently turn to Jell-O when the pressure is on, find a mentor that can help you get better in a crisis. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-types-of-people-who-will-help-grow-your-career?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Types of People Who Will Help Grow Your Career</a>)</p> <h2>9. You don't get involved in gossip or company politics</h2> <p>That's not to say you don't understand the politics in a company. But there is a difference between knowing how to survive, and actively engaging in all the water cooler chitchat and backstabbing moves. Anyone who climbs the ladder by throwing other people off it will eventually find themselves on the receiving end of the same treatment. And in the process, they will lose the respect of their team. If you avoid all of the nonsense that is inherent in most corporations, you will be a better manager, and honestly, a better person.</p> <h2>10. You are always ready to step up and solve problems</h2> <p>It's always not easy; in fact, it can be downright intimidating or require a bunch of extra work and hassle. But, you do it anyway because you know you can help. That's the attitude of a great manager. You roll up your sleeves and you're not afraid to get dirty. You have no doubt had managers that were more like dictators; they were happy to bark orders, but never stepped up to the plate. Those people do not inspire the same kind of respect and confidence from their employees as the managers that dive in.</p> <h2>11. You put the team and the outcome before personal gain</h2> <p>It's not about you. It's about the end result. You don't feel the need to take credit for those times you swooped in to save the day. In fact, you'd much rather see one of your team members get rewarded for the work they did, even though you were right there with them every step of the way. This selfless attitude is a fantastic trait of a good manager. To be happy when the team does well, and be proud when their employees are getting results, is rare in many organizations. Sadly, a lot of managers are quite happy to take the credit when they've done nothing at all, and that creates awful morale and a loyalty problem. That will never be an issue when you're in charge.</p> <h2>12. You're doing a manager's job already</h2> <p>Take a look at your current task list. What is in your job description, and what are you actually doing day in, day out? You may have been doing way more than required for quite some time now, and that's often the case these days. As departments are downsized, some employees are required to take on more work. So much more that they have actually taken on a managerial role. If this is you, the time is ripe to sit down with your boss or human resources department and talk about a raise. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F12-subtle-signs-youd-make-a-good-boss&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F12%2520Subtle%2520Signs%2520You%2527d%2520Make%2520a%2520Good%2520Boss.jpg&amp;description=12%20Subtle%20Signs%20You'd%20Make%20a%20Good%20Boss"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/12%20Subtle%20Signs%20You%27d%20Make%20a%20Good%20Boss.jpg" alt="12 Subtle Signs You'd Make a Good Boss" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/12-subtle-signs-youd-make-a-good-boss">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-10"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/this-one-skill-can-make-you-a-better-boss">This One Skill Can Make You a Better Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-underrated-skills-that-will-help-you-in-any-job">7 Underrated Skills That Will Help You in Any Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-survive-and-thrive-as-a-young-boss">How to Survive and Thrive as a Young Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/15-soft-skills-every-employer-values">15 Soft Skills Every Employer Values</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building bosses empathy feedback hidden signs leadership listening managers personality traits soft skills Fri, 13 Apr 2018 08:00:07 +0000 Paul Michael 2122920 at https://www.wisebread.com How to Set Career Goals When You Lack Direction https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-set-career-goals-when-you-lack-direction <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-set-career-goals-when-you-lack-direction" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_standing_in_front_of_chalk_drawn_arrows.jpg" alt="Woman standing in front of chalk drawn arrows" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You're long past the age where people ask you what you want to be when you grow up &mdash; but you're still trying to figure out what you want to be when you grow up. Maybe you're in a dead-end job, or maybe you're out of work. You know that you need to make some positive moves, but you just can't figure out what you want in a career.</p> <p>It's time to block out some time in your calendar to sit down with yourself and make a plan. Here are some things that can help point you in the right direction of your perfect career.</p> <h2>Mark the day when you will quit your job on the calendar</h2> <p>You're about to embark on a journey of self-exploration, and just like a vacation, this journey will have a hard end date. A deadline gives you the urgency you need to figure this all out. Don't feel guilty when you come to work each day knowing that this job has a set ending point. Remember that company loyalty is rarely reciprocated; if it didn't need you anymore, the company would most likely discard you at the drop of a hat.</p> <p>Don't worry about how long you've been on the job. If you have financial reasons to stay, such as union seniority or a pension vesting, certainly take those into consideration. But do not let yourself be stuck in place out of a feeling of obligation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-its-never-too-late-for-a-career-change?