May 2013

Why Does “Fee-Only” Matter When Choosing a Financial Planner?

It’s easy to find lots of personal finance information online. Most of the time, it’s easy to see how it applies to your life. […]

Ten Pieces of Inspiration #127

Each week, I highlight ten things each week that inspired me to greater financial, personal, and professional success. Hopefully, they will inspire you as well. 1. Aristotle on the educated mind “It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.” – Aristotle If everyone was capable of doing this, the world would be a far better place. […]

Plowing through a furlough: The mindset

After several weeks of discussion, there appears to be a clearer target for many Department of Defense civilian employees regarding furlough as a consequence of the sequestration of funds that went into effect earlier in the year.  These employees are now looking at 11 days of unpaid leave through the end of September. This is half the number of furlough days in the DoD’s original plan, which is s […]

When You Change Yourself, You Change Those Around You

“You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” – Jim Rohn At the start of 2006, my life was in financial disarray. I’ve described many times what I did to turn it around. I clamped down hard on my spending. I started saving for the future. I learned a ton about personal finance. I changed careers. I bought a home – and paid for it in full. […]

Do Amazon Mail Order Subscriptions Save Money?

When I buy household products, I look at the cost per unit before everything else. I try to figure out the cost per ounce, the cost per bag, and so on whenever I examine an item. Usually, my comparisons end up looking at the cost of the item at our local warehouse club versus the cost of the item when it’s on sale at our local grocery stores. […]

Your Take: Do You Trust the Stock Market?

Last week, I wrote about how few “retail investors,” that’s folks like you and me, have come back to investing in the stock market after the craziness of the Great Recession. […]

Spare Change: The free, cheap, and paying extra edition

This post is from staff writer April Dykman. I’ve mentioned a couple of times that I’m in the process of renovating a house. This includes a complete kitchen remodel, new fireplace, drywall to replace wood paneling, refinishing the ceilings, paint and wall repairs in every room, and more. Needless to say, this project has kept me extremely busy! […]

Citi Platinum Select / AAdvantage World MasterCard Review

The promise of airline frequent flier credit cards relies on a premise — cardholders will actually be able to redeem a reasonable amount of their miles for award flights a reasonable amount of the time. […]

10 Self-Improvement Apps to Make You Smarter, Stronger, and Happier

There is an old adage that says "if you do what you've always done, you'll get what you've always got." In other words, change is good. Of course, implementing real change in our lives isn't always easy. We are a culture of habit — equating the familiar with the warm and fuzzy concepts of safety and security, even if the "familiar" isn't necessarily good for us. […]

Best Money Tips: Writing the Perfect Cover Letter

Welcome to Wise Bread's Best Money Tips Roundup! Today we found some fantastic articles on writing the perfect cover letter, why gas prices keep going up, and retirement advice from real people. Top 5 Articles 7 Tips to Writing the Perfect Cover Letter — To write the perfect cover letter, keep it clean and don't bring up your weaknesses. […]

How I cut my spending in half to take a job I loved

This article, by Ainslie Simmonds, as told to Libby Kane, comes from our partner site LearnVest. In 2009, I was a very senior executive celebrating my fourth anniversary at a brokerage firm.  I was working about 70 hours a week, managing 80 people and traveling to the company’s other offices (two of which were cross-country) 3-4 days a week, twice a month. […]

Who Knew Prom was so Expensive?

Here's a piece from the Wall Street Journal that says families with teens going to proms spent an average of $1,139 on the event last year.All I can say is "wow".Most of the cost is in the attire (as you might expect), but there are also costs for transportation, flowers, photography, and tickets for the event. They all add up to an average of over $1,100. […]

Anonymous S, April 2013 Net Worth

Naked With Cash is the year-long series on Consumerism Commentary where seven readers’ households share their financial progress on a monthly basis. I’ve partnered with financial planners who will offer some guidance along the way. Read this introduction to learn more about the series. Anonymous S is a 24-year-old engineer earning $67,000 a year plus bonus. […]

Overwhelmed

There have been many, many times over the past several years when I have felt completely overwhelmed by the huge gap between where I am right now and where I want to be. My big dream is to reach true financial independence. […]

Look, Mom! I’m on TV!

This post is from staff writer Kristin Wong. “If they cleaned this place up, it could be pretty nice.” –My mom’s take on NYC. This week my mom was kind enough to take some time off work and accompany me to New York, where I was a guest on one of her favorite shows, “Fox & Friends.” “Did you know Gretchen Carlson won Miss America?” my mom asked me when I first told her about the interview. […]

One Clever Idea You’ve Never Thought of to Save Money on a Wedding

One of the most expensive financial decisions many of us make is having a wedding. While my wedding was pretty modest (coming in at right around $3,000), the average cost of a wedding as of this writing is a little more than $28,000! Who has $28,000 to spend on a wedding — especially if you have student debt and you are hoping to save up for a house? One way to pay for your wedding is to obtain sp […]

Is Life Insurance Through Your Employer Worth It?

Life insurance tends to be pretty low on the list of financial priorities for most people, but it really shouldn’t be. If you’re married or have young children, life insurance is one of the most important things to have if others depend on you. What kind of financial hardship would your family be in if the unfortunate happened to you? […]

Reader Mailbag: Favorite Albums

What’s inside? Here are the questions answered in today’s reader mailbag, boiled down to five word summaries. Click on the number to jump straight down to the question. 1. Checking account buffer 2. Insuring collectibles 3. School now or later? 4. Traveling for music 5. Parents helping with home purchase 6. Piano lessons 7. A messy divorce 8. Hiding a credit card 9. […]

Money highlights while traveling

This post is from staff writer Kristin Wong. Last week, I got back from an amazing 10-day trip. Brian and I saw Stonehenge, sailed the Irish Sea, and I threw up three times. It isn’t a true vacation unless I’ve thrown up. During our journey, we had a few money-related experiences, and I took the time to journal them. We were frugal. We learned about tipping. We talked to bartenders about taxes. […]

The Top 10 DIY Jobs Homeowners Should Avoid

Doing it yourself is a great way to save money. Home improvements and repairs can be costly, and any contractor you hire to do the job will mark-up prices on materials and labor. […]