Consumerism Commentary

This informative group blog was honored by Kiplinger as a “must-read” blog and named as one of Yahoo!’s “Ten Money Blogs Everyone Should Read.”

Profile of Consumerism Commentary

Latest Posts from Consumerism Commentary (page 5)

Who Benefits From 529 Plans, the Middle Class or the Wealthy?

When I first began reading that President Obama was considering reducing the tax benefits for savers who make use of 529 plans and other education savings accounts to reduce the cost of education-related expenses, I was surprised. It has been my understanding that 529 plans, all though I do not have one, are intended to help the middle class by encouraging tax-efficient savings for education. […]

Who Benefits From 529 Plans, the Middle Class or the Wealthy?

When I first began reading that President Obama was considering reducing the tax benefits for savers who make use of 529 plans and other education savings accounts to reduce the cost of education-related expenses, I was surprised. It has been my understanding that 529 plans, all though I do not have one, are intended to help the middle class by encouraging tax-efficient savings for education. […]

New Jersey Business Filing Services: Scam or Not?

Update: I can’t believe this. I received a second notice from these hustlers — asking for even more money! Read the details at the bottom. Here’s an idea for all you people who like to “hustle” to come up with ways to earn extra income. This has happened to me many times, and it comes it many forms. […]

Prize-Linked Savings: Win Money For Opening a Savings Account

Since December, federal banks and credit unions have been allowed to offer savings accounts that include a raffle element, after some states have allowed accounts like these for some time. The goal of these lottery-like accounts is to encourage more people to save money, particularly those households with low and moderate incomes. […]

Is It Time to Invest in Oil? Here’s What I Did.

At the beginning of the year, I joined another investing challenge. This was sponsored by Motif Investing, who provided me and several other financial writers and bloggers $500 to invest in strategies each of us would choose. Like last year’s Grow Your Dough competition, this is a relatively short time horizon for me. […]

Is It Time to Invest in Oil? Here’s What I Did.

At the beginning of the year, I joined another investing challenge. This was sponsored by Motif Investing, who provided me and several other financial writers and bloggers $500 to invest in strategies each of us would choose. Like last year’s Grow Your Dough competition, this is a relatively short time horizon for me. […]

4 More Personal Finance Rules I’ve Broken

A few days ago I shared four personal finance “rules” I’ve broken. So-called rules sell books because they provide a way for an author to be declarative and have solid opinions, even when these rules have been around for a long time, repeat already well-known concepts, or aren’t appropriate for everyone. Start saving for retirement when you start working. […]

4 More Personal Finance Rules I’ve Broken

A few days ago I shared four personal finance “rules” I’ve broken. So-called rules sell books because they provide a way for an author to be declarative and have solid opinions, even when these rules have been around for a long time, repeat already well-known concepts, or aren’t appropriate for everyone. Start saving for retirement when you start working. […]

Final Update: Grow Your Dough Throwdown

Throughout the last year, I’ve been participating in a friendly competition among friends. We each placed $1,000 in an investing account (or multiple investing accounts) at the beginning of the year, chose an investing strategy, and tracked progress throughout the year. I gave the initial details in the beginning of 2014. My strategy was to invest in the products I use the most. […]

4 Personal Finance Rules I’ve Broken

Thumb through any book about personal finance, money management, and investing written by an expert, and you’re bound to come across a number of rules dictating financial behavior. Sometimes the author-dictators believe their rules are unbreakable and chastise those who might think differently, while other writers leave room for flexibility. […]