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Reasons It's Never Too Late for a Career Change</a>)</p> <h2>Look for self-improvement opportunities at work</h2> <p>Before you leave your current job, explore every benefit your employer offers. If they pay for education, take a class. If they allow telecommuting, set up a day a week that you work from home to arrange your work schedule around job interviews if the need arises. If they have a mentorship program, sign up. Take advantage of every resource at your disposal while you still have them. Don't feel guilty about using these resources when you're planning to leave. Of course, you also shouldn't be slacking off or searching for a new job while on company time, either.</p> <h2>Reach out to your network</h2> <p>At work, in your neighborhood, or among college or high school alumni, ask everyone you know and trust about their workplace and their job. What do they love about it? What kind of staff can they never find enough of? What could they imagine you doing there? Can they give you a tour of their workplace?</p> <p>After college, my husband didn't know what he wanted to do with his art degree. But he met some friends who had a startup video game company, and he started visiting this company after his regular job, offering some of his skills for free and just hanging out. Once he realized how much he liked the work, he ended up pursuing a career as a game artist.</p> <p>When you ask friends and family for career advice, accept that you will get plenty of unrealistic suggestions. These people may not have researched the jobs they're suggesting, so they might not know, for example, how long it takes to start making money as a hair stylist or how long you have to study to become a veterinarian. Pass up the fluff and push people to share their firsthand knowledge about their own jobs and workplaces.</p> <h2>Assess yourself</h2> <p>Take a career aptitude test. It can help you identify what your skills and preferences are and make suggestions on what careers might be within your skill set. You may even learn about a career you didn't know existed.</p> <h2>Try volunteering</h2> <p>For obvious reasons, a volunteer job is a lot easier to get than a paid job, and the commitment tends to be low. So it can be a good opportunity to try out new roles and to uncover passions you didn't know you had. Through volunteering during the cookie sale with my daughters' Girl Scout troops, for example, I learned that I love inventory management, a career path that I never would have imagined for myself.</p> <p>Find out if your company offers paid volunteer time during the weekday, or carve out some evening or weekend time for volunteer jobs. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-college-courses-that-will-boost-your-career?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 College Courses That Will Boost Your Career</a>)</p> <h2>Make a list of what you're passionate about</h2> <p>If you've already tried the first few steps on this list, you've had the opportunity to explore your interests. Now have a meeting with yourself where you list those things. Rank them. You only have one life. Is it most important to you that you spend it in a career that helps children, or is it more important that you get to use your organizational skills? Once you have a short, well-edited list, post it in a place that forces you to look at it every day.</p> <h2>Look for opportunities to pursue your passions in your current job</h2> <p>Once I had a relatively boring copy editing job, but I really wanted to write. I let this desire be known in my company. I brought it up in performance reviews, and I posted a freelance article I'd published on my cubicle wall. After a few months, when a manager needed someone to write something for the company's internal website, she called upon me. It wasn't the journalistic writing I later progressed to, but it was writing, and the task helped push me to look for a real journalism job, which I soon found. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-rekindle-passion-for-your-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Ways to Rekindle Passion for Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>Remember that you're more than your job</h2> <p>Look beyond your current job description when you assess what you have to offer. Consider every positive goal and outcome you've contributed to at work, and how you helped achieve them. Keep those successes in mind &mdash; whether or not they're part of your official job title &mdash; when assessing what abilities you could bring to your next job.</p> <h2>Go back to school</h2> <p>Before you've identified your new career goal, taking a class can help you explore your interests and skills. After you've identified a career goal, taking a class can help you get there. It could be a whole new degree, but it could also be a certification in a software program, a public speaking class, or a professional training program. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-college-courses-that-will-boost-your-career?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 College Courses That Will Boost Your Career</a>)</p> <h2>Lay the groundwork for change</h2> <p>Figuring out your passions and how to use them may take time. During that time, work to prepare your landing pad for the leap you will eventually take. Set aside some money each week for an emergency fund, in case you end up quitting your job before you find a new one. Deal with any personal situation that is taking up too much of your time and energy, whether it's an unhealthy relationship or a nagging health problem.</p> <p>At the same time, don't fall into the trap of believing that conditions must be perfect before you can make your move. Remember that date on the calendar? Work every day toward being prepared when that date comes, but don't push Quitting Day back just because you don't have every single duck in a row.</p> <h2>Invest in yourself</h2> <p>Spend 3 percent of your income on professional development. Attend professional conferences even if your company won't pay for your plane ticket. Read career books. Treat potential mentors to lunch or coffee. Take courses, as mentioned above. All of these activities can help you find or hone those career goals and get you closer to reaching them. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-spending-3-on-you-will-advance-your-career?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Here's How Spending 3% On You Will Advance Your Career</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-set-career-goals-when-you-lack-direction&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Set%2520Career%2520Goals%2520When%2520You%2520Lack%2520Direction.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Set%20Career%20Goals%20When%20You%20Lack%20Direction"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Set%20Career%20Goals%20When%20You%20Lack%20Direction.jpg" alt="How to Set Career Goals When You Lack Direction" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-set-career-goals-when-you-lack-direction">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-11"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/8-networking-tips-for-introverts">8 Networking Tips for Introverts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving">How to Ask for Your Old Job Back After Leaving</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-bring-up-with-your-boss-at-your-annual-review">10 Things to Bring Up With Your Boss at Your Annual Review</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40">The 10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career goals classes direction networking passions quitting self reflection volunteering Mon, 09 Apr 2018 08:30:14 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2123013 at https://www.wisebread.com 6 Quick Ways to Retrain for a New Career https://www.wisebread.com/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i_have_made_my_tablet_a_mini_workstation.jpg" alt="I have made my tablet a mini workstation" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You need more than an entry-level job to pay the bills, but you don't have the time or funds to get a four-year college degree. Or maybe you already have a college degree, but it's not helping you find work. You could be a stay-at-home parent re-entering the workforce, or a midlevel manager who's sick of your industry and wants to start fresh.</p> <p>If this sounds familiar, you could soon be one of the most in-demand types of workers in America: the &quot;middle skill&quot; worker. More than half of all available jobs fall into this category. These are jobs that require more than a high school diploma, but less than a college degree &mdash; whether it's a certificate program, an apprenticeship, or on-the-job training.</p> <p>If you're ready to switch gears and retrain for a new gig, there are some fast and affordable ways to do that.</p> <h2>1. Pinpoint your target job</h2> <p>Even if you need to get retrained quickly, that doesn't mean you should skip the planning stage. <em>Do not </em>enroll in a training program without knowing what job you're going for and how much it would pay.</p> <p>If you haven't chosen a target industry yet, look at the ones with the highest-paying jobs that don't require a college degree. Once, these jobs were mostly found in manufacturing, but now they're more likely to be in the &quot;skilled services industries,&quot; such as health care, finance, and information technology.</p> <p>Georgetown University lists the <a href="https://goodjobsdata.org/wp-content/uploads/Good-Jobs-States.pdf" target="_blank">top industries and occupations in each state</a> that don't require a BA; in Pennsylvania, for instance, the top industries are manufacturing and health services, and the top occupation is office and administrative support (median earnings: $51,000). You can also check the resources offered by your state development department; California, for example, lists the <a href="http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/customers/middle-skill-infographics.html" target="_blank">most in-demand middle skill occupations</a> for each region. Also think about the job's future; check <a href="https://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_table_103.htm" target="_blank">job growth projections</a> and find out which workers may be <a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2015/05/21/408234543/will-your-job-be-done-by-a-machine" target="_blank">replaced by robots</a>.</p> <p>Besides this online research, you should get the word on the street in your community. Ask your friends and family what type of jobs their employers have trouble filling, what those jobs are like, and what they pay. Visit your local job center and study the openings.</p> <p>Finally, consider working with a vocational counselor or career coach who could guide you. If you recently lost your job, your local workforce agency or your former employer might provide you with this kind of help for free. If not, it may be worth the money to hire one out of pocket. Make sure you find a counselor with experience in the middle-skills market &mdash; not an executive recruiter or coach &mdash; and make it clear what you want out of the relationship before you start.</p> <h2>2. Focus on fit</h2> <p>Once you have a list of promising jobs you could train for, cross out those that you know you don't have the aptitude for or would hate. If you're a couch potato, there's probably no point in trying to get certified as a personal trainer. Ask yourself which jobs could make good use of your soft skills or transferable skills from previous jobs. Take an aptitude test if you don't already know what you're best at. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-soft-skills-every-employer-values?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Soft Skills Every Employer Values</a>)</p> <h2>3. Find the right training program</h2> <p>Local research is probably your best friend here, too. If you can land an informational interview at a prospective employer, find out what certificate, associate degree, or other training they look for or require. Ask contacts who are already in your desired field where they trained and if they would recommend it.</p> <p>Perhaps the most important question you can ask about a job training program is whether it is connected with local companies that hire graduates. Programs codeveloped by hiring companies, or otherwise &quot;demand driven,&quot; produce graduates with higher employment rates.</p> <p>Having teachers who work full-time in the industry can be a plus, too; when my husband was training to be a video game artist, he ended up getting hired as a part-time game tester by one of his teachers, and that job later led to a full-time artist position.</p> <p>You should also research potential schools and programs online. Is the program recognized by a national association for the field? What do students say about the program in forums? Has the school been targeted by student lawsuits for fraud or does it have other bad press? What is the school's graduation and employment rate? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-online-certifications-worth-the-price?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are Online Certifications Worth the Price?</a>)</p> <h2>4. Don't forget the trades</h2> <p>Deciding to become a plumber, electrician, or carpenter isn't a quick fix. It takes four years of apprenticeship, for example, to become a licensed journeyman electrician. That's after passing the union application exam, which many people spend months or years preparing for. On the other hand, you can earn while you learn; the average apprentice electrician earns around $35,000 a year. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Jobs That Pay Over $50K and Don't Require a Bachelor's Degree</a>)</p> <h2>5. Try temping</h2> <p>Registering with one or more temporary agencies can be more than a way to make ends meet while researching your career move; it can be a way of conducting that research. Think about it: If you apply for a job or even attend a job interview, you get a very limited peek inside the company. But as a temp, you'll spend all day on the inside. You could be exposed to job roles you might not have even known about. Ask questions of everyone you work with, from the agency staff, to your on-site supervisor, to co-workers.</p> <h2>6. Look for retraining opportunities within your current company</h2> <p>If you like where you work, try to get trained for a better job within the organization. You might approach a manager about this, or you could ask human resources what education programs the company has.</p> <p>You might also discreetly talk to other managers, or browse internal job listings. I recently met someone who had been driving a forklift at a large grocery warehouse, until the company paid for her to get trained in refrigerator/freezer repair. Now she makes more money and has more job satisfaction, without ever having to interview for a new job.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Quick%2520Ways%2520to%2520Retrain%2520for%2520a%2520New%2520Career.jpg&amp;description=6%20Quick%20Ways%20to%20Retrain%20for%20a%20New%20Career"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Quick%20Ways%20to%20Retrain%20for%20a%20New%20Career.jpg" alt="6 Quick Ways to Retrain for a New Career" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/6-quick-ways-to-retrain-for-a-new-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-12"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree">5 Jobs That Pay Over $50K and Don&#039;t Require a Bachelor&#039;s Degree</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-escape-a-dying-industry">8 Ways to Escape a Dying Industry</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-should-do-in-the-first-six-months-of-a-new-job">12 Things You Should Do in the First Six Months of a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-things-your-boss-wishes-youd-tell-them">7 Things Your Boss Wishes You&#039;d Tell Them</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building apprenticeships certifications job growth middle skills new job research retraining training programs Fri, 06 Apr 2018 09:00:07 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2120733 at https://www.wisebread.com What to Do If Your Employer Won't Pay You https://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-your-employer-wont-pay-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-to-do-if-your-employer-wont-pay-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businesswoman_under_stress.jpg" alt="Businesswoman under stress" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Work is a formal contract. Employees dedicate their time and expertise to fulfill a set role or task. Employers compensate workers for their time with a monetary wage. In an ideal world, both parties profit from the arrangement.</p> <p>Unfortunately, not all bosses fulfill their end of the bargain. Company wage theft costs the U.S. workforce billions of dollars every year, according to The Economic Policy Institute. Employers have been known to shortchange employees by:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Refusing to pay them altogether.</p> </li> <li> <p>Handing over a non-valid check.</p> </li> <li> <p>Refusing to give paid breaks where legally required.</p> </li> <li> <p>Paying under the federal, state, or county minimum wage.</p> </li> <li> <p>Having employees work off the clock.</p> </li> <li> <p>Taking tips.</p> </li> </ul> <p>What do you do when you realize your boss isn't properly compensating you?</p> <h2>Document the problem</h2> <p>The first thing you should do is document the problem. Make a copy of your pay stub. If you have access to the time management software the organization uses, print the reported hours worked. Begin documenting any past or ongoing &quot;bad&quot; behavior.</p> <p>On top of that, keep track of any financial fallout you experience from the wage loss. This can include:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Missed bills.</p> </li> <li> <p>Missed loan payments.</p> </li> <li> <p>Late fees.</p> </li> <li> <p>Bank fees.</p> </li> </ul> <h2>Check in with the company</h2> <p>The next step is to check with the company. It might just be an honest mistake that can be remedied quickly.</p> <p>If you're currently an employee, talk with human resources or a manager about the problem. They can direct you to the right department if they can't help you themselves. If you're a former employee, you might try contacting a former manager, human resources, or a general contact email about pay discrepancy.</p> <p>If the company won't respond and won't pay you for all hours worked at the right wage, there are steps you can take to potentially recoup all or some of the money. There aren't, unfortunately, any one-size-fits-all solutions to this problem. There are, however, a variety of strategies you can try to force your former or current employer to compensate you properly.</p> <h2>Dealing with wage theft on a state level</h2> <p>Reporting wage theft is highly dependent on the individual state. Every state has slightly different laws and procedures to help employees report and recover stolen wages.</p> <p>First, you can file a wage claim through your state's Department of Labor. If you go this route, state department of labor investigators will look into your case.</p> <p>This may seem like the most obvious and easy route, but it can be a long journey that might be doomed to fail. Recently website Politico reported that six states had no investigators to look into wage violations, and 26 states have fewer than 10 investigators. The end result is that many individuals who report wage claim violations to their state never see their money.</p> <p>An alternate option is to file a civil complaint in court against the business. The court that the complaint is filed with depends on the monetary amount.</p> <h2>Dealing with wage theft on a federal level</h2> <p>If filing a complaint at the state level isn't a viable option, individuals can file a complaint with the Wage-Hour Division of the U.S. Department of Labor. According to Politico, the department has about a 90 percent success rate in recovering stolen wages.</p> <p>The success rate does seem impressive, but it should be noted that the department is very selective on the cases they take on. Investigators at the department don't accept every claim that comes through the door.</p> <p>And unfortunately, even if they do take on your case, don't be surprised if they can't recover all the money that you're owed. The U.S. Department of Labor can only recover the federal minimum wage. That means if you should have been paid above the federal minimum wage, you still might be looking at a significant loss.</p> <h2>Alternate options to dealing with wage theft</h2> <p>If you belong to a labor union, take the case to union representatives. They should, at the very least, point you in the right direction. The union might even be willing to file a grievance on your behalf if they believe the case is strong enough.</p> <p>If the wage theft is widespread at the company, employees might be able to band together to file a collective action complaint. A collective action complaint allows groups of employees with similar Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) wage violations to file a complaint against the company together. A collective action complaint, unlike a class-action lawsuit, requires employees to actively sign onto the lawsuit in writing. Employees that don't consent to join the complaint won't benefit or be bound by the ruling. Collective action complaints must be filed, in most cases, within two years.</p> <p>If you're not sure of your best option, it's recommended that you consult with and possibly hire a lawyer to represent your interests. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-times-to-hire-a-lawyer-immediately?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Times to Hire a Lawyer Immediately</a>)</p> <p>In the meantime, make it a priority to switch jobs. If your employer has been flat out refusing to pay you <em>period</em>, jump ship now. Yes, you might have to go without a paycheck for a time, but you're already experiencing that now. You deserve better than an employer that has shady business practices. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-you-should-quit-your-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Signs You Should Quit Your Job</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fwhat-to-do-if-your-employer-wont-pay-you&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FWhat%2520to%2520Do%2520If%2520Your%2520Employer%2520Won%2527t%2520Pay%2520You.jpg&amp;description=What%20to%20Do%20If%20Your%20Employer%20Won't%20Pay%20You"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://wisebread-killeracesmedia.netdna-ssl.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/What%20to%20Do%20If%20Your%20Employer%20Won%27t%20Pay%20You.jpg" alt="What to Do If Your Employer Won't Pay You" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="https://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-your-employer-wont-pay-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-13"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-your-paycheck-bounces">What to Do If Your Paycheck Bounces</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise">The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/7-things-your-boss-wishes-youd-tell-them">7 Things Your Boss Wishes You&#039;d Tell Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="https://www.wisebread.com/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks">Ace Your Next Performance Review With These 7 Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building boss department of labor employer Fair Labor Standards Act hiring a lawyer minimum wage rights wage theft Mon, 02 Apr 2018 08:30:14 +0000 Samantha Stauf 2118486 at https://www.wisebread.com